By Working Gringos

We recently acquired a key player in the residential, and ocean front property companies in the Yucatan. This group has an enviable record of success in developing consumer markets.

We currently have a large number of listings and are developing new ones daily. We will soon be expanding into the rental and property management area. Our director has many years of commercial and industrial experience, which has already brought exciting opportunities to us in the Yucatan.

We are firm believers in the quote…”If you are not growing…you are dying”!

For this reason we will be hiring a few choice people for the upcoming seasons.

You want from us:

*Honesty
​*Genuine Opportunity
*Training
*Excellent Income Potiental

We Want from You​:

*Coachability
*Integrity
*Accountability

While we invite all to apply, please recognize that we are guests in this great nation…. Nationals will be given preferential status for Language Training, and In Market/Hands On training.

Glen Mac Farlane
Director Sales/Marketing
Yucatan Dream Properties
204 480 6435 Vonage
9992988998 Cell
yucatandreamproperties [at] gmail [dot] com

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting May 25 , 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) May 25, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Tuesday (Martes) May 26, 2015

Yucatan Living Diploma of Photography: El Toloc Collective – May 26 – 30
Historical Archives of Merida: Module 1: Visual Language
Teacher: Patricia Aridjis
Location: Contact for more information
Time: Open Hours: Tuesday – Friday: 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM, Saturday: 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Registration and Information: Cell: 999-335-6916, e-mail: toloc [dot] colectivo [at] gmail [dot] com, Facebook: Tolocolectivo

Yucatan Living Movie: The Element of Crime
(Denmark 1984). Director: Lars von Trier. Starring Michael Elphick, Esmond Knight, MeMe Lai, Jerold Wells, Ahmed El Shenawi and Astrid Henning-Jensen. Fisher, a police inspector, returns to Cairo after investigating a murder in Europe. In a state of confusion, he seeks the help of a psychotherapist in order to use hypnosis to reconstruct a crime from data he has been collecting.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti/Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20, García Gineres.
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Los Galanes
Audiences are enjoying seeing more of this iconic trova trio these days.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Chinese Roulette
(Germany 1976) Both the parents of a young teen who walks with crutches, go on their own secret meeting with lovers, both surprising each other at the family’s county home. The daughter arrives and initiates a guessing game of “Chinese roulette”. In German with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) May 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family suffered a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of Ida’s roots, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Groupo Quo Vadis: Dances of Europe
This group has rapidly become a favorite in Merida. It is under the direction of Pawel Marek Blaszkowski.
Location: Teatro Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Choir of the City of Merida: To You – I Love You So Much
This is a wonderful choir under the direction of a masterful leader.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Joy Division
Joy Division is a 2007 British documentary film on the British post-punk band Joy Division, directed by Grant Gee. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) May 28, 2015

Yucatan Living Progreso: Annual Motorcycle Meeting: Lawless Tribe – May 29 & 30
Look for at least 400 members of the Lawless Tribe, from all across Mexico, to be in Progreso for this event. If you love leather and motorcycles, this is the place for you! There will be loads of activities going on, including motorcycle repair workshops and visits from a number of well known athletes in a variety of sports. From what we can tell see now, this will be a photographer’s dream weekend, so do plan on being there.
Location: Malecon in Progreso
Time: Two days and nights
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Trial
(France, Germany, Italy 1962). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Anthony Perkins, Rommy Schneider, Jeanne Moreau and Orson Welles. An unassuming office worker is arrested and stands trial, but is never told what the charges are. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingMovie: Come Back To Life
(Mexico 2010) The love story between a top model from New York, a Mexican scuba diver and a shark. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Relay Art Installation #12
Manager: Nina Dunkel
Location: ReLe, Calle 65 #349 B x 38 y 40, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Stella Cadente
(Spain 2014) The film narrates the brief reign of Amadeo of Savoy in Spain, who in 1870 tried to tidy up and modernize a country which was ungovernable. The king was misunderstood abroad and quickly took refuge inside his palace. Outside his palace, the country was collapsing, and within it, he plays his court games with love, pleasure, beauty and melancholy. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Tim’s Vermeer
(USA 2013) Inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer, and has some pretty amazing success. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 29, 2015

Yucatan LivingMovie: J.C.Chavez
(2007 Mexico) Directed by Diego Luna. A documentary about the life and career Mexican boxer Julio César Chávez. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: An Immortal Story
(France 1968). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Jeanne Moreau, Roger Coggio, Norman Eshley and Fernando Rey. The Portuguese colony of Macao in the 19th century. Mr. Clay is a very rich merchant and the subject of town gossip. He has spent many years in China and is now quite old. He likes his clerk Levinsky to read the company’s accounts to him at night for relaxation. Tonight Mr. Clay recounts a true story he heard years before about a rich man who paid a poor sailor 5 guineas to father a child with his beautiful young wife. Levinsky says that’s a popular old sailor’s legend and not true. Mr. Clay has no heir for his fortune and no wife either. He resolves to make the story true. Levinsky approaches Virginie, another clerk’s mistress, and strikes a bargain for 300 guineas. Now to find the sailor… In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Choir of the City of Merida: To You – I Love You So Much
This is a wonderful choir under the direction of a masterful leader.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Taxi Driver
(USA 1976) A mentally unstable Vietnam war veteran works as a night-time taxi driver in New York City where the perceived decadence and sleaze feeds his urge for violent action, attempting to save a preadolescent prostitute in the process. Legendary performance by Robert DeNiro and Jody Foster. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Jauja
(Various 2014) A father and daughter journey from Denmark to an unknown desert that exists in a realm beyond the confines of civilization. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 30, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(Spain 2013) An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and gives viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Tour of Independent Music: Los Lásgori y Barzoo Bands
This is part of the Sinestesia Festival that is under the direction of Jairo Couoh Pech. Sinestesia is the experiencing of emotion with two or more senses. This event includes a Bazaar in the courtyard.
Location: Calle 60 x 37 y 39, Centro Merida
Time: 5:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Don Quixote
(France 1992). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Jess Franco, Francisco Reiguera, Akim Tamiroff, Patricia McCormack and Orson Welles. After reading too many novels about knights and heroic stories, Don Quijote and his servant Sancho Panza decide to wander the roads of Spain to protect the weak and to accomplish good deeds. English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Emiliano Buenfil and Tropical ChanCil
This performance is under the direction of Sandra Gayou Soto. Watch for Emiliano Buenfil and Tropical ChanCil to shoot to the top of the international music scene. They are just wonderful!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: The Color of Money
(USA 1986) Fast Eddie Felson teaches a cocky but immensely talented protégé the ropes of pool hustling, which in turn inspires him to make an unlikely comeback. Starring the amazing blue eyes of Paul Newman and a young Tom Cruise. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Entre Sombras
(Mexico 2014) In a final attempt to resolve their marital problems, Eric and Mari make ​​a road trip to the jungles of southeastern Mexico. Just when his luck seems to be changing, she disappears. Confused and devastated, Eric begins the journey back to the capital, encountering on his way an enigmatic character, Narciso, who becomes his traveling companion. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), May 31, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary: Prehistoric Sharks
In the ancient seas, there was a shark ancestor of the great white shark of today. We call it Megalodon. It was as long as a bus and weighed over 20 times what a great white shark weighs today. This documentary introduces this great predator of the seas of antiquity.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Orchestra of Merida: Night of Soloists
Never miss an opportunity to see the Chamber Orchestra of Merida!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Les Carabiniers
(France 1963) Twelve episodic tales in the life of a Parisian woman and her slow descent into prostitution. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) June 01, 2015

No events planned for today as yet. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Yucatan Living Hurricane Season Officially Begins

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Writing and Publishing Workshop – Saturday, June 6
This is a bilingual workshop. Participate in writing exercises. Explore different types of writing and learn about self-publishing.
Location: Biblioteca Publica, Lectura Salon, Calle 55 x 60 y 62, Centro, Merida
Time: 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Admission: Free
More Information: Contact Ria: Ria [dot] stonemail [at] gmail [dot] com

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Double Barrel Yucatones – Sunday, May 31
The fabulous Yucatones, past and present, will be performing at Hemingways. Don’t miss this fun time! Great music, great food, great company. More info here.
Location: Hennessy’s Irish Pub
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: Various
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar – Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Khaki Scott

Navy Day: Dia de la Marina: May 22 – June 1

The growth of Navy Day reminds one of the growth of Progreso itself. Little more than a decade ago, Dia de la Marina consisted of a commemorative mass, the crowning a queen and the laying of a wreath in the Gulf of Mexico to honor all the sailors and fishermen who have died at sea. In 2015, the Progreso Marathon of the Marina , from Merida to Progreso, will begin in the early morning hours of Sunday, May 31. As runners head for Progreso, the 11:00 AM mass at the Yucalpeten pier will begin the day in Progreso. Following the mass, will be the Singa Tournament (Torneo Singa), a rowing contest. Marathon runners will be coming in for most of the day and the sports tournaments that began as early as May 22 will have their concluding matches. Ending the day will be the official ceremony in Progreso’s Parque de la Paz , on the Malecon , and the laying of the wreath at sea. Don’t forget that this is also the final weekend of the national and international motorcycle convention, also to be held in Progreso. For those who still labor under the impression that Progreso lives on as a sleepy-little-fishing-town, well – perhaps not so sleepy after all.

Oil Potential Off the Coast of Yucatan

A new Pemex Exploration and Production study has identified the area from Celestun to las Coloradas as an area that holds both oil and natural gas. Now, it has also identified an offshore area in the center of the Chicxulub Crater between Progreso and Chicxulub as an area of potential oil production. These are not necessarily new findings. What makes them important now is that the rules of the game have changed. Before now, Semarnat and Profepa have kept oil companies away from Yucatan on the grounds of the possibility of environmental damage to the reefs and to densely populated areas. With the new national energy reforms now in place, the way is now clear for Pemex, as well as international companies, to begin new three dimensional geologic and seismic studies, with the understanding that any proposals they make must include the impact of their work on sustainable development and effects on the environment. With the potential for a looming worldwide oil crisis, there may soon come a time when oil production really does come to Yucatan.

Progreso: Unsung Canadian Heroes

Do you know who they are? This week, there was a slideshow of photos, in Progreso Hoy , that showed a group of Canadian volunteers who had simply shown up to remodel the home of a family that had been living in a cardboard house. The Canadians did not speak Spanish and no one in the neighborhood spoke English, so the people never found out who their benefactors were. They think these altruistic angels may have belonged to either a church or to an association because they were dressed in blue and green shirts and shorts, but that is all they know. We would love to know who these folks might be. Leave us a comment if you can identify the group in this Progreso Hoy photo.

Maritime Cargo Management Training in Progreso

Houston Community College, in Texas, will be installing a study center for Americans and Mexicans who want training in the logistics of importing and exporting maritime cargo. Facilities for this new training program will be provided by Puerto de Altura de Progreso and the degree that students will earn will be from the Houston Community College. The academic diploma will be called Specialty Provider of Global Maritime Logistics, and will be offered to students both in Progreso and at Houston Community College. Their curriculum will include sections on maritime operations, port management, suppliers of high technology in transportation, and distribution and administration in warehouses and on docks. This is the type of training that catapults Yucatan far into the 21st century and creates a workforce that is stable enough to continue the rapid climb of Yucatan’s economy and quality of life.

Live in Yucatan? Are You Tsunami Ready?

Are you prepared for a hurricane? Of course you are! Are you prepared for a tsunami? Probably not. Thus far, Yucatan has not addressed the possibility of being hit by a tsunami of any size. However, with the Earth’s environment changing and the increase in the number of earthquakes worldwide, this might be a good time to at least visit the subject. Considering that some tsunamis can range inland for between 15 and 20 kilometers, Yucatan would be at risk because there is no high ground here to stop that kind of wave action. What Yucatan needs is fast highways and a training program for residents so they can get out of harm’s way whenever the occasion arises. The Mexican Association of Emergency Medicine and Disaster suggests that every area of Mexico should be trained and ready for any number of disasters that do not ordinarily happen where they are. It might sound silly for Yucatan to prepare for a phenomenon that seems only to happen in the Pacific, but we never know when or how the environment of the planet will change just enough to put us in harm’s way. Better safe than sorry.

Merida: Slow to No Water Pressure

With temperatures at or above 40 C or 104 F, the demand for water in Merida is sufficient to create a situation in which many areas of the municipality have slow or no water pressure. As usual, fingers are pointed at the swimming pools of north Merida, or CFE’s outages in various parts of the city. In the end, however, what we have is a huge population and a water department that is working constantly to repair and maintain older water pipes as well as put in new ones – and trying to work in extreme heat themselves. We only have a few more weeks of this before temperatures cool off and the demand for water falls back to normal. In the meantime, please be patient and conserve water whenever you can.

Chinese Set to Invest in Merida

It’s official. Merida’s safety, infrastructure and services have combined to ensure that China will make significant investments in this city and state. Their main interest is in solar and wind power, and they are also open to worker exchanges between Merida and Qingdao, in Shandong Province, on the east coast of China. Qingdao and Merida have much in common, with age, colonial history, and love of their own culture as a starting place. The beauty of the two cities is unmistakable and tourism is welcome in both places. Needless to say, their temperatures and rainfall are both a bit lower than what can be found in Merida, but their summer weather would make for a great getaway for anyone in Yucatan. Preview Qingdao


New Daily Flight to Villahermosa

Yes! You can now hop up to Villahermosa, Tabasco, for a day of shopping, a night out on the town, or a special event, any day of the week. The airline is a relative newcomer, but has daily flights to 21 domestic destinations without having to go through Mexico City. This is great news for expats who want to see more of Mexico without having it turn into a huge traveling annoyance. Welcome to Aeromar! We hope they have a long and successful run in Merida. Preview Aeromar

Proactive Arts in Yucatan

Where does Yucatan get its low crime rate? How does Yucatan fight the worldwide problem of gangs and disintegrating social orders? The answer is actually quite simple and one we were all taught as children. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” But what does Yucatan use as prevention? It’s easy. That begins with toddlers and the arts. Yucatan invests in its children from day one. Children who are singing, dancing, acting, painting, graphic arts, and playing music would not only be on their way to degrees, including graduate degrees, in the arts, but it also would not cross their minds to engage in delinquent or criminal behavior. We had to laugh, this week, as we saw Yucatan described in the news as a “hotbed of artists.” We don’t know about that, but we do know there are many art and sports agencies that are dedicated to the young people of Yucatan.

Yucatan Fights Rabies House-to-House

Rabies continues to be a threat in Yucatan. To date, this year, there have been 854 cases of dogs biting humans. Thankfully, there have been no cases of rabies. However, last year, there was a scare when a dog was infected by a wild animal and then bit a child. Earlier this year, the First National Rabies Week was undertaken in Mexico. Now, the Second National Rabies Week is underway, with the goal of vaccinating 450,000 domestic animals in Yucatan. This is a house to house fight, with health workers making certain that every dog and cat in every home is up to date on their rabies vaccinations.

Summer Health Risks in Yucatan

Yucatan has now registered its second case of heat stroke for 2015, and its first case of heat “exhaustion”, though we are not clear on the difference. In the space of just a few weeks, there have also been six cases of influenza, with one case proceeding to an outcome of death. All of these are preventable. Stay in the shade, especially during the heat of the day. Stay well hydrated. Save exercise for early morning. Make hand-washing a ritual and stay out of crowds that could spread germs. As always, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables! Try to cut back on eating street food due to food preparation issues this time of year. These are common sense rules that should keep everyone safe. Add to this the strong admonition to see your doctor at the first sign of not feeling well and you have the recipe for the perfect summer in Yucatan.

Casa Itzimna in Architectural Digest Mexico, May 2015

The Reyes Rios + Larrain Studio of Architecture and Design is located in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. The firm was founded by Architect Salvador Reyes Rios and Josefina Larrain Lagos. In addition to being nationally recognized in the field of colonial restoration and remodeling, the Reyes Rios + Larrain Studio has executed numerous contemporary projects developed as private homes and public buildings. The Studio is also known for their modern and minimalist furniture design, as well as environmentally sustainable landscaping design. Now, their home in Itzimna has been featured in Architectural Digest Mexico. Look for it in the next issue. Congratulations to our friends Salvador and Josefina!

By Working Gringos

Company Name: Floreana
Job Location: Merida, Yucatan
Email: info [at] shopfloreana [dot] com
Job offered: Fashion start-up based in Merida looking for bilingual Spanish/English executive assistant.
20+ hours/week. Flexible scheduling.
Responsibilities include: sourcing fabric, vendors, artisans. Overseeing projects/timeline/production. Fashion/Design/Photoshop/Drawing skills important. Must have valid driver’s license.
Growing company looking for someone to grow with us. Must be good at research, outgoing, friendly. Interest in sustainability and social change a huge plus.
ContactCamilla at info [at] shopfloreana [dot] com with Subject heading: Floreana Assistant

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting May 18, 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) May 18, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Tuesday (Martes) May 19, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) May 20, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: El Cielo Abierto (The Open Sky)
(Mexico 2011) Vigorous documentary on Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero, the voice of the voiceless in El Salvador, the pastor in the midst of one of the bloodiest civil wars. Romero dared to say that the mission of the Church is to identify with the poor. Archbishop Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Dances of Europe: Grupo Quo Vadis
This performance is under the direction of Pawel Marek Blaszkowski.
Location: Church of Monja, Calle 63 x 64
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tour of Independent Music: Los Lásgori y Barzoo Bands
This is part of a Sinestesia Festival that is under the direction of Jairo Couoh Pech. Sinestesia is the experiencing of emotion with two or more senses.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 63 x 64
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Leviathan
(Rusia 2014) Kolya lives in a small village on the Barents Sea, north of Russia. It has a garage next to his house, where he lives with his young wife Lilia and her son Roma, from his previous marriage. The village mayor wants to steal his land, his home and his workshop for their projects. In Russian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) May 21, 2015

Yucatan Living Valladolid: Andre Solo Lecture: Journey to Meet the Gods
André Solo is an American author and adventurer. As a child, he dreamed of traveling across the Americas. Three years ago, he quit his job and set out to do it – entirely by bicycle! So far he has crossed the United States and Mexico, living and writing in cities and villages along the way, and he plans to continue to South America. To Andre this journey is a spiritual quest. It’s a chance to push himself to his limits, learn from the beliefs of the people he meets, and perhaps even come face to face with the divine. Andre will share stories from his travels, talk about the difficult life of the road, and describe how he managed to cross the dangerous narco trafficking region along the US/Mexico border.
Location: The Palapa XOCO LOCO in Casa Hamaca, Valladolid
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: $50 pesos donation to V.E.L.

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Othello
(Morocco 1952). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Suzanne Cloutier, Michael MacLammoir, Robert Coote and Fay Compton. The General Othello is manipulated into thinking his new wife has been carrying on an affair with one of his officers, when in reality it’s all part of the scheme of a bitter lieutenant. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingMovie: Twenty Feet From Stardom
(USA 2013) This is a tribute to the background singers, who are on stage, but are secondary compared to the famous singers they support. Their voices provide harmony to the best bands in popular music. In English
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Relay Art Installation #11
Manager: Saul Villa (SNCA)
Location: ReLe, Calle 65 #349 B x 38 y 40, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(Spain 2013) An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and gives viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Lisboa Story
(Germany 1994) The director Friedrich Monroe has trouble with finishing a silent b&w movie about Lisbon. He calls his friend, the sound engineer Phillip Winter, for help.. In Englsih with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 22, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Machete Language
(Mexico 2011) Ray and Ramona are a young couple (30′s) who spent many years together. They live in Mexico City. They are hyper aware of chaos and injustice of the social context of which they are part. Each in his own way want to change that reality, fight for a fairer world. His life fluctuates between that world and the world of nighttime partying. She works for an NGO and she is a singer in a punk band. Their relationship is intense, often problematic. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Confidential Report
(France, Spain, Switzerland 1955). Director: Orson Welles. Staring: Orson Welles, Akin Tamiroff, and Michael Redgrave. An American adventurer investigates the past of mysterious tycoon Arkadin… placing himself in grave danger.In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Everything Is Illuminated
(USA 2005) A young Jewish American man endeavors to find the woman who saved his grandfather during World War II in a Ukrainian village, that was ultimately razed by the Nazis, with the help of an eccentric local. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of Ida’s roots, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 23, 2015

Yucatan Living Art Fest at Bistro Cultural in Merida MexicoBistro Cultural Art Fest – May 23
The Bistro Cultural Art Fest returns better than ever. There will be live music performances throughout the evening, a special menu from Chef Yohann, and your favorite artists and craftspeople return along with a select few new and interesting ones. Don’t miss it!
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 43 X 66, Santa Ana, Merida Centro
Time: 4:00 to 10:00 PM
Admission: Free, but bring money!

Yucatan Living Movie: Ilo Ilo
(China 2013) Ilo Ilo chronicles the Lim family as they adjust to their newly arrived Filipina domestic helper, Teresa, (Angeli Bayani) who has come, like many other Filipinas, in search of a better life. In English.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Touch of Evil
(United States 1958). Director: Orson Welles, with music by Henry Mancini. Starring: Janet Leigh, Charlton Heston and Orson Welles. This movie has performances by Marlene Dietrich, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Victor Millan, Dennis Weaver, Ray Collins, Joseph Cotton, Keenan Wynn, and Mercedes McCambridge! A stark, perverse story of murder, kidnapping, and police corruption in a Mexican border town. This movie is worth seeing for the cast alone! English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Live Essence
Everyone should come out for this performance! The group is the same one that performs for Merida’s Love of Baroque on Sundays. This series of concerts gives each member an opportunity to direct a performance. Tonight, the Director will be percussionist Felissa Estrada. In just a few days, Rob Meyers will take his turn. Let everyone else head for the beach, while you stay in the city and enjoy these wonderful concerts!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Raging Bull
(USA 1980) An emotionally self-destructive boxer’s journey through life, as the violence and temper that leads him to the top in the ring, destroys his life outside it. Amazing performance by Robert DeNiro. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Jauja
(Various 2014) A father and daughter journey from Denmark to an unknown desert that exists in a realm beyond the confines of civilization. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), May 24, 2015

Yucatan LivingDocumentary: The Maximum Guide to Ants
This is a look into a world in which absolute obedience to societal rules has ensured the survival of a species.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: For the Love of Baroque
Not to be missed, especially when excitement is running high during this group’s current concert series. The performance should be more memorable than ever!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission:$50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: My Life to Live
(France 1962) Twelve episodic tales in the life of a Parisian woman and her slow descent into prostitution. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) May 25, 2015

No events planned for today as yet. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Progreso: Annual Motorcycle Meeting: Lawless Tribe – May 29 & 30
Look for at least 400 members of the Lawless Tribe, from all across Mexico, to be in Progreso for this event. If you love leather and motorcycles, this is the place for you! There will be loads of activities going on, including motorcycle repair workshops and visits from a number of well known athletes in a variety of sports. From what we can tell see now, this will be a photographer’s dream weekend, so do plan on being there.
Location: Malecon in Progreso
Time: Two days and nights
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Writing and Publishing Workshop Saturday, June 6
This is a bilingual workshop. Participate in writing exercises. Explore differet types of writing. Learn about self-publishing.
Location: Biblioteca Publica, Lectura Salon, Calle 55 x 60 y 62, Centro, Merida
Time: 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Admission: Free
More Information: Contact Ria: Ria [dot] stonemail [at] gmail [dot] com

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
Goossens, Eugene – At the Tarn Op. 15 No. 1
Britten, Benjamine – Simple Symphony for String Quartet
Bacewicz, Grazyna – String Quartet No. 4
8 PM performance.

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Double Barrel Yucatones
The fabulouos Yucatones, past and present, will be performing at Hemingways. Don’t miss this fun time! Great music, great food, great company. More info here.
Location: Hennessy’s Irish Pub
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

My name is Piper Delaney.

I am currently living in Honduras but will be moving to Yucatan area in June.

I am looking for an ESL teaching job.

My email is piperosedelaney [at] yahoo [dot] com and my phone number is 1 (541) 499-8153.

Work Experience:

2009-2013 Steens Mountain Running Camp Burns, Oregon, USA
• Oversaw, organized and inspired a group of high school runners for weekly sessions.
2013 YMCA Medford Medford, Oregon USA
• In charge of a group of children at a day of camp, responsible for their needs, creating activities and general welfare Counselor for a week resident camp
2014 Idiomas-Sin-Fronteras Puerto Varas, Chile
• Taught English to Spanish speaking students from age 7 to 75
• Prepared lesson plans focusing on grammar, listening, speaking and writing skills
2015 Western international School Santa Rosa de Copan, Honduras
• Taught English to first graders
• Prepared lessons for two classes of first grade, teaching the basics of English

By Nadine Calder

Married couple in historic YucatanIn most cases, married life produces conflicting effects on women. Some slim down, others gain weight, this one loses her looks and that one becomes more beautiful, and very few are those who remain the same. The fresh and beautiful Guadalupe, who after a half year of marriage began to lose the color and fullness of her cheeks, did not fare well.

Certainly it is true that the lifestyle of a husband like Pancho Vélez would not augment positive signs of health in his wife, who for as much as she tried to avoid it, couldn’t help but lose sleep waiting up for the night owl.

Her impressions of her new life, into which she had entered with the curiosity of a child, were reason for her not feeling the full weight of pain that her mother’s death must have caused her. And when the rosy clouds that huddle in the honeymoon’s sky began to come undone, the terrible reason that precipitated her marriage had been held back only to awaken in her the need to pay the full tribute of tears that she owed to the memory of the woman who had given her life.

Furthermore, other family questions were attracting her attention and bothering her deeply… those were the differences arising between her husband and her brother Manuel over the lack of a will, and the latter’s displeasure reaching the point that he had completely stopped going to his brother-in-law’s house.

The estate was put up for auction and Manuel kept the plantation, paying the difference at his own expense.

The newlyweds had moved into a decent annex, spruced up with some nice furnishings, not far from the street that was the scene of their first conversations at the window. They acquired it as property with the inheritance, and the eighteen thousand pesos left over from their share of the hereditary package were invested in a trading house that paid them twelve per cent a year, that is one hundred eighty pesos a month. With this, they could have gotten by quite handsomely, small as the family was, if the husband’s personal budget had not had outlays that were like a hole through which the fortune of a Croesus could seep.

Marriage in YucatanLupita had to resign herself to seeing that, little by little, the enchanted castles she had manufactured in her maiden’s fantasy, and that she had hoped to see upright and dazzling when she was married, were crumbling. How many times then had she imagined herself going to gatherings, attending dances, riding in a coach through the avenues dressed elegantly and always accompanied by her adored Pancho Vélez, who would show her off in the best society, like displaying a rich treasure that stirs the envy of others.

But the distinguished playboy was not fulfilling such beautiful dreams, and not because of the prescribed mourning period. In fact, even when this was past, when his wife managed to have him take her to a party, he would leave her alongside a friend, if not a stranger, and return for her later.

And it even happened once at an open-air concert that the music ended and Pancho Vélez didn’t appear. Lupita found herself suffering the mortification of having to be taken home by the kind Chonita and her mechanic husband, while her own was perhaps arguing in a cantina, if not wandering around someplace less licit.

At one in the morning, he came home. His young wife, awake and upset, heard him come in, and while he calmly took off his coat and unknotted his tie, she said to him in an ill-tempered voice:

“You really treated me well. You had a lot of nerve leaving me stranded.”

“Before the concert ended I was desperate walking through the plaza looking for you. But girl, with all those people!”

“And that’s why you didn’t come to see if I was already here?”

“I didn’t think it was necessary. Where were you going to go? I supposed that you were with Chonita, whom I seated you next to and you would have expected to come home with.”

“What fun I would have had following you around waiting. Who knows where you were at that hour?”

“Well, talking with friends.”

“So I believe it; and the friends are those who give you flowers like the one I found yesterday in your pocket.”

“Flowers? Ah yes. You know that I’ve always liked flowers. The day before yesterday I bought them from a boy to give them to you, and you don’t thank me.”

“I thank you very, very much,” grumbled Lupita.

At first, such scenes were more violent and they made her cry.

“Tears?,” he said then. “Well, the sensible thing is to get away from where it’s raining to keep dry. If you keep crying, I’ll leave again.”

Fortunately, maternal care and affection came to make married life’s difficulties more bearable. A little after one year of marriage she had a child to whom they gave the baptismal name of his father.

BagbyThe new being came into the world somewhat weak and sickly, but to Lupita he was the most beautiful child on earth and she dedicated herself to caring for him, spending long hours looking at and caressing him.

When Pancho Vélez first came in to see his heir, he let out a grunt. And he still had not figured out if he liked him or not. But little by little he was beginning to feel affection and even showing great satisfaction at feeding time by cooing to the little guy. He often brought him sweets or toys appropriate to his age.

Because of that, it should not be believed that such domestic digressions were changing his behavior. His late nights were the same, with the difference that Lupita became accustomed to them and no longer offered a single reproach, and only occasionally one concern or another about his health, as Pancho Vélez was day by day becoming yellow and wrinkled, and a suspicious cough was beginning to bother him.

Out with FriendsThe womanizer’s mother had given up any hope that the holy knot could bind her son strongly enough.

What more did Lupita need than to receive without letup the news that her husband had given that woman an expensive dress or the other a very elegant fan, all of them women of questionable virtue?!

How many things had been brought to her attention and how urgently she wanted to do something about them.

The details, which seemed too impossible to talk about, came to her and irritated her and gave rise in her spirit to a dangerous desire.

One night, during theater season, someone told her that her husband was in a restaurant dining in full view of everyone with an attractive chorus girl, and she was tempted to go out in the street and, taking the arm of the first young man she happened on, look for Pancho Vélez and in front of him and the chorus girl, closely embrace the other man, provoke a jealous explosion, and feel the pleasure of revenge.

****

Want to catch up? Go here and start with Chapter One

By Working Gringos

Trofeo de Amistad

A few weeks ago, (April 22 – April 27, 2015) a well-planned tennis match was held between a team from Club Libano here in Merida, Yucatan, and the Kraft Tennis Club of Amelia Island, Florida.
The Yucatan participants at the tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida Yucatan
The instigator of this event was Peter Johnson, a retired State Department FSO (Foreign Service Officer) who is now a resident of Merida. Peter, and his wife Alicia who was born in Cuba, spent many years working in Latin countries, both in Latin America and on the Iberian Peninsula. Peter and his wife are obviously very familiar with the Latin culture and after living and working all over the world, they decided to settle in Merida upon retirement.

One of Peter’s accomplishments before retiring was founding the Kraft Tennis Club on Amelia Island. As a resident of Merida, he also has become a member of Club Libano. It was only a matter of time before he decided to put the two together.

The tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida YucatanClub Libano was represented by Dr. Eduardo Patron, a Merida cardiologist. The Merida club has about eight players in the over-60 category and all of them were enthusiastic about the idea. In addition, these players offered their homes to host the players and their wives from the United States. They also offered to host meals and serve as city guides. In the end, Peter and a representative from each tennis club conceived of a visit for couples from the United States, where a competitive tennis tournament would be combined with parties, get-togethers and a few archaeological day trips.

Since they were the ones traveling, the Kraft group determined the size of the teams. In the end, there were four players on each team, each accompanied by their wives. Club Libano’s team was headed by Dr. Eduardo Patron and Kraft’s team was headed by Phil Scanlan, a retired AT&T executive. As a resident of Merida, Peter played for the Club Libano team.

A Successful Event

The Kraft group arrived on April 22, and Alicia and Peter held a welcoming reception for everyone, complete with a Cuban trio and un monton de mojitos. Dr. Patron and his wife, Gloria, hosted the despedida (farewell) dinner, complete with roving Mexican minstrels on April 27. A good group of local expatriates and Yucatecans showed up in the intervening days for the two tennis matches, choosing their sides with no agenda, but just to enjoy the competition.

At the closing dinner, a Trofeo de Amistad (Friendship Trophy) was given to the Kraft team with an inscription bearing the players’ names and other information. The attractive little trophy included a small statue of Serenade at the tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida Yucatana male tennis player. Everyone was so pleased with the outcome that an an April visit to Amelia Island is in the planning for the Yucatecans in 2016. While the Kraft team won the tournament, the point of the trophy was not to celebrate the winner, but the event itself. In addition to the satisfaction of winning, the Kraft players had some terrific Mayan food at a typical restaurant, a great visit to the luz y sonido display at Chichen Itza and a Sunday trip to the Plaza Grande.

Tennis in Merida

The sport of tennis is itself growing in Merida in recent years, though information about tennis is incredibly difficult to find in Merida. We are sure that, like many things these days, this will be changing.

In and around Merida, there are several public or quasi-public courts. Parque Salvador Alvarado, located on Calle 60 just north of the zona hotelera, has three hard courts which are open to the public. The Kukulcan Sports Complex, in the east of Merida at Avenida 28 at Circuito Colonias, in the section called Morelos Oriente, also has six tennis courts open to the public. There are courts at Parque Aleman, in Fraccionamiento Los Heroes there are 4 courts (cost of $10 peso per hour, maximum 2 hours). There are courts also in Dzitya, and in Francisco de Montejo at Centro Bic. Tennis Court at Reef YucatanVarious hotels have tennis courts as well. The one pictured here is at Reef Yucatan, on the Yucatan Gulf Coast in Telchac Puerto.

The prominent private clubs are Club Campestre with 18 hard and clay courts, Club de Banqueros which has several hard courts, and Club Libano (Centro Libanés) which has five hard courts. The Club de Golf de Yucatan north of Merida has 9 hard courts, 2 of which are covered. Also to the north, the clay courts at the Yucatan Country Club are excellent, but the club seems to put more emphasis on the world of golf. All the clubs have pros who will gladly sign you up for lessons. Antonio at Club Libano, for instance, is a great teacher and player, according to Peter, and manages to speak English pretty well. Peter says he chose Club Libano because the welcome was inviting and warm and continues to be. Peter thinks he is possibly the only non-Mexican who plays tennis at Club Libano. The price of admission varies with each Players at the tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida Yucatanclub and level of membership, but all of them involve an upfront payment and a regular amount each month. A recommendation from an existing member is also necessary.

Every club has its own tournament schedule for men and women. Club Libano is doing their part to promote the sport by encouraging some of the older age groups of men and women to pick up a racquet and start playing. Players play all year round, but tend to play earlier in the day during spring and summer as the days get so hot. From time to time, major tournaments are held in Merida and they are typically held at Club Campestre, which has a much higher capacity and more courts than any of the other clubs.

In 2015, a Davis Cup match between Mexico and Bolivia was held at Club Campestre with good attendance. Davis matches are held throughout the world, as regions work towards winners and playoffs. The match with Bolivia was well attended, the Bolivians played better than anyone expected, and in the end, the Mexican team won.

Retrospect on the Trofeo de Amistad Event

In retrospect, the event with the team from Amelia Island seems to have forged more than a tennis connection. Peter reports that the Mexican participants, none of whom have previously had much contact with Americans, warmed considerably to the Americans who came to visit. More than anything, they were apparently pleased that their American counterparts seemed without airs or arrogance… that they were just regular people. The Players at the tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida YucatanAmericans, on the other hand, were equally effusive about the experience, calling it “a wonderful cultural experience for all of us!” They marveled at the hospitality of their new Mexican friends, their delicious food and how frustrating it was to not be able to communicate more easily.

Everyone involved in this unique tennis event is anxious to do it again, and Peter is pretty convinced that the next contingent from the USA will be larger, based on the reports of the first team.

Peter, whose job in the Foreign Service was often to develop and improve relations between the USA and other countries, was pleased that this small event seemed to create a warm and personal bridge between these representatives from the USA and Mexico. For our part, we hope it is just the start of many more to come!

****

More about the Salvador Alvarado Sports Park can be seen here (in Spanish).
The Institute of Sports for the State of Yucatan (IDEY) has a website, but it is not well maintained.
More about the Kukulcan Sports Complex
Club Campestre
Centro Libanés
Yucatan Country Club
Centro Bic in Francisco de Montejo
Club Deportivo de Olivo in Las Americas
and last but not least…
The Mexican Tennis Federation, in case you are interested.

By Working Gringos

I’m an old gringo who is a senior computer systems engineer and have worked for corporate America for 25 plus years. I’ve a ton of experience in this area (see below for some of it. Resume upon request). I’ve not yet retired and would like to help out here in the Merida area. I live in Chelem and would like to meet folks and obtain some odd jobs here and there. I’ve not yet learned Spanish but am trying very hard.

I can help with just about anything from setting up a home system to setting up corporate networks. I’ve been doing this a long time so not much is out of my area of expertise.

If anyone is interested in my assistance, please contact me via email at brian-waldron [at] hotmail [dot] com.

Experience:

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING / GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS
Customer-focused IT Leader with in-depth Systems Engineering expertise who contributes cost effective solutions that move the business forward. Strong technical skills in Windows, Exchange (all versions), Citrix, Rightfax Enterprise Suite within rapidly changing environments. Adept in systems migration and integration initiatives across diverse geographic locations. Special expertise in architecture design and development. Excellent diagnostician with a history of building positive customer relationships.

Core Technical Competencies:
Active Directory
Citrix XenApp 6.0
Windows/Symantec Clustering
Windows (all versions)
SharePoint Portal
MIIS
Exchange (all versions)
Scripting: (vbscript, Powershell, C#)
MS Office Suites
Forefront for Exchange
Documentation
Visual Studios
Rightfax Enterprise Suite
Group Policy
NetApp
Blackberry Enterprise Server
SQL
NetBackup
Office 365
ActiveSync
MOM/NetIQ
ISA
Dell Kace
IIS
Lync 2010 & 2013
WSUS

By Khaki Scott


Deadly Heat Continues

With temperatures still soaring above 40 C (104 F), the weather is beginning to take its toll on the people. This week, a vendor fainted in Progreso. Please take every precaution against the heat. The following recommendations are made by the Mayo Clinic: Drink plenty of water. Wear loose, lightweight clothing. Stay in out of the sun during the heat of the day. Cut back on alcohol consumption. Be careful with medications that might dehydrate you or make you sensitive to heat. Never leave anyone in a parked car. Finally, if you attend any events during the day, make certain that medical assistance is available if necessary. With these precautions, your summer in Yucatan should be free of worry about heat-related illnesses.

Obama Administration Approves Ferry to Cuba

This is wonderful news, but still for a limited number of travelers. It has been 50 years since there was ferry service between the United States and Cuba. Now, the U.S. Treasury and Commerce Department has issued at least four companies licenses to travel between Florida and Cuba. Those companies include: Havana Ferry Partners of Fort Lauderdale, Baja Ferries of Miami, United Caribbean Lines Florida of Greater Orlando and Airline Brokers Co. of Miami and Fort Lauderdale. There may be more licenses approved, but no others have yet been announced. The ferry trips would be cheaper than flying and passengers could bring much more free luggage. But don’t start the party quite yet. Cuba still has to approve the operation and, even when that happens, U.S. tourists are still not allowed to go to Cuba for general tourism. It is important to note that the twelve specific categories of approved travelers to Cuba are still in effect and only Congress can lift the embargo. Havana Ferry Partners plans to begin service within a few weeks at approximately $350 USD round trip and with 200 pounds of free luggage allowed. Baja Ferries USA is planning on making the trip three times a week. United Caribbean Lines Florida plans to leave from at least three Florida ports. There is no word yet on any plans for expansion of service to Yucatan, but that connection has long been considered and will surely be revisited as the new ferries settle into routine routes. Since the Florida to Yucatan ferry had difficulty paying for itself except during October and April Snowbird migrations, visiting Cuba could likely bring in enough additional income from tourists and residents of the Yucatan Peninsula year round. This is especially true of the business and technology professionals in Cuba and Yucatan. Ferry watchers look for these kinds of discussions to begin appearing in the news in the very near future.

Where are You Going on Vacation?

Are you an expat in Yucatan but looking for somewhere to go on vacation? There is a new non-stop flight coming soon from Cancun to Lima, Peru. The Avianca flights begin on July 26 and will run three times a week. This new flight is not a surprise, considering that travel from Lima to Cancun was up 77% in 2014. Avianca also offers seven flights per week between Cancun and El Salvador, as well as 14 flights per week between Cancun and Bogota. From Lima, connections can be made to almost anywhere in South America. So, if you want to see something new, the sky is – literally – wide open for business.

Murders Decline in Mexico

New numbers are in and there is good news to report. For the third straight year in a row, murders are down in Mexico, with the most notable decline in the states along the U.S. border. Five of the six Mexican states that border the United States have a combined drop of 17.7% in the number of homicides in 2014. Much of the drop in murders in Mexico is due to Mexico’s determination to go after the heads of every cartel. They have been supported by the United States with $2.3 billion USD, since 2008, earmarked for police training, aircraft, scanners, x-ray machine and almost 400 dogs that can alert to drugs, weapons and explosives. Initially, when Mexico first went after cartel leaders, there was an explosion of violence, but that soon dissipated and, each year, the murder rate continues to drop. It is a matter of concern that the only murder rate that went up was against journalists. There were seven journalists killed in Mexico in 2013, and that number rose to 17 in 2014. But the good news is that the murder count, from all categories, in the entire country of Mexico, was 15,649, a 13.8% reduction over the year before.

Free Trade Between Norway and Mexico

This feels as if we are waiting for the other shoe to finish dropping. Mexico and Norway are working together on every front. There is even a Norwegian Business Day in Mexico and Mexico has begun a number of ambitious reforms designed to make itself more attractive to the international business and investment community. These reforms are especially important to Norway, as Norwegian companies are leaders in providing environmental solutions for natural resource exploitation, especially offshore, in Mexico. The only thing left is sea trade, and that will come as soon as Mexico fully implements the free trade agreement between Mexico and Norway.

Injured Workers Brought to Hospital in Merida

On May 5, one of the legs of the Troll Solution platform collapsed off the coast of Campeche. Eighteen workers went to the hospital in Campeche, but only four needed to remain hospitalized. Two workers died, three are simply under observation, and four were brought to the Regional High Specialty Hospital in Merida. A total of 101 workers were not injured and all were successfully evacuated. The platform was swaying at the time the leg collapsed and continues to sway. It is owned by Typhoon Offshore. More will be known in the days to come. We are just glad to know that Merida has the hospitals and staff to handle emergencies such as this.

Second Edition of Rally Maya Mexico 2015 Delivers Wheelchairs

Over the past week, Rally Maya Mexico 2015 drove from Merida to Cancun. This is not a car race. It is more of a tour/parade, and all participating cars have to be at least 45 years of age. There are different paths taken throughout Mexico, with each functioning as an altruistic association in their own area. This week, they delivered wheelchairs and hearing aids to disabled children in Progreso. To learn more about this wonderful event, do visit their website: Rally Maya Mexico. We are looking forward to the third edition of this tour in 2016. If you own an elegant old vehicle, look for the opening of registration for Rally Maya Mexico 2016 along about September 2015.

Hotel Boutique Rosas & Xocolate Wins International Award

Congratulations to Rosas & Xocolate Boutique Hotel for winning the international ESR 2015 distinction at the VIII Latin American Meeting of Socially Responsible Companies. The award was presented by Lorena Martinez,of the Federal Prosecutor’s Consumer Office and was received by owner, Carol Kolozs. The event was attended by over 2,500 business executives, leaders of business associations, government officials, leaders of CSOs and members of the media, all on hand to exchange ideas to better refine best practices for social responsibility.

Quintana Roo Plays Hardball with Bullying

This past week, two 13 year olds and a 14 year old attacked another boy outside of a school in Cancun. Someone called the police and all three of the bullies landed in jail. It seems that Quintana Roo has had enough of bullying and discrimination in and around their schools. The State of Quintana Roo formed a commission to come up with ways to fight it and zero tolerance was at the top of the list. While it is all well and good to develop programs to help the bully, the prime motivation must be the protection of their innocent victims. If a bully pushes the issue to the point of leaving jail as the only option, then Quintana Roo has no other choice but to arrest them. This will be seen as a good thing by some and as not necessarily the right way to treat children by others. The fact remains, Quintana Roo had the courage to keep all options open with respect to fighting the scourge of bullying.

Yucatan Influenza Death Free Winter of 2014 – 2015

No one died of influenza in Yucatan this past winter, pointing to a very successful vaccination program. DIF stresses that it is up to the people to get their flu shots and take ordinary precautions against catching the flu virus. These are actually quite simple precautions, such as hand washing, sneezing into the crook of one’s arm, staying out of crowds and away from people who are already ill, plus be sure to eat your fruits and vegetables every day. Yucatan is, after all, a state with a thriving citrus industry and markets everywhere you go, so no excuses! Influenza is a killer and it cannot be stressed enough that one successful winter is not a free pass. Please contact your physician to find out when he or she recommends getting a flu shot – and then make sure you get yours. It is so easy to put off something like this when you feel well. So do call your doctor’s office and follow their lead.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting May 11, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performance: May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17. Remember, the venue has changed from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) May 11, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Tuesday (Martes) May 12, 2015

Yucatan Living Invitation: Dutzi Design, City of Valladolid
Dutzi Design and the City of Valladolid cordially invite you to join them to honor designer Ariane Dutzi, founder of Dutzi Design. This is a great honor… Felicidades, Ariane!
Location: Parque Principal in Valladolid
Time: Inauguration: 6:00 PM, Catwalk: 8:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Soylent Green
(United States 1973). Director: Richard Fleischer. Starring Charlton Heston, Leigh Taylor-Young, Edward G. Robinson, Chuck Connors, Joseph Cotton, Brock Peters and Paula Kelly. Synopsis: In 2022, the population of New York is about 40 million and they are living in miserable conditions. A synthetic food, soylent green, is created to alleviate hunger, but a policeman and a survivor of another era suspect there is something disturbing behind the new food.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20, Garcia Ginerés
Time: 8:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Los Romanticos
This trio is a one of the long-time signature trova trios of Yucatan. They represent the best of traditional trova and always please their audiences.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Carnage
(USA 2011) Two pairs of parents hold a cordial meeting after their sons are involved in a fight, though as their time together progresses, increasingly childish behavior throws the discussion into chaos. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) May 13, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Radio La Colifata
(Spain 2007) LT22 Radio La Colifata is a radio station run entirely by the patients of the J.T. Borda Psychiatric Hospital in Buenos Aires. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living First Festival of Sexual Diversity Yucatan 2015
Different activities until June 10.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20, Garcia Ginerés
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free: Adults Only

Yucatan Living Movie: El Mudo
(Peru 2013) The story is about a Peruvian government official named Constantino Zega. He doesn’t fit anywhere among the hodge-podge of Peruvian government officials and looks down on his colleagues because he has never succumbed to an act of corruption and, every time he has had the opportunity to do so, he has made an effort to impede it. Over his two decades as a government official he has cultivated purity – the fuel for his soul. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) May 14, 2015

Yucatan Living Merida English Library: Evening of Magic Wine Tasting
Villa Verde, the location for the May event, is a beautifully restored, 250 year old colonial mansion that is now a boutique inn / guest house in the heart of historic Centro. The location boasts remarkably restored historic Spanish architecture with 20 foot ceilings, mosaic pasta tile floors, vigas, mahogany doors, fountains and many other historic features. The wine is being provided by Elliot Diaz of Taninos and the botanas will be prepared by Michael Berton and Robert Klie of Botella Verde.
Location: Calle No. 56 # 468 x53 y 55, Centro Merida
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $250 pesos for members, $300 pesos for non-members. Tickets available at the Merida English Library.

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Lady from Shanghai
(United States 1947). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Rita Hayworth and Everett Sloane. Fascinated by gorgeous Mrs. Bannister, seaman Michael O’Hara joins a bizarre yachting cruise, and ends up mired in a complex murder plot. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: H2O
(Mexico 2012) Mexico City grows unchecked. Before an area surrounded by lakes, now supplying water to this city is a real problem. H2Omx records shortages, waste and serious water pollution problems. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Relay Art Installation #10
Manager: Saul Villa (SNCA)
Location: ReLe Calle 65 #349 B x 38 y 40, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Armadillo
(Denmark 2010) In February 2009 a group of Danish soldiers accompanied by documentary filmmaker Janus Metz arrived at Armadillo, an army base in the southern Afghan province of Helmand. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Ernest & Célestine
(France 2012) The story of an unlikely friendship between a bear, Ernest, and a young mouse named Celestine. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 15, 2015

Yucatan Living Teacher’s Day: School Holiday

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(Mauritania 2013) The Malian city of Timbuktu has fallen into the hands of religious extremists. Kidane lives quietly in the dunes Satima with his wife, his daughter Toya and Issam, a shepherd boy of 12 years. But city dwellers suffer the regime of terror imposed by the jihadists: banned music, laughing, smoking and even football. Women have become shadows trying to resist with dignity. Each day, some Islamists launch makeshift court judgments as absurd as tragic. In Arabian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Macbeth
(United States 1948). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Jeanette Nolan, Dan O’Herlihy, Roddy McDowall, and Edgar Barrier. In fog-dripping, barren and sometimes macabre settings, 11th-century Scottish nobleman Macbeth is led by an evil prophecy and his ruthless yet desirable wife to the treasonous act that makes him king. But he does not enjoy his newfound, dearly-won kingship. The movie plot is restructured, but all the dialogue is Shakespeare’s. In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Expo Movie Poster V Edition
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Mumia
(USA 2012) The film captures the life and revolutionary militancy political prisoner on death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal. The new documentary by Stephen Vittoria is an inspiring portrait of a man many consider the most famous US political prisoner, a man whose very existence challenges our beliefs about justice and freedom. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 16, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Third Man
(United Kingdom 1949). Director: Carol Reed. Starring: Joseph Cotton, Alida Valli, Trevor Howard and Orson Welles. Pulp novelist Holly Martins travels to shadowy, postwar Vienna, only to find himself investigating the mysterious death of an old friend, black-market opportunist Harry Lime. English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Live Essence
This performance is under the direction of Felissa Estrada.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa
(UK 2012) When famous DJ Alan Partridge’s radio station is taken over by a new media conglomerate, it sets in motion a chain of events which see Alan having to work with the police to defuse a potentially violent siege. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(Spain 2013) An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and gives viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), May 17, 2015

Yucatan LivingDocumentary: Secrets of the Humpback Whale
Watch the secrets of the deep as these beautiful animals migrate and raise their young in groups.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Laura Moguel, Soprano
This performance is under the direction of Felipe de J. Cervera.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission:$50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Symphony of Yucatan Performance
Piano and Romance. Fernando Varcarcel as Guest Director and Dario Antonio Martin García on the piano. The first part is a tribute to the father of romanticism, Beethoven. It includes the Fidelio Overture and Piano Concerto no. 4. Also the young Cuban winner of the international Piano competition “Jose Jacinto Cuevas” will perform Symphony no. 101 by Haydn.
Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance. The regularly scheduled performances for May 15 and 17 will now take place in this combined performance May 17.
Location: The venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero.
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Chamber Sundays: For the Love of Baroque
This is a performance by the International String Quartet of Merida, much loved and admired. If you have a chance to see them, don’t pass it up!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students & Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: A Woman Is a Woman
(France 1961) A French striptease artist is desperate to become a mother. When her reluctant boyfriend suggests his best friend to impregnate her, feelings become complicated when she accepts. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) May 18, 2015

No events planned for today as yet. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Art Fest at Bistro Cultural in Merida MexicoBistro Cultural Art Fest – May 23
The next Bistro Cultural Art Fest returns better than ever. There will be live music performances throughout the evening, a special menu from Chef Yohann, and your favorite artists and craftspeople return along with a select few new and interesting ones. Don’t miss it!
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 43 X 66, Santa Ana, Merida Centro
Time: 4:00 to 10:00 PM
Admission: Free, but bring money!

Yucatan Living Progreso: Annual Motorcycle Meeting: Lawless Tribe – May 29 & 30
Look for at least 400 members of the Lawless Tribe, from all across Mexico, to be in Progreso for this event. If you love leather and motorcycles, this is the place for you! There will be loads of activities going on, including motorcycle repair workshops and visits from a number of well known athletes in a variety of sports. From what we can tell see now, this will be a photographer’s dream weekend, so do plan on being there.
Location: Malecon in Progreso
Time: Two days and nights
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
Goossens, Eugene – At the Tarn Op. 15 No. 1
Britten, Benjamine – Simple Symphony for String Quartet
Bacewicz, Grazyna – String Quartet No. 4
8 PM performance.

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Double Barrel Yucatones
The fabulouos Yucatones, past and present, will be performing at Hemingways. Don’t miss this fun time! Great music, great food, great company. More info here.
Location: Hennessy’s Irish Pub
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Name of Company – Loyola Comunidad Eduativa

Job Location – Dzodzil Norte (close to the Gran Plaza and Liverpool)

Name of Contact – Jessica Robertson/ Claudia Alvarez (School´s principal)

Phone Number – 999.941-5454

Email Address – jrobertson [at] serloyola [dot] edu [dot] mx / calvarez [at] serloyola [dot] edu [dot] mx

Job Description – We are currently looking for part-time or full-time elementary school teachers to work with us for the 2015-2016 school year.

Job Requirements

-Native or very fluent English speaker
-Experience teaching the desired age group
-Availability during the entire 2015-2016 school year (from August 2015 – July 2016).
-Desire to work closely with other teachers in a learning community
-Knowledge of socio-constructivist theory

Additional Information – Loyola is a forward-looking private school in Mérida, México founded in socioconstructivist learning theory and the idea that students should be the central players in their education. We seek to form responsible, creative, and reflexive individuals who are empowered to make a difference in their community and are equipped with all of the abilities necessary to do so. Our classes are small (maximum 24) so that teachers can give each student the personal attention and support that they need. In English, our students learn the language skills necessary to express their ideas and communicate with the world. Our English teachers also work to develop projects in collaboration with others to link to other content areas. And, as a team, we’re 100% committed to constantly growing and learning.

Websitewww.serloyola.edu.mx/

By Nadine Calder

Room in Merida Yucatan

Home Life

It seemed impossible that so many people and so much junk could fit into the two holes in the wall where the bachelor’s sister lived with him and her seven children. In one of them, with smoke-darkened ceiling and grime-coated walls, there was a large table wrapped with sheets that was used for ironing, which was the industry with which his sister Teresa helped don Hermenegildo with the household expenses.

On the hooks in the wall could be seen the rolled hammocks, and in two of the corners, at hand height, ropes were extended to show off, like the best coat racks, a jumble of dirty clothes in which it was as likely to see a petticoat as a pair of little boy’s pants, full of tears and patches. On the floor were pots and pans, when they weren’t being used in the kitchen, alongside crates on which were some beat-up trunks; for their part, these held the big baskets for the ironed clothing, and other odds and ends for domestic use appeared elsewhere.

At night, with the table shoved up against the wall, that tiny room was converted into a dormitory for the señora and five of her children, four who slept two by two and one, the youngest, beside her in the hammock which was biggest, or to put it more accurately, least small.

Sleeping in the YucatanThe other room was assigned to don Hermenegildo and his two older nephews, who also slept together; because while sleeping in that house, the fifty-year-old was the only one who comfortably stretched out his shanks without danger of coming up against the obstruction of another body, even though there was little certainty that his legs wouldn’t end up outside the narrow hammock, which had little of itself to offer.

At best, from what could be seen, that room was the place to receive visitors, with five somewhat rickety chairs and a padded rocker which was missing an arm, leaving in its place only the tip of a screw that served to snag any clothing that came into contact with it.

A table that could be used for writing, a trunk less damaged than the others, and an old shelf that had lost the color of its paint fit laboriously into that hovel, theater of don Hermenegildo’s musings and of the vigils that made him suffer his younger nephews’ cries which thus intensified the aches and pains of his lamentable life.

This changed somewhat with the death of doña Prudencia, as it served to interrupt his promising dreams of matrimony’s good fortunes.

Hermenegildo’s Dilemma

The fifty-year-old was wondering if he should observe mourning for the widow’s death, and after much hesitation, he finally decided to place some inconspicuous crepe next to his hatband and to pass the hours in sadness as a sign of his profound pain.

He imagined that he had suffered a loss that wounded him deeply, and it is certain that, had he known of those things, he would have compared his luck to that of Dante upon his loss of Beatrice. However, doña Prudencia’s remains could sleep in peace, sure that they had not, with a spark of love, removed the clerk’s dry heart.

He skipped doña Raimunda’s gathering those first days, but his return was fertile ground for jeremiads on the loss that he had suffered, and to which he referred while greatly arching his eyebrows and giving his eyes an expression that made them seem to contemplate from his gaunt face the stingy tomb that guarded forever the object of his newly truncated illusions.

Aside from his love for the deceased, his past loves, if they could be called that, didn’t occur to doña Raimunda and the lawyer. Don Hermenegildo’s lack of ardor and great reserve weren’t conducive to getting to know him, and the licenciado don Felipe Ramos Alonzo’s spouse only remembered the bachelor’s loves when she had him in front of her to get him to talk and make her laugh for a while. Lupita didn’t have the slightest suspicion that don Hermenegildo’s visits had any but the ordinary objective and so, although he would have liked the whole world to pity him for the great misfortune he had undergone, he frequently sighed without having anyone stopping to think about it.

Making The Best Of Bad Luck

Convinced that the adverse star that pursued him was depriving him of the conjugal state just as he felt inclined to embrace it, he resolved to make his sister Teresa’s family more his own and to see his nephews as compensation for the children that heaven was denying him.

A good invention for the YucatanHe dedicated himself to their care and made the eldest, Lucas, study daily, reviewing his lessons before sending him off to class at a free school. The second was barely seven years old, and don Hermenegildo decided to get him started on the challenges of learning the primary subjects in order to avoid the drawbacks of sending him to school, not the least of which was the necessity of providing him with clothes; at home he could easily go around shabby and dirty, as always, eventually converting to shreds his older brother’s already-unusable rags.

The latter, aside from being an incorrigible prankster, for which he suffered frequent detentions in school and tugs on his ears at home, seemed intelligent and was benefiting from his lessons. His books could have been handed down to his little brother, but when he was finished with them, only the last pages were left and those had come unstitched.

Evil Genius

Ramoncito, don Hermenegildo’s primary-student disciple, wasn’t any more careful. After two weeks he had already defaced nearly half of a paperback copy of the primary book by Mantilla, and everywhere on the pages, despite his teacher and uncle’s warnings and threats, could be seen numerous strokes and extravagant figures done in pencil, a sign of the child’s early love of drawing. The pencil had come from a rascal in the neighborhood, a buddy of his, in exchange for a good amount of tamarind seed, currency used in the games of hoyuelo* and arrimadilla**.

What Ramoncito shone at was drawing people. Any paper he found, and walls alike, served him as canvas for his artistic conceptions. Those soldiers in the making were his delight, and he showed them to his friends with pride.

Soldier stick figuresHe would draw a circle destined to be a head, and inside he would put a pair of points to represent the eyes; from each of the places where the ears should be, he drew a horizontal line in the guise of an arm, which ended in another five, opening like a fan to represent the fingers; downward, in place of the neck, he drew two parallel lines which fancied themselves legs, and there you have a quintessential man.

Later converting this individual into a troop was for Ramoncito a simpler procedure than that employed by the government. He crossed that phenomenal body with a line that stuck out to one side of its head, and its rifle was at the ready; a dozen figures like this and a company was formed.

Don Hermenegildo needed a good dose of patience to see to it that this precocious rival of Apelles could overcome the difficulties of spelling, and he had to think about teaching him the multiplication table. All this in those moments when he found himself free of his commitments as clerk and his customary attendance at his excellent friend señor licenciado don Felipe Ramos Alonzo’s traditional gathering, which he had missed only once in order to visit Lupita.

And so two more years of his life went by, amid the pressures of domestic life, the whining of his little nephews, and the arguments brought on by the older ones. And so he would have continued to live with the same prosaic monotony if life, which has so many ups and downs, didn’t have in each one of them varied and new developments that change the face of things and shoot down man’s hopes and expectations.

****

*”dimple:” A child’s game in which, throwing from a distance, one tries to land coins or pellets in a hole.

**”come close:” A child’s game in which each player tosses a marker (coin, button, etc.) against a wall attempting to have it remain as close as possible to the wall; the one who succeeds in landing closest wins all the markers.

By Working Gringos

Uaymitun Beach House for Rent

Beautiful, stately beach front home in prestigious Uaymitun
15 minutes to Progreso and 35 minutes to Merida
Huge master bedroom, plus 2 more bedrooms all en suite on second floor, plus en suite downstairs for staff member.
Gorgeous outdoor patio, pool with magnificent palms creating a tropical paradise.
Living Room, dining room, kitchen, pantry, washer/dryer, and full time caretaker.
Available June 1 – 30, $2,500.00/US
Not available in July.
Available August 1 – 30, for $5,855.00 US
Available September – November for $2,500/mo. US
Rent for one month, or longer.

Contact Information

Please contact: Paola Ferrer by phone in Merida
999.368.18.18
or email: paoferrer [at] live [dot] com [dot] mx

By Byron D. Augustin

Road Trips Revisited

Road Trip! When I was in college a group of students would gather on Saturdays for activities that, for the most part, were not beneficial to society. On many of these occasions, someone would yell, “Road Trip!” Planning would begin immediately and within an hour the cooler was full of soft drinks (or other beverages), and off we went. It was great entertainment and we visited some interesting places and actually engaged in some accidental learning.

In our Yucatan retirement years, my wife and I have returned to those wonderful experiences of times gone by. The Yucatan Peninsula is covered with roads that beckon the adventurer to explore a world of unexpected discoveries. We have met the perfect couple to share in these experiences. Ron and Dee Poland are a couple of expats from southern Canada. They spend their winters renovating their property, known as Hacienda Santa Inez, near Dzitas. Ron has a built-in GPS system in his brain, making him a handy companion for these trips, and Dee always packs a great cooler full of snacks and soft drinks.

Ron’s sense of humor is drier than the most recent climatic spell that brought no rain and the hottest temperatures on the planet to the Yucatan. So, when he suggested a road trip to the Shrine of Wine, we were all in. I have always had an abiding interest in the roadside monuments and chapels scattered along the Yucatan’s roads. They are wonderful expressions of some individual’s personal commitment to the memory of loved ones or personal expressions of faith, and like haciendas, each one is unique.

Who Built The Wine Bottle Chapel?

The Wine Bottle Chapel in YucatanThe Wine Bottle Chapel turned out to be well worth the road trip. The first visit initiated my interest in discovering how on earth an edifice of this nature could come to fruition. Ron declared that Dee and he knew the people responsible for building the chapel and that they were good friends. So, Ron made an appointment to meet with the builders and we all went back for a second visit, anxious to learn the fascinating story behind this unique shrine.

Victor Tuyub and his wife Diane are currently living in Sudzal, four kilometers away from the chapel on a road with a new asphalt surface. Victor is a local contractor and Diane is an archaeologist by training. After an impressive career in archaeology, Diane began to dabble in land investment and development of properties in the area of Yucatan near Izamal. A few years ago, there was a rash of fires set by an unknown individual that endangered livestock, wild animals, birds and property. Victor and Diane decided to build a chapel in the heart of the area where the fires were occurring. They hoped the chapel would have a positive impact on the perpetrator of the fires and that he would cease to engage in his illegal activity. The plan, by the way, seems to have worked and the fires have stopped.

Let us pause a moment to consider the wonderful Mexicanismo that resulted in this solution.

Why Wine Bottles?

When construction on the chapel started, Diane was the managing partner of the Hacienda San Antonio Chalante Bed and Breakfast, located a short distance from the chapel site. The Bed and Breakfast had a great kitchen, wine bottles in Yucatansuperb meals, and an excellent wine list. Diane could not bring herself to throw the beautiful, wine bottles of many colors away and asked if there was a way to incorporate them into the construction of the chapel. Since Victor is a talented builder, he was sure there was a way to use them and set about drafting a design for the inclusion of the wine bottles into the construction materials.

At one point, there was a brief hesitation in planning while they discussed the inclusion of wine bottles into a building devoted to prayer and religious issues. They came to the conclusion that it was permissible since Jesus turned water into wine at the marriage of Canaan, and wine was essential for the communion sacrament in the doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church. They feel it was a good decision and not a single person has ever suggested that the chapel is in any way sacrilegious. For my money, the beauty of the cross in the chapel will cause any thoughts along those lines to evaporate immediately.

Construction of the Wine Bottle Chapel

Construction of the chapel began in 2001. Initially, Victor and his father, Eliseo Tuyub, did the work. They cleared a space for the chapel near the road and started with the walls. The dimensions of the chapel were approximately 13.5 feet by 13.5 feet. The walls were built using the local construction technique using stone and mortar, known as mamposteria. Limestone rocks present in the area were used to form the walls and the rocks were held in place using a mortar, which consisted of cement, pulvo (dust), cal, and water.

cross at wine bottle chapel in YucatanSpecial care had to be taken to leave space for the massive wine bottle cross, the paloma, or dove of peace over the front door, two windows and the entrance door. The cross is composed almost entirely of green wine bottles. However, there are five blue bottles in the center of the cross. I suspected there was some symbolic meaning to these five blue bottles, so I asked Victor to explain its symbolism and the choice of only five blue bottles. He looked at me like I might be missing a few cells in the cabeza (head) and said, “because that is all there were.”

The chapel was an open sanctuary without a roof until additional building supplies could be acquired. Rafters for the roof were cut from Victor and Diane’s property. The metal covering was a gift from an anonymous donor. The door was salvaged and recycled from a previous construction project.

One major question remained unanswered. What should be done about the dirt floor? After some time passed, Victor suggested that wine bottles be used to create a glass floor. It would require that the bottles be inverted downward with the bottom of the bottle serving as the surface of the floor. Mortar would have to be mixed and each bottle would need to be installed separately. This would require a significant amount of labor and a truckload of bottles.

Los Patas Rajadas

Victor owned and still owns a construction company by the name of Los Patas Rajadas. At the time, the company had seven employees, and after a lengthy discussion the workers agreed to donate their labor las patas rejadas in Yucatanand help install the floor.

At this point, I had to call a time out so that I could determine how Victor decided to use that name for his company. The term Los Patas Rajadas, means “the cracked feet” and has often been used as a derogatory term by some elite members of Yucatecan society to describe the fact that many Maya peasants walk barefooted, causing the bottom of their feet to get callouses and crack.

An incident in a pueblo in the area occurred shortly before Victor selected the name for his company. A local politician spoke at a political rally to endorse his favorite candidate. The largely Maya crowd asked the politician questions that were difficult for him to answer. He became more and more agitated until his frustration caused him to blurt out, “I am not going to continue to listen to a bunch of cracked foot Indians”. The candidate the politician had supported lost the election and Victor found a name for his company, which reminds the local population of the insensitive and unacceptable behavior that sometimes occurs in politics.

Feet of the Maya by Fernando Castro PachecoAs an aside, Fernando Castro Pacheco, Yucatan’s famed muralist and painter, painted an image of two cracked feet walking down a path. This image can be found in Merida’s Palacio Municipal, and is a visual expression of the poverty and hard life experienced by many rural Maya.

Drink More Wine!

As the workers from Los Patas Rajadas continued to work on the floor, guests at Diana’s Hacienda San Antonio Chalante Bed and Breakfast were unable to consume enough wine to meet the needs of the floor crew. So, Victor drove to the Izamal sanitary landfill in search of more bottles. Appropriately, in the Bible, Matthew 7:7 and Luke 11:9 have similar verses which state, “Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and you shall find.” virgen made of wine bottles in YucatanThis was good advice, because as it turns out, Victor found a mound of hundreds of empty bottles in excellent condition that had been recently dumped by a local company. By the time the floor was finished, more than one thousand bottles had been consumed by the little chapel.

La Virgen That Could Not Be Stolen

Diane’s goddaughter wanted to contribute to the project, so she gave Diane a beautiful jute wall hanging of an image of the Virgin of Guadalupe. After a year, a chapel visitor stole the special gift. Everyone involved in the project agreed that there had to be a new image of the Virgin in the chapel, but this time, the image should be an image that could not be stolen.

Los Patas Rajadas again came to the rescue. First a local artist named Pez from Izamal painted an image of the Virgin on the front wall next to the altar. The workers then made the shape of her body with mortar. The mortar used for her dress was dyed red and had pieces of clear glass bottle fragments imbedded in the mortar before it dried. Her cloak consisted of grey mortar with pieces of glass from blue wine bottles, and quetzalcoatl in the wine bottle chapel in Yucatanthe halo surrounding her, utilized green bottle glass. It has been said that as drivers approach the front of the chapel at night, the lights of their vehicle reflect off the Virgin’s glass and it appears as if she moved. Perhaps it is only an optical illusion, but some drivers have been sure it was a miracle.

Quetzalcoatl Joins In

When the Virgin was completed, one of the Maya workers suggested that an image of a Maya god should be displayed on the other side of the altar. Some Maya still incorporate ancient Maya religious beliefs with Catholicism and this image would make the chapel ecumenical.

Enrique May Rejon, an extraordinarily talented designer, painter, and sculptor also from Izamal, was hired to create an image of Quetzalcoatl. The image was made of stucco and meticulously painted with bright colors. The builders expressed their hope that visitors to the chapel will not be offended by the presence of both Christian and Maya religious icons. They feel strongly that in the privacy of the chapel, an individual has the freedom to practice his or her own personal faith.

The floral mosaics on the exterior of the chapel were a labor of love by Leonardo Chi, an employee of Los Patas Rajadas. He requested permission to contribute his talents with the creation of his own floral designs. flower out of wine bottles in YucatanIt is truly amazing what some talented individuals can do with pieces of broken glass.

Chapel Perilous

Recently, when the road was straightened, improved and resurfaced, the chapel was nearly lost. Even though Victor and Diane had been assured that the chapel would be protected, information leaked back to them that this was not true. Anonymous sources warned that the state government and the construction company did not want to build a curve to avoid the chapel. The source went on to tell them that early some morning a bulldozer would appear, and make short work of the structure and then nothing could be done to save the chapel.

The information revealing the impending destruction of the beloved chapel spread like wildfire through the community. Local people expressed outrage and indignation and protested vociferously. Yamil Apud Chavez, a neighbor, traveled to Merida personally and informed the Diario de Yucatan of the potential injustice. The newspaper investigated Altar made from wine bottles in Yucatanand printed an article. This, along with local support, placed heavy pressure on those responsible for the road to preserve the chapel. So now, the road now makes a gentle curve around the Wine Bottle Chapel. Sometimes, the good guys do win!

****

Directions to the Wine Bottle Chapel: Take the autopista from Merida toward Cancun. At kilometer 68, turn at the retorno (return) and proceed west for a short distance before exiting at the sign to Izamal. Drive through Xanaba, and continue to the town square in Sudzal. Pass the brightly painted Palacio Municipal on your left and turn right at the first intersection. Follow that road for approximately four kilometers and the Wine Bottle Chapel will appear on your left. If you are arriving from the direction of Valladolid, exit at the sign to Izamal at kilometer 68 and follow the same directions the rest of the way. Please respect the sanctity of this unique site and leave it as you found it.

By Nadine Calder

Mexico CityLuis Robles had gone to Mexico City. Making good use of connections available through a relative who gave him letters of recommendation, and a letter that he was able to get from his Law professor, he was hoping to obtain a scholarship that would allow him to live comfortably and somehow manage to continue in such a way that the big city would open a path for him, securing a respectable position in line with his aspirations.

After a lot of useless waiting around in the Ministry and continued persistence with influential acquaintances who met with him there, he came out in the end with the longed-for scholarship that ensured his stay in the nation’s capital. Going to class at times, and skipping the rest, Luis didn’t lose his sense of humor with the change of scenery, much less when that change offered a broader field for his inclinations and character.

He increased his connections, began to attend some gatherings of a certain type, donned his top hat, and in order to make himself look as important as possible, was no longer inclined to leave his frock coat unbuttoned.

As he was handsome, the new look and his free and easy air spoke well of him. He was kind to those he dealt with and six months after arriving, he was making his way around the city as if he owned the place.

With some young journalist friends, he had begun to frequent the editorial offices, where he began handling news, verbally at first and then written. He was bitten by the desire to appear in the press and was hoping to be paid later for what he was now providing for free, since his talents were beginning to be appreciated.

It was of this that doña Raimunda and don Hermenegildo were speaking in her home one night. The bachelor was not visiting doña Prudencia because she had fallen ill during the day, and that afternoon a high fever was consuming her to the point of making her delirious. It did not, however, seem to be anything of concern, so as he was not worried, he went to visit his friend doña Raimunda. The latter teased him that it was a matter of planning the wedding that was bothering doña Prudencia.

“Wedding plans, already? I don’t deny that I think I’m making progress. But wedding plans, there are none. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

“But why don’t you speak frankly? I’ve talked with doña Prudencia and she tells me that you don’t show her your intentions with anything more than indirect statements. Why don’t you tell her once and for all that you want to marry her?”

Señora, because I don’t have it in me, because I can’t control myself, because I don’t have the courage. When I want to tell her something, I get strangely agitated. I can’t avoid it. It’s like someone is going to kill me.”

“But those are childish things, don Hermenegildo. Make up your mind.”

“All right. I’m going there soon. I know what I’m talking about. Two nights ago I reminded her that with Lupita’s marriage, she was going to be left alone and that there wouldn’t be a better occasion for her to remarry.”

“And she?”

“She smiled. She’s very nice. Ay! But I wasn’t born for these things, doña Munda. I assure you that if all men were like me, not even half of them would marry.”

“Well, I’ve already talked with you about this and you told me it would be odd for her to propose to you. That means that it’s best left up to you and that you just need to talk with her.”

“Yes. I promise you that I’m going to talk frankly with her. But what will she think of my brevity? The first time that I speak clearly!”

The attention of the two visitors was caught by the arrival at doña Prudencia’s home of a carriage from which stepped the family doctor. A little later they saw that a boy who had come out of the house was running down the street with a bottle, and as he passed by he informed them that he was hurrying to the pharmacy because the señora was not doing well.

Don Hermenegildo went to find out what was happening and returned with the news that the widow was in serious condition.

Ave María!,” exclaimed doña Raimunda. “I’m going over there.”

And after giving some instructions to the domestic help, she went to her friend’s house.

The doctor, after the examination and prescription, explained to the family that the intense nature of the fever was not very reassuring. He recommended that they take great care that she not miss a dose of the medicine, and promising to return soon, he took his leave. Doña Raimunda, who left there very late that night, attended the patient with true affection.

The latter’s condition was worse in the morning. The doctor said it would be wise to prepare for the eventuality of her death, and the difficulty was to find someone to break the news to her. Doña Raimunda resigned herself to the task, making use of cautious understatement, to which the patient responded by designating which priest she wanted.

Another worry, equally serious, assailed the ailing Prudencia in those moments: Lupita. What would become of her daughter, young and without maternal support? She begged them to call Pancho Vélez and she spoke with him in a voice weakened by her illness. He, who deep down was not a bad person and who blamed his habits and disorderly life on nothing more than a flaw in his education, was moved by the dying woman’s words and he of course promised to get married, after which he left the house ready to fix everything.

Once on the street he set himself to thinking about his situation, and it seemed to him he was in a fantastic position. He had decided to get married, because he had to do it some day and because his mother was always preaching to him about marriage’s convenience. But if one night he had set the date for his own marriage, it was so that he would not be left with nothing to say. The truth was that he had never thought seriously about it.

Dead coupleThis time, the situation presented itself as inescapable. The sick woman wanted to see them united before she died. The poor señora! She had been very good to him. And in the end, if he had to get married, today was the same as tomorrow. Why not give the poor woman what she was asking for?

So on the following day, the ceremony was celebrated at home, in front of an altar in the patient’s room and in keeping with her insistence that she wanted to witness it from her bed.

The wedding was sad and hushed. Aside from the wedding party and witnesses, the only others in attendance were doña Raimunda, puffing due to her weight and the heat, don Hermenegildo, looking as if he was about to cry, and their neighbor Chonita, with a strange look in her eyes, probably making notes for her next liaison with her mechanic.

Doña Prudencia was crying, and every once in a while her moans interrupted the solemn words of the ritual recited by the priest. That celebration that is usually cause for a party and rejoicing therefore had the funereal aspect given it by the circumstances. Guadalupe was emotional and Pancho Vélez had a disgruntled look on his face.

The sponsors were the young man’s sister, as his mother excused herself with the rheumatism that tormented her, and Guadalupe’s brother, Manuel, who with his sullen and bad-tempered face and untidy mustache, had the look of a wild beast caught in a trap.

When the celebration was over, the widow called to her daughter, and sweetly drawing her toward her, the two embraced, intermingling their kisses and their sobs. Everyone present at this scene had the discretion to leave the room.

Lupita, who had watched the approach of her marriage and the seriousness of her mother’s condition as if she didn’t understand what either of those events signified, felt her very being diminished during the ceremony. And drawing near to the bed of the dying woman, who between tears snatched the opportunity to lavish her with caresses, more tender and effusive than ever, with the pain of thinking they were the last, her child’s heart, new to strong emotion, seemed to open itself to that first teardrop impregnated with deep sorrow, and a torrent of weeping arose from her young and beautiful face.

DeathChonita, who came to dispense a spoonful of medicine, interrupted the scene. A little while later, the bride conversed with the neighbors in the hallway, seated beside Pancho Vélez, although she constantly went to check on her mother, next to whose bed the surly, but sensible Manuel spent almost the entire day.

The following day, in the afternoon, doña Prudencia died. Numerous friends of the deceased and of Lupita showed up at the house of mourning, to say nothing of some friends of Pancho Vélez, who was now considered one of the bereaved. The neighbors were not to be missed. Chonita was there, doña Raimunda and her husband the señor don Felipe were there, and next to them the dutiful don Hermenegildo.

The prayers, the chocolates and the conversations followed as they do in such situations. Once past the initial impression that death produces, wakes resemble any other gathering place. People talk about everything and they laugh. Few are those who maintain a suitable circumspection, and of those there was naturally our most courteous don Hermenegildo, who was often engrossed in his own thoughts and who only once in a while spoke privately and haltingly with the señor don Felipe, who was at his side. Facing them could be seen the rigid body of the dead woman amid four sconces with their respective fat candles burning melancholicaly.

Doña Raimunda was calculating with her husband the likelihood that Pancho Vélez would inherit the estate, and the time that it would take him to exhaust it in riotous binging, when don Hermenegildo interrupted them, saying darkly:

Don Hermenegildo

“Can you see now, doña Munda, that I’m right in saying that I’m very unlucky?”

“Why do you say that?”

“When I was thinking again of getting married and I was at the point of arranging everything . . .”

Doña Raimunda sprang up, and inasmuch as her volume would permit, she hurriedly got out of there so that she could give way to the laughter that was filling her cheeks and that she held back with a hand over her mouth.

As for the licenciado, half in jest, half seriously, he set about consoling the bachelor.

“Another one will turn up, don Hermenegildo. It’s a big world.”

“I doubt it very much, señor licenciado. Misfortune is my destiny. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

****

Want to catch up? Go here and start with Chapter One

By Khaki Scott


Getting Around the City Changing Soon

The first of the new buses has arrived. The drivers are trained and all that remains is the installing of intelligent traffic lights that will connect with the buses to get riders around the city faster than ever. Funding has been a cooperative effort between the State and Federal Governments and dealers, including a 20% subsidy, in order to speed the process along. This will be a welcome change for the many expats who have chosen to live without vehicles in Merida, and it will be the best news we have had in a long time for the environment. The first two routes to open will be Circuito Poniente and Ruta 52 Norte Santa Gertrudis Copó.

Heat Hits Poultry but Not Pork and Honey

This is not good news. For every week of extreme heat, poultry farmers lose 200,000 chicks (from a total of 1.7 million) and 10,000 cases of eggs (from a total of 175 thousand cases). Chickens and eggs are not under fans because the cost of the electricity would be monumental. Consumers can expect higher prices for chicken and eggs beginning soon. As of now, 90% of all swine are under shade roofs and most are under ceiling fans. Swine producers say they will not suffer significant losses. The honey industry is on its way to a bumper crop this year (12,000 tons, up from 10,000 tons last year). The only thing that could hurt them now is drought or fire and every precaution against those two events is being taken. We don’t hear much from the beef industry and are assuming they are busier than ever now that they are USDA certified.

Addy Velazquez Sosa: Queen of Navy Day 2015

Any time anyone thinks that titles are handed out to just any pretty face in Yucatan, they have another think coming. Addy Velazquez Sosa is only 23 years old, but is already dedicated to working for her father’s company, exporting fish, pulpo and sea cucumber. This young lady is a consummate professional and is fluent in English, French and Mandarin Chinese. Addy Velazquez Sosa is also the first elected Queen of Navy Day. In prior years, this honor was made by appointment. Yucatan Living would like to congratulate Addy Velazquez Sosa, her parents, and siblings. We can only imagine how thrilled her family and her community must be over this happy event and we look forward to meeting her on Navy Day.

First International Festival: The World in a Mayan Village

Traditional music and dance from ten visiting nations were presented in Telchac Puerto last week. The participating countries included Canada, Malaysia, Lebanon, Spain, Ecuador, Ireland, Cuba, the Republic of Korea, Colombia and Mexico. The purpose of this festival is to bring cultures together to showcase their similarities, as well as their differences. This is to be an annual festival and next year, should be a wonderful tourism opportunity as they will have more time to plan, and visitors can structure a visit around this marvelous event. We suspect that indigenous cultures from around the world will find that they have many more things in common than they have differences.

Merida Inaugurates First Dog Park

The new dog park is called Peek Park, and it sports areas for specialized pet games, drinking fountains, wading pools, veterinary care, and even child care. The park is located in Unidad Territorial 5 del Parque Lineal and covers approximately 608 square meters, divided into sections for small and large dogs. Visitors can also take advantage of such activities as Zumba, yoga and outdoor movies. There is a small admission fee to get into the park. A decent dog park in Merida has been a long time coming and congratulations are due all around for the completion of this project.

Annual Children’s Day in Mexico: April 30

April 30 was Mexico’s Children’s Day and most of the news that week always focuses on what’s new with kids. They are, after all, the generation that will be in power when we are old and gray, so we have a stake in who they are and who they will become. We are happy to report that much has improved in the lives of Yucatan’s children over the past few years and the stories below showcase just a few of those improvements.

Maya Genome: Heredity and Disease

The National Institute of Genomic Medicine of Mexico will now be working with specialists in chemistry, medicine, science and psychology to study the Mayan genome and to define the reason some communities in Yucatan are more susceptible to obesity and diabetes. These communities have had years of nutritional education and still their rate of obesity, diabetes, and coronary disease continue to climb. Is there a psychological or cultural issue here? Is the problem purely genetic? With all that is known about the Mayan genome today, it is time to track these diseases to their roots. If this can be accomplished in the Maya, then the findings can be extrapolated to populations around the world. That sort of miracle is a long way off, but maybe it will be the Maya who provide the original model for defeating obesity, diabetes and coronary disease.

Children: Traditional Games Survive and Thrive in Yucatan

We have all heard the stories of our grandparents’ childhood toys, along with stories of their having made many of those toys themselves. Then, most of our parents moved to cities and we grew up with store-bought toys that had nothing to do with who we were or where we came from. Today, we are happy to report that such is not the case with the childhood toys of the Maya. Parents, evidently without being prompted to do so and no matter their level of urbanization, continued to purchase traditional toys for their babies and teach older children to create and build their own toys. The time the children spend in crafting their own toys is time during which culture itself is strengthened. “Studies show” (everyone loves that term when it brings good news!)… studies show that it will be many more generations, if ever, before there will be a decline in the use and construction of traditional Mayan games for children. In the meantime, technology has decided that it’s easier to join the Maya than to fight them. Today, new electronic games played on cell phones, using Mayan language and traditional graphics, are being taken to outlying towns and villages. It looks to us as if the Maya of tomorrow are going to be in quite a good position when it comes to living with one foot in both cultures.

Chickenpox Still on the Rise in Yucatan

From the beginning of January to the beginning of April, there has been a 121% increase in cases of chickenpox over the same time last year. This is not usually a life-threatening disease for small children, but both chickenpox and its secondary manifestation, shingles, can be life-threatening to older adults. To help stop this disease, all children in all daycare centers must now have an up-to-date immunization record. If they do not, then free immunizations are given immediately.

Number of Births on the Rise

According to the Civil Registry of Yucatan, in 2009, there were 36,134 babies born in Yucatan state. With a steady increase each year, the Civil Registry of Yucatan reports that in 2014, there were 37,966 births in the state of Yucatan. Unfortunately, 25% of these births were to teenage mothers. One hospital administrator believes it is the culture of the internet that is encouraging sexual activity at increasingly earlier ages. Teen mothers are a worldwide issue and Yucatan’s DIF works hard to provide as many services as possible to these young mothers, their babies, and their families.

The Name Game

In 2013, Yucatan enacted a law that says parents have the right to name their child with the mother’s surname first and the father’s surname second. If they choose that option, the rest of their children will also have that inverted name. If they do not choose that option, the default option is the old way of naming, with the father’s surname first and the mother’s second. It looks as if the people only wanted that option, and were not necessarily intending to use it. Thus far, only 15 babies in Yucatan have been named with the inverted naming pattern. We have to admit that we are a little relieved that this is not a popular practice. With Spanish as our second language, any little stable crutch we can hold onto to understand the culture around us is a plus for us!

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting May 04, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performances:
May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17
Remember, the venue has changed from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – April 24 to May 4
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddhist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion. People of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Daily during Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Oaxaca in Merida: Until May 4
For the next two weeks or so, come visit Oaxaca at Parque de la Paz. Great food, shopping and dance demonstrations!
Location: Parque de la Paz, Avenida Itzaes at Calle 59
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) May 04, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today

Tuesday (Martes) May 05, 2015

Yucatan Living National Holiday: 5 de Mayo

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
This is the final performance for this traveling event.
Location: Parque de la Colonia Emiliano Zapata Oriente, Calle 22 entre 37 y 39.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Grand Prize of Classical Dance
This event is under the direction of Rosa Elena Camacho de Farah. This will be a gala function to present prizes for outstanding achievements.
Location: Centro de Estudios de Ballet (CEBAC)
More Information: Cell: 999-121-4782

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova
Always a great Trova Trio performing… check it out!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Vertigo
(USA 1958) A retired San Francisco detective suffering from acrophobia investigates the strange activities of an old friend’s wife, all the while becoming dangerously obsessed with her. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) May 06, 2015

Yucatan LivingMovie: Pina
(2011 Germany) Pina is a 2011 German 3D documentary film about the contemporary dance choreographer Pina Bausch. It was directed by Wim Wenders. The film premiered Out of Competition at the 61st Berlin International Film Festival. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Hasta el ultimo trago… corazon! (‘Till the Last Drink… my Love)
This movie was made in Mexico in 2005. Directed by Beto Gomez and starring Lila Downs, it is a documentary about Mexican music and the women who have contributed to its development. Yes, it’s in Spanish but the language of music is universal! In Spanish with English subtitles. And a great chance to see Lila Downs!
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 30, 2015

Yucatan Living 110 Years of Korean Immigration in Yucatan
This is a very special program to honor one of the integral ethnicities that form the culture of Yucatan in the past, present and future.
Location: Museum of the City of Merida, Calle 65 x 56
Time: 11:00 AM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Magnificent Ambersons
(United States 1942). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Dolores Costello and Agnes Moorehead. Welles was the narrator of this movie. Synopsis: The spoiled young heir to the decaying Amberson fortune comes between his widowed mother and the man she has always loved. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living .56% What Happened to Mexico?
(Mexico) This is the story of the battle for power in Mexico; the story of a man, known as AMLO, who was once the mayor of Mexico City. He ran for President, lost, and challenged his country’s institutions by proclaiming himself legitimate president after losing the 2006. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Virgin Suicides
(USA 1999) A group of male friends become obsessed with five mysterious sisters who are sheltered by their strict, religious parents. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 08, 2015

Yucatan Living Valladolid: English Teachers’ Workshop
The Valladolid English Library is pleased to be the host location for the first English Teachers’ Workshop of Mextesol, La Asociacion Mexicana de Maestros de Ingles, A.C.
Location: Valladolid English Library
Time: 9:30 AM Thursday
Admission: $25 pesos. All teachers of English are invited and encouraged to attend.

Yucatan Living Movie: Gerhard Richter – Painting
(Germany 2011) A documentary on the German artist that includes glimpses at his studio, which has not been seen in decades. In German with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Journey into Fear
(United States 1943). Director: Norman Foster. Starring: Orson Welles, Dolores del Rio and Joseph Cotton. A Navy engineer, returning to the U.S. with his wife from a conference, finds himself pursued by Nazi agents, who are out to kill him. In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: El Mudo
(Peru 2013) The story is about a Peruvian government official named Constantino Zega. He doesnt fit anywhere among the hodge-podge of Peruvian government officials and looks down on his colleagues because he has never succumbed to an act of corruption and, every time he has had the opportunity to do so, he has made an effort to impede it. Over his two decades as a government official he has cultivated purity – the fuel for his soul. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 09, 2015

Yucatan Living Bird Watching Tour
This tour will participate in the Global Big Day, an initiative of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, which aims to record the largest possible number of birds in a day and thus contribute to their knowledge and conservation. All birdwatchers, experienced and non-experienced, are invited to participate in this important, worldwide event.
Location: Leaves from: Gran Plaza, Merida (in front of Samborns). Destination: Sierra Papacal
Time: 5:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: $200 pesos
More information: On their website. www.ebird.org/globalbigday or call: (999) 988-4436 ext 113, or e-mail infotoh [at] pronatura-ppy [dot] org [dot] mx.

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Surprise Screening
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Stranger
(United States 1946). Director: Orson Welles. Starring Edward G. Robinson, Loretta Young and Orson Welles. An investigator from the War Crimes Commission travels to Connecticut to find an infamous Nazi. With Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Music: Emiliano Buenfil and La ChanCil Tropical
Do not miss any performance by this group. They have an amazing range of music and are one of the most exciting groups to come along in a long time.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(Spain 2013) An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and gives viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), May 10, 2015

Yucatan Living Mexican Mother’s Day

Yucatan Living Documentary: Wild Panama
Discover the rain forest on a wild Panamanian island. There are precious few unspoiled areas like this left in the world, so this documentary is more valuable to us with each passing year.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Laura Moguel, Soprano
This performance is under the direction of Felipe de J. Cervera.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission:$50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Le Petit Soldat
(France 1963) During the Algerian war for independence from France, a young Frenchman living in Geneva who belongs to a right-wing terrorist group and a young woman who belongs to a left-wing terrorist. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 5:00 and 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) May 11, 2015

Nothing planned as yet.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performance May 17
Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
The regularly scheduled performances for May 15 and 17 will now take place in a combined performance May 17.
Location: The venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero.
Admission: People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Art Fest at Bistro Cultural in Merida Mexico

Bistro Cultural Art Fest – May 23
The next Bistro Cultural Art Fest returns better than ever. There will be live music performances throughout the evening, a special menu from Chef Yohann, and your favorite artists and craftspeople return along with a select few new and interesting ones. Don’t miss it!
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 43 X 66, Santa Ana, Merida Centro
Time: 4:00 to 10:00 PM
Admission: Free, but bring money!

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
Goossens, Eugene – At the Tarn Op. 15 No. 1
Britten, Benjamine – Simple Symphony for String Quartet
Bacewicz, Grazyna – String Quartet No. 4
8 PM performance.

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

We are in need of a short term nanny.

Name of Company: Nanny for family with one 20 month old boy
Job Location: Merida, Mexico
Name of Contact: Emily
Phone Number: n/a
Email Address: emily [dot] dutterer [at] gmail [dot] com
Job Description: Full time nanny (Monday-Friday) for 20 month old boy. Position is only for the month of June 2015.
Job Requirements: Prior experience as a nanny/babysitter for children under 2 years old.

By Working Gringos

After several months, don Hermenegildo hadn’t made much progress in his plan to rescue doña Prudencia from widowhood and to escape his own long and regrettable celibacy.

A few times when visiting with others at doña Raimunda’s house, the widow received from the good gentleman one or two timid compliments, which at first astonished her, given his natural Paseo de Montejo in Merida Yucatangravity and restraint. Don Hermenegildo, for his part, broke out in a sweat with each one of these little raptures, but he never managed to present the widow with a formal declaration due to the sensitivity of his nerves, those damned nerves that always abandoned him when he tried to take a step toward putting an end to his long bachelorhood.

It didn’t take long for doña Prudencia to figure out the object behind all her suitor’s honeyed phrases. At first she thought it outrageous to get married again, but then she began to think it wouldn’t be such a ridiculous thing, inasmuch as she wasn’t an old woman nor was don Hermenegildo a scarecrow.

Given the good position in which she found herself upon the death of her husband, she calmly dedicated herself to the care of her children, without ever thinking that they would walk her once more to the altar. But the clerk’s timid advances had made her realize that the youthful fire in her heart was not completely extinguished.

Nothing could be resolved, however, because the dusty hero did not use clear and concrete language. Doña Prudencia was longing to hear the words she saw fighting to escape, but no one would be able to guess what was going on in her heart, and in that of her modest suitor, unless doña Raimunda, who was in on the secret, nudged him so that what had so many times choked him would finally emerge.

Guadalupe suspected nothing. She was sufficiently preoccupied with Pancho Vélez, who was still visiting her every night. She had stood out at various parlor dances, showing off her elegant beauty and accompanied by the well-known playboy who, it was said, had decidedly chosen her to put an end to his dissolute and crazy life.

Park in Merida YucatanThe young man’s mother, nearly distraught on account of his recklessness, had with good grace consented to the marriage in hopes of seeing it subdue her son, whose lack of restraint was damaging his health, predisposing him to tuberculosis. And she thought that married, he might fall heir to some benefits that could save him from misery, as there was not much to hope for, given his attitude toward work.

After nearly a year of visiting the house, Pancho Vélez still had not set the date for the wedding. Lupita’s brother, who knew his future brother-in-law’s history and did not seem to sympathize much with him, touched on the point one day.

“And when has he said that they’ll get married?”, he asked his mother.

“I haven’t asked him about it.”

“Well, you have to tell him to set a date, because already the engagement is becoming interminable. Is it that he wants to make fun of my sister like he has of so many others?”

The seriousness of the observation wasn’t lost on his mother, but she was incapable of carrying out any such mission that could hurt the sensitivity of that distinguished young man.

Nevertheless, she asked Guadalupe if her intended had indicated to her when the wedding might be, but she was just as ignorant of that as her mother. Don Hermenegildo came up with a solution to the difficulty when, approaching Pancho Vélez during one of his visits, he asked:

“And when are we going to drink the chocolate, Panchito?”

“Whenever you like, don Hermenegildo. We can have some today if you want”, he replied lightheartedly.

Saint Francis Borgia in Merida Yucatan“Many thanks. But I am referring to the famous wedding chocolate. I promise myself to drink two that day: one to Lupita’s health and the other to yours. When will it be?”

“Within three or four months… my saint’s day.”

“Saint Francis Borgia, isn’t that right?”

“Yes, sir.”

“Good idea. That way the celebration will serve a double purpose. I look forward to my invitation. Lupita is well aware that I want to see her happy, no less than you, who are the spitting image of your father. Such a fine man, so gentlemanly, so considerate toward me. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

This brief dialogue produced two impressions on doña Prudencia: the satisfaction of knowing that shortly the young girl would be well situated, and the sadness of realizing that that daughter, from whom she had never been separated, was going to form a family apart, in another house different from her own.

The nobility of the maternal sentiment manifested itself with all its power, and moved, she was at the point of crying. In order to distract her thoughts she returned to talking with don Hermenegildo, who was formulating in his mind a statement clear enough to lead him toward his own loving purpose.

****

Want to catch up? Go here and start with Chapter One

By WD Barr

New Leones Outfielder

Corey Wimberly has traveled a long and winding path from his boyhood days in Florida to now roaming the outfield for the Leones de Yucatan in Merida.

Corey Wimberly of the Leones de YucatanBorn in Jacksonville, Florida in 1983, the now 5’8″ 170-pound Wimberly attended Ribault High School from 1999 through 2002 and became one of three players from that school to have been drafted by the Major Leagues. Upon completion of his playing days at Ribault, Wimberly was signed to play the infield and outfield for the Alcorn State Braves in Lorman, Mississippi.

Corey played for two seasons (2004-05) at Alcorn. Always known for his speed on the base paths, his statistics while there are most impressive. In 2004 he hit .420 with 8 doubles, 4 triples and 40 stolen bases. 2005 was an even better year for Corey. He raised his batting average to .462, stroked 10 doubles with 3 triples and stole 42 bases. The Colorado Rockies took note and drafted Wimberly in the 6th round of the draft in 2005.

Minor League Career

The Rockies immediately sent Wimberly to the Casper Rockies of the Pioneer League, a Rookie League. In Casper, Corey hit .381 with 10 doubles and 36 stolen bases in 67 games.

Wimberly played in the Rockies organization from 2005-09 before being let go and signed by the Oakland Athletics. In 2010, with the AAA Sacramento River Cats of the Pacific Coast League, he hit .284 with 14 doubles, 7 triples and 3 home runs while driving in 57 in 135 games. Wimberly had several more stints at the AAA level, Indianapolis of the International League (Pirates), the Buffalo Bisons of the International League (Mets) and the Gwinnett Braves of the International League (Braves). In all, Corey has played for 7 Major League organizations in his career.

Mexican and Venezuelan Leagues

As a newcomer to the Leones, Wimberly is still no stranger to Latin America. Wimberly began his international playing career for the Yaquis de Obregon of the Liga Mexicana del Corey Wimberly of the Leones de YucatanPacifico in 2009. His debut was pretty inauspicious as he appeared in just 7 games for the Yaquis and hit just .240 with 2 stolen bases. In 2010 he played for the Tomateros de Culiacan where he hit .266 with 5 doubles, a home run and 4 stolen bases in 24 games.

In 2011, Wimberly played for the Leones del Caracas of the Venezuelan Winter League where he hit .231 with 6 doubles and 8 stolen bases. Corey did not play international ball again until he signed with the Yaquis for the 2014 winter season. That year, he hit .289 with 8 doubles and 17 stolen bases.

2015 will be his first experience in the Liga Mexicana de Beisbol having signed to play for the Leones de Yucatan.

In 11 years in the minor leagues, including the 2015 season with the Leones, Corey has played in 840 games and compiled a .290 batting average with 902 hits, 111 doubles, 30 triples, 12 home runs and 258 RBIs. Wimberly has stolen 318 bases while being caught stealing 100 times.

Interesting factoid about Corey Wimberly

While a member of the AAA Indianapolis Indians of the International League in 2011, Corey was called on to pitch one time. He gave up 3 hits and an earned run in one inning on the mound and was not involved in the decision.

****

Mexican Baseball Standings as of April 26, 2015

Norte Division

Team Record|WP|GB

Rieleros de Aguascalientes 14-6|.700|-
Acereros del Norte 12-8|.600|2.0
Diablos Rojos del Mexico 12-8|.600|2.0
Toros de Tijuana 12-8|.600|2.0
Vaqueros de la Laguna 12-8|.600|2.0
Saraperos de Saltillo 7-13|.350|7.0
Broncos de Tamaulipas 6-14|.300|8.0
Sultanes de Monterrey 6-14|.300|8.0

Sur Division

Team Record|WP|GB

Tigres de Quintana Roo 13-7|.650|-
Delfines de Ciudad del Carmen 12-8|.600|1.0
Leones de Yucatan 11-9|.550|2.0
Olmecas de Tabasco 11-9|.550|2.0
Pericos de Puebla 10-10|.500|3.0
Piratas de Campeche 8-12|.400|5.0
Guerreros de Oaxaca 7-13|.350|6.0
Rojos del Aguilas de Veracruz 7-13|.350|6.0

Statistical Leaders Through 20 Games

BATTING

Batting Average
Justin Greene (SAL) .468
Jesus Castillo (AGS) .415
Max Ramirez (MTY) .397

Hits
Jesus Castillo (AGS) 34
Olmo Rosario (MVA) 32
Jose Amador (MVA) 31

Doubles
Mike Jacobs (OAX) 9
Danny Richar (AGS) 9
Randy Ruiz (TAM) 9

Home Runs
Saul Soto (AGS) 8
Jorge Cantu (TIG) 7
CJ Retherford (TIJ) 7
Jose Ruiz (MVA) 7

RBIs
Saul Soto (AGS) 28
Jose Ruiz (MVA) 23
Manny Rodriguez (SAL) 22

PITCHING (minimum 20 innings pitched)

Record
Pablo Ortega (TIG) 4
11 tied with 3

ERA
Josh Lowey (MVA) 1.78
Pablo Ortega (TIG) 1.80
Jose Contreras (TIJ) 1.88

Walks
Omar Espinoza (TAM) 13
Ramon Ramirez (AGS) 13
Orlando Lara (AGS) 12

Strikeouts
Irving Jimenez (TAB) 31
Jose Oyervidez (MVA) 30
Cesar Valdez (TAB) 28

WHIP
Jose Oyervidez (MVA) 0.77
Jose Contreras (TIJ) 0.92
Jarrett Grube (TIG) 0.95

**

For those of you who, like us, forgot or maybe never knew these things:
WP: Win Percentage
GB: Games Behind
ERA: Earned Run Average
WHIP: Walks+Hits/Innings Pitched
RBIs: Runs Batted In

By Khaki Scott

Hottest Place on Earth

As temperatures hover between 40 C and 42 C (104 F and 107.6 F), for at least a week, the Yucatan Peninsula has been named as the hottest place on the planet. The coolest parts of the day bring temperatures of 20 C to 24 C (68 F to 75.2 F). Yikes!!

Hurricane Predictions for 2015

For the past several years, the University of Colorado’s experts in atmospheric sciences have distinguished themselves in the area of accuracy when predicting hurricanes. Hurricane season begins on June 1, but early predictions are already out. To its credit, the scientists at the University of Colorado caution that predicting this far ahead has its problems, but they believe, at this point, that 2015 will be the calmest year since 1994. As of now, they expect seven named tropical storms, with three hurricanes, at least one of which will be a Category 5. Although this is good news, we must caution everyone that it only takes one hurricane to cause widespread damage. This means that now is the time to prepare for a hurricane so that everyone can enjoy a safe and relaxing summer no matter what weather comes our way.

Brush and Forest Fires Rage On

The combination of extremely high temperatures and high winds creates an environment in which brush and forest fires flourish. The fire season begins, in Yucatan, about mid-February. Currently, we have had more fires this season than last, but they have actually consumed a smaller area because the skills of our firefighters increase every year. Firefighters are asking that people be very careful with sources of fire. Obviously, this includes not throwing lit cigarettes of vehicles. But it also includes not throwing out anything that is in the least way shiny. Bits of cellophane and aluminum foil, found mostly in packaging, serve as a magnifying glass for sun rays and fires begun this way can be well underway before they are even noticed. Please do your part by not creating an environment in which fires can begin.

Merida: Water Use Up 40%

JAPAY is reporting that the demand for water is up 40% and will likely remain high as long as temperatures are near or over 100 F. They also report that the biggest contributors to this increase in demand is coming from the north side of Merida, where filling and maintaining swimming pools, and showering more than once a day are common in this kind of weather. Even though JAPAY spent the entire winter repairing and maintaining the water lines, this is still not enough to prevent citywide drops in water pressure due to demand. Please try not to use more water than is necessary. Water is a precious resource that is going to be an increasingly important topic far sooner than anyone would have thought. As an added note, for those who live with flooded streets during the rainy season, the city is taking advantage of this time of year to clean and repair storm drains.

Rate of Conjunctivitis Up 113%

Conjunctivitis (pinkeye) is caused by viruses, bacteria, irritants, or allergies. With high temperatures, people tend to sweat and wipe their eyes with their hands. This, combined with thousands of children out of school and running around during summer vacation is setting up a perfect storm situation in which the spread of conjunctivitis can become a serious health issue. The consistent use of antiviral and antibacterial sanitizers and wipes is recommended, but the best thing to do to prevent the spread of this eye disease is to wash your hands often with soap and water, then keep your hands away from your eyes.

Summer Vacation 2015: July 18 through August 24

Students throughout the State of Yucatan will be taking national evaluation tests during the week of July 13 – 16, with Friday, July 17 designated as Prom Night. Summer vacation begins on Saturday, July 18. Although no 2015 – 2016 calendar has yet been published, newspapers are reporting that the new school year will begin on Monday, August 24. That means that, for five weeks in a row, children will be playing in all of the parks and there will even be informal soccer games, at all times of the day and night, in many of the streets throughout the state. Please drive carefully and practice patience.

Sports: National Day of the Marina (Navy Day) Sunday, May 31, 2015

Calls for teams are going out now from Progreso. There will be tournaments in beach volleyball and soccer, as well as basketball and softball. These tournaments will include both women’s and boys’ divisions. If you know of a local team that might like to play, have them contact the Director of Sports in the Municipality of Progreso. Entries are open until May 20, at the Victor Cervera Pacheco Sports Complex.

Closed For Summer: Muelle Market – Bazar del Muelle

The Muelle Market is affiliated with the Chicxulub Food Bank. The market helps raise money to support the many programs of the food bank. This year, between December and March, the Muelle Market donated $6,826 pesos to the Chicxulub Food Bank, $6,000 of which paid for the busses for three field trips to the Science Park for food bank kids. The remainder went to children’s programs and food pantries. The Muelle Market will reopen in December. Look for great vendors to make the Muelle Market 2016 better than ever.

Merida: A Neighborhood of Senior Citizens

As we look into the future of every nation, time and attrition are working hard to sort and sift populations everywhere into groups with similar characteristics. Such is the case in one, if not more, of the neighborhoods of Merida. Over time, San Damian has become a neighborhood of senior citizens. Some are in need because of loss of family relationships. Some are in need of medical services. The fact remains, however, that the citizens of Colonia San Damian are part of the future of the world. They are quietly aging in place and only time will tell how well. To Merida’s credit, local politicians and DIF are doing their best to meet the needs of this population, but this is a worldwide trend that it would do all of us well to watch.

Two Crimes with Guns This Week

All of Yucatan is proud of this state’s position as the state with the lowest crime rate in all of Mexico. However, that does not mean that any of us should assume that there is never any crime at all in Yucatan. This past week, a group of armed individuals boarded a bus on its way from Cancun to Merida. Just prior to crossing into Yucatan, they stopped the bus and robbed the passengers. Only one shot was fired, into the roof of the bus. No one was injured, but the fact remains, a bus was robbed at gunpoint. One of the criminals was captured immediately, but the others are still on the run. Then, an auto service shop at Bodega Aurrera in Motul was robbed by five men with guns. No shots were fired, but three employees were injured. When they could not get the safe open, the criminals fled with only the money in the cash registers. These criminals have not yet been captured.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting April 27, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performances:
April 24 & 26, combined performance on April 26
May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17
In all cases, the venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – April 24 to May 4
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddhist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion. People of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Daily during Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Oaxaca in Merida: Until May 4
For the next two weeks or so, come visit Oaxaca at Parque de la Paz. Great food, shopping and dance demonstrations!
Location: Parque de la Paz, Avenida Itzaes at Calle 59
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) April 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today at Ejercito Nacional. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Tuesday (Martes) April 28, 2015

Yucatan Living Photography Workshop (3 nights)
Instructor: Maestra Sagrario Bargas Caporali
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20
Time: 6:00 to 9:00 PM Tuesday
More Information: (999) 112-1954 (space limited)

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Inspiración
This trio is fast becoming one of Merida’s favorites. We don’t see nearly enough of them.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant
(Germany 1972) Petra von Kant is a successful fashion designer — arrogant, caustic, and self-satisfied. She mistreats Marlene (her secretary, maid, and co-designer). Enter Karin, a 23-year-old beauty who wants to be a model. Petra falls in love with Karin and invites her to move in. The rest of the film deals with the emotions of this affair and its aftermath. Fassbinder tells his story in a series of 5 or 6 long scenes with extended uses of a single camera shot and deep focus. In German with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 29, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: La Vida Loca
(Mexico 2008) This documentary offers a glimpse into the life of gang members in Central America. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today at Francisco I Madero. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Wednesday
Time: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 30, 2015

Yucatan Living Children’s Day
Today the whole country celebrates the children of Mexico.

Yucatan Living Opening of Dog Park
Location: Paseo Verde, in Juan Pablo II
Time: 5:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Kid
((United States 1921). Director: Charles Chaplin. Starring: Charles Chaplin, Edna Purviance and Jackie Coogan. The Tramp cares for an abandoned child, but events put that relationship in jeopardy. In English (it’s a silent movie, but whatever…) with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 5:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Stone Boy
(Mexico 2015) Arina and her cousins, Tito, Tato and Tete, live in a colorful tropical valley called Tamaulipeca Huasteca. One day, the fair comes to town. Marina and her cousins made a fantastic trip to the Far Senses country where its inhabitants, Ears, Hands, Eyes, Mouths and Noses, help a child of stone regain human form. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Concert: Chamber Orchestra of Merida
This performance is in honor of Children’s Day and is named “From Aluxes and Other Dreams of the Mayab.” Special Guests include the members of the Choral Workshop of the Wallis Cultural Center and the Coro Domingo Ma. Ricalde de Hoctún Centro Cultural Independiente. These are both brilliant choirs and the Chamber Orchestra of Merida is a treasure in and of itself.
Location: Parque de Santa Lucia, Calle 60 x 55
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingThe World in a Maya Village – April 30 to May 5
Much-accomplished Maestro José Luis Chan Sabido will direct this festival of dance and culture that will use traditional Maya dance and music to introduce attendees to the culture, traditions, language, cuisine and customs of the Maya.
Location: Telchac Puerto
Time: No times announced yet, details to follow.

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today at Chenkú. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living TUI NA Massage Therapy
Tui Na is a therapeutic form of massage and has been used in China for more than 2,000 years. It is an external form of massage and is used for giving special treatments to people of all ages. This Chinese therapy use different techniques along the energy´s channels of the body to establish harmonious flow of Qi throughout the body and bringing it back to balance. Tui Na massage therapy is now becoming a more common therapy method due to its focus on specific problems rather than providing a general treatment. The lecture will be given by Katia Sandoval, who has lived in Valladolid for 7 years. She has a Masters Degree in Tropical Natural Resources Management and has studied Acupuncture in Nei Jing Acupuncture School in Cancun and Puebla. She also has a background in Tui Na Massage Therapy at Nei Jing School in Cancun, México City and Puebla.
Location: The Palapa XOCO LOCO in Casa Hamaca
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Donation of $50 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Mommy
(Canada 2014) A widowed single mother, raising her violent son alone, finds new hope when a mysterious neighbor inserts herself into their household. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Way Way Back
(USA 2013) Shy 14-year-old Duncan goes on summer vacation with his mother, her overbearing boyfriend, and her boyfriend’s daughter. Having a rough time fitting in, Duncan finds an unexpected friend in Owen, manager of the Water Wizz water park. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 01, 2015

Yucatan Living Official Holiday: Labor Day
While Americans celebrate Labor Day in a different way, around the world, May 1 is a day to celebrate everyone who works. Enjoy the day off!

Yucatan Living Grand Prize of Classical Dance
This event is under the direction of Rosa Elena Camacho de Farah.
May 1 – 4: Master Classes
May 5: Gala function
Location: Centro de Estudios de Ballet (CEBAC)
More Information: Cell: 999-121-4782

Yucatan Living Movie: Good Night Nobody
( Switzerland 2010) The mysterious world of the sleepless. Four insomniacs from around the world invite us to spend a night with them. While the rest of the world sleeps, they’re awake. In Japanese with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today in Merida at San Sebastian. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living First Friday International Cocktail Party
Special 2×1 drink prices, free botanas, reduced parking. Get connected. Join old friends and make new ones at Merida´s biggest monthly gathering of ex-pats and Meridanos.
Location:La Hach Bar, Fiesta Americana Hotel, Avenida Colon and Paseo de Montejo
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Orson Welles Interview in Paris
(United States 1960). Director: Allan King. Starring: Bernard Braden and Orson Welles. This interview captures Orson Welles reflecting on Citizen Cane and expounding on directing, acting, and his wish to leave a valuable legacy of work. Not something you can easily dial up on Netflix. In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Too Much Johnson
(United States 1938). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Joseph Cotton and Virginia Nicholson. This is a Keystone Kops style short. A woman has two lovers and the chase is on when one finds out about the other.
Location: Videosala del Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 02, 2015

Yucatan Living Opera Yucatan: La Rondine
This is a romantic opera in three acts with an Italian libretto by Giuseppe Adami, based on a libretto by Maria Willner and Heinz Reichert. It was first performed in Montecarlo in 1917.
Location: Sala Mayamax in the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Opera Talk: 11:30 AM, Video performance begins: 12:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Yucatan Living Movie: A Band Called Death
(USA 2012) A documentary on the 1970s punk trio Death, and their new-found popularity decades after they disbanded. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Mini Marathon, Happy Children’s Day
My Neighbor Totoro and The Princess Bride. In Spanish.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 5:00 and 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today in Merida at Chembech. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(Mauritania 2013) The Malian city of Timbuktu has fallen into the hands of religious extremists. Kidane lives quietly in the dunes Satima with his wife, his daughter Toya and Issam, a shepherd boy of 12 years. But city dwellers suffer the regime of terror imposed by the jihadists: banned music, laughing, smoking and even football. Women have become shadows trying to resist with dignity. Each day, some Islamists launch makeshift court judgments as absurd as tragic. In Arabian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Tribute to Bon Jovi
This is a performance by Gabriel Marian, former vocalist for Rata Blanca.
Location: McCarthy’s Irish Pub Merida Montejo
Time: 10:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Call 316-2222 for complete information and reservations.

Sunday (Domingo), May 03, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Laura Moguel, Soprano
This performance is under the direction of Felipe de J. Cervera.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission:$50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today in Merida at Inalambrico. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) May 04, 2015

Nothing planned as yet.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performance May 17
Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
The regularly scheduled performances for May 15 and 17 will now take place in a combined performance May 17.
Location: The venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero.
Admission: People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Art Fest at Bistro Cultural in Merida Mexico

Bistro Cultural Art Fest – May 23
The next Bistro Cultural Art Fest returns better than ever. There will be live music performances throughout the evening, a special menu from Chef Yohann, and your favorite artists and craftspeople return along with a select few new and interesting ones. Don’t miss it!
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 43 X 66, Santa Ana, Merida Centro
Time: 4:00 to 10:00 PM
Admission: Free, but bring money!

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Byron Augustin and wife in Valladolid YucatanYL: When did you move to the Yucatan and from where did you move?
Byron: My wife Rebecca and I bought our house in Valladolid in 2008. However, the house needed substantial renovations. Rebecca retired from her elementary teaching position, came to Valladolid, rented a small apartment, and essentially became a construction supervisor. She knew very little Spanish, but soon picked up construction Spanish and learned to swear in Mayan. By 2010, the house was progressing nicely and was suitable to live in. I resigned my position as a Professor in the Department of Geography at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, and arrived on the scene in October of 2010.

YL: Why did you move?
Byron: We moved to Valladolid because it was my “dream retirement” location. I brought a group of students to Valladolid on a Study Abroad Program in 1978 and fell in love with the city. Over the years I returned with more study abroad students approximately every two years. Our groups usually had 30 to 35 students and it was exciting for me to show them the place I talked about frequently in my classes. Many of those students now return to Valladolid to show their children where they cultivated their interest in Mexico.

YL: Why did you choose the city you now live in over other places in the world?
Byron: During my teaching career, I visited 55 countries on five different continents, so I was certainly aware of other choices. When my students asked me which country of the 55 that I had visited was my favorite, I never hesitated. I always said, Mexico! Most of my university students from Texas said that they knew Mexico from their visits to border towns like Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Ciudad Acuña, and Ciudad Juarez, and did not understand why Mexico ranked number one on my list. I always told them that they did not know Mexico, if their experiences had been limited to the border towns. I moved to Mexico and specifically Valladolid because of the Maya culture that still prevails, the rich Spanish colonial history, the food, the music, and above all, the people.

YL: Did you buy a house right away or rent first? Do you think you made the right decision?
Byron: My wife made the decision on which house to buy. Our very dear friend, Mario Escalante at the Hotel El Meson del Marques, called us and told us that there was a house on the market in a nice neighborhood. Rebecca flew down, checked it out and bought it. I never saw the house until a few months later. She is far more creative than I am and I trusted her judgment regarding the potential this house possessed. We both think that individuals contemplating taking up residence in Valladolid would be well advised if they rented initially, to make sure they were comfortable with the culture. Rental rates are fair, and it would provide them with adequate time to search for their own dream home.

YL: Are you doing now what you intended to do when you moved here? If not, why not?
Byron:I believe we are doing much of what we intended to do regarding our decision to move to Mexico. We make frequent trips to Isla Mujeres to fish with our long-term captain. He is very knowledgeable regarding where the fish are located and we have never been “skunked” on one of his trips. Both Rebecca and I are very competitive and always challenge each other for the first Byron Augustin in Valladolid Yucatanfish, the most fish, and the biggest fish. I hate to admit it, but she usually wins. We also like to go to the Maya Riviera to relax, and we take two or three-day road trips to Maya sites we have not visited.

YL: What are the most interesting things about living here for you?
Byron: For me the most interesting aspect of living here is to observe the confluence of two entirely different cultures, Maya and Spanish. As a university professor for 42 years, I engaged in a fair amount of research and writing. Valladolid and the surrounding area is a treasure trove of potential research activities. I do not believe that I planned on continuing to conduct research, but the opportunities were so numerous, I could not help myself. It was a real treat to connect with Ellen Fields at Yucatan Living and submit articles and photos for her to work on with her editing magic.

YL: What do you absolutely love about living here?
Byron: The climate is a big factor. I hate cold weather with a passion and from late October to the end of March, this location is a climatic paradise to me. Mild daytime temperatures cool evenings for great sleeping, and lots of sunshine. Summers are pretty hot and humid, but I have always adjusted better to heat and humidity than to frigid temperatures with ice and snow.

YL: What do you miss from your “former life”?
Byron: I think what I miss most about my former life is punctuality. My German heritage has instilled in me a strong responsibility to honor the time of an appointment. In the German community where I grew up, they joked, “that if a German knew what the precise time of his death was, he would arrive ten minutes early, rather than be late. I am aware that this is a cultural characteristic, but I doubt that I will ever really adjust to the lack of punctuality.

YL: What don’t you miss from your “former life”?
Byron: Of all the things that I do not miss about my former life, the item at the top of the list is high property taxes. Our property taxes in Texas were atrocious, but our property taxes in Valladolid are more than fair.

YL: What is your favorite local food?
Byron: Asking what my favorite food is, is like asking an alcoholic what his favorite booze is. The variety of good food here is exceptional, as my girth will document. The fresh fruit and vegetables available at our large central market are superb and a selection of choices is available throughout the year. Right now I am foundering on mangoes. As far as specific dishes, I love Yucatecan pork, especially cochinita pibil and poc chuc.

YL: What is your favorite time of year here and why?
Byron: My favorite time of the year in Valladolid is late fall and winter. During this time of the year, the vertical rays of the sun are less intense and temperatures drop. More importantly, it is the dry season and the relative humidity declines substantially. Also, there are lots of festivals and cultural opportunities to take advantage of in this season.

YL: Where do you take guests who visit you here to show them something really special?
Byron: We kind of have a routine we follow, especially with first time visitors. Ek Balam and Chichen Itza are our choices for local Maya ruins. Our preference is Ek Balam because it is more intimate, has fewer tourists crowding onto the site, and allows visitors to climb to the top of the Acropolis pyramid (96 feet tall) for a spectacular view of the site and the countryside. A really fun adventure is a visit to the Mayapan Distillery for a tour and tasting of Valladolid’s very own agave azul product. It has a unique tequila flavor, but cannot be called tequila because of Mexican law, so it was named Mayapan. The San Roque Museum is well worth a visit and contains a nice mixture of Maya and colonial period items on display. It is located next to the Heroes Park, where three heroes of the 1910 Mexican Revolution are interred. They were blindfolded and shot by a firing squad of federal soldiers a few feet from where their permanent resting places are located.

YL: The last time you went out to dinner, where did you go and why?
Byron: We have some excellent restaurants in Valladolid. I do not remember exactly which one we dined in last, but we have some favorites that we regularly patronize. It is hard to top the regional Yucatecan menu items at the restaurant in the lovely central garden of the Hotel El Meson del Marques. Breakfast is a delightful experience at Xoco Loco in the palapa at Casa Hamaca. The best pizza in our opinion can be found at Casa Italia, and the lasagna is to die for at Restaurante San Juan. For pure elegance and exquisite cuisine it is hard to top the coconut shrimp served on a slice of grilled pineapple with either a mango or tamarind sauce at Taberna de Los Frailes.

YL: How is the city where you live different for residents than it is for tourists?
Byron: I believe it is different for residents because we have become familiar with the pulse and flow of activity in the city. We know where interesting shops and restaurants are located and we have found excellent health care doctors and expert dental services. Most of us, especially those who are residentes permanantes, are proud to claim that we are Vallisoletanos.

YL: Do you have friends from the local community or do you pretty much hang with the expat crowd?
Byron: We have made many friends and acquaintances in the local community including the city’s last three mayors. The friendship extends across the Maya/Spanish heritage communities. We have been testigoes for Maya and Spanish ancestry weddings, attended several quinceañeras, baptisms, and a Maya Hetz mek ceremony. We hang out with the expat crowd at meetings, dinners, and lectures at the Valladolid English Library (VEL) on the grounds of Casa Hamaca, whose gregarious owner, Denis Larsen always makes everyone feel welcome.

YL: If you are working or own a business, what is it like owning and running a business here or working here? How is it different from doing the same thing in your country of origin?
Byron: I spend a significant amount of time doing research, photography, and writing. In the states I received payments for book contracts, royalties, articles and photos. Fortunately, we do not have to make a living here because of retirement investments my wife and I made when we had full-time jobs in the states.

YL: Are your work habits different here?
Byron: My work habits are different here. I am more laid back and things that need to be done get placed on the back burner more frequently. This is especially true when my wife goes to the States without me. Not too much gets done until she is two or three days from the date of her return. Then, I have to regain my old work ethic and hustle to make it look like I was Mr. Homemaker for three or four weeks. When friends ask me what I do with my time during retirement, I tell them, “I really do not know what I do, but it takes me all day to do it.”

YL: Did you speak Spanish when you moved here? Where did you learn Spanish (if you did)? Is the language barrier a problem for you in your daily life?
Byron: I did not speak Spanish very well when I moved here. I did study some Spanish for a few weeks in San Miguel de Allende. I hate conjugating verbs, especially the irregular verbs. However, I think I can communicate in an acceptable fashion if pressed. With Spanish, I have found that a few drinks improve my Spanish more than studying the language.

YL: What interesting Spanish word or saying have you learned lately? What does it mean and how did you learn it?
Byron: I think one of the more recent concepts I have learned in Spanish is, “lo siento,” or I am sorry. I still do not know how to say that in English.

YL: Are you a Mexican citizen? Do you plan to become one?
Byron: Several of the expats we know in the community are gaining Mexican citizenship or planning to do so. We have so many rights and privileges as residentes permanantes, that I do not feel citizenship is necessary. Besides, at my age, I do not wish to study and take any more exams.

YL: Have you traveled much within Mexico? If so, where and what has been your favorite location to visit? What did you see there that you liked so much?
Byron: Latin American geography was my regional specialty when I was a university professor, so I travelled extensively in Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Basin. However, Mexico always held the greatest interest for me. So far, I have visited 27 of Mexico’s 31 states and the Federal District. There are so many places that hold special memories but one of the most dramatic occurred near Saltillo. On a whim, we turned off the main highway, drove a few miles and then entered a tunnel one and one-half miles long. When we emerged from the tunnel, an absolutely spectacular panorama unfolded before us. It was the old silver mining town of Real de Catorce. We spent a day and a half soaking up the ambiance of this truly unique place, including a church, which was a popular pilgrimage site for Catholics.

YL: How are you treated by Mexicans? Do you feel resented or welcome?
Byron: We have been especially well treated by Mexicans. They show us respect, integrate us into their family’s social activities and always make us feel welcome. A perfect example occurred this past Friday. During the 1980s, I always took my study abroad students to Hacienda Holoctun, just outside of Merida, to visit an operating henequen mill. The mill supervisor and his brother ran the operation and lived in the old Casa Principal. Eduardo, the main supervisor always had his wife make fresh tortillas for the students over an open fire. The students were fascinated while watching the masa turn into a hand-made tortilla. The mill closed more than 25 years ago and the machinery collapsed along with the building, which housed it. I was curious as to what had happened, so my two Canadian friends and I pulled into Holoctun. After checking out the total destruction of the mill we went to the Casa Principal and knocked on the door. Eduardo’s wife came to the door with a smile a mile wide. The sight of her after all of those years melted my heart and long hugs with her and her adult daughter brought back so many warm memories. We talked for thirty minutes and she made me promise to bring Rebecca to see her on our next trip to Merida. The Mexican people have always made us feel welcome.

YL: How do you feel about the economic prospects of Mexico? Of the Yucatan?
Byron: I worry about the economic prospects of both Mexico and the United States. Government officials in both countries have placed their economies at risk because of large debt accumulation. The United States is even worse than Mexico, and if the United States falls into economic decline it will drag Mexico down with it, in my opinion. I do feel more optimistic about the economic future of the Yucatan. As long as airfares from flights originating in the United States or Western Europe remain affordable, the economic development of tourism should continue to grow.

YL: What are some changes you are hoping for in the city in which you live? Do you see any progress towards these changes?
Byron: Name a city where street repair is not a problem and I would guess you live in Shangri-La. We have that problem, but the city government is close to completing a major street project on Calle 40, which enters the center of the city from the south. I would love to see the city pass noise restrictions on motorcycles and scooters. Many of these numerous machines assault the sense of hearing beyond belief and it is a major nuisance.

YL: What are your plans for the future here?
Byron: In the future, I will most likely continue to be actively engaged in research, writing and photography. In June, I will assist a young professor of Global Studies and Cultural geography from Middle Tennessee State University with a group of study abroad students, including providing some class lectures on Cuba and the differences between Maya and Inca cultures. My wife and I hope to continue to explore the Yucatan Peninsula, do some fishing and enjoy the aspects of Valladolid that make it so special.

YL: What is the one most important piece of advice you would give someone buying property and/or planning a move to the Yucatan?
Byron: I would advise potential candidates that might move to the Yucatan to come and live here in rental property for six months to a year, in order to make sure it is the “right place” for them. If they decide to buy, hire a construction engineer to examine the property before the purchase is completed.

YL: If you could say something to all the people of Mexico, what would you say?
Byron: If I could say something to all of the people of Mexico, it would be, “Thank you for making me feel like a special guest in your beautiful country.”

****
Byron Augustin is a regular contributor to Yucatan Living. You can read many of his articles in our Valladolid Living section.

By Working Gringos

Don Hermenegildo had had to work at slipping away from Luis Robles every time he ran into him, in order to avoid the ubiquitous question about what had come of his request. The bachelor had yet to encounter the señora under favorable conditions, at times because she had visitors, at times for some other reason.

And he was not sure of the motive behind the young man’s strange wish.

“It’s impossible,” he thought, “that Luis can’t understand that everything will come about without doña Prudencia agreeing to his visiting the house to woo her daughter. Why then his impertinent insistence that I provide the recommendation as soon as possible?”

It was undoubtedly just one of that scatterbrain Luis’s crazy urges. On the chance that he could escape a negative situation that was neither improving nor worsening for him, he wanted to test the remote possibility that the señora would accede to his wishes. That’s just the way he was; nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Luis had attended many banquets and other parties without anyone having invited him, and he had thoroughly enjoyed himself.

“You’re very happy-go-lucky,” someone once said to him.
“What? Am I going to let the scruples of a nun keep me from doing what I want? I’m sure that if some people don’t invite me, it’s because they don’t see me in time. I never go into a place if I know I won’t be well-received. And don’t think they’re not still thanking me for that. I’ve arrived at parties that had the atmosphere of a wake, and it took me a while to turn everything around. In those cases I’m more useful than the musicians. One of these days I’m going to publish my rates and start charging people like them a fee.”

Don Hermenegildo resolved to take the bull by the horns. Issuing a thousand provisos and assurances that he knew Lupita’s many merits, and that he spoke only to satisfy an obligation, he presented Luis’s proposition to doña Prudencia. She, without hiding behind rhetorical flowers or walking amid their greenery, said…

“But what can that fool be thinking? Can he suppose that I’ve gone crazy, or that I don’t know what he’s up to? You tell me.”
“No, señora, no. I’ll tell him whatever you want me to, don’t get excited. I’m doing no more than fulfilling a commission. I am neither here nor there. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”
“Fine. You can tell him that my daughter is still very young for those things. And even if she were older, not in his dreams.”

The poor fellow grabbed hold of the first part of this response which he would amplify in the most golden of terms, neatly keeping the remainder to himself. And that is just what he did with the result that Luis, as if the response were completely natural, didn’t get upset, quieting don Hermenegildo’s fears that it would precipitate a huge outburst.

Meanwhile, in his own interest, the latter had not failed to move forward, dropping in with more frequency for visits to the widow’s house even to the point, overcome by trembling, of daring to predict to her that some day when least expected, a suitor would present himself and she would get married.

Doña Prudencia took delight in the crazy idea, and laughing detracted from her appearance, aged her, as she said how stupid was the man who would pay attention to her when there were so many women in the world.

“Well, don’t you believe it; don’t believe it. The day you least expect it . . . believe me, I know what I’m talking about.

And they went on speaking of other matters.

Smiling to herself, Doña Raimunda had observed that at her gatherings, don Hermenegildo was noticeably more solicitous and courteous with doña Prudencia, and taking satisfaction in that as an accomplishment of her own, she discretely made a point of continuing her attempt to fan sympathetic flames in the idle heart of the widow and in the almost cataleptic one of the bachelor.

Meanwhile, Lupita went on being touched by the dew of new days that were developing her beautiful body and boldly accentuating her figure. Increasingly more splendrous and acclaimed, her beauty was attracting admirers and feminine envy, and even the charmed Pancho Vélez was making his rounds in the street either in a two-wheeled Tilbury or simply astride a beautiful, prancing dark bay. He then persistently watched Lupita from afar and would greet her with an elegant tipping of his hat when coming face to face with her.

Exhausting the rich vocabulary he reserved for these matters, Luis Robles was seeing red, fearing the consequences of a rivalry with someone so much in favor with the fair sex. As for Fermín Dorantes, he suffered the most discouragement, seeing that his girlfriend’s character was unaffected by his fierce loyalty and considering her behavior with Luis Robles to be a good example of that fact.

The poor Fermín loved her deeply and if at times he considered forgetting about her in face of his shortcomings, he continued showing up on the street in hopes that his thinking would little by little work its way into her frivolous nature.

So much sensible advice, so many affectionate scoldings! Lupita seemed to prefer him and she continued to come out to the shutters to talk with him. But she tolerated Luis Robles more than he would have liked. When the latter approached to talk with her, she no longer always went inside, and despite Fermín’s efforts, at the informal dances she danced various numbers with Luis.

“If you like Luis Robles better, just tell me once and I won’t come back,” he sadly told her one night.
“But, hombre, because I dance one or another of the numbers with him?”
“Yes! And because you laugh at the dumb jokes he tells you and that’s what he wants. And because I’ve asked you not to do it, just like that.”
“Do you think Luis Robles is going to eat me? I don’t know what crazy ideas you have. What does it matter to you that he talks to me and dances with me if I only love you?”
“If you loved me, you would do what I have begged of you so many times.”
“It’s that I think you’re mistaken.”
“Fine, now you know… either Luis Robles or me.”
“You, hombre, you. Don’t be foolish.”

After a few days, the reasons for complaint presented themselves anew and the previous dialogue was repeated with slight variations.

“You are incorrigible. You seem more childish every day,” said Dorantes.

And so things continued until a third party appeared to resolve the lovers’ conflict.

Little by little Pancho Vélez’s visits to the street were becoming more frequent, and Lupita always responded to his greetings with obvious appreciation, showing as much interest as she did for either one of her old boyfriends. One day, as night approached, after Vélez passed by a few times on horseback, he approached the window where the young woman was seated, and making the animal place its front hooves on the sidewalk, he struck up a half-hour conversation with her in full view of Robles, who was already on the corner, and of Dorantes who arrived later. Doña Prudencia, who made a brief showing, greeted Pancho Vélez attentively, a pleasant third in the conversation.

This scene, often repeated, resulted in the other two men going elsewhere, not wanting to continue in their slighted roles: Fermín Dorantes, truly dejected to have lost his hope for a love that had dominated his being, and Luis Robles, swearing that he was now convinced that Lupita was most pleased by men who always rode horseback.

“I’m going to ask for an old nag they use to haul water on my father’s property to see if I can dethrone Pancho Vélez.”

****
Want to catch up? Go here and start with Chapter One…

By Working Gringos
Dental Implants Merida Yucatan

Implantology in Merida

A dental implant is a surgical process that connects a person’s jawbone to a dental prosthesis, such as a crown, denture or bridge, anchoring it in such a way that it is as secure (or maybe more so…) than the original tooth. According to a Wikipedia article, the science of implantology is based on “a biologic process called osseointegration where materials, such as titanium, form an intimate bond to bone”. Though there are some minor risks associated with a dental implant, “…in the presence of healthy tissues, a well integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have long term success rates of 93 to 98 percent for the fixture and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth.” (Wikipedia)

Throughout Merida, more and more dentists are learning the techniques of implantology, as the demand for implants grows. Dr. Ricardo Peniche, a practicing implantologist in Merida, is one of Latin America’s experts in the newest technique of implantology, called All on Four, and he is one of a very select group that is teaching the other dentists in Merida and across Mexico.

Dr. Ricardo Peniche

Dr. Ricardo Peniche, an English-speaking dentist here in Merida, received his degree in Dental Surgery from the well-respected dental school at UADY here in Merida. He then went on to get his Masters dr-ricardo-peniche-implants Merida Yucatandegree in Oral Rehabilitation from the Universidad Finis Terrae in Santiago, Chile, with a specialty in Oral Implants. He has also earned a Testimony of Outstanding Performance from the Centro Nacional de Evaluación (CENEVAL) in Mexico, as well as a Professional Certification from the Asociación Dental Mexicana, to which he has belonged since 2008.

He is the Coordinator of the Diploma that is given in Oral Implantology at Anahuac-Mayab University, and he is also a Professor in the Department of Implantology Dental Surgery and in the Department of Implantology Oral Rehabilitation Specialty at the same university. Dr. Peniche was a lecturer at the International Dental Federation Mexico Conference in 2011, and has been a lecturer in conferences of various associations such as the Dental Association Yucatan, Campeche Dental Association, the College of Dental Surgeons of Quintana Roo, the Mexican Federation of Oral Implantology, and the Mexican Association of Periodontology. Dr. Peniche is also a teacher of various courses organized by Nobel Biocare and Biomet 3i in Yucatán, Campeche, Quintana Roo, Mexico, Mexicali, Guanajuato, Chiapas, Nuevo Leon, Sonora, Aguascalientes, Morelia, Colombia and Chile and he has been invited to speak at various conferences on implantology inside and outside of Mexico.

Dr. Peniche has also written papers on the Surgical-Prosthetic Considerations for Immediate Occlusal Loading Procedure, the Ultrastructural Evaluation of Composite-composite Interface on Incremental Technique, and Implants in Patients with Systemic Diseases.

If you are looking for the expert in implants in Yucatan, you are looking for Dr. Ricardo Peniche.

All-On-4 Implants

There is now a most exciting technology that is being advertised and offered around the world by cutting edge dentists… it is called All On Four. All-On-4 is a surgical and prosthetic medical procedure that was created and systemitized in the 1990′s, and which now is available in most places around the world.

This technology is designed for people who previously would need a complete or near-complete replacement of their dental arch. In the past, these people would be fitted for dentures… removable teeth ALLonfour technology from Dr. Peniche in Merida Yucatan Mexicothat must be specially cared for. Now, with All-On-4, these people can be given a fixed prosthesis with 12 to 14 teeth (the entire lower or upper arch), which is placed immediately on the day of surgery. For patients with significant tooth decay or bone loss in the jaw which prevents normal implants, this technology is a wonderful solution.

The procedure of All-On-4 is patented by the company Nobel Biocare, whose products are used in the process. For the entire jaw, only four implants into the bone are used, securing the entire set of teeth. The entire surgery is first done virtually, on a computer using special 3D software. After taking a complete digital Xray of the patient’s jaw, Dr. Peniche works in the software to design the best application of the implants and determines their exact placement. Any mistakes or experiments are made on the computer until the perfect solution is achieved. Then the design is codified and the implants are designed. When the time comes to place the implants in the mouth of the patient, the process is easier and faster, resulting in less pain and fewer problems.

In Merida, and in Yucatan, the expert in All-On-4 implants is Dr. Ricardo Peniche.

Other Implants

Of course, Dr. Peniche also provides other dental implant technology to his patients. Overdentures are dental implants that are supported by teeth but can be removed for cleaning in a similar way to your Dental implant bridge from Dr. Ricardo Peniche in Merida Yucatancurrent denture. Unlike a conventional denture, overdentures are supported by implants, so there is no need for adhesives and the discomfort associated with movement of the prosthesis when it is removed.

Like the natural root of the tooth, a single dental implant provides the ideal foundation for a new all-ceramic dental crown. A ceramic crown on a dental implant looks and functions like the missing tooth, and is often the solution needed when only one tooth is damaged.

The loss of several teeth may reduce bone, change the structure of your mouth and age your appearance. A simple solution to stop this process is a dental implant bridge. When several teeth are missing or must be removed, often Dr. Peniche can place only two implants, topped by a bridge, which is sufficient to replace three or four teeth.

 

 

Hours and Contact Information

Dr. Peniche’s offices are located in the CMA Hospital, just one block east of Paseo de Montejo and one block south of WalMart on Paseo de Montejo. This location is walking distance to the Hotel Zone in Merida, and very close to the historic center of Merida.

Hours: Monday through Friday, from 9 AM to 1 PM and 4 PM to 8 PM. Saturdays, 9 AM to 1 PM.
Address: Centro Médico de las Américas, Calle 54 # 365, interior 314.
Office Phone: (999) 926-4434. Dr. Peniche speaks perfect English.
Email: info [at] dentalimplantyucatan [dot] com
Website: www.dentalimplantyucatan.com

 

 

 

 

This is a paid advertisement.

By Khaki Scott


Mexico in Top 10 Most Visited Countries

Mexico has returned to the list of Top Ten Countries Most Visited by Foreigners. It actually climbed from 15th place to 10th place in one year! Mexico is the most visited nation by foreign tourists in Latin America, and the second most visited nation by foreign tourists from North America. The Top 10 Countries Most Visited by Foreigners in 2014 were: France, the USA, Spain, China, Italy, Turkey, Germany, the UK, Russia and Mexico, in that order. Viva Mexico!

Merida’s Airport Busier than Ever!

At 980 passengers an hour over the past three weeks, it looks as if the Merida International Airport has hit the big-time and will soon need to be expanded. A good deal of this traffic might be generated by the new Merida-Milan connection because people can grab that flight out of Merida and, when they get to Milan, can then get a quick flight to any European destination. The percentage of traffic increase at Merida’s International Airport is three times the global average and, over the Easter weekend, more than 100,000 passengers passed through, with many stopping to enjoy the wonders of Yucatan. Airport management is keeping up, but we wouldn’t be surprised to see expansion in the near future. In the meantime, the Merida airport rarely seems crowded to us and is a pleasure to pass through, especially when you push that button and get a green light!

Merida: When the Wind Chill Goes Up!

Late April and all of May are the hottest months in the year in Yucatan. For several days in a row, Merida reported a temperature of 104 F with a wind chill of 113 F. What the heck does THAT mean?? Merida is a city of well over a million people, with houses built of concrete, connected by hard surfaced streets and roads. As in any city of its size, there are not enough trees, nor are there enough water features. Although the coast is only a few short miles from the city, breezes are blocked by buildings and the people inside must endure the heat or find a way around it. If anything underscores the need to escape to the beach (even for a few hours), this is it. As of this writing, it is only 93 F in Progreso, with no daytime temperature in the next week expected to rise above 97 F, and always with a breeze. Since many of Yucatan’s Snowbirds are landing in snow at home, we are left to wonder if they are just a little glad to see it?

Junior World Champion Weightlifter from Progreso

April 7 – 12 saw the 2015 competition for the Junior World Champion Weightlifter held in Lima, Peru. When it was over, Mexico came home with three gold medals and one bronze. All three gold medals were won by Josue Said Medina Andueza, in the Under Age 17 category. Josue won gold medals for both events in which he was entered. He lifted 150 kg. and 188 kg. Then, he won his third gold for his overall combined score. Needless to say, his parents and grandparents are bursting with pride, as is all of Progreso, Yucatan and Mexico.

Yucatan’s World Class Fencer Returns from European Tour

Abigail Valdez Andrade is a young lady on her way to the top of her sport. She just participated in her first World Cup. Thus far, she is ranked in 44th place as an individual fencer in the world, 15th in mixed teams, and 6th in teams. She has been on tour for the World Championship in Spain and Uzbekistan. In the coming weeks, Abigail will travel to Guanajuato to attend Mexico’s National Olympiad. Yucatan produces some of the best young athletes in the world and we are as proud of them as we know their families and coaches must be.

Progreso Hosted Semi-Final Fashion Show of Miss Earth 2015

The six semi-finalists in Yucatan’s Miss Earth 2015 competition were first presented in a ceremony at Rosas and Xocolate Hotel in Merida on March 19. Since then, they have had a number of public activities, including the planting of trees in Progreso and Cholul. Then, on Saturday, April 11, at 8:00 PM, the young semi-finalists participated in a fashion show in Progreso in which all of their clothes were made from recycled materials. The girls were absolutely beautiful in gowns and swimsuits made out of everything from grocery bags to bubble wrap. See those amazing outfits on Progreso Hoy. Special guest for the event was Yucatan designer Enrique Polanco. The theme of the entire evening was centered on caring for the environment. The Grand Finale to crown Yucatan’s Miss Earth 2015 will take place in Merida on April 25. The winner will represent Yucatan in the Mexican National Miss Earth 2015 contest on August 29 of this year. To keep up with these lovely young ladies and their events, simply look for Miss-Earth-Yucatan on Facebook.

64th FLAM Convention Held in Merida

This past week saw Merida hosting the 64th Assembly of the Latin American Federation of Justices (FLAM). One hundred ten justices from twenty nations attended the event, which was designed to help Latin American nations strengthen judicial independence. One of the deciding factors in choosing Merida to host this event was Yucatan’s dedication to and success in reforming its own judicial system, and its determination to strengthen respect for human rights. Since the manner in which justice is administered has a direct bearing on the economic and social growth of nations, Merida was the logical location in which to hold this meeting. This is yet another area where those who live in Yucatan can be proud of their culture and can really understand that the world is watching.

Immigrant Diet, Public Health, and Culture in Mexico

This past week, there was a case, in Tijuana, in which Mexican authorities, following an anonymous tip, found dog meat cooking in a Chinese restaurant. Since nothing like this has happened in Yucatan, now may be a good time for each of us to think about how we feel about the dietary habits of other cultures. According to the State Ministry of Health, dog meat would be ok to eat if it is properly raised, processed, and prepared. However, the random use of street dogs for this purpose could pose a significant public health problem and would never be approved. With the population of the world increasing and the migration rate also increasing every year, we need to take stock of what our attitudes will be when migrants to Yucatan come and want to continue the diets they had in their home countries. Do we forbid them? Help them? Change them? As deeply as Yucatan loves and respects its pets, we suspect (let’s be honest… we HOPE) that eating dog meat will not be on any menu here in the near future.

Mythical “Sacbe” Now on GPS

The Sacbe (White Road) that connects a number of Mayan settlements to Uxmal was built over 1,000 years ago and is still in good shape today. The connected communities include Nohpat, Che’etulix and Kabah. This is a road that is five to six meters wide, which once facilitated the movement of social, political and military groups, and which ensured Uxmal’s hold on her designation as the capital of the region. One of the more interesting facts concerning the materials used to build this road is the size and shape of the stones. The stones lining the edges of the road are all 30 to 60 centimeters in diameter and well aligned. The stones in the road itself are all 20 to 30 centimeters in diameter. There are a number of lookout points built from round stones that are three or four meters in diameter and between 1.5 and 2 meters tall. Now that restoration is complete and the coordinates of the road have been registered with GPS, we can look forward to any number of cultural events to take place on the mythical-no-more sacbe.


Mexican Postal Service: Business is Booming

With the introduction of the Internet and e-mail, it was expected that the Postal Service in Mexico would soon breathe its last. Such has certainly not been the case! Instead, Internet shopping has created a boom in package deliveries for the Mexican Postal Service. Two years ago, there were a dozen post office branches in Merida. Today, there are fifteen post office branches in the city alone, plus a brand new host of delivery trucks. It is wonderful to hear that many of the packages come from other parts of Mexico and from around the world. Many thanks to the Mexican Postal Service in Yucatan for their service, and our congratulations on a job well done.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting April 20, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performances:
April 24 & 26, combined performance on April 26
May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17
In all cases, the venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – April 24 to May 4
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddhist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion. People of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Daily during Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Oaxaca in Merida
For the next two weeks or so, come visit Oaxaca at Parque de la Paz. Great food, shopping and dance demonstrations!
Location: Parque de la Paz, Avenida Itzaes at Calle 59
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
We have not found out how long this art exhibit will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) April 20, 2015

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood? (Thank you, Debi!!)
Location: Colonia Zazil-Ha (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission:Free

Tuesday (Martes) April 21, 2015

Yucatan Living Chelem Christmas Toy Drive
April Bingo/Raffle Extravaganza. Just one of the Prizes is an original Paul Lawrence Oil Painting. The fun and funky Nacional Beach Club and Bungalows in Mahahual has donated a three night stay and Lolo Lorena Bed and Breakfast in Isla Mujeres has donated a one night stay. For a $100 peso donation, they will throw 5 tickets in the drawing for you. You do not have to be present to participate in the drawing. You can let them know where to meet you and they can get your tickets to you, or you can donate through PayPal on their donation page.
Location: LaBarca/Dunas Hotel and Restaurant, Chelem
Time: 6:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: There are several categories of bingo cards, so come on out and bring plenty of pesos.

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Parque San Antonio Xluch (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Tuesday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Yellow Submarine
(United Kingdom / United States 1968). Director: George Dunning. Starring: Paul Angelis, Geoffrey Hughes, John Clive, Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and John Lennon. This is the iconic movie of the 60’s, in which the Beatles must save the country from the Blue Meanies of Pepperland, evil beings who have banned music and enslaved the inhabitants of this strange place. (Go ahead – admit it – you know the words to that song, but when is the last time you saw the movie? It’s still great!)
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Café Canela
The Cinnamon Coffee Trio! This is a new trio to us, but you know they have to be good to make it to Tuesday of Trova. We can’t wait to hear them!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Birth
(USA 2004) A young boy attempts to convince a woman that he is her dead husband reborn. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 22, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Food Inc.
(2008) An unflattering look inside America’s corporate controlled food industry. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Fraccionamiento Mulsay (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Wednesday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Choir of the City of Merida: Game and Song
This is a wonderful choir of young people. The title implies that a great time will be had by all.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Mumia
(USA 2012) The film captures the life and revolutionary militancy political prisoner on death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal. The new documentary by Stephen Vittoria is an inspiring portrait of a man many consider the most famous US political prisoner, a man whose very existence challenges our beliefs about justice and freedom. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 23, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Oliver
(United States 1968). Directed by Carol Reed. Starring: Mark Lester, Ron Moody, Shani Wallis and Oliver Reed. Musical adaptation about an orphan who runs away from an orphanage and hooks up with a group of boys trained to be pickpockets by an elderly mentor. Excuse me, sir…
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 5:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Rupestre
(Mexico 2014) The director of this film, Alberto Zúñiga, accepts the invitation of cultural promoter Jorge Pantoja, founder of Tianguis Popular, to document the history, life and motivations of a group of rockers that transformed the history of urban music of Mexico. Over 40 respondents give their testimony about the origin, importance and validity of this unique cultural movement. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Parque Salvador Alvarado West (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Red Cross Benefit: Chip and His Dog
Vocel en Escena will present the children’s opera “Chip and His Dog.” All proceeds will go to support the Red Cross.
Location: Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33 #174 x 112 y 114.
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Adults: $100 pesos, Children: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $80 pesos
Tickets on Sale Now at the following locations: (1) Progreso’s Red Cross, Calle 35 x 72 y 74, (2) Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33, #174 x 112 y 114 in Progreso, and DigiPrint Progreso, Calle 29 # 152-A x 89 y 82.

Yucatan Living Music: For the Love of Baroque Music
This is a performance by the same group that brings us Chamber Sundays, under the direction of Rob Myers.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Concert: Live Essence
This performance of street music is under the direction of Felissa Estrada.
Location: Teatro Felipe Carrillo, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Hearthbeats
(Canada 2010) The story of three close friends who are involved in a love-triangle. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) April 24, 2015

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – Starts Today
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddhist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion. People of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Daily during Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Bird Photography Workshop
This workshop is limited to 12 participants. Participants must have their own photographic equipment, including zoom lenses.
Location: Offices of Pronatura Peninsula de Yucatan (Calle 32 #260 x 47 y 47-A, Col. Pinzon II, Merida.
Time: Friday, 24th: 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Saturday, 25th: 7:00 AM to 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Sunday, 26th: 7:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Fee: $1,500 pesos . Must register by April 21.
More information and Registration: (999) 988-4436 ext 113

Yucatan Living Movie: Luminito
(Cuba 2013) The legendary photographer Roberto Fernández “Luminito” presents a sample of his career in Cuban cinema. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: San Jose Tecoh (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Red Cross Benefit: Chip and His Dog
Vocel en Escena will present the children’s opera “Chip and His Dog.” All proceeds will go to support the Red Cross.
Location: Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33 #174 x 112 y 114.
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Adults: $100 pesos, Children: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $80 pesos
Tickets on Sale Now at the following locations: (1) Progreso’s Red Cross, Calle 35 x 72 y 74, (2) Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33, #174 x 112 y 114 in Progreso, and DigiPrint Progreso, Calle 29 # 152-A x 89 y 82.
INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Art Opening at SoHo
Mexican sisters Hortencia and Laura Bueno present their works, New Horizons.
Location: SoHo Gallery, Calle 60 x Calle 43, centro of Merida
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(Mauritania 2013) The Malian city of Timbuktu has fallen into the hands of religious extremists. Kidane lives quietly in the dunes Satima with his wife, his daughter Toya and Issam, a shepherd boy of 12 years. But city dwellers suffer the regime of terror imposed by the jihadists: banned music, laughing, smoking and even football. Women have become shadows trying to resist with dignity. Each day, some Islamists launch makeshift court judgments as absurd as tragic. In Arabian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Stranger than Fiction
(USA 2006) An IRS auditor suddenly finds himself the subject of narration only he can hear: narration that begins to affect his entire life, from his work, to his love-interest, to his death. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) April 25, 2015

Yucatan Living Weekly Meetup: Sabados de Gay Coffee – Every Saturday
This is a recurring, gay friendly event, hosted by Cindy Santos R, who is looking forward to creating a network of LGBT and others who are LGBT friendly. The objectives are to be in touch, get together, and make new friends. Visit their website at Merida LGBT Professionals Meetup.
Location: Gloria Jean’s Coffee, Av. Andres Garcia Lavin #303 x Calle 37 y Calle 37-A, Local 7, San Ramon Norte, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 5:30 PM every Saturday
Admission: Free but purchase your own coffee and food

Yucatan Living Movie: The Stone Boy
(Mexico 2015) Arina and her cousins, Tito, Tato and Tete, live in a colorful tropical valley called Tamaulipeca Huasteca. One day, the fair comes to town. Marina and her cousins made a fantastic trip to the Far Senses country where its inhabitants, Ears, Hands, Eyes, Mouths and Noses, help a child of stone regain human form. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Emiliano Zapata Sur I (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Emiliao Buenfil and La ChanCil Tropical
This you have got to see. The performance is under the direction of Sandra Gayou Soto. Those of you who have a little country (or Cajun) in your soul and miss a bit of toe tapping accordion music – here is Yucatan’s answer to everything you need. …and if you don’t believe that, just take a look at this preview. We dare you not to be dancing in your seats.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos.

Yucatan Living Movie: 24 Hour Marathon
16 different movies playing all night on Saturday and all day on Sunday.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), April 26, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary: Wild Packs
Opportunistic and adaptable, wild dogs show their prowess as hunters and the powerful ties that bind every member of the pack together for life.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Roble Agricola (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Sunday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Charles Chaplin Movie
No information is given as to what this movie will be, but all of the Charles Chaplin movies are classics now, and well worth attending.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 x 47
Time: 7:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Sundays: For the Love of Baroque
This performance is under the direction of Robert Myers.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

 

Monday (Lunes) April 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Ejército Nacional (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission:Free

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan LivingThe World in a Maya Village – April 30 to May 5
Much-accomplished Maestro. José Luis Chan Sabido will direct this festival of dance and culture that will use traditional Maya dance and music to introduce attendees to the culture, traditions, language, cuisine and customs of the Maya.
Location: Telchac Puerto
Time: No times announced yet, details to follow.

Yucatan Living TUI NA Massage Therapy – April 30
Tui Na is a therapeutic form of massage and has been used in China for more than 2,000 years. It is an external form of massage and is used for giving special treatments to people of all ages. This Chinese therapy use different techniques along the energy´s channels of the body to establish harmonious flow of Qi throughout the body and bringing it back to balance. Tui Na massage therapy is now becoming a more common therapy method due to its focus on specific problems rather than providing a general treatment. The lecture will be given by Katia Sandoval, who has lived in Valladolid for 7 years. She has a Masters Degree in Tropical Natural Resources Management and has studied Acupuncture in Nei Jing Acupuncture School in Cancun and Puebla. She also has a background in Tui Na Massage Therapy at Nei Jing School in Cancun, México City and Puebla.
Location: The Palapa XOCO LOCO in Casa Hamaca
Time: 7:30 PM

Yucatan Living Opera Yucatan, A.C. – May 02
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies beginning May 2.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Looking for: Full-time energetic inside Sales Representatives for immediate hire in Merida.

Requirements:

Native English speaker.
Sales experience.
Energetic / Positive attitude.
Self-motivated.
Outbound call center experience is a plus

This position pays a base salary and includes a high commission plan.

Contact:Josh Padilla at ja [at] dunhillworldwide [dot] com

By Working Gringos

Editor’s Note: This article was first published in December 2008, and updated again in August of 2011 and March of 2013. It has been two years since our last update, so its time to do it again. What follows is the original article with added comments and updated prices. For comparison, we have included the the 2008, 2011 and 2013 prices in parentheses wherever possible, so we can all watch the trends.

In editing the article and putting in the new prices, we found a lot of interesting changes. The prices of tomatoes, water and martinis have not changed, but the price of gas and electricity sure has. Some price changes are hard to quantify… the price of real estate is all over the map, and while prices are not rising as much as they were a few years ago, they haven’t exactly fallen either. We hope you enjoy the update and we look forward to your comments!

What Does It Cost to Live in Merida Mexico?

One of the most common questions we have been asked by readers of Yucatan Living is also one we often hesitate to answer: What’s the cost of living in Yucatan? Our standard (and rather evasive) answer has been: “Well… it depends”. We are particularly surprised by those who ask us, “Can a person live on $4,000 dollars a month down there? Or $2,000 dollars?” Because the answer to that, of course, is “Yes! There are thousands, maybe millions, of Mexicans living here on much less.”

Unlike the United States and other developed counties where money talks and the consumer is king, Mexico and the Yucatan in particular, do not have homogenous economies. In so-called “developed” countries, most people have a wage-earning job, drive a car, shop at the mall, save with an IRA, use a credit card, pay income taxes and share a common – if not equal – economic reality.

But the long and very special history of Mexico has produced a different economy here. Either through imposition or experimentation, Mexicans have incorporated, and to a varying extent maintained, economic systems inherited from Native America, Colonial Spain, the Napoleonic Empire, the Catholic Church, Capitalism, Socialism and Communism, just to mention the heavy hitters. There are whole communities in Mexico that still live off the land, like our great, great grandparents who settled the “wild west”. At the other extreme, the man who consistently competes with Bill Gates to be the richest in the world (Carlos Slim) makes his home in Mexico. And almost every other conceivable economic arrangement and social class is also found here.

You Paid Too Much

While the trend is that more and more Yucatecos are joining what we call the “money economy”, most campesinos still prefer to bargain and barter, avoid banks and loans, and minimize formal payrolls and income taxes. While those in Gringolandia tend to pay top dollar, Yucatecos boast of finding el precio mas barato (the lowest price) for their last purchase.

When we first moved here, a gringa friend of ours had composed a little ditty entitled “You Paid Too Much!”. We don’t remember the lyrics or the tune, but we remember and appreciate the sentiment: no matter what you tell someone you paid for something here, the reaction is almost universal… you paid too much! At first it was unnerving, causing us to walk around feeling like we had been duped at every turn. This is an easy feeling to adopt when you are an expatriate. Sometimes it can feel like there’s a big dollar sign (or pesos sign… coincidentally, they are the same!) printed on your forehead, and you are the only one who cannot see it. Gradually, we have gotten used to this feeling and recognize it as the symptom of a mindset that is always looking for a bargain.

Lifestyle in the Yucatan… It Depends

These and other significant economic and cultural differences mean that the cost of living in Yucatan (and much of Mexico) depends more on your lifestyle and personal financial decisions than they probably do in your own pollo pricescountry. There are simply more options here. Many commodities can be found at very different prices depending on location, context, and quality. The Mexican economy is like eBay, a swap meet and a garage sale wrapped in a department store in a mall at Disneyland (we refer to Cancun). For example, you can watch the same Hollywood blockbuster in an art-deco theater in Santiago for about $2.50 USD that would cost you $8.50 USD lying in a barcalounger in a modern cineplex in northern Merida. Or you can go to a government-sponsored film festival at the Olimpo or Teatro Merida and pay nothing to see an art film. Or you can buy that film for $25 pesos (about $1.60 USD in 2015) from the guy who comes by your table selling piratas (pirated DVD’s) and watch it at home. You see? It depends…

When in Rome… Uh, Merida!

One important way to reduce costs is through immersion and assimilation. The more Yucateco you become, the less you’ll find yourself paying (and willing to pay) too much. It is obvious to most of us who live here that speaking Spanish and adapting to local traditions will almost always guarantee finding a lower price or a lower-priced alternative. What is not immediately obvious is how thrift becomes a way of life when it is supported by the culture that surrounds you. You can drive across town to Home Depot for that machete (yes, you might like to have one here), or you can walk to the corner hardware store and buy one for less. The choice is yours. But you are bound to feel more comfortable at the corner store if you speak a little Spanish and are willing to become a part of your neighborhood.

About the Mexican Peso

With only a few exceptions (real estate and lodging come to mind), you’ll be paying for everything in pesos. After the horrific peso devaluation of 1994, there have been important changes in Mexican finance, which includes a virtual peso “peg” to the U.S. dollar. For about six years after 2000, the Mexican peso tracked the value of the dollar at an exchange rate of 11 pesos to one U.S. dollar, plus or minus half a peso. In mid 2011, when this article was previously updated, the exchange rate of the peso was about 12.3pesos to the U.S. dollar. For comparison purposes and quick calculations, we will use the 12 to 1 ratio in this article, though in the last year, the peso has been as high as 14.3 (May 2012), was 12.3 the last time we updated this article (Mar 2013) and is about 14.9 for this update (April 2015).

Unlike Europeans and Latin Americans, who are conditioned to think in multiple currencies, most norteamericanos have a difficult time understanding the value of anything not quoted in dollars. But it’s not that difficult. We just divide the price in pesos by 10, and then give yourself a 30 percent discount. For example, something that costs $100 pesos costs $10 dollars minus 30%, or about $7.00 USD, mas o menos.

As a service to you, our reader, the rest of this article quotes most of the prices in pesos, so you can practice doing the math…

Housing

One of the more fundamental expenses is housing, and prices in Yucatan are particularly difficult to generalize. The cost of housing keeps increasing just like everywhere else in the world, but from such a low value that there are still many locations that are affordable by North American or European standards. And the rise in prices was not caused by an over-abundance of loans, as most Mexicans own their homes outright. Mortgages are only now becoming available to the growing middle class, and are still practically impossible to get if you are a foreigner.

A renovated colonial house in the centro historico of Merida that cost $150,000 dollars five years ago may now sell for as much as $350,000. Unrestored properties can still be found for well under $100,000 dollars, but a good one is rarely under $35,000 to $40,000 USD. Compared with prices ten to fifteen years ago, this is quite an increase. The center of Merida, along with the beach areas along the Gulf Coast, have appreciated the most, as these are the most attractive locations for expatriates and retirees. There are places in Merida that are exclusive and expensive, such as La Ceiba (the gated community north of Merida on the way to Progreso), and prices there have been fairly stable. And there are numerous other safe and attractive neighborhoods in Merida that are just getting on the expat radar, such as Colonia Mexico or Chuburná, as well as smaller towns around Yucatan State, such as Cholul, Motul, Izamal and Valladolid, where lower priced homes are still available. se vende houses in Yucatan

Fortunately for the real estate shopper, there are numerous agencies in Merida and the Yucatan with comprehensive websites where you can gain a broad view of the market. Just Google “Yucatan real estate” or “real estate in Merida Mexico” (when you have a lot of time). And don’t forget that all prices are negotiable.

Of course, another option is to rent, at least until you have some “on the ground” experience with life in the Yucatan, and have shopped the real estate market to your heart’s content. Many foreigners do rent before they buy, but the variety of rental properties makes determining a price range almost as difficult to generalize as real estate for sale. We have rented modest houses in the centro historico for as little as $200 USD per month and as much as $500 USD. These were rented from locals by locals. Now, a typical two-bedroom rental downtown with the type of amenities that most expatriates are looking for and in the most desirable areas might go for $600 to $1200 USD per month or higher. A vacation rental home in Merida or on the beach, rented by the day or week, costs a lot more. Click on the Vacation Rental topic on the right side of this page to see some of the local offerings. Or as with real estate purchasing, just type in “vacation rental merida yucatan” into Google and compare prices on VRBO.com or Airbnb.com. While we don’t have an exact measure to report, it is our intuition that these prices have stayed pretty stable. Certainly demand has been steadily rising, but supply of these homes has as well, so prices do not seem to have changed too much in the last two years. If anything, they have maybe gone down a bit as competition has been increasing.

If you’re not a local, you’ll be competing with tourists, foreign professionals and student travelers when you rent. Depending on the condition of the property and its location, you will likely pay more than you might have five years ago. This is especially true of restored colonial vacation rental houses. Unfortunately, these are the most frequently advertised on the Internet. The most affordable properties are still advertised by their owners by painting En Renta on the façade or by advertising in Spanish in the Diario de Yucatan, Merida’s leading newspaper. Finding a suitable and affordable rental property therefore usually requires a visit to the area, a leisurely tour up and down the streets of the neighborhood in question, and lengthy communication in Spanish with the owner. For the cost-conscious shopper, we recommend staying in one of the low-price hostels or hotels while shopping rental properties like a local.

Income and Value Added Tax

Very few people in Mexico pay income tax. Well, technically, nobody pays income tax. If you are employed at a company that pays salaries and reports earnings, the company withholds and pays your personal income tax for you. But the number of wage-earning jobs subject to income tax in Mexico is relatively few compared to the United States or Canada.

Many Mexican workers earn their income, in whole or in part, abajo de agua (literally “under water”, but it means ‘under the table’). These workers include private farmers, artisans, independent contractors and construction workers, small restaurants and other sole proprietors of small businesses. This practice is not illegal, although poco a poco, the Mexican government is trying to bring everyone into the fold (ABOVE the table). In the past, you could choose to participate in a “gray” economy, without reporting any profit or loss to the government, or you could participate in the formal economy through serialized invoices called facturas, and report both profits and losses. Many businesses operated in both economies, depending on the client. In the last year or two, the government has begun to require facturas for almost every business transaction and the “gray” economy has theoretically been shrinking.

To compensate for a lack of tax revenue from income, the Mexican Government imposes a rather steep national sales tax, or Value Added Tax, called Impuesto Valores Agregado in Spanish, which is abbreviated to IVA and pronounced ee-VAH (or ee-BAH by many). You are expected to pay IVA for everything you purchase except medicines, unprepared foods, water and other basic necessities of life.

However, there are many cases, depending on your lifestyle choices, where IVA is not added to the price of your purchase (referred to as mas IVA, or plus tax). For example, you can eat fast food, where IVA is added, or you can eat at a private cocina economica, where it is not. You can contract with a professional cleaning service for your housekeeping needs and pay IVA, or you can hire a freelance housekeeper. You can buy a machete (you really should get one…) at Home Depot mas IVA, or you can buy it at the mercado, sin IVA. The choice, once again, is yours: WalMart or Chetumalito (a section of the mercado)? Bit by bit, that 15% savings adds up.

Property Taxes

Your property’s value is determined by a state government agency called Catastral or Catastro (strangely, the same agency, two different names, both correct), and is based on the historic value of the property more than the (usually understated) last sale price. Every year, starting in January, you will receive a bill for property taxes, called a predial (pray-DEE-al). In most cases, you will be stunned to learn that this is profoundly less than you paid in your own country. For example, the former Yucatan Living offices, which was a two-bedroom, restored colonial in the centro, had a market value of over a million pesos. It had been appraised by Catastral at $212,000 pesos. We were billed $110 pesos for predial in 2008. And if we paid before March, there was a discount! Predial prices have not changed much in the last few years, but if you renovate your house, your predial will be raised to reflect the new appraised value. Working Gringos lovely home in San Sebastian, which sold for over $300,000 USD in 2012, paid a predial of approximately $300 USD in 2011, just to give you an idea.

Honestly, the property taxes are so low that we compensate by giving back to the city whenever we can. Anyone who asks us for a donation or wants to sell us flowers on the street will get a few pesos from us… it’s our way of contributing to the life around us here. We figure it’s the least we can do. After all, there’s that “$” on our forehead.

Fidecomiso

As anyone who has shopped for real estate in Merida or along the coast has learned, we are in the so-called “restricted zone”. This means that as foreigners we cannot own property directly in this zone, but must purchase it through a bank trust called a fidecomiso (FEE-day-co-MEE-so). These trusts charge a hefty annual maintenance charge. Just when you thought you were escaping the costs of property ownership: bang, the fideicomiso bill arrives!

Still, adding together the $4,500 to $7,500 peso charge for our bank trust along with the cost of the predial, the net expense is still a tenth of what we paid in property taxes back in California, so we try not to complain. But those annual fideicomiso charges are one motivation for becoming Mexican citizens, which would allow us to own the property outright. Also, there is a serious effort afoot within the Mexican government to make foreign investment in Mexico even easier by getting rid of the fideicomiso requirement. It has not passed and been put into law yet, but we are all watching and waiting.

Everything Else

After housing, most foreigners expect to pay for basic modern conveniences like water, garbage, gas, electricity, telephone, cable and internet. The per-unit cost of your monthly utility bills are not negotiable, but the total cost is directly affected by lifestyle choices.

Water

The water supply is delivered by a company called JAPAY (HOP-eye). There really is no shortage of water in Merida, nor in most of Yucatan, so prices are low compared to the rest of North America. The least you will pay in the centro historico is $58.5 pesos per cubic meter for up to three cubic meters of water (up from $50 pesos in 2008). One cubic meter is 164 gallons. An average toilet flush is about 2.5 gallons. A five-minute shower is roughly 13 gallons. A load of laundry in a modern washing machine runs between 30 and 40 gallons. The more water you use, the higher the price per cubic meter, as the table below illustrates. In updating the prices from 2008, we noticed that most prices had been raised 6 to 10 pesos, but in this last update after a year and a half, there were almost no changes. In updating now in 2015, there have been no changes in the following table.

Water Consumed (M3)

Pesos per M3

4 – 10

$62.00

11 – 15

$69.00

16 – 20

$72.00

21 – 40

$4.5 per M3

41 – 60

$4.8 per M3

61 – 80

$5.5 per M3

You will notice in the table that if you consume less than 20 M3′s per month, you are billed a flat rate. Above 20 M3′s, you are billed per M3. So a consumption of 25 M3′s will run you about $112.50 pesos. To add to this complex billing structure, prices also vary depending on location. In the southern (less affluent) areas of Merida, prices per cubic meter start at $47 pesos (up from $40 in 2008), while in the northern (affluent) areas, they start at $61 pesos (up from $52 in 2008). There is also a higher rate for business locations, which in 2013 is $171.50 pesos per M3. Consumers are billed every other month and in our aforementioned large home, we pay on average about $170 pesos per bill. Yes, we take showers AND we use a washing machine.

Many Yucatecos who own swimming pools choose to drill their own well to fill them, as well as to irrigate their gardens. This probably made more sense back in the day when water was pumped using windmills, but not as much (as we will see) now that the pumps are run by expensive electricity.  It may again make more sense if you install wind or solar energy generators, as we know some friends have done at their haciendas. For more information about water prices, you can check JAPAY’s website. You will note that the last price update was January 2009. Since water is a basic human need, prices for water tend to stay fairly stable in the Yucatan.

Garbage

We are familiar with two garbage collection companies in Merida: Servilimpia and Pamplona. They have different collection days depending on your location. For instance, Servilimpia works Colonia San Sebastian on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. In the tourist areas of the centro historico, they collect whether you pay or not. Sometimes, they forget to stop by for some reason, but in general the service works.

Prices for garbage removal used to be $17 pesos a month across the board in the centro and everywhere else. If you pay for a whole year in advance, they will even give you a discount. Prices are eminently reasonable:

  • Zona Residencial Alta – $53.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Residencial Media – $46.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Media Alta – $33.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Media Media – $28.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Media Baja – $23.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Popular Alta – $20.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Popular Media – $17.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Popular Baja – $14.00 pesos per month
  • Fraccionamiento Popular Alta – $20.00 pesos per month
  • Fraccionamiento Popular Media – $17.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Marginada – $0.00 pesos per month

Have something big or unwieldy you want to throw away? Put it outside. If it is at all valuable or reusable, chances are a neighbor or passerby will pick it up before the garbage truck even gets there. If your garbage requires more effort or ingenuity on the part of the garbage company to haul it away, you might find them banging on your door, even in the middle of the night. Tip them $10 or $20 pesos and they will be happy. If not, they’ll tell you how much they want to take away your couch or old refrigerator, and there is no reason not to pay them.

In addition, you will occasionally see a group of men (and sometimes women) in orange vests, sporting brooms and rolling trashcans, making their way along the streets of Merida to pick up after those who toss candy wrappers and plastic bottles from their cars or from the buses (which at times, seems to be almost everyone…). We would be knee-deep in modern, brand-name detritus if not for them. The discussion about stopping those people from tossing the candy wrappers in the first place is for another article, one we will probably never have the insight to write.

Electricity

La Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) is the national electric company that supplies power to all of Mexico. Although they are a “World Class Company”, (as the slogan on their trucks continues to remind us), they do not pretend to be affordable. Without a doubt, electricity is the most expensive utility in Yucatan. 

We in Yucatan benefit from the previously-mentioned socialist influences within the Mexican economic system by living in a region classified as 1C. This means that because we have an average summer temperature of 30 degrees Celcius (86 degrees Fahrenheit), our electric bills are subsidized during the summer months of May through October. (Or, if you are a die-hard capitalist, you could say we are gouged the rest of the year.)

For a private residence in Merida, the summertime electricity rates are:

up to 300KW/H in 2013

Basic: $0.711 pesos (up from $0.567 in 2008, $0.643 in 2011, $0.693 in 2013) up to 150 Kilowatt Hours (KW/Hr)
Intermediate: $0.839 (up from $0.668 in 2008, $0.742 in 2011, $0.808 in 2013)) for the next 150 KW/Hr (this limit used to be 600 KW)
High Intermediate: $1.071 (up from $1.040 in 2013) from 300 to 450 KW/Hr
Surplus (excedente in Spanish): $2.859 (up from $2.772 in 2013) per KW/Hr over 450 KW/Hr

During the rest of the year, the rates are:

Basic: $0.809 pesos (up from 0.661 after 150 KW/Hr in 2008, $0.733 in 2011 and $0.789 pesos in 2013) up to 75 KW/Hr
Intermediate: $0.978 pesos (up from $0.780 up to 600 KW/Hr in 2008 and $1.229 up to 150 KW/Hr in 2011, $0.960 in 2013) up to 100 KW/Hr
High: $2.859 pesos (up from $2.350 after 600 KW/Hr in 2008, and $2.593 after 150 KW/Hr in 2011, $2,808 in 2013) after 175 KW/Hr

For those who are not familiar with the term “KW/Hr”, it means kilowatt-hour, which is a thousand watts of electricity consumed in an hour. If you burn ten, 100-watt light bulbs for an hour, they consume one KW/Hr of electricity. Naturally, here in Yucatan, low-cost fluorescent bulbs (11 to 17 watts) have been widely adopted, not just to conserve electricity, but also because they survive power fluctuations caused by our lovely afternoon electrical storms better than standard incandescent bulbs.

A new rule says that if you consume more than 850 KW/Hr per month, you are now Tarifa DAC (de Alto Consumo) and you must pay a fixed price of $80.63 pesos per month, and $3.484 pesos per KW/Hr.

How much electricity does your lifestyle consume? If you plan to live like most campesinos outside Merida, you do not own a refrigerator. If you want a cold drink or fresh eggs, you walk to the corner store, which serves as the community refrigerator. You don’t own a washing machine either, preferring to wash your clothes by hand. You might own an electrical fan, but you certainly don’t own an air conditioner. You hang your hammock in a shady spot and let the breezes cool you off. Probably the only electrical appliances you own are a (rather loud) radio and a television, along with a few light bulbs (and maybe a string or two of Christmas lights, (para La Virgen).

With the exception of a few ceiling fans, a small refrigerator and perhaps a washing machine, many working class Yucatecos living in Merida don’t consume much more than their campesino cousins, although a growing number own a DVD player and a battery charger for their cell phone.

We observe that the Yucatan middle-class owns an assortment of electrical appliances similar to most middle-class expatriates, but they do not have as many and they are not used as often. You won’t find a garbage disposal or dishwasher in most Yucatan kitchens, including ours. But the obvious socio-economic dividing line is air conditioning. The modern miracle that made Las Vegas possible and lures thousands of campesinos and working class Yucatecos to the malls every summer is what takes the biggest bite out of anyone’s electric bill. Lest we start feeling at all high and mighty, this modern miracle is also probably what makes Merida even liveable for most expatriates coming from the Great White North.

At the Yucatan Living offices, we would often run two “mini-split” air conditioners throughout the business day. (Only for the comfort of our clients and our computers, you understand.) It was not unusual for our bills to run $6,000 to $8,000 pesos per month. In our home, we only had air conditioners in the bedrooms – a common practice among homeowners who chill electrically – and we avoided using them whenever possible. Consume more than 850 KW/Hr on a regular basis, and you will be rated DAC (De Alto Consumo) (High Consumption) and the rate becomes a fixed price of $80.63 pesos per month, and $3.484 pesos per KW/Hr ($3.281 per KW with a set charge of $74.69 each month in 2013). And no discount during summer months! You guessed it… we were rated de alto consumo. For the luxury of a large renovated house and an air conditioned office, we ended up paying top dollar. And once rated DAC, you can pretty much resign yourself to always being rated that way unless you substantially change your ways. We have learned to cool off with the swimming pool or a cold shower before we resort to air conditioning, but never did get out of the DAC category.

The CFE bill is delivered every other month, so expect to see double when it arrives.

Propane Gas and Carbon

There are no natural gas mains running under the calles of Merida. Every home and office has some sort of propane tank on its roof or in a closet. The gas is delivered from a truck operated by one of several independent companies with names like Z-Gas, Delta Gas and Gas Peninsular. The price of propane has nearly doubled since we moved here in early 2002. That’s the bad news. The good news is that it’s still one of the least expensive utilities and one of the most efficient energy sources.

A typical three-bedroom colonial home has a 300-liter stationary tank on the roof. At a price of $8.14 pesos per liter (up from $5.48 pesos per liter in 2008, $5.94 in 2011 and $6.65 in 2013), it costs more than $2000 pesos to fill it. The gas heats the calentadores (water heaters), secadora (clothes dryer) and is used for cooking, although we often use the campesino method where cooking is done on open wood fires or with charcoal (…in other words, we use a barbeque with carbon (pronounced car-BONE)). A tank lasts us five or six months, so we figure we pay an average of about $400 pesos a month for gas. The government now supplies a handy dandy gas calculator for your convenience.

To save both gas and electricity, we try to hang our clothes out to dry as much as possible, and only use the clothes dryer for rainy days and during the rainy season. We also disable our water heaters during the summer months or if we are gone from the house for more than a week or so. By the way, just like everything else here, if you use carbon for your barbecue, you can buy it in two ways. You can get the branded briquettes you are familiar with at Costco or WalMart, or you can buy a small bag or two at your corner store. That carbon is made locally in the countryside, and costs $8 to $15pesos per bag. It also helps support the people who make it, which is a good feeling.

Transportation

Anyone who reads the financial press or studies Mexican history knows the entire oil industry is consolidated into a state-run institution called Pemex. The Mexican government nationalized the oil industry after the Revolution and sets the prices for gasoline at legislated intervals. Despite protestations and seductions from free-market advocates in Gringolandia, this native bit of socialism has been working out rather well for “We The Consumer”. In addition, we are pretty sure we save a lot of precious hours of our life not worrying about which gas station has the lowest prices, as the prices are all the same at every Pemex station.

There are two grades of unleaded gasoline at the pump. Regular is called Magna and premium is called, well, Premium. A liter of Magna currently costs $13.70 pesos per liter (it was $7.05 pesos per liter in 2008, $9.32 in 2011, $11.14 in 2013). Premium costs $14.73 pesos per liter now (in 2008, $8.77 pesos per liter, $10.32 in 2011, $11.70 in 2013). To convert to dollars per gallon, here’s the math:

(Pesos-per-liter times 3.7854) divided by pesos per dollar

Using an exchange rate of 14.9 pesos per dollar, the cost of unleaded regular gasoline is (drum roll, please) $3.49 USD per gallon. It was $2.93 USD per gallon when we updated this article in 2011, and $3.50 in 2013. taxi ride in Merida

If that sounds like great news, then you probably spend a lot of time in your car. However, you don’t have to drive very much in Merida. Many who live in the centro find themselves walking more, and if you need to make a quick trip to the mall or the mercado, you can always find a taxi, combi or a bus to take you there. A bus ride to anywhere costs $7 pesos (up from $5 pesos in 2008, no change from 2011 and $6 in 2013). (Find out everything you need to know about taking the bus in our article about Taking The Bus in Merida). A typical taxi ride costs about $30-35 pesos (up from $25-30 in 2008 and no change since 2011). And in many cases, what you need – groceries, prescription drugs, dry cleaning – can even be delivered to your home at no additional cost.

Auto Insurance

It is your civil responsibility in Mexico to carry auto insurance. A policy to cover everything your vehicle does to others, but without coverage to yourself, will cost you about $2,000 pesos a year. The cost of total coverage depends on the kind of vehicle you have. For our ten year old SUV, the cost for car insurance was about $7,000 pesos last time we updated this article in 2011, which is about $585 USD a year. Prices for auto insurance have not substantially changed since then.

Telephone

Like everywhere else in the world, your telephone options are mind-boggling. And even though Telmex (and its little cellular brother Telcel)  is still the monopoly of old (oops! did we say ‘monopoly’? Carlos Slim would not be happy with us…), it has been increasingly forced to compete with other companies, if not in price, at least in features. You may want to compare offerings from Axtel, Telefonica, Movistar, IUSACELL, and others (not to mention VoIP options) before making any decisions, but you could find yourself spending a significant part of your life shopping telephone service. We aren’t going to go into all the possibilities here, understandably. But we’ll give you an idea of what costs are from the leading provider.

If your new or restored home has never enjoyed telephone service, you’ll need to order a new line from Telmex. This process has been known to take weeks and costs about $2,000 pesos for the installation. After that, basic service is $389 pesos a month (it was $200 pesos in 2013), which now includes 200 cel phone calls (a new feature in 2015), 100 local calls (it used to ONLY include 100 local calls), and unlimited national and international calls (never included before). Additional calls are still $1.50 pesos flat rate as they were in 2013 (They used to be $4.50 pesos flat rate… a price that has gone DOWN since 2008!).

If you want to upgrade your Telmex service, there are several options. In 2011, for $400 pesos a month (it was $600 pesos per month in 2008), you could order “Telmex 1000” service, which included 100 local calls, 100 minutes of long distance within Mexico and a 1 MB broadband Internet connection with wireless router. For twice the bandwidth and unlimited long distance calls within Mexico, you could order “Telmex Without Limits”, which costs around $990 pesos (it used to be $1,100 pesos in 2008) per month. In 2013, that same package was called Paquete Conectes (which translates to ‘connecting packets’, an awfully technical telephone term…) and cost $389 pesos per month. The package included 100 minutes of calls to cellular phone numbers, 100 local phone calls, 100 national minutes (within Mexico) and internet (called Infinitum) at 3 MBPS. in 2013, “Telmex Without Limits” (Sin Limite) cost $999 pesos per month and included unlimited local, national and international calls, 100 minutes of calls to cellular phone numbers and an internet connection at 10 MBPS. Now, in 2015, for $599 pesos per month, you can get unlimited cell calls, local calls, national and international calls AND internet.

Television

Most Yucatecos of every economic persuasion own a television. What’s more, you can watch television while waiting in line at the bank, having your hair done, strolling down the aisle of your supermarket, riding in a taxi, or having your teeth cleaned. At many drinking establishments, you’ll be greeted by at least half a dozen flat-panel televisions encircling the bar overhead. Yucatecos love television.

There are several local broadcast channels you can watch for free, but most people purchase a cable or satellite service. The cable provider in Merida is CableMAS. They offer various packages of different local, national, sports, movie and pay-per-view channels. They also offer Internet services. Basic service with 40 (up from 26 in 2013) channels and a 6 MB Internet connection (in 2008, it was a 256 Kb Internet connection, in 2011 it was a 1 MB connection, in 2013 it was a 3 MB connection) costs $360 pesos per month (up from $350 pesos per month in 2008 and in 2011, down from $390 in 2013). You can also now, in 2015, get a package of 40 channels with 10 MB service for $480 pesos a month, of unlimited internet with 20 GB, national and international phone calls and cable TV including HBO for a mere $999 pesos per month. But check around with your neighbors… there isn’t a joke about CableMENOS for nothing.

In 2008, the only real option for satellite service was from SKY, (famously pronounced, esk-EYE here) a part of Rupert Murdoch’s global news and entertainment empire. A few years back, they purchased Hughes DirectTV, eliminating the competition at the time. In 2011, a standard SKY package cost $250 pesos per month (down from $400 pesos per month in 2008), but included more channels than the basic cable package. For about $650 pesos (this price did not change from 2008 to 2011), you could have nearly all available channels, including familiar movie channels like HBO, Cinemax and Showtime, along with news from Fox, CNN, BBC and Bloomberg. Other English language channels include Discovery, TLC, National Geographic, Warner and E! In 2013, SKY’s basic package costs $169 pesos per month and could go all the way up to $743 pesos per month for all the additional add-on channels.

In 2013, Dish TV was offered through your Telmex account. For a cost of $164 pesos per month for one TV (it was $150 pesos per month in 2011, and the same $164 in 2013) you can have access to more than 40 channels. That price goes up to $274 pesos per month for up to 3 TV’s. For an ‘all access’ package, you will pay about $469 pesos per month (it was $400 pesos per month back in 2011, $429 in 2013), and enjoy more than 79 channels (60 channels in 2011). The Dish TV packages also provide the convenience of being able to pay in your Telmex bill. Talk about a monopoly! (oops, did we say that again?).

The Cost of Health Care

Like everything else in Mexico, there are multiple socio-economic levels of health care, ranging from free to affordable. If you opt for free or co-paid government-sponsored services, you may have to wait longer and the conditions will be less agreeable. If you choose a private hospital, you will pay more but will be treated to world-class facilities.

There are also several, affordable health insurance options that will take the sting out of any expensive procedures or chronic conditions. For example, our health insurance is multinational, which means it covers costs anywhere in the world. Being rather young and healthy, and because routine health care in Mexico won’t bust our budget, we chose a high deductible plan ($5,000 dollars) that cost about $1,500 USD per person annually in 2013 (in 2008, it cost $1,200 USD per person annually and in 2011 it cost $1,400 USD). Emergency services are not subject to the deductible, and we have been reimbursed for emergency room visits here in Merida. If you want to live like a local, you can sign up for health insurance through IMSS, the Mexican health care system. There are age and other restrictions, but if you qualify, that insurance will run you about $300 USD per year.

For prices in 2015, I asked an insurance agent (John McGee at expatglobalmedical.com) who specializes in expatriate insurance to give me prices for a healthy male, age 60, with no pre-existing conditions. He gave me two sets of prices. The Care Choice works if you plan to spend all your time in Mexico. The Select Choice would be more appropriate if you plan to travel back to the USA, Canada, Europe or Asia.

For deductibles of $250 USD per year, the Care Choice insurance costs $1175 USD per year, or $2315 USD per year to add coverage in the USA. The Select Choice insurance costs $1935 USD per year or $3835 USD per year for USA coverage. With a $5000 USD per year deductible, those costs go to $707 USD per year, $1379 USD with USA coverage, and for the Select option, $1156 USD per year or $2276 per year with USA coverage.

We have written several articles about our medical experiences in Yucatan, as have others (take a look in our Health Section), and there are plenty of sources of information on the internet about this subject, so we won’t elaborate here. In short, there is very good healthcare available in Mexico and it is surprisingly inexpensive compared to Gringolandia. In addition to great prices, we have found that there are none more patient or gentle than Mexican healthcare workers. Many medications can be purchased without a prescription (although that is no longer true of antibiotics or some other commonly-abused drugs such as pain killers). We recently surveyed the prices of some basic dental and medical services, and here is what we found:

Dentistry (prices taken from www.yucatandental.com)
Cleaning: $35 USD (Has stayed about the same since 2008. Often/usually quoted as $400 – 500 pesos)
Dental implant: $1750 USD ($13,000 pesos in 2011. $1750 USD in 2013)
Porcelain crown: $300-400 USD (was $2,000 pesos in 2008, $260-350 USD in 2011, $280-$360 in 2013)
Root Canal: $200-290 USD (Was $1,200-1,700 pesos in 2008, $180-260 USD in 2011, $200-290 USD in 2013)

Ophthalmology
Cataract Surgery: $15,000-17,000 pesos per eye.
Reflective Surgery (Eximer Laser): $15,000-17,000 pesos per eye

One Hour Doctor Visit : $400-600 pesos per visit, same as 2008, 2011 and 2013

Blood Tests (in 2011 and 2013, prices taken from Biomedicos. In 2015, prices from Megalab)
Hematology: $142 pesos (was $100 pesos in 2008, $132 in 2011, $142 in 2013)
Cholesterol: $95 pesos (was $70 pesos in 2008, $82 in 2011, $105 in 2013)
Glucose: $95 pesos (was $50 pesos in 2008, $82 in 2011, $95 in 2013)
Uric acid: $95 pesos (was $60 pesos in 2008, $82 in 2011, $105 in 2013)
Hepatic test: $553 pesos (Was $350 pesos in 2008, $396 in 2011, $533 in 2013)
Triglyceride: $95 pesos (was $70 pesos in 2008, $88 in 2011, $108 in 2013)
Urea: $95 pesos (was $60 pesos in 2008, $82 in 2011, $103 in 2013)
Urine Test: $85 pesos (was $80 pesos in 2008, $78 in 2011, $110 in 2013)
Glucose, cholesterol and uric acid tests together: $285 pesos in 2015, with the in-home visit costing an additional $70 pesos ($421 pesos in 2011, $415 in 2013. In 2011, they charged an additional $65 pesos if they came to your home, and in 2013 they charged $84 pesos for a home visit, depending on the location. (In 2008, a complete blood test taken at your home, including reports was $750 pesos)

Medicines
Advil (12): $40 pesos discounted to $28 (was $20 pesos in 2008, $32 in 2011, $45 in 2013)
Aspirin 500 MG (40): $31 pesos discounted to $22 (was $20 pesos in 2008, $24 in 2011, $28 in 2013)
Insulin (10ml): $600 pesos now, and in 2008 and 2011 (depending on the brand)
Pedialite (500ml): $30 pesos discounted to $20 ($25 pesos in 2011, $30 in 2013)
Prozac (28): $1266 pesos discounted to $937 ($700 pesos in 2011, $772 in 2013)
Tabcin (Cold medication, caps) (12): $53 pesos discounted to $36 (was $20 pesos in 2008, $37 in 2011, $42 in 2013)
Tafil (Xanax) (90, .5 MG): $1020 pesos discounted to $815 ($750 pesosin 2011, $686 in 2013)
Viagra (1, 100 MG): $324 pesos discounted to $207 (was $150 pesos in 2008, $170 in 2011 and 2013. Also, there are now generic options, starting at $80 pesos per pill in 2011, now $60 pesos in 2013).
The discounted prices are the final prices we were able to obtain at a pharmacy in a small town (Maxcanu) outside of Merida. There are many pharmacies in Merida that also discount medications.

Groceries

Food is where the choice of lifestyle really kicks in. But again, the range is broad, and you can eat well for very little if you choose to eat local cuisine.  As our article on grocery shopping explains, there are a variety of places to shop for groceries, and as any walk or drive through the city will show you, an almost infinite number of places to eat. You can check out the Yucatan Restaurants section of this website for a never-complete-but-always-trying list of restaurants in and around Merida and the Yucatan Peninsula, with approximate price levels when we know them, as well as hours, addresses, directions and reviews. tomatoes in the mercado in Merida

So, let’s talk about groceries. A recent trip to various grocery stores resulted in this informal price survey, with 2008 and 2011 prices in parentheses:

Coke 500 ml: $9 pesos ($ .60 USD in 2008, $6.5 pesos in 2011, $7 pesos in 2013)
Loaf of 540 grs. multigrain bread: $28 pesos ($20 pesos in 2008, $24 pesos in 2011, no change from 2013)
Box of whole milk: $16 pesos ($13.50 pesos in 2008, $15 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Box of 510 grs. Special K Cereal: $38 pesos ($37.40 pesos in 2008, $42 pesos in 2011, no change since 2013)
Tomatoes per pound: $12 pesos ($12 pesos in 2008 and 2011 and 2013)
Haas avocados per kg: $20 pesos ($12 pesos in 2008 and 2011 and 2013)
Papaya per kg: $15 pesos ($ 5.5 pesos in 2008, $10 pesos in 2011, $12 in 2013)
Bananas per kg: $9 pesos ($4.9 pesos in 2008, $9 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Granny Smith Apples per kg: $35-40 pesos ($18 pesos in 2008, $28 pesos in 2011, no change since 2013)
Mexican limones per kg: $5-10 pesos ($5-10 pesos when we added these to the list in 2011 and in 2013)
Philadelphia cream cheese:  $22.50 pesos ($22.58 pesos in 2008, $22.50 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Bag of 3 kg (6.6 lb) cat chow: $125 pesos ($86 pesos in 2008, $92 pesos in 2011, $108 in 2013)
Can of Purina cat chow:  $12 pesos ($8pesos in 2008 and 2011, $10 in 2013)
Bag of 4 kg (8.8 lb) Purina Dog Chow:  $150 pesos ($99 in 2008, $110 in 2011, $129 in 2013)
Arm and Hammer (1.36 Gal.) Laundry Soap: $99 pesos ($84.50 in 2008, $100 in 2011, $93 in 2013)
Generic (1 kg) (2.20 lb) Laundry Soap: $19 pesos ($15 pesos in 2008, $19 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Instant (100grs.) Nescafe:  $35 pesos ($30 in 2008, $42 in 2011, $32 in 2013)
Pound of sugar:  $10pesos ($5 pesos in 2008, $8 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Absolut Vodka (750 ml):  $218 pesos ($195 pesos in 2008 and 2011, $218 in 2013)
Whole Chicken (3.50 lb): $60 pesos ($ 42.80 pesos in 2008, $55 pesos in 2011, $60 in 2013)
A bag of charcoal (large): $35 pesos ($32.02 pesos in 2008, $35 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Pack of Marlboro’s at OXXO or similar: $47 pesos ($25 pesos) in 2008, $38 pesos in 2011, $42 in 2013)

Carton of Marlboro’s at Costco: $400 pesos ($261 pesos in 2008, $350 pesos in 2011, $400 in 2013)

Prices Vary by Season and Store

Now, keep in mind that some of these products come from the United States, so the prices are probably higher here. A note about tomatoes, which are NOT from the United States. Tomatoes are cheaper in the local markets, and the cost varies by the season. Tomatoes can go as low as $8 pesos per kilo, or as high as $30 pesos per kilo, depending on the season. Coffee is grown in Mexico, so as long as you don’t insist on an American brand, you can find it cheaper. And it will be even cheaper (and probably better) if you have time to go to one of the coffee shops downtown and have it ground right there for you. Chickens are locally raised, as are pigs and turkeys. But beef can be more expensive, especially if you go for the Argentinian beef that is not raised in the Yucatan. Prices of anything grown or raised locally will be even lower if you go to the local mercados, and even lower at the central mercado.

The cost of meat depends on where you buy it and, of course, the cut you buy. Pork can range from $60 to $100 and beef from $70 to $150 pesos per kilo. Arracheras (Beef cut prepared for the dish arrachera) costs about $150 pesos per kilo. Chicken can be found from $30 to $38 pesos per kilo, shrimp for about $150 pesos per kilo, fish $80 to 120 pesos per kilo, of course depending on the kind of fish and the season. Pulpo (octopus) is about $70 to $80 pesos per kilo. Special beef and pork cuts depend a lot on the place you buy. At Sam’s Club, beef costs between $150 to $300 pesos per kilo, but can be found for less in local markets.

Of course, the savings in price has to be weighed against the time and money it costs to run to all those different places to get everything you need. It definitely is cheaper to eat local foods from local stores and menu at xcanatunshop in local markets.

Dining Out

You’ll find everything from taco stands to fast food outlets to gourmet restaurants in Merida. If you live in a major urban area in the States or in Canada, you’ll probably find fewer foreign food choices here, such as Thai or Indian restaurants. A new exotic restaurant (anything from Asia, basically) is always cause for celebration among Merida expatriates. Often those restaurants do not last long, and at this writing in 2015, they are still hard to find, but not impossible anymore. Now you can get good Korean or Thai food if you know where to go and when.

A meal at Burger King costs about $55 pesos, more than the kids working there make in a day (but that’s another story). A taco at the Wayan’e taco stand costs $9 pesos now in 2015 (it used to be $7) and a drink still costs $10 pesos, and we’ve never met someone who didn’t rave about the food. A hamburger at Hennessys Irish Pub in Merida costs $95 pesos, and meals at any upscale restaurant can run from $120 pesos up to and over $300 pesos. A martini runs from $70 pesos up to about $120 pesos, depending on the restaurant, and that price has not changed in three years.

Again, you can spend as much or as little as you want. You decide.

Maintenance

Nearly every expat we know here has someone cleaning their house. We do too. This is an affordable service in Yucatan, and with all these tile floors, practically a necessary one. Housekeepers are paid anywhere from $125 pesos per day to $250 pesos per day, and a lunchtime meal should be included. Laundry is often not included, and some people hire specialists just to do their laundry. Those specialists charge about $150 pesos per day for cleaning and ironing. Launlaundry in Meridadry services abound, as do dry cleaners. Yucatecans are known for dressing in white and always being clean, so there is no shortage of services towards that end.

Gardening is another service that is easy to come by. Gardeners are usually paid about the same as housekeepers. Our gardener costs about $50 pesos per hour and comes once a week. There are viveros (nurseries) here that will deliver and install plants, and there are landscape consultants who will design and install a garden. They will cost a lot more than our gardener, but still probably less than in the USA or Canada.

Plumbing and electrical maintenance is also a rather constant expense. Not regularly, like a gardener, but in a tropical environment with a lot of rain, lightening and humidity, stuff happens. Whether you need a shower head replaced or a hose bib somewhere where you did not have it before, or a new tinaco on the roof or a whole new kitchen, plumbing services will run you about $50-75 pesos an hour. Electrical is sometimes done by the same people, but more and more we are finding specialists who just do electrical work. And usually, they don’t charge by the hour, but by the job. You describe the problem and they quote a price that doesn’t include materials. You pay for materials up front, which they will purchase and return with your receipt. The obra de mano (the work that they do) is paid for when the job is done.

Painters are another type of worker you might end up seeing every couple of years. Our painter charges us $24 pesos per square meter, plus materials.

A typical expatriate-targeted handyman service still costs about $150 – $175pesos an hour plus supplies. You can hire them to do anything from ironwork to painting to plumbing and electrical repair. You can usually find a local guy in your neighborhood with the same sort of offering for less (maybe $50 pesos per hour or $150 pesos per day), but he typically will have less knowledge about the type of quality you are expecting.

Tipping

La propina is a very important part of the Mexican economy, and it behooves one to carry a pocketful of coins wherever you go. We keep a stash in the car at all times. If you drive and consequently find yourself parking somewhere, you are bound to run across a little (usually old, sometimes handicapped) man with a red cloth who will guide you into your parking space as if you were a returning 747 at a major airport. He will expect a tip when you get out or when you return. After grocery shopping (where it is customary to tip the person who bags your groceries between $5 and 10 pesos), you can expect those same guys in the parking lot to help you with your groceries (especially if you are a woman) and they should also be tipped about the same. Waiters, of course, should be tipped (the normal 15-20%, depending on the level of service). People who make home deliveries should be tipped. Anyone who helps you through your day should be tipped. 5 pesos here, 10 pesos  there. It adds up, but not to very much. It helps grease the economic skids, and it is an important part of some workers’ income. So when in doubt, tip! And tip generously, but not OVER-generously. Our prices above for tips are on the high side, but give you a general idea. Don’t forget, as a foreigner, you generally have a $ on your forehead and are expected to tip. Not tipping makes us all look bad.

A Random Price List

Here’s a smattering of prices for other things you might find yourself buying on a semi-regular basis. Feel free to add to this list in the Comments section!

Purified water 4.4 Gal: $23 pesos ($20 pesos in 2008, $22 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Spanish lesson: $250 pesos per private class, in 2008, 2011, 2013 and now.
Movie theater ticket: Regular tickets at Cinepolis are $65 pesos now in 2015 (up from $60 in 2013). Some complexes offer senior discounts, and the prices are different in each cinema complex. Prices range from $50 pesos to $70 pesos, with VIP tickets ranging from $80 to $100 pesos, and 3D movies from $70 to $100 pesos. Of course, the most expensive ticket is the VIP 3D movie, ranging from $70 to $130 pesos. In some movie theaters there is a discount for seniors at $46 pesos. These prices are pretty much the same since 2008.
Santiago’s movie theatre ticket: $35 pesos ($25 pesos in 2011, $30 in 2013) (this is the cheapest movie ticket in Merida for a first run movie and has been in 2008, 2011 and 2013.
1 liter bottle of fresh-squeezed orange juice: $15 pesos ($12 pesos in 2008, $20 pesos in 2011)
… depends more on the season than the year.

Official Disclaimers

Yes, we know. Somewhere in this article, we paid too much for something. Elsewhere, maybe we misquoted the price we most recently paid. We do not have a full-time accountant or economist on the payroll, but we do what we can. This article is not intended to be an exact accounting of our expenses here or a promise about what your expenses will be. It is intended to communicate the idea that living a thrifty lifestyle is more easily achieved in Yucatan than in many parts of the so-called developed world (looking at you, California!). But your mileage may vary. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. And in the end, the savings you take is equal to the effort you make.

As always, and especially on this article, we and all the other readers welcome your comments. This has always been a very popular article and there are a lot of comments. Read them for more information, and then add yours! What do YOU want to know the cost of?

By Nadine Calder

A man and his hat in Mexico

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Seven

Don Hermenegildo gave his hat a final brushing, placed it on his head, and taking up his walking stick, said good-bye to his sister.

Deep in thought and brooding, he set out on the delicate and serious task to which he had agreed, determining the best ways to handle it so as not to leave the impetuous young man unhappy and not to displease doña Prudencia, something that would have caused him one of the greatest anxieties of his life.

When he arrived at the widow’s house, she was leaving with Guadalupe for the dance.

“Hello!, he exclaimed upon seeing them. You going out? And someplace nice?”
“To a little dance that’s going to be at the Ortegas’ house. Did you come to visit us?”
“Yes, but I’ll come another time, and I can accompany you now if you’ll allow me that favor.”
“With much pleasure.”

And they set out together with don Hermenegildo walking alongside the señora.

“And will you dance, doña Prudencia?”
“I, yes; there’s no fool like an old fool.”
“Old! Señora . . . If you haven’t married again it’s because you don’t want to.”

Don Hermenegildo had not forgotten doña Raimunda’s advice and he felt himself getting flustered alongside the woman who seemed to him the most suitable to bring him out of his aching celibacy, going beyond his limits to the point of indirectly insinuating the idea of a new marriage. It seemed to him he had said too much, but enlivened by his companion’s eloquent silence, he continued:

“Well, of course, you could get married again. It seems impossible that you should have a thirteen-year-old daughter.”
“Fourteen, don Hermenegildo.”
“Fourteen? It’s that she’s very beautiful, but it’s hard to believe she’s that age upon seeing her mother. You are still very young.”

At this, doña Raimunda came out of her house and joined the group, interrupting don Hermenegildo’s burgeoning momentum.

A dancing shoe in YucatanWith nothing worth noting, they continued on their way to the dance, and there their companion stepped aside, as he had not been invited, when Perico Ortega, who had seen him, insisted on introducing him.

Off to one side, there were four rocking chairs for the mamás, two occupied by the señora of the house and Chonita’s mother. Doña Raimunda and doña Prudencia seated themselves in the others and don Hermenegildo took a chair nearby after politely saying hello.

Upon her arrival, Guadalupe was surrounded by her companions. Those of the opposite sex were approaching, first Pancho Vélez and then the others, grouped together, asking her for different dances and placing her in the difficult situation of responding to all their demands, then holding in her memory that sea of commitments to which she was unaccustomed.

This new development held great importance for her, as it seemed to promise a series of triumphs in life, based on the happy outcome of one small entrance into the world. And it did not escape her that Pancho Vélez had been the first to approach her in a way that was obvious to everyone. It was known that this young man was from one of the leading families, despite the modest position of his cousins, the Ortegas, even though the cousin relationship was unclear to everyone except the girls’ mother, who would explain it to anyone who wanted to disentangle the genealogical skein she put before them.

In a corner was set up the music, composed of a piano and a violin. In the hall next to the parlor several older men were chatting. And outside on the street, the curious craned their necks to peep through the sole window’s shutters. The door had been closed since the last guests entered.

Among those on the street was Fermín Dorantes, snorting because inside he could see Luis Robles, whose strategic moves he had observed. He watched Luis approach the girl along with the others and then be the last to leave her, and he figured it was certain that his impertinent rival would dance with her and not pass up the opportunity to talk with her to his heart’s content.

Indeed, Luis Robles had achieved the promise of nothing less than the first dance, which is typically the cuarta and the polka. For this reason, Lupita resisted somewhat, because she had never danced. But in the end she agreed, counting on her partner’s expertise and the fact that she had practiced alone in her room, humming in the absence of other music.

Couple dancing in YucatanEverything went perfectly in the beginning. Luis Robles, the first dance; Pancho Vélez, the second and the lanceros. But after that, Lupita could not remember how she had distributed the rest. As long as the young men opportunely presented themselves to jog her memory and there was no one to dispute their claims, she didn’t come up against any difficulty. But it so happened that Perico Ortega, mistakenly or maliciously, let her know that the fourth dance, coming up next, was promised to him. The girl agreed, but as the young man of the house stepped away, Luis Robles approached, saying:

“I’ve just told the musicians they shouldn’t end this next dance they’re going to play until dawn.”
“Why?”
“Because this, the first, and the polka will be the most enjoyable that I’ve danced in my life.”
‘So who do you have it with?,” she asked with alarm, suspecting what was the matter.
“What do you mean, who with?”

And so followed the clarification and Lupita’s dismay. Luis Robles was adamant, but he finally had to give in, assuming a gracious persona and the girl’s promise to dance the following one with him. He walked away to see who had agreed to be his other partner for the fifth dance and to arrange a partner for the fourth. This was Belita Ortega, captured at the far end of the room by Pancho Vélez, who had stealthily passed the lulls between dances talking with her.

Everyone said that Belita Ortega was Vélez’s girlfriend, and she, like the other members of her family, assumed that the fair and natural outcome of their encounters would be a wedding. But for anyone not wearing a blindfold that prevented them from assessing the circumstances, the heartthrob had not even in jest given a thought to descending from the heights of his position to introduce the appetizing Vélez branch into the modest Ortega family tree.

Guadalupe knew all this and more, and she did not fail to consider the probabilities and the pleasure she would take in displacing her friend.

Dancing in YucatanPancho Vélez, playboy that he was, was regarded as an excellent catch in the common sense of the word because his family was one of distinction and considered rich, although in reality they were not much so, as they endured serious hardships to maintain old decorum and not be diminished among their relatives.

But let us return to the dance, where the beginning of the fifth dance is sounding, and the gathering is putting itself into motion.

Two people plant themselves in front of Guadalupe: Luis Robles and Francisco Vélez.

“At the beginning you gave me the fifth.”
“Remember; you gave it to me.”
“And what am I to do?” awkwardly exclaimed the young woman.
“Well, dance it with me because you gave it to me,” observed Pancho Vélez.

And taking drastic action he took his disputed partner by the hand and began dancing.

“Don’t be rude”, Luis Robles accused him in exasperation, and let her decide.

But Vélez either did not hear him or pretended not to notice, because he continued swaying and turning in step with the music. The young woman’s heart was in her mouth. She could not figure out how to appease Luis Robles.

Preoccupied with this, she did not even see the forgotten Fermín Dorantes’s upset face at the shutter, although she had seen it earlier without reacting in the least. And she was drawn out of deliberating about her thankless straits only by the voice of Vélez, who began paying her compliments to which she responded with the traditional “You are very kind…” (Muy amablé…)

As the dance ended, Pancho Vélez felt a sharp tug on his coat tails at the same time that a voice said, with a commanding and arrogant tone, “Come over here!” He immediately went out into the hallway with Luis Robles, who had tugged at him, and they got into a dispute exchanging acrid and provocative words.

The fuming Luis wanted them to go from there to the street, but due to the others’ voices of reason, they left the matter for later.

News of the incident circulated within moments, and Luis Robles, figuring that his cause would be the worst bet, especially in that tribunal of cousins, took the option of leaving as the most prudent.

The dance ended a little later, as much because of the incident as the fact that it was already ten-thirty at night. Lupita was the first to leave, accompanied by her mother, by doña Raimunda, and by don Hermenegildo. The latter, as soon as he walked the women home, returned to the dance, trusting that his words of wisdom would pacify the irritable young men.

Pancho Vélez was not allowed to leave because the Ortegas, especially Belita, feared a disaster. But in the end he left with don Hermenegildo in the direction of the corner where Luis Robles was waiting surrounded by the others.

“Now I want to see, right now,” the latter exclaimed, “if you dare to repeat here what you just said.”
“Do you think I’m scared to death? Not of you or your father or all your family,” answered Vélez.

A duel over a woman in MeridaJust then a furious wallop knocked him backwards. But recovering immediately, he went at the other delivering a punch to the face. Robles, blind with rage, gave him such a kick that don Hermenegildo, waving his hands like an olive branch, intervened shouting, “Calm down, gentlemen, calm down!” But the contenders did not hear him and amidst the clamor of battle, he mistakenly received a slap on the head that sent his hat rolling in the dust.

Both contenders had moved in close and were exchanging blows to the head and face until they fell down in a tangle. As he got back up, Pancho Vélez took out a revolver and prepared to shoot, but two of the spectators grabbed him from behind to make him drop it while others, with the help of don Hermenegildo, contained Luis Robles, who had armed himself with brass knuckles. The others disappeared as if by magic, questioning their safety given the new turn of events.

This was brought to an end with the friends’ intervention and each one went off in his own direction: Luis Robles with a bump on his left cheekbone, Pancho Vélez with an injured hand, and don Hermenegildo cleaning his hat with his handkerchief.

Lupita had trouble sleeping that night. What might be happening? She would have given anything to know. Luis Robles is crazy and Pancho Vélez is no coward. They could be tearing each other to pieces and all for her, for her alone.

****
Want to catch up? Read here…
Chapter One and the Intro
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five
Chapter Six

By WD Barr

Jerry Royster, Baseball PlayerEditor’s Note: As part of a series of posts about the 2015 Liga Mexicana de Beisbol, here is our look at the first of the managers of the 16 baseball teams. Following that, the standings of the Mexican baseball teams as of the beginning of this week.

Jerry Royster of the Tigres de Quintana Roo

Jerry Royster was born in Sacramento, CA in 1952. He was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1970 and started his first major league game in August of 1973, playing third base. He had a career that spanned 15 years in which he played for five different big league teams. Jerry compiled a .249 batting average while hitting 40 home, driving in 352 and stealing 189 bases. During his career, he also played for the Chicago White Sox, the San Diego Padres and the New York Yankees. He ended his playing career playing third base with the Atlanta Braves in 1988. In 1976, he was named to the 1976 Topps All-Star Rookie Roster.

His coaching career began in 1993 as a third base coach for the Colorado Rockies, a gig that only lasted one year. Jerry was out of baseball until 2000 when, as a bench coach for Davey Lopes of the Milwaukee Brewers, he was named interim manager after Lopes got off to a disastrous start. Although the interim tag was removed 2 weeks later, Royster was fired at the end of the year following a 53-94 record.

Before being named manager of the Dodgers Triple A affiliate, the Las Vegas 51′s, in 2005, Royster had been the Dodgers infield coordinator for the 2003 and 2004 seasons.

Jerry Royster Manager in South KoreaIn 2007, Royster was signed as manager of the Lotte Giants of the South Korean Baseball League in Busan, South Korea. He became the first non-Korean to manage in the league and he managed the Giants until 2010.

The Tigres de Quintana Roo hired Royster as their manager in 2014 where he led the team to a 65-48 record and 1st place in the Sur Division of the Liga Mexicana de Beisbol. The Tigres lost to the Pericos de Puebla in the semi-final round of the divisional playoffs last year, so you can bet he is hoping to bring back his winning team in 2015.

****

Mexican Baseball Standings as of April 14 2015

Norte Division

TEAM Won/Loss|WP|GB

Toros de Tijuana 7-1| .873
Acereros del Norte 5-2 |.714|1.5
Diablos Rojos de Mexico 4-4 |.500|3.0
Rieleros de Aguascalientes 4-4 | .500|3.0
Vaqueros de la Laguna 4-4 |.500|3.0
Sultanes de Monterrey 3-5 |.375|4.0
Saraperos de Saltillo 2-5 |.286|4.5
Broncos de Reynosa 2-6 |.250|5.0

Sur Division

TEAM Won/Loss|WP|GB

Leones de Yucatan 5-3|.625
Olmecas de Tabasco 5-3|.625
Pericos de Puebla 5-3|.625
Tigres de Quintana Roo 5-3| .625
Delfines de Ciudad del Carmen 4-4|.500| 1.0
Rojos del Aguila de Veracruz 4-4|.500|1.0
Piratas de Campeche 3-5|.375|2.0
Guerreros de Oaxaca 1-7|.125|4-0

BATTING LEADERS THROUGH APRIL 12, 2015

Batting Average:
Max Ramirez (MON) .538
Ivan Terrazas (MEX) .519
Jesus Castillo (AGS) .483

Hits:
Max Ramirez (MON) 14
Ivan Terrazas (MEX) 14
Jesus Castillo (AGS) 14
Saul Soto (AGS) 14

Doubles:
Danny Richar (AGS) 6
Francisco Mendez (LAG) 5
Ruben Rivera (MEX) 5
Randy Ruiz (REY) 5

Triples:
Alejandro Gonzalez (OAX) 2
13 tied with 1

Home Runs:
CJ Retherford (TIJ) 4
Saul Soto (AGS) 4
6 tied with 3

RBIs:
Saul Soto (AGS) 16
CJ Retherford (TIJ) 12
Cristhian Presichi (MVA) 11
Jose Ruiz (MVA) 11

PITCHING LEADERS

Wins:
7 tied with 2

ERA: (10+ innings)
Cesar Valdez (TAB) 0.69
Jose Oyervidez (MVZ) 0.82
Jarrett Grube (TIG) 1.50
Jon Leicester (YUC) 1.50

WHIP: (10+ innings)
Jose Oyervidez (MVA) 0.36
Jo-Jo Reyes (CAM) 0.62
Tomas Solis (VER) 0.77

***
For those of you who, like us, forgot or never knew these things:

WP: Win Percentage
GB: Games Behind
ERA: Earned Run Average
WHIP: Walks+Hits/Innings Pitched
RBIs: Runs Batted In

By Working Gringos

YL: When did you move to the Yucatan and from where did you move?

Denis: I started visiting the Yucatan about 18 years ago, traveling with a volunteer group named Mano Amiga (www.manoamiga.net). My very first meal in the Yucatan was in Valladolid while crossing the Yucatan Peninsula to the small fishing village of Chuburna Puerto. I thought Valladolid was a quaint, sleepy village and the thought never crossed my mind of ever living here. However, during my first visit to the Yucatan, I fell in love with the people, the climate, the food… everything. The volunteer work I was doing consisted of helping high school students from the USA build concrete roofs for owner-occupied homes… sort of like Habitat for Humanity… but faster. In a good day, the groups of high school kids could complete four concrete roofs that would last for generations. I had been living in northern New Jersey for almost 20 years at the time.

YL: Why did you move?
 
Denis: I came one week the first year as a volunteer and two weeks the second year. The third year, I joined the board of directors of Mano Amiga and was visiting the Yucatan up to six times a year. At some point I realized I was giving a lot of money to Continental Airlines and started renting in Isla Mujeres.
 
YL: Why did you choose the city you now live in over other places in the world?

Denis: In 2005, I took a two week driving trip to the five Mayan states with an extended Mayan family… some from Temozon, north of Valladolid, and some from Chilon, Chiapas. In a number of the places we stayed, we had a meal in the courtyard. I loved the idea of having my morning coffee in a courtyard garden with the birds and the butterflies. So when we returned to Isla Mujeres from the trip, I made a list of five cities that I had visited as a tourist that met my criteria of being a Mayan city overlaid with a Spanish colonial city. The cities were Valladolid, Izamal, Merida, Campeche and San Cristobal de las Casas. My plan was to see them all again looking at them as a place to live rather than as a place to visit.

Since Valladolid was the closest to Isla Mujeres, it was at the top of my list. The third time I was in Valladolid looking at property, I came across the house I finally purchased. It was very run down but had good bones and I knew I could work with it. The house was on almost 1/2 acre (34m x 68m) of land in a cul de sac on a small park about 4 blocks from the main square.

Denis Larsen of Valladolid, YucatanAs I look back now on my original list, I know I have made the right choice. Izamal is too small; Merida, too big; Campeche, too remote; and San Cristobal, too cold. Valladolid is just the right size for me! Every time I go to the market, or the main square or the supermarket, I run into people I know. And these are local people, not expats. I feel like I belong and am accepted. As a small example, on Good Friday, I was standing in a huge line at the market to purchase fish. The line was moving very slowly since most of the people were buying fried fish and they had to wait for the fish to fry. An elderly man I knew came up to me and whispered that there was a fish truck about three blocks away where there was no line. We went there to purchase very fresh fish, and there was no line.

Valladolid is not for everyone. The expat community is VERY small… perhaps, 50 or 60 of all nationalities…. probably fewer than 20 full-time Americans and the rest a mix of Canadians, French, German, Belgian, Italian, Venezuelan, Portuguese, Peruvian, Austrian, Japanese and Chinese…. and probably a few that I do not know.

YL: Did you buy a house right away or rent first? Do you think you made the right decision?

Denis: In Valladolid, I purchased right away. However, I had been living on Isla Mujeres for about 4 years (on and off) in a rental. I had looked there at houses, apartments and raw land. And finally decided I did not like island living.

YL: Are you doing now what you intended to do when you moved here? If not, why not?
 
Denis: When I purchased the house I live in, I had plans to start some kind of business, but I did not know what it would be. As I remodeled the single story building, I decided to build a second floor. And then made the decision to open a bed and breakfast to help pay for the construction. I had never even considered opening a bed and breakfast and had only stayed in ones in rural Pennsylvania and New Hampshire.
  
YL: What are the most interesting things about living here for you?
 
Denis: I have three overlapping lives here, all of which provide interest and stimulation.

My bed and breakfast guests are extraordinarily interesting and diverse. They have visited everyplace I have ever thought about visiting… and have engaging lives and occupations and hobbies and interests. They are split between North Americans and Europeans with smatterings from South American, Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. But we almost always find common interests that lead to great conversations. About a year ago, we opened the “breakfast” part of the bed and breakfast to the public. And have now expanded Xoco Loco Restaurante y Bar to breakfast, almuerzo (lunch) and cena (supper) from 7:00AM to 10:00PM with a full service bar from noon to closing. Our menu is a mix of Yucatec, Mexican, Continental and “eclectic”. For instance, we have an off-menu “Elvis” sandwich of peanut butter, banana and bacon on toast. Before we opened, we hired a professional bartender to come in for five weeks, two hours a day for five days per week to teach or staff about bartending. Before, they could open a beer… period! No idea on how to open a wine or make a cocktail. A similar thing happened when we opened the bed and breakfast… we brought in a young lady who had taught housekeeping services at the Ritz-Carlton in Cancun. She taught our staff how to make a bed (none of the staff owned a bed or slept in a bed) and how to fold a towel (their family probably never had enough towels to fold… they washed them, dried them and then used them).

I am also president of the Valladolid English Library (or VEL… it is somewhat patterned after the Merida English Library). Through the library and its programs, I interact with a wide variety of people and Opening Night at the Valladolid English Libraryorganizations. We host a monthly lecture series under the palapa of Casa Hamaca Guesthouse. This is also the one time a month that I am sure to interact with our local expat community. We have hosted a summer school for local kids for the past four years and our first Easter camp this year. We have English conversation groups and are planning an English teacher training workshop to help students and recent graduates in teaching English to find the means and resources to be better, more successful teachers.

And my third life seems to be part of the very diverse local community. I have lectured, given workshops or participated in panel discussions at three universities. I helped found a group of tourist-related businesses with the objective of helping grow our businesses. And I have participated in a number of food-related events sponsored by the local government. Every year I have university students interning or students doing their practica working alongside us for periods from two weeks to three months. I have started raising Mayan stingless bees and have begun to enter a very closed community of Mayan beekeepers who provide guidance and education to me and my staff. I have a jungle garden of over 80 specimen plants, trees and flowers important to the Maya. There are still a few gaps, but I am filling them as fast as possible. And we have a language academy (Academia AMI) where we teach English (mostly) and Spanish when requested. We also have a small spa and massage business on site in a traditional Mayan thatched-roof nah (house or hut).

YL: What do you absolutely love about living here?

Denis: I never get bored. Life happens everyday. Problems appear and are solved, ignored or changed to opportunities.

YL: What do you miss from your “former life”?

Denis: Not much. My daughter visits me a couple of times a year and I visit her and her family once a year. I do miss good German and Italian sausage and have taken the first steps to make my own. Today we ate spaghetti with both hot and sweet homemade Italian sausage… not bad but spice adjustments are needed.

YL: What don’t you miss from your “former life”?

Denis: Stress. Cold weather. Short growing season. Shoveling snow. Wearing shoes. Sleeping in a bed. Isolation.

YL: What is your favorite local food?

Denis: That’s easy. Lechón al horno… roast suckling pig… even if it is not really made from suckling pig. The place I go most often to eat lechón gives me Lechón Lite… estilo Gringo (gringo style). Sin grasa y sin higado, without fat and without liver.

YL: What is your favorite time of year here and why?

Denis: I like all four seasons here… they are just a little more subtle than in the north. But the trees shed their leaves, fruits come in season and the rainy season provides relief from the May heat. The almost crisp mornings in January when I must wear long pants for two or three days. It’s all good. All of my guest rooms have air conditioning. But I don’t have it in mine. I have slept in a hammock for more than 15 years and my room does not have air conditioning. I kind of like it when I must cover myself with a blanket.

YL: Where do you take guests who visit you here to show them something really special?

Valladolid YucatanDenis: I take them to Casa de los Venados in Valladolid, Teatro de los Indiginas y Campasinos in Xo-Cen, Ek Balam Mayan ruins, the Distillery, Rio Lagartos, the Museum of the War of the Castes, the Valladolid municipal market for breakfast on Sunday, a molina where they grind corn and make tortillas, small Mayan villages to deliver dispensas (two weeks worth of food and household necessities) to the elderly, infirm and out of work, adventures on roads that really require a 4x drive (we go very slowly in a minivan) to pass cenotes, abandoned haciendas and un-explored Mayan ruins to visit Mayan bee-keepers or hunters or shaman. Small villages where the cottage industry is making huipiles and guayaberas. Various cenotes.

YL: The last time you went out to dinner, where did you go and why?

Denis: A street cart to have a sandwich (torta) of lechón. My regular lechón taqueria was closed and i was jonesing for lechón.

YL: How is the city where you live different for residents than it is for tourists?

Denis: Many of the tourists are in Valladolid for less than one hour, either on their way to or the way from Chichen Itza. The buses come from Cancun and Playa del Carmen and for most of the tourists, this is their day of “culture”. They wander around the main square, take some photos and then return to the artificial world of Playa or Cancun. Many of them are too timid to leave the main square. Most will never return to the “real” Mexico.

Denis Larsen Trip Advisor Valladolid YucatanYL: Do you have friends from the local community or do you pretty much hang with the expat crowd?

Denis: Friends from both groups. I can go for days without speaking English… except for the interactions with guests and inquiries via the internet.
 
YL: If you are working or own a business, what is it like owning and running a business here or working here? How is it different from doing the same thing in your country of origin?

Denis: In many ways it is easier to own and operate a business here than it was in New Jersey. But the language and the cultural differences sometimes make things challenging. Now I have a network of local professionals and acquaintances who I can tap when I have a question or problem.
 
YL: Do you find it more or less difficult to make a living here than in your country of origin?

Denis: I have never been very good at making a living. But I have been very successful at making a life here in Valladolid.
 
YL: Are your work habits different here?

Denis: I usually get up at 5:00AM or a little later, so that I can spend time without interruption on the computer making bookings, answering emails and checking FaceBook and world news. If I know one of my guests is checking in from Singapore, for instance, I read the news that might affect him, his country or region. It makes for a good ice-breaker when we first meet.
 
YL: Did you speak Spanish when you moved here? Where did you learn Spanish (if you did)? Is the language barrier a problem for you in your daily life?

Denis: I have been attempting to learn Spanish for 60 years and still do not do well. Most of my staff speak Spanish as a second language (they speak Yucatec Mayan as their first language) so they are not great teachers. Almost everyone in Valladolid speaks or understands at least a little of Yucatec Mayan. Valladolid was founded by the Spanish colonialists about 473 years ago on the Mayan city of Zaci (White Falcon). Many villagers still refer to the city of Valladolid as Zaci… long memories!

YL: What interesting Spanish word or saying have you learned lately? What does it mean and how did you learn it?

Denis: If a visitor is here for a few days and has a few words of Spanish, my favorite is to explain the difference between “malo” and “maa’lo.” Malo is “bad” in Spanish and maa’lo is “good” in Maya. Life can become interesting.
 
YL: Are you a Mexican citizen? Do you plan to become one?

Denis: I am a permanent resident and would like to become a Mexican citizen.
 
YL: Have you traveled much within Mexico? If so, where and what has been your favorite location to visit? What did you see there that you liked so much?

Denis: I have done a lot of volunteer work in border towns in Coahuila, visited Nogales for the afternoon, seen Cuidad de Juarez from El Paso and spent a small amount of time in Aguascalientes and Léon. I think I like the Mundo Maya more than I like the rest of México.

YL: How are you treated by Mexicans? Do you feel resented or welcome?

Denis: I feel very welcomed by the Mayas and the Yucatecas. I don’t know a lot of Mexicans. Many people of the Mayan world first identify as Maya or Yucatecas and, incidentally, as Mexicans. I have a tee shirt that I used to wear that had the Republic of Yucatan flag on it (for two short periods there existed the Republic of Yucatan consisting of the five Mayan states: Quintana Roo, Yucatan, Campeche, Tobasco and Chiapas). When I wore the shirt in Merida, I would always get a lot of thumbs up! Now I only wear guayaberas.
 
YL: How do you feel about the economic prospects of Mexico? Of the Yucatan?

Denis: I try not to think in”economic prospect” frameworks. They almost always imply “growth”. And growth is not the direction we need to think of… we need to think of sustainability NOT growth.

YL: What are some changes you are hoping for in the city in which you live? Do you see any progress towards these changes?

Denis: The police chief wants the city to be safe because his family lives here. The small business owners have been successful on keeping out large franchise businesses (or at least giving them a VERY small footprint). The beekeepers have been successful in keeping out GMO’s. All in all, I am happy with the direction of the city and the state.
 
YL: What are your plans for the future here?
 
Denis: I am at the point of not buying green bananas. However, there are interesting opportunities here:

Education: If I were younger I would start a K-12 school focusing on a vegetable garden. All things worth knowing can grow from planning, planting, tending, harvesting, preparing and eating the bounty of the garden. Math makes sense when you must plan a garden, geography makes sense when a particular plant comes from somewhere else and must be nurtured differently, botany and biology make sense when insects attack your plants and you must find a defense, culinary arts make sense when you must find a way to eat all that you have grown. Getting kids out of classrooms and into the natural environment benefits both the kids and the environment.

Fiber and fabric: Before the Spanish came, the Mayan tended high-bush cotton and wove it using back-strap looms. When the Industrial Revolution came to Mexico in the way of the first cotton factory in Valladolid, this cottage art quickly died. Cotton, as a commodity, is a fertilizer, water and pesticide user par excellence. High-bush cotton, grown sustainably, is organic and very desirable as a “boutique” export crop. In addition, the inner fibres of the banana trunk yield fibers of increasing fineness as you remove the concentric layers of the trunk. The outer layers are coarse like sisal or henequen. As you reach the inner layers, the fibers become finer and finer, approaching silk in the inner core. One of the very cool things about using banana stalks for fiber is that the banana fruits just once and then the trunk dies off. The other is that the fibers of the stalk can be separated mechanically without the use of water since most of the trunk is water. Most other “cool” fibers like hemp and bamboo need a huge amount of water to help separate the fiber.

From any of the Mayan ruins, raised limestone roads (called Sac Be) radiate to other ruins. There is a extensive network of interconnected roads including Mayan ruins in Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador and Mexico. From the ruins of Cobá in Quintana Roo to Yaxunah, Yucatan, is a 100K Sac Be straight through the jungle. The last time it has been officially walked is in the late 1920’s. There is an opportunity to make the Mayan Trail, analogous to the Inca Trail in Peru or the Appalachian Trail in the USA. For anyone with interest, I have a PowerPoint presentation of the possible benefits (economically sustainable) to the economies of Quintana Roo and Yucatan using Peru as a role model. The costs of development are very low (all that has to be done is clear the existing road of vegetation). The support services needed including outfitters, guides, transportation, food, lodging, etc. would support a new kind of tourism for the Yucatan. And this trail would be very accessible compared to the Inca trail which is at 3.000+ meters, and includes a flight to Lima, Peru and another to Cuzco and then either a train trip or a bus trip to the trailhead followed by 3 to 4 days on the trail. The Mayan Trail, on the other hand, is almost at sea level, an easy 2 hour+ bus trip from Cancun and a level trek, as opposed to one which varies from one of about 2,000 meters to over 3,400 meters. Many more people could have the possibility of the experience at a much lower cost and a much lower level of physical capacity. As a kick-off and promotional event, a once-a-year, 100k Ultra-marathon in January (when there are no major ultra-marathons) could attract runners from around the world. Various fun runs and regular marathons could also be incorporated into the event. Eventually a five (5) country interconnected network of Mayan Sac Be trails could be hiked.

Honey: The 16+ types of stingless Mayan bees produce small amounts of very rich honey. The koli cab is the biggest bee of the group and produces the greatest amount of honey… but still only about 10% of what a honeybee might produce. However, there is a market for organic, exotic honey in both the USA and Europe and, I believe, in Asia. The stingless bees, as their name implies, do not sting and therefore beekeepers do not need elaborate protective clothing or smokers. They are easy to care for. Ancient Maya regarded them as family pets. Most honey from the koli cab is now used for ceremonial or medicinal purposes.

YL: What is the one most important piece of advice you would give someone buying property and/or planning a move to the Yucatan?

Denis: Try it on for size before buying. It’s not for everybody. Rent for a minimum of six months… a year is better. Try to live as you envision yourself living if you made a permanent move.

YL: If you could say something to all the people of Mexico, what would you say?

Denis: ¡Si! ¡Si puede! (Yes! You can) and Te amo (I love you).

****

Denis Larsen is the owner of the wonderful Casa Hamaca Bed & Breakfast in Valladolid, Yucatan.

By Khaki Scott

Prizes for Paying Property Taxes Early

For the second year in a row, the current administration in Merida has held a drawing for 100 prizes won by citizens of the city who pay their property taxes (called ‘predial‘) during the first quarter of the year. Prizes included three new cars and four motorcycles. The prizes at the drawing also included 26 32-inch flat screen TVs, 26 seven-inch electronic tablets, and 41 new Mercury bicycles. The Municipality of Merida is doing well. Property taxes rose sharply over the past three years ($113 million pesos for all of 2012, compared to $142,055,000 pesos in just the first quarter of 2015), as did the number of taxable properties in Merida (187,000 in 2012, compared to 214,000 in the first quarter of 2015). From these taxes, the Municipality not only pays for streets and services, such as the expansion of potable water and electricity, the maintenance of parks, and free internet, but also gives reduced or free property taxes and/or other retirement benefits in the amount of $3.3 million pesos to 14,000 pensioners and retired city workers.

Merida Zoos to Exchange Some Species

With an increasing birth rate and the continued need to house 150 circus animals confiscated by Profepa, Centennial Zoo and Animaya are finding their space inadequate, which leads to a direct threat to the gene pool in ongoing breeding programs. In another case, the baby hippo, born at Centennial Zoo four years old, wants to challenge his father for territory. One of them needs to move. Zoo managers report that keeping so many animals at Centennial Zoo is also damaging the environment, hard-packing the ground and ruining vegetation. As a result, 74 animals from Animaya and 40 animals from Centennial Zoo will exchange places. These decisions are not made lightly. Attending the meeting that resulted in this decision were representatives from local, state and Federal agencies, as well as representatives from UADY’s School of Veterinary Medicine, and representatives from local animal aid and canine training organizations. As someone who has been driving by the zoo for years, I hope this means they are going to reunite the giraffe family.

Fashion Show for Real Women in Yucatan

On Sunday, April 20, at 2:00 PM, there is going to be a fashion show at Rancho Tierra Bonita. The 30 dresses presented will be for real women of all size and heights. The purpose is to show that beauty comes from within, not from looking like a stereotypical runway model. This fashion show is presented by the “Living in Fullness” group, directed by Alejandrina Escaroz, and the “Fashion Without Measure” project, directed by fashion designer Javier Fabian. Dresses will be by UNAM Fashion Design students and a local prestigious department store. Models will be young college women, mothers, and women who are “Living in Fullness.” Since the ladies on the runway are not professional models, they will be trained and supervised by Ruben Parra, a specialists in this field. After walking the catwalk, the ladies will share their testimony of life. This is going to be a wonderful event in a beautiful setting. Both the setting and the concept make it well worth attending.

When Solar and Wind Power are Best Options

There are 32 of the 106 municipalities in Yucatan that do not have full coverage with electricity. This is because there are many small villages in this state where the population is between 50 and 100 individuals. At least 40% of the indigenous population still lives in towns with a total population of less than 15,000. Bringing electricity and water to a village of only 50 people is, obviously, a serious cost-benefit issue when resources are scarce. Yet, the indigenous population of Yucatan is no less entitled to proper services than anyone else in the state of Yucatan. This turns attention back to the power that can be generated by sun and wind. Because of the equipment and work involved, it would take years to bring conventional electrical services to all of rural Yucatan, at tremendous cost to the state. Now, however, with a Federal matching grant, solar and wind power could be quickly brought to all of these rural areas. The good news is that this project is now underway. Two locations will be finished within two to three months and nearly 80 more are in line after that.

Designing a Workshop for Fishing and Aquaculture

How many times, world wide, have badly needed programs failed because they were developed from the top down, rather than from management asking those on the front lines what they need and how they would go about providing for those needs? Such is not the case now in the fishing industry in Yucatan. Fishermen are currently in a workshop where they are brainstorming about future strategies for fishing and aquaculture. Following that, there will be a similar workshop that includes management, academics, and other professional personnel. Information gleaned from those two workshops will be used to develop a workshop for Yucatan’s fishermen that will take place in September. This will give Yucatan’s fishermen a great start to being able to manage their industry well into the future. The Center for Research and Advanced Studies is also working with Yucatan’s beekeepers, so we expect more news about this area soon.

Fatal Motorcycle Accidents in Yucatan

In Yucatan, there is one motorcycle death every 2.87 days, along with thousands of serious injuries every year. These deaths and injuries are caused by not wearing a helmet or wearing a helmet improperly, by ignoring traffic laws, by overloading the motorcycle with passengers, by allowing minors to operate motorcycles, and by not mechanically maintaining the motorcycle. For those of us who are on the highways in vehicles, this should serve as a warning. Please be careful and always assume that a motorcycle could appear in front of you at any given time. No one wants to live with a lifetime memory of having been involved, even through no fault of your own, in a fatal accident with a motorcycle.

Paramedics Weigh in on Semana Santa

Although extra Red Cross ambulances remained on duty following the holidays, paramedics reported that they had no more calls, during the entire length of Semana Santa than they have during any normal month. This is great news for the traveling public. Over a month’s time, Red Cross ambulances handle approximately 50 calls, with most of them due to automobile accidents or pedestrians being hit by vehicles. Over the three day Easter weekend, there were only three automobile accidents between Merida and Progreso that required an ambulance. According to paramedics, this is no more than any normal weekend. Perhaps the 7,000 security professionals on duty throughout the holidays made more difference than anyone could have suspected. Whatever the reason, we are happy to report that Yucatan was safe, as usual, during the holidays. Many thanks to all of the ambulance personnel who man bases throughout Merida and the Yucatan.

Record Holiday Numbers in Progreso

Speaking of Semana Santa in Yucatan, there may be no way to count the numbers of tourists in this past weekend’s crowds in Progreso, but those who came in the 4,000 buses, taxis and combi vans can be counted. Those numbers fell somewhere between 100,000 and 120,000 visitors. At least 50,000 of the visitors remained on the malecon, the rest spread out to their vacation homes in towns and villages along the Yucatan Gulf Coast. With the addition of tens of thousands of driving visitors, many with full cars of visitors, there were traffic jams in small towns that lasted for up to an hour. Regardless of the inconvenience, small town fairs and festivals continued and a good time was had by all in Yucatan during Easter week.

Cruise Crowds Not Spring Breakers

Some service providers were disappointed this Semana Santa when the cruise ships arrived and were full of adults and families with children. Those who had planned for Spring Breakers had weak sales, but it was a week of boom times for those who cater to adults and families. Yucatan itself is a state that loves visitors and does everything it can to meet the needs of families and children, so this may be the future trend for Spring Break in Progreso. What we know for sure is that everyone was safe and well and had a marvelous time! We hope to see them all back again next year!

Happy 45th Birthday to the Yucatan State Folkloric Ballet

This past weekend, the Yucatan State Folkloric Ballet turned 45 years young. To celebrate, they held two shows at Teatro Armando Manzanero. For four decades, this group has presented Yucatan’s history and culture to its own people, and has served as Yucatan’s cultural ambassadors both nationally and internationally. They have worked with such talents as the folkloric ballets of other states in Mexico, as well as with the Chamber Choir of Yucatan. They have been to France, Spain, Italy, China, Belize, Canada and to the United States. They have danced their way through the Hispanic Day Parade in New York City and performed at a number of events in Mexico City. Through the years, they have developed a wide array of vaquerias, each more beautiful than the last. Many thanks to the Yucatan State Folkloric Ballet for their wonderful work. Yucatan Living wishes them a happy 45th birthday and many many more!

Do Children Need to Learn a Love of Culture?

Cultures survive or fail on the foundation of their collective memory. How does one go forward without knowing where one has been? The questions “Who am I” and “Who are we” have the power to ring down through the ages. However, this does not mean that one can capture the interest of children by simply sitting them in a classroom, with a history textbook, and talking at them. The Grand Museum of the Maya World now has Spring Mayan Culture classes for children between the ages of 5 and 12. These are hands-on classes, in which the children can make pottery, as well as sculpt and draw. They visit museums and learn to play Mayan games. Every aspect of their creativity and talent is encouraged, so they will learn to love who they are, as well as knowing where they came from. On this kind of foundation, it is certain that the Maya of Yucatan will continue long into the future.

“El Día Del Niño” Support For Children April 30

Support is needed for the School Children of San Simon, a highly marginalized community made up largely of children. These children are between 5 and 15 years of age and live in families that have between two and ten children each. Needless to say, parents lack the resources to purchase school supplies. We are asking you to help Enrique Valdes, who organizes aid for these children, mostly in the form of school supplies, but clothing and baby accessories will be appreciated as well. This campaign is also being organized in Cancun by Araceli Prado and Yveline Lemay (887-2450). Friends in Merida can send an e-mail to Enrique Valdes, who is the Director of Culture and Sustainable Tourism at Mayaland. They will be in Merida every Tuesday in April and will be happy to stop by your home to receive donations. Thank you in advance for anything that you can do!

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting April 13, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performances:
April 17 & 19, combined performance on April 19
April 24 & 26, combined performance on April 26
May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17
In all cases, the venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
We have not found out how long this art exhibit will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) April 13, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie Night at Hennessy’s
Come watch a movie, have dinner and drinks and enjoy time with new and old friends.
Location: Hennessy’s Restaurant and Bar, Paseo de Montejo at 41
Time: 7:00 PM, Monday
Admission: No cover

Tuesday (Martes) April 14, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Return to Oz
(USA 1985) Dorothy, saved from a psychiatric experiment by a mysterious girl, is somehow called back to Oz when a vain witch and the Nome King destroy everything that makes the magical land beautiful. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 15, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Inside Job
(2010)Takes a closer look at what brought about the financial meltdown. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Rupestre
(Mexico 2014) he director of this film, Alberto Zúñiga, accepts the invitation of cultural promoter Jorge Pantoja, founder of Tianguis Poplar, to document the history, life and motivations of a group of rockers that transformed the history of urban music of Mexico. Over 40 respondents give their testimony about the origin, importance and validity of the cultural movement that say Zuniga is like between rock’n'roll before 80 and who joined the so-called “rock in your language” “missing link” . In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 16, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Klip
(Serbia 2012) Jasna is a beautiful girl in her mid-teens, leading a crude life of the postwar generation in Serbia. In Serbian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Sound of Music
(UK 1965). Director: Robert Wise. Starring: Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer, and Eleanor Parker. A young woman leaves an Austrian convent to become governess to the children of a widowed Naval officer. Come, watch and sing along!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo
Time: 5:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Performance: International String Quartet
This performance will include Haydn’s Quartet O 76 #1 and Smetana’s Quartet in E minor “From My Life”.
Location: Hacienda Xcanatun, on the road to Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $200 pesos
Reservations: call 930-2140

Yucatan Living Opening of the Exhibition: Retrospective 1984 – 2014
A look at 30 years of the works of local photographer, Ygnacio Rivero.
Location: Galeria de Arte Municipal de Merida, Calle 65 x 56
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Mumia
(USA 2012) The film captures the life and revolutionary militancy political prisoner on death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal. The new documentary by Stephen Vittoria is an inspiring portrait of a man many consider the most famous US political prisoner. A man whose very existence challenges our beliefs about justice and freedom. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Road Home
(China 2013) Prompted by the death of his father and the grief of his mother, a man recalls the story of how they met in flashback. In Mandarin with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) April 17, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: January
(Mexico 2013) After murdering his wife, Horacio flees with his lover, Lucrecia. Refugees in a cottage in the countryside, they look to continue the love that is no longer possible to sustain. Despair and guilt will lead them to face their own limits. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Up With People
Remember Up, Up With People? (…you meet ‘em wherever you go…). They are coming to Merida. Find out more at their Facebook Page.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 at Calle 61, Merida centro
Time: 5:00 PM and 8:30 PM Friday
Admission: Donation… from $100 to $350 pesos
Reservations: Buy your tickets at www.elektrotickets.mx or call Tel. 99 9312 7835. You can also buy tickets at the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero, Segafredo Galerías cafes, in the Gran Plaza and at Universidad Marista, UADY y Colegio Rogers Hall. More information from Katelen Pérez T’Seyen at kpereztseyen [at] upwithpeople [dot] org or Angel Cancino at acancino [at] upwithpeople [dot] org.

Yucatan Living Independent Music Tour: Los Lasgori y Barzoo.
This performance is under the direction of Jairo Couoh Pech.
Location: Music Hall, Calle 30 x 29, Col. México
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Lolita
(USA 1962) A middle-aged college professor becomes infatuated with a fourteen-year-old nymphet. A famous story by Nabokov. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) April 18, 2015

Yucatan Living Weekly Meetup: Sabados de Gay Coffee – Every Saturday
This is a recurring, gay friendly event, hosted by Cindy Santos R, who is looking forward to creating a network of LGBT and others who are LGBT friendly. The objectives are to be in touch, get together, and make new friends. Visit their website at Merida LGBT Professionals Meetup.
Location: Gloria Jean’s Coffee, Av. Andres Garcia Lavin #303 x Calle 37 y Calle 37-A, Local 7, San Ramon Norte, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 5:30 PM every Saturday
Admission: Free but purchase your own coffee and food

Yucatan LivingMovie: Pulp
(UK 2014) The film centers around December 8, 2012, at the time when Jarvis Cocker & Co. were getting ready to celebrate their anticipated concert return to his native Sheffield Motorpoint Arena facilities, the latest presentation stadium band. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Return of the Living Dead
(USA 1985) When two bumbling employees at a medical supply warehouse accidentally release a deadly gas into the air, the vapors cause the dead to rise again as zombies. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(Mauritania 2013) The Malian city of Timbuktu has fallen into the hands of religious extremists. Kidane lives quietly in the dunes Satima with his wife, his daughter Toya and Issam, a shepherd boy of 12 years. But city dwellers suffer the regime of terror imposed by the jihadists: banned music, laughing, smoking and even play football. Women have become shadows trying to resist with dignity. Each day, some Islamists launch makeshift court judgments as absurd as tragic. In Arabian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), April 19, 2015

Yucatan Living Gypsy Market / Bazaar
Come out and support local artists and artisans – plus sample some great specialty food products.
Location: midway between Chelen & Chuburna at Graciela’s Secret Garden, just look for the cars!
Time: 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free but bring money and buy, buy, Buy!

Yucatan Living Fashion Show for Real Women in Yucatan8058359798
There is going to be a fashion show at Rancho Tierra Bonita. The 30 dresses presented will be for real women of all size and heights. The purpose is to show that beauty comes from within, not from looking like a stereotypical runway model. This fashion show is presented by the “Living in Fullness” group, directed by Alejandrina Escaroz, and the “Fashion Without Measure” project, directed by fashion designer Javier Fabian. Dresses will be by UNAM Fashion Design students and a local prestigious department store. Models will be young college women, mothers, and women who are “Living in Fullness.” Since the ladies on the runway are not professional models, they will be trained and supervised by Ruben Parra, a specialists in this field. After walking the catwalk, the ladies will share their testimony of life. This is going to be a wonderful event in a beautiful setting. Both the setting and the concept make it well worth attending.
Location: Rancho Tierra Bonita
Time: 2:00 PM Sunday
Admission: We don’t know.

Yucatan Living Orquesta Sinfonica de Yucatan: Summer Nights
Starring Carla Dirlikov as teh Mezzo-soprano and Juan Carlos Lomonaco as director. Carla is a Mexican singer who has work with the Orchestra on different occasions. She will interpret Summer Nights by Hector Berlioz and the Symphony Number 3 by Sergei Rachmaninov will be played for the first time in Merida.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Tickets on sale

Yucatan Living Chamber Sundays: For the Love of Baroque
This performance is by the International String Quartet of Yucatan.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: The Double
(UK 2013) A clerk in a government agency finds his unenviable life takes a turn for the horrific with the arrival of a new co-worker who is both his exact physical double and his opposite – confident, charismatic and seductive with women. Stars Jesse Eisenberg, Mia Wasikowska and the enigmatic Wallace Shawn. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) April 20, 2015

No events announced for today… yet!

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Chelem Christmas Toy Drive: Tuesday, April 21
April Bingo/Raffle Extravaganza. Just one of the Prizes is an original Paul Lawrence Oil Painting. The fun and funky Nacional Beach Club and Bungalows in Mahahual has donated a three night stay and Lolo Lorena Bed and Breakfast in Isla Mujeres has donated a one night stay. For a $100 peso donation, they will throw 5 tickets in the drawing for you. You do not have to be present to participate in the drawing. You can let them know where to meet you and they can get your tickets to you, or you can donate through PayPal on their donation page.
Location: LaBarca/Dunas Hotel and Restaurant, Chelem
Time: 6:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: There are several categories of bingo cards, so come on out and bring plenty of pesos.

Yucatan Living Red Cross Benefit: Chip and His Dog – Thursday, April 23 & Friday, April 24
Vocel en Escena will present the children’s opera “Chip and His Dog.” All proceeds will go to support the Red Cross.
Location: Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33 #174 x 112 y 114.
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Adults: $100 pesos, Children: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $80 pesos
Tickets on Sale Now at the following locations: (1) Progreso’s Red Cross, Calle 35 x 72 y 74, (2) Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33, #174 x 112 y 114 in Progreso, and DigiPrint Progreso, Calle 29 # 152-A x 89 y 82.

Yucatan Living Bird Photography Workshop: April 24, 25, and 26
This workshop is limited to 12 participants. Participants must have their own photographic equipment, including zoom lenses.
Location: Offices of Pronatura Peninsula de Yucatan (Calle 32 #260 x 47 y 47-A, Col. Pinzon II, Merida.
Time: Friday, 24th: 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Saturday, 25th: 7:00 AM to 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Sunday, 26th: 7:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Fee: $1,500 pesos . Must register by April 21.
More information and Registration: (999) 988-4436 ext 113

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – April 24 to May 4
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion, although people of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: During Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Opera Yucatan, A.C. – May 02
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies beginning May 2.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By WD Barr

Renovated seats at Kukulcan Stadium in Merida Yucatan MexicoEditor’s Note: Kukulcan Alamo Stadium has been renovated and the 2015 baseball season has begun. Those of you who enjoyed baseball in the United States may find that you enjoy it even more here in the Yucatan. There are good teams, players and a lot of fun is had by all who attend and play baseball games in Mexico. To keep you more informed about this time-honored favorite pasttime in the Americas, we will be bringing you periodic updates and articles from a new writer, WD Barr, who writes about baseball in Mexico on his own blog (linked below). We hope that you will enjoy this, and that knowing more about the local teams might even spur you to go see a game or two in person. Enjoy!

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The Liga Mexicana de Beisbol (Mexican Baseball Leagure) presence in the Yucatan is firmly established with three teams that compete in the equivalent of America’s Triple A Baseball. Young players with potential to advance to the major leagues are given a venue to exhibit their talents for the major league scouts. Older players, those who know that they will never advance beyond the minor leagues, still have the chance to play and continue living their dream.

The paycheck is not the main motivation for the players, and the travel schedule can be brutal. But, this game played by men who have a talent for hitting a small round ball, can be rewarding on its own merits. Pitchers face an even harder task. As the saying goes, “If you can’t get them out in Triple A, you’ll never make it to the big leagues, kid”. The potential for a callup to the Grande Liga is a driving force for some, while others love the game so much they will endure the hardships, hoping for one last shot at their dream of reaching the big leagues but playing because it is what they do best.

LEague of Mexican BaseballThe Liga Mexicana de Beisbol (LMB) is made up of 16 teams, located in towns from Cancun to Tijuana. The league is divided into two divisions, Norte and Sur. The Piratas de Campeche (Pirates), Tigres de Quintana Roo(Tigers) and Leones de Yucatan(Lions) are in the Sur, or Southern Division. The five other teams in the division are from Ciudad del Carmen, Puebla, Oaxaca, Tabasco and Veracruz.

The rosters of LMB have players with checkered pasts… some with little prospect of moving to the big league and some with great potential and bright futures. They all share a love of baseball and the hope that they can attract the attention of one of the big league scouts.

The Piratas de Campeche, managed by Dan Firova, last won the LMB Championship in 2004 and made the playoffs in 2014, but were ousted in the first round by the Pericos de Puebla. Estadio Nelson Barrera, the 6,000 seat stadium in downtown Campeche is home to the Piratas. With good pitching and timely hitting, Campeche will contend this year. The outfield in 2015 is young and 18 year old pitcher Francisco Haro, along with some seasoned veterans, should have the Piratas back in the playoffs in 2015.

Estadio Beto Avila, a 9,500 seat facility in Cancun, is home to the Tigres de Quintana Roo. Piloted by former major leaguer Jerry Royster, the Tigres made the playoffs in 2014 only to lose the semi-final round to the eventual league runner up, Pericos de Puebla. The Tigres have won 11 LMB Championships, the latest in 2013. Quintana Roo has a good mix of talent with excellent hitters and very good pitching and can be expected to compete for a playoff spot and contend for the LMB title.

Leones de Yucatan baseballThe Leones de Yucatan play their home games in El Estadio Kukulcan on the southeast side of Merida, just off of the Periferico. Although the Leones did not make the LMB Playoffs in 2014, they did win a championship in 2006 and look to rebound in 2015 with a veteran lineup. Roberto Saucedo, a 40 year old Designated Hitter (DH) leads this year’s team with the potential to go deep into the playoffs. Manager Wilfredo Romero is skillfully employing a mix of youngsters with veterans to produce a winning combination of players.

Although early in the 2015 season, the Leones de Yucatán are 2-1, the Tigres de Quintana Roo are 1-2 and the Piratas de Campeche are winless at 0-3.

The Season So Far

The 2015 season has just started, so here is an update of the last Leones game, played against Guerrero, as well as an update on the other games played last week. Looking ahead, each team in the league has 110 games to play culminating in the playoffs in mid August.

Leones vs. Oaxaca Guerreros lose 6-2

On April 5, the season opened with a game between the Tigres of Quintana Roo and the Leones. Sadly for Yucatecan fans, the Tigres won 4-2 to put a bit of a damper on the excitement of the event. Two days later, the Leones faced the Guerreros de Oaxaca (Warriors), winning 5-1 at the start of the series.

The next day, the Leones faced the Oaxaca Guerreros again. Juan Delgadillo started off badly for the Leones, giving up 2 singles and a walk to Alejandro Gonzalez to load the bases with no outs in the top of the 1st. Mike Jacobs followed with a single that scored Alan Sanchez and Jaime Brena. Tim Torres then ground out to first to score Gonzalez. The Guerreros had staked starter Ruddy Acosta to an early 3-0 lead.

Luis Medina singled to lead off the 2nd for Oaxaca, stole second and scored on a triple by Alejandro Gonzalez as the Guerreros increased their lead to 4-0.

The score would remain the same until the top of the 8th inning. With one out, Yunesky Sanchez doubled and came around to score on a 2 run home run to left by Mario Valenzuela that gave the Guerreros a 6-0 lead.

The Leones got on the scoreboard in the bottom of the 8th. Hector Gimenez singled with two outs. Jesus Valdez singled and Luis Garcia hit a ground ball deep in the hole at short for an infield single that loaded the bases. Willy Aybar came through with a single that scored Gimenez and Valdez to narrow the gap to 6-2 but the Leones would score no more runs and Oaxaca won by the 6-2 score.

Game Statistics

Ruddy Acosta pitched 5 shutout innings to get the win for Oaxaca while Juan Delgadillo gave up 4 runs in his first two innings of work and was charged with the loss for Yucatan. Jaime Brena was 3 for 5 on the night for the Guerreros while Mike Jacobs went 1 for 4 with 2 RBIs. DH Mario Valenzuela had the home run in 4 at bats driving in 2. Ivan Araujo, Jesus Valdez and Luis Garcia were all 2 for 4 in the game for the Leones and Willy Aybar went 1 for 4 with 2 RBIs. 4,802 people attended this game at El Estadio Kukulkan.

Other Games Around the League

Diablos Rojos de Mexico baseball in YucatanThe Diablos Rojos de Mexico(Red Devils) collected 25 hits on their way to a 16-10 mauling of the Broncos de Reynosa. This was not a pitchers night by either team. The Diablos had 7 extra base hits, 6 doubles and a triple by Jesus Fabela while the Broncos had a double and home runs by Frank Diaz and Randy Ruiz.The game took 3 hours and 43 minutes to play and only 1,172 were in attendance.

The Veracruz Aquilas (Eagles) scored 4 runs in the 2nd and 4 more in the 6th to score 11 runs on 16 hits. Ciudad del Carmen’s Delfines (Dolphins) managed 8 hits and 3 runs but committed 4 errors in the game. Enrique Osorios went 3 for 4 with 2 RBIs for the Aguilas and Alejandro Rivera was 2 for 5 with 2 RBIs. Alex Valdez had a 2 run home run for the Delfines. 2,676 fans turned out in Veracruz to watch the home team win.

sultanes-de-monterrey Mexican baseball in YucatanManuel Lopez singled to score Christian Quintero with the go-ahead run for the Tabasco Olmecas in the top of the 9th and Luis Ayala shutdown the Piratas in the bottom of the inning to save the game for Jose Cobos and win for the Olmecas 5-4. Osiris Matos took the loss for Campeche. Daniel Nunez went 2 for 4 with 2 RBIs for the Olmecas and Jasson Atondo was 2 for 4 with an RBI for the Piratas. 1,073 fans showed up at Parque Nelson Barrera in Campeche to view the contest.

Pablo Ortega pitched 7 shutout innings for the Quintana Roo Tigres allowing just 4 hits while striking out 3, and winning the game 5-0. Jesus Castillo and Francisco Rodriguez pitched the final two innings to preserve the win for Ortega. Carlos Valencia went 2 for 3 with an RBI for Quintana Roo and Carlos Gastelum was 2 for 5 with an RBI. Jon Del Campo had a double in 4 at bats for the Pericos. 3,759 saw the Tigres knock the Pericos from the ranks of the unbeaten as Puebla fell to 3-1 on the year.

The Toros de Tijuana(Bulls) remained unbeaten so far, 4-0 on the year, with a 7-2 win over the Sultanes de Monterrey (Sultans). Dennys Reyes got his 2nd win of the year in relief. The Toros scored all 7 runs on 5 home runs. CJ Retherford hit his 3rd home run, leading the LMB, in 4 games. Max Ramirez had a solo home run for the Sultanes on a 2 acereros-de-monclova Mexican baseball in Yucatanfor 3 night. 5,188 were on hand to see the home team win again.

The game between Rieleros de Aguascaliente and the Acereros de Monclova was suspended by rain in the middle of the 7th with the score tied 6-6. And the game between the Saraperos de Saltillo and the Vaqueros de Laguna was rained out completely.

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If you love baseball, keep following the Liga Mexicana de Beisbol here at yucatanliving.com and follow WD Barr at www.wdbarrsports.blogspot.mx or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/wdbarr.

Click here for the schedule of Leones baseball games.

By Working Gringos

Honda CRV for sale

For Sale: 2015 Honda CRV EXL-2WD

Description: The car is only 2 months old with 2,900 kms. It still has that new car smell!

The car has leather interior, a navigation system, and keyless entry.

Price: $335,665.00 MXN – 15% less than the price we paid.
Honda for sale in Merida Yucatan

Contact: If you are interested, please email Donna at pyraprod [at] yahoo [dot] com or call 999 178-4594.

By Nadine Calder

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Six

Doña Prudencia got up that morning in a bad mood. The previous afternoon a messenger from the hacienda had arrived, carrying on a mule a sack of beans and another of fruit, but also a letter that gave her the bad news that the process of scraping pulp from the henequen fibers had been suspended because the steam engine was having problems.

Hacienda worker in Yucatan

“I’m going to blow my top,” she said. “Sometimes it’s the fire stoker arguing with the cart boss. Other times countless cut leaves are drying out or this or that part of the machine has broken. If it isn’t that work has been interrupted because five or six workers are sick. And all of them asking for a fortune . . . . I don’t know how I’m going to do it. Some day when it’s least expected, I’m going to sell the plantation or abandon the whole place and let it go to ruin.”

The messenger, who had gone to see the machinist, returned saying that Sr. Gómez couldn’t go to the plantation until Monday (it was Wednesday) because he had many commitments for the week.

“He has to go!,” exclaimed doña Prudencia, beside herself. “He’s embarrassed to repair something that he didn’t know how to fix right fifteen days ago. They go on, doing bad work and making the problem worse and then they bill us again charging a fortune. Surely they know how to do this! But eight days later the same problem comes up again and it’s back to the same foolishness.”

Niña,” she said, turning to her daughter who was brushing her hair in a dining room chair. “Get things together so that we can write to your brother.”

And with these words she went into the interior rooms, coming out a little later with a tin container in one hand and, holding against her chest with the other, several brown-paper wrapped packages Family in Yucatanwhich she fit into the can after placing it on a table. She was finishing securing the lid of the container, tying it with string, when Lupita, after finding her writing paraphernalia on a wooden pedestal table, pulled up a chair, seated herself on it, and dipping her pen in the inkwell, spoke, raising her voice so that doña Prudencia, who was now in the hall, would hear her.

“I’m ready, mamá.”
“I’ll be right there.”

While she was waiting, the mischievous girl entertained herself by drawing letters and extravagant sketches on the cover of a Manila folder, adding to the many that already littered various items on the tabletop.

Her mother finally began to dictate various recommendations regarding work on the plantation and other details, ending with: “Your mother who loves you and wants to see you”.

Doña Prudencia immediately placed some scribbles at the end of the letter believing she was writing her name, and she hadn’t even lifted the pen when she said,

“Let’s add a flourish.”

This matter of the flourish was indispensable in doña Prudencia’s letters. At first, she had not included the “your mother who you know loves you and wants to see you” but, taking care to demonstrate affection for her children, it was that ubiquitous flourish that came to be her trademark.

At this, three knocks sounded on the door of the zaguán.

“Who’s there?”, the two asked at the same time.

“Me”, answered the voice from the street, as if that pronoun would be enough for them to recognize.

Lupita went to the shutter at the window.

“It’s the Ortegas”, she said to her mother with alarm.

Quickly she then slipped into the room adjacent to the parlor, as she was somewhat disheveled, in old sandals and bare feet. She immediately half-closed the doors and picked up the red-striped stockings she had tossed aside. After putting them and some pretty calfskin shoes on, she looked in the mirror, dusted powder on her face and finished braiding her beautiful hair.

Meanwhile, two young women, a little older than she, had appeared in the parlor.

“To what do we owe the pleasure of seeing you here at this hour?” said doña Prudencia, squeezing the hands they offered her and turning pleasant the sour expression on her face.

“Oh, nothing, doña Prudencia. We came to see if you would do us a favor. Where’s Lupita?”

“In her room; she’ll be here soon. And what is it that you want?”

“Well, as you know the carnaval is coming up, and Belita (Isabelita) wants to learn the lanceros and some other dances. And tonight our cousin Pancho, our brother Perico and six more friends are coming to the house so we can practice, just among friends, with two groups.”

“Good idea.”

“Yes, but the reason for our visit is to let you know that we’re counting on Lupita and we’re begging you to let her join us.”

“But, girls, Lupita doesn’t dance.”

Woman in Yucatan“She danced at Tonita Pérez’s wedding . . .”

“Nothing more than square dances. And that because the group was incomplete and they coaxed her not to leave the three couples in position unable to dance.”

At that Lupita appeared in the parlor.

The Ortega girls arose, and each one of them, stretching her neck to bring her face near, exchanged loud kisses with the recent arrival, who seated herself on the sofa.

Josefita Ortega, who was the older, said to her:

“We want to know if you’ll join us in a rehearsal at our house tonight.”
“A rehearsal,” Lupita exclaimed with delight. “I don’t know if mamá wants me to” she added, timidly lowering her head and raising her eyes in order to see the effect her observation would have on her mother.

“I’ve told them you don’t know how to dance”, doña Prudencia pointed out in order to say something.

“Well, for that very reason”, Lupita almost wheedled in reply.

“All right. If you want to, I don’t see a problem, as long as it doesn’t end too late.”

“No, doña Prudencia. You’ll have her here by 10:00 tonight”, exclaimed Belita firmly, in order to put to rest this last of the señora’s reservations.

“Who is going?”, asked the now satisfied invitee.

“Well, you, our neighbor Chona Garcia and the two of us. That’s four. And the three Palomos and Rosa Barrera, eight, for two groups.”

“And what time does it start?”

“At seven thirty, but it’s better that you come a little early.”

“Well, we’ll be waiting for you!” said Josefita, getting to her feet. “We still have to let Chonita and the Palomos know.”

And they returned to the handshakes with the señora and the kissing with Lupita, who accompanied them to the door of the zaguán, where they had another interesting chat.

In it the daughter of the house explained that she had known since the day before what was developing with the dance and that the one principally behind it was Pancho Vélez, her visitors’ cousin, although she was unaware if it had been decided who the other boys were.

“You tease!”, retorted Belita mischievously. “You want to make us believe that Luis Robles hasn’t told you that he’s one of them.”

“Oh God!”, replied Lupita bursting with pleasure at the joke. “I never speak with Luis Robles. He comes by here, but…”

“No, and they say that because of that, Fermín Dorantes is upset with him.”

“Let’s see”, interrupted Josefita. “Which one of them would you rather have go?”
“Me? Both of them.”
“But Lupe; that is so like you.”
“Why?”
“So you want both of them, right?
“But, girl, what do you want me to answer? Let both go or neither one go, it’s the same thing.”
“Right. Now you make yourself indifferent.”

And so they continued chatting, until the Ortega girls left for good. Lupita went into the parlor, and with obvious pleasure at the prospect of the rehearsal and of the favors and compliments that it promised her, she sat down at the piano and noisily set about playing a mazurka.

Niña, let’s finish that letter”, said her mother, interrupting her when she entered a little later.

And it was finished and placed in the envelope and dispatched with the wrapped parcels, after which doña Prudencia had a look at the kitchen, gave four scoldings to the maids, locked horns with a boy because he was Butaqueplaying and had not finished sweeping, and going for her sewing basket, seated herself in a butaque* in the hallway to do some mending, helped by a little girl. Meanwhile, Lupita had already hurriedly given her piano lesson a bad run-through. Then she went to her room, put her sandals back on and began the operation of rolling the hair around her face into cone shapes so that the wavy hair that would have to look good that night would have been properly curled. When she was finished, she picked up a novel that she had on her dressing table, flung her body into the hammock and sent her imagination flying through the world of illusions.

Soon she mentally selected the outfit she was going to wear and the accessories she thought would have the best effect, devoting a good amount of time speculating about the probable impressions awaiting her at the dance rehearsal.

She opened the book, looked for the page she had left off on and had four chapters under her belt when she was interrupted by the announcement that lunch was on the table.

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*small, low sling-chair made of wood and leather

Want to catch up? Read Chapter One and the Intro, Chapter Two, Chapter Three, Chapter Four and Chapter Five here.

By Khaki Scott

At the Beach: Telephone and Internet Service

As science, industry, and import/export business grow at the Port of Progreso, reliable telephone and internet service is more important than ever before. Recently, a tech company called ITD took over Motul Connect. Outages are a thing of the past and superior customer service is being reported by users. Packages run from 2 to 10 MB download and begin at $660 pesos per month. Customers can pay online and can even turn the service off when they are gone for extended periods of time. This is a company that even calls its customers to check on how their service has been! Also, Telcel has upgraded its service to Progreso to a 4G LTE high-speed network that allows surfing the net at up to 20 MB per second. It supports 30 different models of phones, tablets and USB modems. This means a great deal to business operations, as well as to the talented professionals who are being courted to come to this area to work. Expats who live at the beach are also the beneficiaries of these new services and it means a great deal to them to finally be securely connected to each other, to family and friends back home, and to the world.

Additional Progreso Events During Semana Santa

While tens of thousands of Yucatecos were enjoying their beach vacations, two groups took advantage of the days off to hold annual conventions and events. On Thursday, April 2, there was a Zumba marathon in the auditorium of Parque Morelos. This marathon was in support of the Yucatan Association Against Autism and Other Related Disorders of AC Development. On Easter Sunday, at the Casa de la Cultura, the first Geek Progreso 2015 convention was held. This event was for all Cospley and Anime lovers. There were lots of bands and booths selling clothing and other items. Both of these events were designed to raise awareness in the community and to include young people in supporting their community and altruistic causes. Community activity in the coastal towns and villages in Yucatan is at an all-time high and is a measure of welcomed improvements in quality of life all along the coast.

New Tennis Courts in Progreso

Over the holidays, with thousands of children out of school for Easter vacation, two new sports parks were opened in Progreso. They include areas for basketball, volleyball, soccer, chess and tennis. On opening day, 100 chess players were on hand to inaugurate their own new areas of the parks. One of the most often asked questions we get from new expats is concerned with where they can find public tennis courts. Now, there are two new courts in parks at the beach. Parques Morales and Vicente Guerrero, both in Progreso, are open and available for those who want to play tennis. There are also free chess classes available.

Chicxulub Crater Explored by UNAM

During March and April, 100 scientists from a number of countries will drill 1,500 meters into the center of the Chicxulub crater as part of a project by the Geophysics Institute of UNAM. This crater is the world’s best-preserved terrestrial scar. Drilling is designed to examine the area for samples of flora and fauna that will give us more information about the environment as it was 65 million years ago. The water depth at the point where they are drilling is only about 20 meters. The rig itself is safe for the environment and has been used in a number of high profile environmental projects around the world. No marine life will be harmed during this project. Some of the most notable scientists working on this project include Joanna Morgan of Imperial College, UK; Sean Gulick, University of Texas at Austin, USA; David McInroy, ECORD Science Operator, the European Union; and Mario Rebolledo Vieyra, of the Yucatan Center for Scientific Research. Following 50 days of drilling, there will be up to one year of laboratory studies prior to a final report of findings. It is expected that these findings will contribute to a better understanding of climate change.

Malcolm and Jillian Bedell In the News

Malcolm and Jillian Bedell are former expats in Yucatan and the founders of Yolisto. They have moved home to Maine, become the parents of two precious baby girls, and have built a wonderful career around their website From Away. Now, they are opening a sandwich wagon called “Wich Please.” It is set to open May 15 in Rockland, Maine’s Buoy Park. Malcolm and Jillian have a new book out called Eating in Maine. Their first book was called “‘Wich Please: 30 Sandwiches to Help You Win Friends and Influence People.” Go to their website: From Away to see Malcolm’s wonderful food photography. It brings new meaning to “looks good enough to eat.” There is a link there to order each of their books. Congratulations, as always, to Malcolm and Jillian Bedell for charting their own course and sticking to it.

Mexican Students Participate in UK’s KICK

Three hundred nineteen Mexican students from the best secondary and high schools in Mexico are traveling to England to participate in Kaplan International Mexico, a leading provider of language courses specializing in English language courses and other study abroad programs. Mexico’s 319 participants in the KICK competition will pit their English language skills against other international groups of students. This Kaplan International Knowledge Challenge is designed to help young people cultivate friends from around the world, as well as to build their confidence in an international setting. These types of events are key to Mexico’s youth being able to bring the country into a more successful future for all Mexicans. Congratulations and best wishes to all of the Mexican students who head off for this competition in England.

Yucatan’s USDA Certified Beef

The beef industry in Yucatan works tirelessly to improve their herds and the quality of their beef. This has now earned Yucatan’s cattle the designation of USDA Certified Beef and cleared the way for their exportation to the United States. In addition, Yucatan’s Maya pulpo (octopus) fishermen are already in training to meet the standards of the European Union. Yucatan already has 46 pulpo boats and will be able to export their catch to the European Union as soon as the training of the fishermen is complete. Gone are the days when Yucatan’s exports were limited to a few citrus fruits. Agriculture, animal husbandry, and all forms of rural development are big business today in Yucatan and the quality of rural life in this state is taking giant leaps forward. We certainly want to congratulate the cattle producers of Yucatan on their new USDA certification and wish them all the best for the future of their industry.

The Tourist Police Speak Four Languages

The Tourist Police in Yucatan are some of the nicest young people you will ever meet, and they can help visitors now in four languages. Twenty-two of the Tourist Police members are fluent in Spanish, English, French and Maya. They spend most of their time in places where there is the permanent presence of foreigners. This includes Progreso’s Malecon, the highway between Progreso and Merida, Paseo Montejo and the Plaza Grande. When needed, they move out to Chicxulub and Chelem. They can usually be found at archaeological sites, on beaches, and in the colonial cities of Yucatan. We would like to thank the Tourist Police for all they do for foreigners who often find themselves in need of just a little help or direction when they are new to our adopted state. They make visiting and living in Yucatan easier for all of us.

Tourism Agreement with Chinese Province of Anhui

Yucatan recently began exporting pork to the Chinese Province of Anhui. Now, in order to strengthen economic, tourism and cultural ties between the State of Yucatan and the Province of Anhui, an agreement has been signed to promote reciprocal tourism. The Governor of Yucatan said that the State of Yucatan is an open land to the world and to establishing relationships with other cultures. Over the past decade, Yucatan’s ties with China have been mostly academic, creating a generation of young Yucatecos and Chinese who are able to function in business in both nations. We know that Yucatan will be gracious to all of her Chinese tourists, and can hardly wait to hear the experiences of the first Yucatecos to visit Anhui.

Working Dads and Daycare in Yucatan

This is one of those stories that makes us wonder why state and federal workers didn’t demand equal rights to daycare years ago. In most of our cultures, we are quite proud of ourselves when we provide daycare to working mothers. Little thought has ever been given to the daycare needs of working fathers. Now, any working head of household who pays into the Institute for Social Security and Services for State Workers (ISSSTE), or who works for a federal agency, has the right to enroll their children in free daycare. We suspect that it won’t be long before this concept is extended to all workers. This is a good thing to hear in a week when other states in other nations might not be sensitive to the rights of their own people. Yucatan continues to amaze everyone with the depth of respect it has for human rights.

By Working Gringos

This Week… starting April 06, 2014

Yucatan Living School’s Still Out
Yucatan’s children will not return to school until Monday, April 13. Families are still on vacation out of the city, which means that state and city sponsored events will not return until the following week. In the meantime, there are loads of activities going on at neighborhood parks, so do get out and about in your own area. As you can see by our Coming Soon section, events pick back up quickly as soon as the Easter vacation ends.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
We have not found out how long this art exhibit will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Salsa for Gringos
If you are in the mood to dance, you can be certain that Anny is organizing a class just for you! Two new salsa classes are beginning in Merida. We are listing them once here, then moving them to Yucatan Living’s Ongoing Events and Classes page.

For the next two weeks, starting this week…Tuesdays and Thursdays
Location:Hennessy’s, Paseo de Montejo
Time: 10:30 AM Reoccurs weekly on Tuesday and Thursday
Admission: $400 pesos per month

Mondays and Wednesdays
Location: Liberdanza Dance Studio, Calle 24 #95-A x 13 y 15 in Chuburna de Hidalgo, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 7:00 PM Reoccurs weekly on Monday and Wednesday
Admission: $350 pesos per month
For More Information: call Anny at 923-3736 or (999) 125-0466 or e-mail: animex [at] prodigy [dot] net [dot] mx

Monday (Lunes) April 06, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie Night at Hennessy’s
Come watch a movie, have dinner and drinks and enjoy time with new and old friends. Tonite’s movie: Nine Queens, starring Ricardo Darin from Argentina.
Location: Hennessy’s Restaurant and Bar, Paseo de Montejo at 41
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: No cover

Tuesday (Martes) April 07, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Zelig
(USA 1983) “Documentary” about a man who can look and act like whoever he’s around, and meets various famous people. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 08, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Upstream Color
(USA 2013) A man and woman are drawn together, entangled in the life cycle of an ageless organism. Identity becomes an illusion as they struggle to assemble the loose fragments of wrecked lives. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: January
(Mexico 2013) After murdering his wife, Horacio flees with his lover, Lucrecia. Refugees in a cottage in the countryside, they look to continue the love that is no longer possible to sustain. Despair and guilt will lead them to face their own limits. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 09, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: How to Make a Book with Steidl
(Germany 2010) Amazing documentary, in English: The movie observes the publisher, as he collaborates with the world famous photographers Joel Sternfeld, Robert Frank, Ed Ruscha, Jeff Wall and Robert Adams, at their studios and other places of work, in New York, London and Paris, in the Katar desert, and, last but not least, in Göttingen. Here, in “Steidlville”, their works are printed on Steidl‘s own machines, in three shifts. In goes the idea, out comes the finished book. In English.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan LivingMovie: Pulp
(UK 2014) The film centers around December 8, 2012, at the time when Jarvis Cocker & Co. were getting ready to celebrate their anticipated concert return to his native Sheffield Motorpoint Arena facilities, the latest up to now- presentation stadium band. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Friday (Viernes) April 10, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Despertar el Polvo
(Mexico 2013) This is the story of man who has suffered the transgressed living a life of crime and corruption. The neighborhood is the stage where he roams the streets invisible, ignored, lonely, lost in his misery. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Drama / Theater / Contemporary Circus: Magma
This is a performance by Colectivo Clo (Uruguay), starring Maria Noel Rosas and Bruno Tognola. It is a beautiful scenic performance that has been on tour throughout Mexico.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, which is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that he has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state, he discovers Anna origin: his real name is Ida and is Jewish by birth; in addition, his family lived a tragic fate. Meetings begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing his faith and his forces. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) April 11, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Last Days Here
(USA 2011) Bobby Liebling was the charismatic singer of 70′s hard-rockers and doom pioneers, Pentagram. Today dying in his father’s basement smoking crack and heroin, a zombie with overwhelming sores and skin mottling, toothless and disjointed infections, he flirts with death daily. The film begins with the encounter between Liebling and Sean “Pellet” Pelletier, friend and manager who will try to revive the career of the late metal myth. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Drama / Theater / Contemporary Circus: Magma
This is a performance by Colectivo Clo (Uruguay), starring Maria Noel Rosas and Bruno Tognola. It is a beautiful scenic performance that has been on tour throughout Mexico.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Sweeney Todd
(USA 2007) The infamous story of Benjamin Barker, AKA Sweeney Todd, who sets up a barber shop down in London which is the basis for a sinister partnership with his fellow tenant, Mrs. Lovett. Based on the hit Broadway musical. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Mumia
(USA 2012) The film captures the life and revolutionary militancy political prisoner on death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal. The new documentary by Stephen Vittoria is an inspiring portrait of a man many consider the most famous US political prisoner. A man whose very existence challenges our beliefs about justice and freedom. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), April 12, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Tim’s Vermeer
(USA 2013) Inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer. Does it sound kind of dull… if you are interested in art, it is MOST fascinating! In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) April 13, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events planned for Today, yet! !

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Performance: International String Quartet : Thursday, April 16
This performance will include Haydn’s Quartet O 76 #1 and Smetana’s Quartet in E minor “From My Life”. Note: There is only one performance by the International String Quartet in April.
Location: Hacienda Xcanatun
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: $200 pesos
Reservations: call 930-2140

Yucatan Living Up With People : Friday, April 17
Remember Up, Up With People? (…you meet ‘em wherever you go…). They are coming to Merida. Find out more at their Facebook Page.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 at Calle 61, Merida centro
Time: 5:00 PM and 8:30 PM
Admission: Donation… from $100 to $350 pesos
Reservations: Buy your tickets at www.elektrotickets.mx or call Tel. 99 9312 7835. You can also buy tickets at the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero, Segafredo Galerías cafes, in the Gran Plaza and at Universidad Marista, UADY y Colegio Rogers Hall.

Más información:

Katelen Pérez T’Seyen
kpereztseyen [at] upwithpeople [dot] org

Angel Cancino
acancino [at] upwithpeople [dot] org

Yucatan Living Gypsy Market / Bazaar : Sunday, April 19
Come out and support local artists and artisans – plus sample some great specialty food products.
Location: midway between Chelen & Chuburna at Graciela’s Secret Garden, just look for the cars!.
Time: 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Admission: Free but bring money and buy, buy, Buy!

Yucatan Living Chelem Christmas Toy Drive: Tuesday, April 21
April Bingo/Raffle Extravaganza
Just one of the Prizes is an original Paul Lawrence Oil Painting. The fun and funky Nacional Beach Club and Bungalows in Mahahual has donated a three night stay and Lolo Lorena Bed and Breakfast in Isla Mujeres has donated a one night stay. For a $100 peso donation, they will throw 5 tickets in the drawing for you. You do not have to be present to participate in the drawing. You can let them know where to meet you and they can get your tickets to you, or you can donate through PayPal on their donation page.
Location: LaBarca/Dunas Hotel and Restaurant
Time: 6:00 PM
Admission: There are several categories of bingo cards, so come on out and bring plenty of pesos.

Yucatan Living Red Cross Benefit: Chip and His Dog: Thursday, April 23 & Friday, April 24
Vocel en Escena will present the children’s opera “Chip and His Dog.” All proceeds will go to support the Red Cross.
Location: Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33 #174 x 112 y 114.
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Adults: $100 pesos, Children: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $80 pesos
Tickets on Sale Now at the following locations: (1) Progreso’s Red Cross, Calle 35 x 72 y 74, (2) Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33, #174 x 112 y 114 in Progreso, and DigiPrint Progreso, Calle 29 # 152-A x 89 y 82.

Yucatan Living Bird Photography Workshop: April 24, 25, and 26
This workshop is limited to 12 participants. Participants must have their own photographic equipment, including zoom lenses.
Location: Offices of Pronatura Peninsula de Yucatan (Calle 32 #260 x 47 y 47-A, Col. Pinzon II, Merida.
Time: Friday, 24th: 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Saturday, 25th: 7:00 AM to 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Sunday, 26th: 7:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Fee: $1,500 pesos Must register by April 21.
More information and Registration: (999) 988-4436 ext 113

Yucatan Living OPERA YUCATÁN, A.C.: May 02
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Last Scheduled Meeting: Saturday, April 11

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

16 April: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Mozart – String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K575 – OR – Tansman – String Quartet No. 3, Smetana – Quartet in E minor ‘From My Life’

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open: Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Name of Applicant: fernando sabido canche
Email Address: fernando [dot] sabido [at] hotmail [dot] com
Phone Number: 9991068291
Type of Work Desired: teacher or tourist guide
Job Location Desired: Merida and surrounding communities

I am an English teacher in a local community, and I am looking for some opportunities to work in the afternoons. I like to speak English and I know several parts of
Yucatan very well, so I could be a good tourist guide too. I have three years of teaching experience.

Please give me a call or send me an email if you are interested!

By James Dayton Gunn, PhD

Marisol Ceh MooEditor’s Note: Here is another review of a book written in Spanish… this time, the book was ALSO written in the Maya language, and by a contemporary author. For that reason, the book and the author are rather famous. Marisol Ceh Moo is famous for winning a national prize… the first person to write in the Maya language to do so. Our thanks to Dr. James Gunn who gives us a peek into this very important work. Enjoy!

****

Teya, Un Corazón de Mujer

by Marisol Ceh Moo (Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes, 2008)

Marisol Ceh Moo is one of the new, young Mexican writers of the 21st century. She is commonly known as Sol Ceh, and was born in the town of Calotmul, Yucatan. In 2014 she won the Premio Nezahualcóyotl, a prestigious award for Mexican authors.

The Story of Sol Ceh

Sol Ceh is a woman living in two cultures, neither of which values women as highly as they do men. In addition she is Maya, in a world that does not highly value contemporary Maya culture. At an early age, as Sol Ceh has made clear in her interviews, she set out to break through the gender and cultural biases and barriers that limited her own, and her people’s, opportunities. In that she has been successful.

Since Sol Ceh published her first bilingual novel in Spanish and Maya, other Maya writers have written similar works. But Teya, Un Corazón de Mujer is the first novel written in Maya by a woman, and it is also, apparently, the first of its kind in all of Latin America. Previously, Maya literature was limited to traditional Maya legends and myths. With this novel, Sol Ceh broke new ground and opened a door for her people that gives them one more tool to show the world their worth and ability.

The Story of Teya

The novel describes the short life and the sudden, but expected, assassination of a young man. This youth is the leader of an idealistic group of left-wing (communist) intellectuals who defend the rights of the poor and oppose the oppressive oligopolistic government regime that keeps itself in power by fraud and threat. Perhaps the novel was inspired by the life and death of the most beloved Yucatecan political figure, Felipe Carrillo Puerto, although Sol Ceh has said that she did not have him in mind when creating her tragic hero.

Teya Un Corazon de Mujer book from YucatanIn the novel, Sol Ceh reveals to the reader the thoughts and motivations of all her principal characters. The characters include the idealistic son, who fights fiercely for the poor but has few scruples in his relationship with women; the mother who knows her son will sooner or later be killed and is resigned to the inevitable; the local political boss willing to use any means to maintain his privileges and status; and the cacique (originally an Arawak word that has come into common use throughout Latin America in reference to a leader, chief, or political boss) who rises from poverty to power through intimidation and murder. In my mind, the more interesting figure in the novel is not the young man whose final day and tragic murder we follow in detail, but the mother, Teya. It is her emotional reaction to the circumstances and to the murder of her son that is the author’s most significant focus.

The story itself is mundane. What happens in the book is something that happens with disturbing regularity in too many parts of this world. The story, however, is rescued from being ordinary by Teya, with whom the reader feels great empathy. The other characters in the book act out their parts in unsurprising ways, according to their own reasons, reasons the reader may not share but can easily understand. But Teya does not act. She is almost entirely passive, knowing what is going to happen. Teya expresses a deep fatalistic sorrow. Her son seems proud of having chosen a path to martyrdom, but it is Teya who is the reluctant, innocent victim here. She has no choice, and no way to avoid her fate. But she is admirable in accepting that fate with resignation and dignity.

The recent disappearance in Guerrero of the 43 students who were presumably murdered on their way to demonstrate against a local political boss is a reminder that opposing those who are in positions of power can be very dangerous, even today. Teya, Un Corazón de Mujer is well written, courageous, and a timely reminder of an unpleasant fact of life, in Mexico and around the world.

By Working Gringos

Editor’s Note: There are so many running events in the Yucatan in the next two months that we figured they needed their own page! If you are a runner, here are a number of events for you!!

Runs for April and May

Yucatan LivingUltra Marathon Fe: Sunday, April 2, 2015
This race is from Chelem to Telchac Puerto. Length of Race: 50 km and 100 km
Location: Departure: Church of Chelem
Time: 6:00 PM
Registration: $600 pesos.
Registration: Salvador Alvarado Stadium, Monday – Saturday, 7:00 AM – 10:00 AM.
Online Registration: http://manivelasst.com/Grupoee/

Yucatan LivingCancun Commando Race: Sunday, April 19, 2015
This race is the first militarized steeplechase in Cancun – 6 km of mud, obstacles, effort and lots of fun. Visit the announcement (banner at the bottom of the page) at www.masaccion.com.mx. Registrations are pending and coming soon, so check back with that site often.

Yucatan LivingThe 3rd Carrera Gran Santa Fe: Sunday, April 19, 2015
Some say this is the most anticipated race this year. The 3rd 2015 Carrera approaches at GranSantaFe in Merida. Unfortunately, we cannot seem to find out more about this… we’ll post it here when we do!
Location: Caucel, Gran Santa Fe, Merida
Time 7:00 AM
Registration: TBA

Yucatan LivingCareer Tribune, Campeche: Sunday, April 26, 2015
This is a 10 km and 5 km hike.
Location: Moch Cohuo Park, Campeche
Registration: $150 pesos

Yucatan LivingIII Annual Trecevision (Channel 13) Race and Walk Sunday April 26, 2015 The run will be 9,750 km and 5 km for the walk. Proceeds will be donated to charitable institutions as needed. In 2013, the cumulative total was donated to the Center for Child Welfare for the Homeless (CAIMEDE). In 2014, a community kitchen was equipped in La Mielera, located on the Periferico and which serves vulnerable people in this area. This year, nearly 1,500 participants will take part in this race. Participation categories include: free, submaster, master, veterans, and veterans plus for both sexes. The wheelchair category will be mixed gender as well.
Location: Parque de las Americas, Merida
Time: 7:00 AM
Admission: $100 peso donation. Registration can be made, beginning April 1 at the Salvador Alvarado Stadium between 5:00 AM and 10:00 AM, or at the Trecevision offices between 9:00 AM and 7:00 PM.

Yucatan LivingCorro Por Una Sonrisa (Run for a Smile): Sunday May 3, 2015
This run is being organized by the New Generations Rotary Club of Merida.
Location: At the head of Paseo de Montejo
Time: 7:00 AM
Registration: TBA

Yucatan LivingThe 5th Triathlon Tres Rios, Riviera Maya: Sunday, May 17, 2015
This triathlon is for children and Sprint. More information soon on http://masaccion.com.mx/
Location: Hacienda Tres Rios, Riviera Maya
Time: 12:00 AM
Registration: TBA

Yucatan LivingYucarrera 5 km: Sunday, May 17, 2015
More information at: https://www.facebook.com/yucarrera5k?notif_t=fbpage_fan_invite
Location: Paseo de Montejo
Time: 7:00 AM
Admission: TBA

Yucatan LivingCarrera Mayan Race Xmatquil: Sunday, May 17, 2015
5 km or 10 km, 15 to 20 obstacles. This race also has a children’s category.
Location: Xmatquil
Time: 7:00 AM
Registration: $250 pesos

Yucatan Living17th Marathon of the Marina: Sunday, May 31, 2015
This is the oldest and longest race in Yucatan, and it absolutely has the best prizes! If you plan on running or walking in this race, please register early so you will have the latest in directions for the Marathon and for the Half Marathon. There will be very few changes, but some must be made because of construction in Progreso, so you want to know about those early on. There will be a total of more than $500,000 pesos in cash handed out as prizes. This race includes the following categories: free, submaster, master, veterans, and veterans plus for both sexes. The wheelchair category will be mixed gender as well. There will also be a new motorcycle and free trip to the Mayan Riviera (including spending money) for the first local to cross the finish line, and cash bonuses for the first five Yucateco men and first five Yucateca ladies to cross the finish line.
Location: Begins at the Monumento a la Patria
Time: 5:00 AM
Registration: April 27 – May 8: $170 pesos. May 9 – May 31: $200 pesos. Tickets available from the box office at Salvador Alvarado Stadium and the Polifunctional Gym.

Find out about more races (yes, there are more!) at the CorreYuk Facebook page.

By Nadine Calder

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Five

This recent conversation bothered the clerk, and he was constantly going over doña Raimunda’s powerful words, examining them in all possible lights and giving his deliberations food for thought.

Get married! He who had entertained so many illusions of sweet family pleasures, who had resigned himself, defeated by Luck’s setbacks, to passing through the world never having walked arm in arm with a woman he loved. Get married, when he had further resigned himself to dying in complete solitude, without a desolate wife piously closing his eyelids in sorrow and loving children dampening his deathbed with tears. . . ! So, is there anyone who, in spite of his poverty, not only shows him respect, but does so to the point of caring about Hermenegildo López’s happiness? One who might in matrimony help him see his way to the end of his perpetual misfortunes?

But who is about to marry him? Who is about to receive as her husband a man who was rejected as such when he was young? He wasn’t old, no señor, but neither was he a boy. If only he could marry Lupita! She was so beautiful and so gracious! Hadn’t he seen older men marry young girls every day? No. He wouldn’t do this. No matter how much he might like a very young wife, he could win from her heart nothing more than respectful esteem, not the kind of overpowering love that would be for him and him alone. He had, then, to think of someone whose age better matched his own.

Bringing this reflection to a close, another name leaped into don Hermenegildo’s mind: doña Prudencia! After his last disaster, he once thought of declaring love for her, but without doing anything, he fearfully resolved to completely renounce the idea of marriage.

Doña Prudencia must be thirty-seven years old, and a woman of that age would ordinarily not attract the clerk’s attention. Would the widow who was in a comfortable position, if not rich, accept him who lived in misery with his meager salary and modest employment? It’s true that their friendship was bolstered by the esteem he enjoyed, and this, too, is a form of wealth. Although he was poor, his name was respected, which she knew perfectly well, judging by the appreciation and considerations with which she favored don Hermenegildo, and that was encouraging to him.

Without a doubt, doña Raimunda’s suggestions had fallen like rain on dry ground. Not only did her companion not dismiss a single one of those suggestions, despite arguing against them, he received them with quiet satisfaction. So it was that, from that point on, the idea of marriage was firmly fixed in his mind. And in order to concentrate on it and on who would be the object of his affections, he had continued talking with doña Prudencia, heeding the urgency of his desire in order to keep his timid nerves from making him more reticent, those wicked nerves that vibrated as if they would burst when their owner approached a woman with amorous intentions.

Occupied with these thoughts, he was going down the street one night after departing from the usual get-together when he was interrupted by a voice calling out to him.

It was Luis Robles.

The young man was somewhat short in stature, of sturdy build, fair-haired, with smiling face and blue eyes. Always good-natured, he was a famous party-goer, witty and charming. Carefree like few others, he never thought ahead and all his effort had been toward living life as happily as possible.

In school he was always trying to find out at the last moment what the day’s lesson was, the end result being that his name could be found on the detention list, either for bad conduct in class or for not knowing the assigned material.

During exams, he was saved many times by the daring gift of gab with which he responded to the reviewers, saying everything he knew, even though it wasn’t what they had asked him about, spilling out not a few uncertain dates from his abundant supply.

When the time for finals was nearing, he would resign himself to staying in his room in order to master the course materials. But these were many and it was impossible to recover in so short a period all the time lost in a year. His Latin teacher repeated to him and others non valet studere sed studuisse. There is no value in studying without having studied. But he had too much self-confidence to face the truth of this proposal, presenting himself before the good-humored review board like one destined for a triumph and behaving like a brave warrior about to acquit himself well in battle.

After one of these experiences in the subject of World History, one of his classmates said to him:

“Do you know that you’re shameless under fire?”

“Why?”

“You’ve named more dates than a chronology text.”

“It’s always a good idea to name the dates of related events that occur.”

“But they were completely absurd!”

“I went in there absolutely sure of myself. Do you think the reviewers have memorized all those numbers? Not one of them dared to contradict me, and instead they admired how knowledgeable I was.”

“To say that Constantinople fell to Mehmed II in 1506…”

“It wasn’t in 1506? Well, look; I remember something very important that happened in 1506.”

“You must be talking about the discovery of Yucatán.”

“Exactly.”

And he remained just as unperturbed.

He had yet another trait that gave a better idea of his character.

The third-year Latin professor, who was a priest, gave his students daily assignments to train them in composition and translation, exercises which were to be presented in written form. Luis, who thanks to his good memory could regularly respond to a lesson when he studied it at the last minute, never thought to bother his head with this new work. So it was that when the professor collected their notebooks to make corrections, our hero, when it came to his turn, calmly replied:

“I didn’t bring the assignment, father.”

“Well, you know you still have to do it.”

And the following day the invariable declaration from the student and the same reminder from the professor until, exasperated, the latter exclaimed:

“Listen, son. From now on, I’m not going to ask for your composition again, because it’s useless. Every day, after class, you will stay here to write it. Now you know.”

And so on it went. The priest, upon calling on the students one by one to present their notebooks, skipped Luis Robles. But one time, forgetting to do so, or better yet, probably believing that the lazy student had mended his ways, said to him when it came to be his turn:

“Your assignment, Robles.”

“But, father,” answered the one addressed, getting to his feet, “haven’t we agreed that I would stay every day to write it after class?”

Needless to say, general laughter resulted in the boy’s leaving the classroom.

And so he managed to get by until advancing to professional studies and embarking on the study of Jurisprudence. He found no more pleasure in the celebrated institutions of Justinian and the depths of P. Taparelli than in Naquet’s formulas or De Candolle’s observations. He wasn’t lacking, however, in the virtue of perseverance and, still rubbing his eyes, he would load up his books and march off to the class which he tried to entertain by putting forward some point he claimed to find questionable and engaging the instructor in discussion for as long as possible.

Before long came the first year exam, on which he received a grade that barely permitted him to go on to the second year. And it was said that it was thanks to some discreet and opportune gifts to the professor and the school’s director that he didn’t fail. After that, he was very happy to spend his vacation in his hometown, delighting his poor father with news of the encouraging results and managing to get his permission to prolong the break… necessary, he said, to rest his overburdened intellectual faculties so that once refreshed, he could embark anew on his studies with more spirit and to better benefit.

Having these facts, and knowing him better, we can follow along with Luis in company of don Hermenegildo, with whom he walked toward the latter’s home. As soon as the bachelor saw the younger man, he felt come to his lips the string of affectionate questions he kept ready to unload on the first person he happened to run into.

“Hello, Luis. Good to see you. How are you?”

“Pretty good, don Hermenegildo. And you, how’s it going?”

“Bad, my boy. But how is it that you always want to turn the conversation back around to me? And your papá? I hope he’s just as strong and healthy as the last time I had the pleasure of greeting him. Don’t forget to give him very kind regards when you write to him. And the rest of the family, all’s well?”

“Fine, with the exception of an elderly maid we love very much and who for several days, according to what they write me, has had a very high temperature. “

“You don’t say! Such a good woman.”

“Do you know her, don Hermenegildo?”

“No, but I can imagine. Those elderly maids are generally good. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about. So she’s sick! You have to wonder why some things happen!”

“What do you want? People in small towns get sick just as they do in Mérida.”

“I don’t say they don’t; but it’s sad . . . and what are they giving her for it?”

“Listen, don Hermenegildo; I want to ask you a favor.”

“With much pleasure. Let’s hear it.”

“I’m in love.”

“Ah, yes! The young men’s sickness. And what, is this about asking a young lady to be your girlfriend?”

“No, sir. What I want is to have you ask permission for me to visit her at home.”

“That’s no inconvenience at all, as long as her parents are open to the idea…”

“That’s precisely the question. If her parents were open to the idea, I would go there alone. But that’s not the case and for that reason I need you.”

“But if they’re opposed to you, they’ll say no.”

“With that in mind, I want the one who asks for the permission to be none other than you, who are very esteemed and respected in their house and besides that, you like me and claim to be a great friend of my father. You can give me a good recommendation.”

Don Hermenegildo felt his vanity flattered by the young man who sought his respectability and influence in order to win over the girl’s parents, but forewarned as they were against Luis. How could he tell them that their daughter’s suitor was responsible and hard-working, with excellent prospects for the future and other favorable characteristics, if on the contrary he had the reputation he had, giving no thought to the fact that he hadn’t a penny to his name? But how could he decline the young man’s request? Embarrass him by letting him know he didn’t want to recommend him due to his less than spotless reputation? He, incapable of displeasing the most wicked man in the world? Never in his life! Accept the assignment? Considering the prudence and respectability of that “highly distinguished family” that has opened its doors and honored him with their confidence, how could he suggest that they warmly welcome a young man who has little to recommend him as nothing less than their daughter’s future? Wouldn’t he be contributing to the unhappiness that could befall the girl?

He was continuing to walk along in this perplexed state when Luis asked him:

“Will you do it?”

“But, Luis. Keep in mind that you haven’t even told me the girl’s name.”

“Lupita. As if you don’t already know.”

“Lupita?,” exclaimed don Hermenegildo in amazement.

“Lupita Fernández, doña Prudencia’s daughter.”

“But haven’t I heard that she’s going with Fermín Dorantes?”

“Yes. She talks with him sometimes, but everyone knows she doesn’t really like him.”

“Well, then, she’ll talk with you, too.”

“No, she won’t, because I never get the chance. But she laughs, and you’ll see that this is a good sign.”

“But even if you can make her smile, as long as you don’t have an understanding, what good will permission to enter her house do you?”

“That’s it precisely! If we had an understanding and we could have a conversation when I approach her, the rest would not matter much to me. But since she goes inside without listening to what I have to say, I want the visits as a way to take that option away from her. Anyway, that’s my plan and I know women. I have my reasons to believe that Lupita, in spite of everything, likes me.”

Don Hermenegildo heard the determined young man with envy. What he wouldn’t have given to be half as daring! He was afraid to accept the delicate and serious assignment proposed to him and he thought about changing the subject, but Luis was a crazy man and there would be no way to dissuade him.

There was no other recourse, and in the end he had to agree to the venture cast upon him, but with the saving condition that he was doing so because the request had been made and for no other reason.

Luis departed giving him repeated thanks and a strong and painful handshake, demonstrating his hope that a recommendation like don Hermenegildo’s would not fall on deaf ears. And the bachelor went on to his poor home where his widowed sister and the nighttime crying of his little nephews awaited him, rubbing his bruised hand and feeling uneasy about the pressures placed upon him by Luis’s request.

****

Want to catch up? Read Chapter One and the Intro, Chapter Two, Chapter Three and Chapter Four here.

By Scott Wallace

Editor’s Note: Those of us in the expatriate community of Merida are enjoying a growing set of attractions and entertainment that is becoming richer all the time. Restaurants, music, B&B’s, small hotels, large hotels, shops… Merida today is not the Merida that the Working Gringos “discovered” in 2001. But we are not basically city people, and Merida is most definitely a city, with all that entails. On a regular basis, we like to get out of the city and breathe a bit. We have been hearing more and more about Bacalar, a beautiful lake and growing community that is just four hours away. In fact, we’ve published other articles about the paddle marathon at Bacalar and about Bacalar history. So here is our final story, an inside look at Bacalar, from resident Scott Wallace, who offers some tips to help our readers enjoy their next visit to Bacalar.
****

Laguna Bacalar, Beautiful Freshwater

Laguna Bacalar is one of the most beautiful freshwater bodies on the planet. Bacalar also happens to be a comfortable gateway to the fascinating history of Quintana Roo and southern Campeche. Map to Lake Bacalar in YucatanFortunately for Merida residents planning a visit, the same maturing of the business community to meet broader tourist and resident expectations occurring in Merida is also happening in Bacalar. Still, Bacalar is not a major city nor a capital city. Visitors to Bacalar will find an interesting, small pueblo on a spectacularly colorful lake in an area rich with unspoiled nature and complicated history.

The lake and pueblo offer a history, beauty, and engagement of the senses that is every bit as intense as Merida, but definitely not urban and decidedly Quintanaroensis. Forget about the recent alignment with Eastern Time. Somewhere quite early in the four hour drive from Merida to Bacalar, visitors will find themselves squarely in tiempo mexicano.

Visits to Bacalar usually focus on the lake, the town, the history nearby, and the remarkable nature that surrounds it all. Laguna Bacalar has been a vacation destination for nationals for generations and established hotels and restaurants have been serving locals and vacationers for many years. But you still won’t find a spicy tuna hand roll, an extensive wine list, or a Ritz Carlton-level wait staff. What you will find in and around Bacalar is open and genuine hospitality, a stunningly beautiful lake, incredible history and archaeology, and a wide array of options for staying, eating, and enjoying the town and the area.

Start With The Lake

Laguna Bacalar, the hands-down winner on the beauty, activity, and nature front, is not a budget-buster. In fact, it’s free! Six public access points and several public balnearios (public swimming establishments) make hanging out on the beautiful shore or swimming in the clear-blue, soft water simple and easy. Chose from more than a dozen lakefront restaurants and hotels that serve Lake Bacalar on Yucatan Peninsulaup the spectacular colors of the lake all day long. And there are dozens of other pleasant restaurants and hotels to explore. Around Bacalar, as in many places on the Yucatan Peninsula, being flexible and opportunistic navigating the day can gain one much. But even more so in Bacalar, the pace is slow and easy.

Laguna Bacalar is 55 kilometers long and relatively narrow, running more or less north-south with a dogleg on the way. This deliciously-fresh laguna (lake) is Mexico’s second largest sweet-water lake. The east side of the laguna is mangrove shore and low jungle with no houses or development. The west side has development, but also long stretches that remain jungle shore. The north end of the lake is fed by several jungle streams and runoff from seasonal flats. The south end of the lake is fed by a number of cenotes. The lake drains nearly all of this flow out the Pirate Cut and down to the Rio Hondo. Bacalar Pueblo lies on the west side of the laguna about three-quarters of the way south down the lake, directly across from the Pirate Cut. One of the best ways to appreciate both the layout and the beauty of the lake’s remarkable coloration is to check it out on Google Earth.

Bacalar Pueblo

Bacalar Pueblo covers about ten square kilometers with 13,000 or so inhabitants. The older part of the pueblo with the main square, most hotels, restaurants, and shops is east toward the lake. The newer and mostly residential development is to the west. Merida travelers are likely to enter Bacalar Pueblo coming south on Highway #307. As you approach town, just after the fort-shaped tourism center and just before the Pemex station (both on the left), turn left toward the lake. In 200 meters at the “T”, turn right onto 7th Avenue and continue straight into town for eight blocks. On your right you will see the Iglesia de San Jaoquin. Continue one block more and turn left. At the stop sign (you cannot turn right!), you will see the town square. There is plenty of parking around the square, and ATM kiosks ahead and just to the left. Diagonally across the square is the Fuerte de San Felipe (the old fort) and the Tourism Bureau. Along the square are a small collection of restaurants and shops.
The fort at Lake Bacalar on the Yucatan Peninsula Mexico
The 18th century fort (in 2015 it celebrates 32 years as a museum) is a definite vale la pena (it’s worth it!). From atop Fuerte de San Felipe the view of the lake and the Pirate Cut is very, very photogenic, as is the fort itself. And the museum includes many family-friendly exhibits with considerable information on Bacalar’s and the region’s history. The remaining local attractions — the Iglesia de San Jaoquin, the Casa de Cultura, and the Casa de Escritor — are more low key and may merit a visit while you are in town. Unlike the fort, they would probably not warrant making a stop in Bacalar just for them.

Get Outside in Bacalar

If you have a passion that involves nature, you will find friends in Bacalar to help you enjoy birding, paddling, sailing, swimming, hiking, biking and boarding.

Birding in Bacalar

This past January, a group of birding clubs from around the Yucatan converged for a two-day birding jamboree. January and February are great birding months in Bacalar, as some trees lose their leaves making it easier to see birds. Nesting season makes for lots of activity, and many northern species are down for the winter, nearly doubling the population compared to summer months. The Bacalar area Motmot bird on Yucatan Peninsulais well-known for its avian diversity; over 240 species live in the jungle surrounding the Laguna. This event, hosted by Green Jay Mayan Birding (a non-profit in Cancun), was attended by passionate birders from ten clubs.

Over 65 attendees came from Campeche, Yucatan and Quintana Roo. They specifically came to see a number of endemic species (Yucatan Jay, Yucatan Fly Catcher, Rose Throated Tanager) that were of particular interest. Day One started in the jungle and proceeded along the shore of Laguna Bacalar, a meandering walking tour of companions sharing a common passion. Day Two saw the gathering split into many groups. Some explored quiet roadways and agricultural selva (jungle) nearby. Others, returning north toward home in Cancun, went east to explore salt water species an hour away on the Costa Maya shores near Mahajual or went a bit further down the Xcalak Peninsula toward the Xcalak National Park. Campeche-based birders headed south and west to the Rio Bec area to explore Calakmul, Becan, Kohunlich and other jungle ruins readily accessed by car. Merida-based birders toured Chacchoben ruins and nearby jungle on their way home. A number of birders took Kayaking on Lake Bacalar Mexicoadvantage of fair weather for a full-day, guided kayak tour of the remote backwaters.

Water Sports in Bacalar

While the backwaters definitely require the knowledge of a guide, it is easy to explore the shores of the town-side of the lake if one has fair weather. The waters are typically calm with some chop during normal seasonal afternoon wind. And Laguna Bacalar’s breezes are reliable enough and often brisk enough to make for very happy sailing. In February, the Quintana Roo state Olympic team qualification races were held over two days for prams, lasers, and wind surfers. Competitors, principally from Playa del Carmen and north, traversed a course in fair weather and fine wind. On almost any sunny, breezy day in Bacalar, it is common to see a half-dozen or more sailboats scooting along the water. A variety of places on Laguna Bacalar shores offer smaller day sailboat tours and rentals by the hour or the day.

Visitors will find it easy to get on the lake with kayaks, canoes and SUPs (stand up paddleboards) from several adventure outfits as well as hotels and hostels on Laguna Bacalar shores. Waters on the Sailing on Lake Bacalar in Mexicotown side of the lake are shallow and clear. Within minutes of most rental locations, you will find wonderful flat water paddling or swimming, a pleasant shoreline, a deep-water cenote or two, a mangrove waterfront, and, for those with lucky, fair winds or in very good physical condition, islands with larger nesting water birds. A little farther afield, there is a “hidden” jungle cenote with turquoise-clear waters, and still further on, the stromatolite rapids. Guided kayak and canoe tours (1/2 day to three days) into the lake’s very extensive, shallow backwaters and watershed can be arranged in advance for seekers of the ultimate in solitude or extreme birding.

To look at the shore from the lake, a boat tour is the lazy man’s way and, unless you care to paddle for half a day and the wind cooperates, the only way. A dozen or more motor launches offer lake tours that typically take 90 minutes and cost $200 pesos per person ($3000 pesos for a four hour private tour). The town has a cooperative of tour boats and many of the boats and pilots belong. Most tours leave from one of the three balnearios not far from the town square. Typically, these are ponga-style boats with sun covers and life vests. Pilots sometimes seem a Boatrides on Lake Bacalar in Mexicobit more interested in hastening back to the dock for the next customers than in showing the lake at its best, but it is still a nice way to see the lake. Several hotels offer comfortable, shaded pontoon boats with snacks, beverages, and swimming stops and more flexible routes and trip duration.

Bicycling Bacalar

Bacalar Pueblo has a short bike path leading onto town streets from highway #307 at the North end of 7th Avenue. Generally, the pueblo’s streets are in good condition with slow traffic and most make for good-enough cycling. There are definite exceptions and no streets in town are truly 100% kid-ready. The town square is a comfortable, open area just one block from the lake edge. The Costera, which runs along the lakefront, is a very pleasant walk or bike but there is enough traffic to make biking not safe for kids by themselves. The portion north of the main square and the Fuerte de San Felipe (a must see with a surprisingly good small museum) has been recently paved and has smooth sidewalks.

The Costera south of the square is in poorer condition. This route makes for quite decent daytime walking and biking that offers several really nice views of the lake, public access points, and a variety of options for drinks, snacks, or meals. Cenote Azul, a large, deep cenote, is set only meters away from Laguna Bacalar at the opposite end of the Costera from the Fort and makes a nice destination. Four slightly-rolling kilometers from the town square, the cenote has fine swimming, pleasant shady hangouts, and a moderately-priced, large restaurant with a bar. Cenote Azul is unusually beautiful with clear water, vertical-walled 90 meter depths, and a jungle-lined perimeter.

Bacalar Races

Bacalar hosts an annual five and ten kilometer footrace starting and ending in the town center and running along the Costera with a midpoint of Cenote Azul. Later in the year are a half-triathlon and a full-triathlon centered on the town and the lake, with running and biking segments nearby. Want to get out on the lake for some serious paddling? In the first week of May, Bacalar hosts Swimming race at Laguna Bacalar Mexicothe second Paddle Marathon and Festival. The weekend includes a Saturday and Sunday 47 kilometer race, open to any class of paddle watercraft: canoe, kayak, SUP, outrigger canoe or the like. It also includes two days of Adventure Exposition on the lake, two nights of a kayak film festival, a variety of paddle-related workshops and demonstrations, and cultural/musical events for the whole family.

One of Bacalar’s most popular water events is Aguas Abiertas, the open water swim competition that is held each June. In 2014, there were 1200 racers and more than 500 spectators. In 2015, the tenth year of the event, as many as 2000 swimmers are expected. Scheduled for the 19th, 20th and 21st of June 2015, the event includes 5000, 2500, and 1250 meter heats. The swim course finishes at the balneario and large park just two blocks from the main square, making viewing the event simple. The sight of so many swimmers crossing the lake is impressive. In prior years, entrants have come from across Mexico and abroad and the winning times have been extremely competitive.

And There Are Archaeological Zones Too

Within two hours of Bacalar there are various wonderful and infrequently-visited INAH archaeological wonders. It is quite common to find oneself alone in an entire old Maya city or a section of a site. Just north and east of Bacalar lies Chacchoben, a nicely maintained and easily toured site with a collection of restored monuments and buildings. In the southern arc of Quintana Roo and Campeche lie a string of archeological sites that were once cities of varying size or city-states. Kohunlich, Dzibanche, Kinichna, Becan, Hormiguerro, Chicanna, El Ramonal, Xpujil are all in the Rio Bec region and each is an easy day trip from Bacalar. Add in the sites in southern Campeche and there are more than two dozen options!

Calakmul, the largest and most influential of the city-states in southeastern Mexico, lies three-plus hours away near the southern border with Belize. This area along Belize and Guatemalan is a transition zone between low-jungle vegetation of the Yucatan Peninsula and the rainforest jungle of the Peten. Further south in northern Guatemala lies El Mirador and another set of difficult-to-explore Maya sites.

Kohunlich and Dzibanche are the Rio Bec sites closest to Bacalar (more or less an hour by car) and they are also two of the more interesting ruins. They are quite different in their scale and ambience, but each offers the visitor a ready portal into the Mayan past. Both these sites, and the whole area to the west toward Escarcega, are an easy drive. Head south on #307 then west on #186, which are both good roadways. At about Kilometer 215 on Highway #186, you will see the large, overhead sign pointing left to Kohunlich. You will see it shortly after you pass under a similar sign to Dzibanche and Morocoy, pointing you to the right.

300-mask on Yucatan PeninsulaKohunlich was a Mayan center from approximately 300 BC until about 1200 AD, with its peak 600 AD to 900 AD. To get to Kohunlich (an Anglicized name referring to the cahoon palms that abound in the site), turn left just after the large, overhead Kohunlich sign. Travel nine kilometers down the single-lane road into the parking lot. Restrooms are at the guard/payment desk on the right. Parking farthest away (along the forest near the pathway into the site) will ensure your car stays in the shade for the longest time. As with most INAH sites, there is a sparse map showing the monuments and pathways. You might want to snap a quick photo of the map for use along the way.

Entry to the site is through a short pathway surrounded by high jungle and into a large “acropolis” with residential and ceremonial ruins overlooking it. Birds and occasionally small mammals are seen here. Make sure to check the tree canopies for monkeys! At the far end of the acropolis and up a hill is the Templo de Mascarones (Temple of Masks). Originally eight painted, highly-unusual stucco masks, each perhaps two meters tall, decorated this temple. Color and detail can still be seen on several of the roof-protected remaining masks by climbing up the steep staircase.

One can exit the acropolis by passing around and to the rear of the Templo de Mascarones, where a trail leads to the right. This continues downhill until it joins another trail. Head left to Los 27 Escalones (the 27 Steps), a residential complex providing great visibility and breezes from the top. From there, you can get a great view of the ten-square mile site. Returning from Los 27 Escalones brings you back to the acropolis near the ball court, which is not that far from the parking lot.

The Dzibanche site was named for the Maya word for “carved in wood”, referring to carvings on the original temple lintels, which have since been replaced. This very large site covers nearly thirty square miles, including the sister site Kinichna, and was occupied from 600 BC until the Spanish invasion. Hieroglyphs tell of a powerful city or city-state that was successful at war and trade. Dzibanche population peaked between 400 AD and 700 AD. The site has several main areas (again take a picture of that entry map), most with tall forest and large areas of grass or dirt with jungle surrounding.

To get to Dzibanche, head west on Highway 186 and turn right at the signs for Morocoy and Dzibanche. Continue past the pueblo of Morocoy. Not long after, at a storage shed, you will see the one and only one sign pointing to the right to Dzibanche. Take that turn. In another eight kilometers or so, you will reach the Dzibanche parking area. Before you get there, you will see the park station on the right with parking and remarkably clean restrooms. Pay your fee here and then follow signs to the Dzibanche site. The slow drive there is quite picturesque on the single-lane road (caution!), with flowers and trees on both road sides trimmed neatly by passing vehicles.

The path from the parking area into the site is a bit rocky but settles down soon. An early day visit (before 9:00 or 10:00 AM) will almost surely mean you have great portions of the site to yourself. There are lots of birds and several families of howler monkeys live on the site and nearby. One or more of the troops often can be seen in the canopy or, later in the afternoon, heard from afar. You might inquire of the park guard if he has seen one that morning.

Here you will see spectacular trees, with roots cascading down ruin pediments and branches reaching high into the air. Giant termite nests hover in the branches. Tree roots ooze copal sap and occasionally small, present-day Maya offerings are found on the temple steps. It is easy to spend several hours here and the site offers some of the best (still allowed!) pyramid climbing in the area. 300-chac site on Yucatan PeninsulaFrom the top, one can almost see where the network of sacbes (white roads) crossed the jungle to connect the population centers of the area. And it is not hard to imagine a visual, instant communication network across the southern Yucatan Peninsula.

Chacchoben is one of the smaller INAH archeological sites open to the public, but that does not mean it is dull or boring. Not one hour from Bacalar and right on the route to and from Merida, this is a good morning diversion for the trip back. In variable use from as early as 300 BC until the Spanish invasion, most restored areas are likely from the seventh century AD. The site meanders over nearly 100 acres, many with barely-manicured jungle and tall, lush, nut-bearing cahoon palms. The site lies in the “lakes region” (an area of plentiful groundwater and, in Maya times, canal-transport of building wood and stone building materials) and Chacchoben exhibits both the Rio Bec and Chenes architectural influences.

There is ample parking, though not much in the shade. Pay at the entry desk, where you will find restrooms, snacks, and souvenirs. Chacchoben’s paths are clearly marked and lead to sections of the ruin that have been excavated and are well tended. Very pleasant low forest surrounds the monuments of this smaller Mayan city. Parts of the site are accessible to wheelchair visitors but it is often very limited touring for those with walkers or canes. Fruits and flowers are seen in trees and on the edges of the clearings. Raucous parrots, smaller songbirds, and the (very) occasional toucan fly overhead, and leaf-eater ant trails and nests as well as arboreal termite nests are evident during much of the year. Unless you have the great misfortune to overlap with one or more tour buses, Chacchoben is likely to be an enchanting and private site to explore.

Not far to the north and east of Dzibanche — some fifteen kilometers west of Bacalar — lies the all-but-unexcavated city of Xcabal. It is reported to be larger than any other ruin in Quintana Roo and the Rio Bec area, with the exception of Calakmul. Xcabal boasts a pyramid taller than El Castillo at Chichen Itza and its size suggests a very large population at one time.

While a very exciting find and surely an attraction for future Bacalar visitors, Xcabal is not yet open to the public. This may be the one of the few outright failures of hospitality the patient visitor to Laguna Bacalar and Pueblo Bacalar will encounter. But, chances are, Xcabal will become a major attraction soon enough. And, as Bacalar becomes a more hotly promoted and popular Costa Maya destination, the area’s businesses will continue their inevitable march toward their clients’ expectations. That march, one imagines, will proceed not at breakneck pace, but at that decidedly Mexican tempo that those of us who live in Yucatan know well.

Enjoy!

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RESOURCES

The Bacalar Mosaico website has useful information on hotels, restaurants, tours, and local Bacalar businesses as well as maps of the lake and pueblo.

Google Earth is an excellent way to understand where Laguna Bacalar lies in the Yucatan Pensinsula and to observe one moment of the Laguna Bacalar and associated water system’s remarkable coloration. Google Streetview is a resource for exploring and planning remotely. Chacchoben and Dzibanche ruins have Google Earth streetviews, as does much of the town of Bacalar and the Fuerte de San Felipe.

The INAH website has info (in Spanish) on almost all archaeological sites in Quintana Roo and Campeche, including Chacchoben, Kohunlich, Dzibanche and many more of the Rio Bec string. Information is organized by state. Scroll down to the section on Campeche and further down for Quintana Roo.

Facebook Bacalar page (in Spanish) is not very well organized or comprehensive but it is one of the few web resources for Bacalar events.

What’s a stromalite?

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PHOTO CREDITS
Photo of Aguas Abiertas: Turismo Bacalar Facebook
Photo of Sailing Competition: Turismo Bacalar Facebook
Photo of Blue-Crowned Mot-Mot by Green Jay Mayan Birding
Satellite imagery of area: Google Earth
All other photos by author

By Working Gringos

Spacious & Charming
Colonial Vacation Home
For Rent

Come and enjoy the delights of Merida Yucatan Mexico in this historic colonial home, lovingly restored to make it your perfect vacation rental home away from home.

All our rooms have high beamed ceilings typical of these old colonial houses, with both minisplit air conditioners and ceiling fans. The kitchen and bathrooms have been renovated with modern fixtures and appliances, all centered around a courtyard with a plunge swimming pool and a rooftop deck… a great place for an outdoor breakfast or glass of wine while watching the sunset. And because this is the perfect Merida vacation rental, it even has a garage for your car! Look no further, Casa de Los Mosaicos is the perfect vacation house in Merida Mexico!

Better Than Home…

Because it’s in the Centro Historico of Merida! Casa de los Mosaicos (House of Tiles) is located on a quiet street between two parks in the centre of Merida, Parques Santa Lucia and Santiago. It is literally four blocks to the main square, the Zocalo. Here you can watch the world go by, sit in the traditional confidantes (chairs), enjoy the artisans stalls set up on weekends when the centre is closed to traffic. Walk easily to nearby shops, museums and restaurants. And at night, watch the salsa dancing in the parks and maybe even give it a whirl yourself!

The house is also just blocks away from Paseo Montejo with banks, hotels, gas station, restaurants and more.

All The Amenities of a Hotel

Here’s a list of just some of the amenities of this colonial rental home. For a complete list, please see our website:

  • 2 large bedroomswith flexible sleeping facilities that include a queen bed, two twin beds and a futon in the sitting room.
  • Ensuite bathrooms, one with a shower and one with a luxurious bathtub.
  • Spacious sitting room with plenty of space for entertaining.
  • Dining room with seating for 8.
  • Fully equipped and modern kitchen.
  • Central courtyard with plunge pool, sun loungers, table with umbrella and chairs.
  • Roof terrace for additional sunbathing.
  • Private garage with remote door opener.
  • Ceiling fans and remote AC in every room.
  • Cable TV and wireless Internet.
  • Radio and CD music system.

For more details, please see our website!

Prices

This spacious house sleeps 4 to 6 people and is available for $150 US per night in the Low season and $190 US per night in the High season.

We require a 3-day minimum. If you would like to rent by the month, please inquire.

Contact Us!

For information about renting Casa de Los Mosaicos, please see our website:

www.meridahouserentals.com

Or you can email us directly:

email:


jane [dot] galton [at] gmail [dot] com
(we speak English and Español)

 

Thank you.

We look forward to seeing you in Casa de Los Mosaicos.

 

 

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting March 30, 2014

Yucatan Living Festival of Trova: Merida Yucatan – March 22 – 31
All the best of Yucatan’s trova groups and individuals will be in Merida this week. These are the groups that will be singing for you during this week-long celebration of Trova, Yucatan’s signature style of music. They are the best of the best, and some of them are legends in Yucatan’s music world.
Tuesday, March 31: Orquesta Tipica Yukalpeten, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Location: All performances are in Teatro Daniel Ayala
Time: All performances are at 8:00 PM except Sunday March 29 includes a 12:00 PM performance.
Admission: All performances are Free!

Yucatan Living Semana Santa at the Cathedral
All activities and masses are officiated by Excmo. Sr. Arzobispo de Yucatán Mons. D. Emilio Carlos Berlié Belaunzarán.
Holy Thursday: Last Dinner and Feet Washing: 5:00 PM
Holy Friday: Liturgy: 12:00 PM; Christ’s Passion: 3:00 PM; March of the silence: 8:00 PM
Holy Saturday: Liturgy: 9:00 AM
Holy Sunday: Resurrection Sunday
Location: Cathedral of Merida, Calle 60 x 61
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Semana Santa in Izamal
There will be all sorts of Semana Santa related activities in Izamal as well.
Holy Thursday: Mass and Feet Washing: 6:00 PM
Holy Friday: Procession through the streets representing the Crucifixion: 8 AM; Sermon: Noon; March of the silence to the Municipal Cemetery: 8:00 PM
Holy Saturday: Procession through the streets: 9:00 AM; Mass at 7 PM and 9 PM
Holy Sunday: Mass at 10 AM, Noon, 6 PM and 8 PM
Location:Izamal, centered around the Convento in the center of town.
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Easter Closing Notice at MEL
The Merida English Library will be Closed on Friday, April 3 (Good Friday), and Saturday, April 4. They will reopen on Monday, April 6. As usual, Merida has taken to the beach for the week. You can expect all sorts of activities along the Malecon in Progreso. Beach soccer teams from all over Mexico will be practicing every day for the big tournament that begins on Thursday, April 2.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
April 4: Total Lunar Eclipse
April 5: Easter Sunday
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
We have not found out how long this art exhibit will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Salsa for Gringos
If you are in the mood to dance, you can be certain that Anny is organizing a class just for you! Two new salsa classes are beginning in Merida. We are listing them once here, then moving them to Yucatan Living’s Ongoing Events and Classes page.

For the next two weeks, starting this week…Tuesdays and Thursdays
Location:Hennessy’s, Paseo de Montejo
Time: 10:30 AM Reoccurs weekly on Tuesday and Thursday
Admission: $400 pesos per month

Mondays and Wednesdays
Location: Liberdanza Dance Studio, Calle 24 #95-A x 13 y 15 in Chuburna de Hidalgo, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 7:00 PM Reoccurs weekly on Monday and Wednesday
Admission: $350 pesos per month
For More Information: call Anny at 923-3736 or (999) 125-0466 or e-mail: animex [at] prodigy [dot] net [dot] mx

Monday (Lunes) March 30, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events Planned for Today

Tuesday (Martes) March 31, 2015

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Los Tres Yucatecos
This trio is a member of the association that protects and passes on traditional trova in Yucatan.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Person
(Mexico 1966) A nurse is put in charge of an actress who can’t talk and finds that the actress’s persona is melding with hers. In Spanish.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 01, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Life Itself
(USA 2014) Documentary about the life of Roger Ebert, one of the most influential US film critics of all time, died in 2012. Ebert wrote most of his life for the Chicago Sun-Times, published numerous books on cinema and was the first critic who received a Pulitzer Prize for his movie reviews. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan LivingMovie: Last Days Here
(USA 2011) Bobby Liebling was the charismatic singer of 70′s hard-rockers and doom pioneers, Pentagram. Today dying in his father’s basement smoking crack and heroin, a zombie with overwhelming sores and skin mottling, toothless and disjointed infections, he flirts with death daily. The film begins with the encounter between Liebling and Sean “Pellet” Pelletier, friend and manager who will try to revive the career of the late metal myth. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 02, 2015

Yucatan Living Second Yucatan Beach Soccer (Futbol) Cup
Soccer Competition on the beach for the rest of the weekend.
Location: Malecon in Progreso
Time: TBA
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Ultra Marathon Fe
This race is from Chelem to Telchac Puerto. Length of Race: 50 km and 100 km
Location: Departure: Church of Chelem
Time: 6:00 PM
Registration: $600 pesos.
Registration: Salvador Alvarado Stadium, Monday – Saturday, 7:00 AM – 10:00 AM.
Online Registration: http://manivelasst.com/Grupoee/

Yucatan Living Movie: Stella Cadente
(Spain 2014) The film narrates the brief reign of Amadeo of Savoy in Spain, who in 1870 tried to tidy up and modernize the country which was ungovernable. The king was misunderstood abroad and quickly took refuge inside his palace. Outside his palace, the country was collapsing, and within it, he plays his court games with love, pleasure, beauty and melancholy. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan LivingMovie: Mommy
(Canada 2014) A widowed single mother, raising her violent son alone, finds new hope when a mysterious neighbor inserts herself into their household. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Side Effects
(USA 2013) A young woman’s world unravels when a drug prescribed by her psychiatrist has unexpected side effects. Stars Rooney Mara and Channing Tatum. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) April 03, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Lucio
(Spain 2007 ) Lucio was a bankrobber. Now he is 76 years old. This is a documentary about him. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living First Friday International Cocktail Party
Special 2×1 drink prices, free botañas, reduced parking. Get connected. Join old friends and make new ones at Merida´s biggest monthly gathering of ex-pats and Meridanos.
Location: Fiesta Americana, La Hach Patio Bar. Paseo de Montejo at Avenida Colon.
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Movie: January
(Mexico 2013) After murdering his wife, Horacio flees with his lover, Lucrecia. Refugees in a cottage in the countryside, they look to continue the love that is no longer possible to sustain. Despair and guilt will lead them to face their own limits. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) April 04, 2015

Yucatan Living Opera at the Movies: Adriana Lecouvreur
Opera in four acts with an Italian libretto by Arturo Colautti , based on the play ” Adrienne Lecouvreur ” by Eugène Scribe and Ernest Legouvé. Release date: November 6, 1902, Milan. Enrico Caruso attended the premiere.
Location: Sala Mayamax in Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: 12:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Exit Through The Gift Shop
(USA 2011) A documentary about the social grafitti artist, Banksy. Still being debated whether it is authentic, a commentary on authenticity or a complete hoax. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Chelem: Lizard Joe’s Monthly Birthday Bash
This is a birthday party for all of Lizard Joe’s patrons who have a birthday in April. Look for loads of expats here, along with the #1 Yucatan Party Band: Ayudantes de Caska.
Location: Lizard Joe’s in Chelem, Calle 17 #75 x 24 y 26
Time: 8:00 PM to 11:00 PM
Admission: No Cover

Yucatan Living Movie: Inside llewyn Davis
(USA 2013) A week in the life of a young singer as he navigates the Greenwich Village folk scene of 1961. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Leviathan
(Russia 2012) A documentary shot in the North Atlantic and focused on the commercial fishing industry. In Russian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), April 05, 2015

Yucatan LivingEaster Sunday
Mass at the Cathedral in downtown Merida (and throughout the city) is well attended on this day.

Yucatan Living Music: Chamber Sundays: Dances of Europe
This is a performance by the International String Quartet of Yucatan. They are under the direction of Pawel Marek Blaszkowski. If you have not heard them, the city is quiet now and this is a perfect opportunity to do so.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Chelem: Lizard Joe’s Fun in the “Sun” Day
Classic Rock by Nota Negra.
Location: Lizard Joe’s in Chelem, Calle 17 #75 x 24 y 26
Time: 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Admission: No Cover

Yucatan Living Movie: Margin Call
(USA 2011) Follows the key people at an investment bank, over a 24-hour period, during the early stages of the financial crisis. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) April 06, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events planned for Today, yet! !

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living OPERA YUCATÁN, A.C. – May 02
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Last Scheduled Meeting: Saturday, April 11

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

16 April: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Mozart – String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K575 – OR – Tansman – String Quartet No. 3, Smetana – Quartet in E minor ‘From My Life’

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Khaki Scott

Children and Dogs Costume Contest Held in Progreso

One of the most popular events anyone can host is a costume contest that includes children and their dogs. No location for such an event is better than Progreso because of the energy that port city brings to such a day. The entrance fee was affordable (only $25 pesos), and the only requirement was for the child and their pet to wear costumes with coordinating themes. Of course, there could be no injury to the dog, such as hair dye or glue. The day was a great opportunity for families to interact with children and pets, which leads directly to a strengthening of cultural ties. We cannot resist a plea to A.F.A.D., the host of this wonderful event in Progreso, to organize the same thing for those of us who live in the city!

New Yucatan Sports Hall of Fame Now Open

This past week, Yucatan finally opened their long awaited Sports Hall of Fame with a wonderful event at Salvador Alvarado Stadium. The first 20 inductions to the Hall of Fame were announced and, then, there was a calesa parade for the ones who are still living. Among their number were boxers, weightlifters, and ball players from baseball to soccer and basketball. Those inductees who have passed away were represented by family members, for whom this ceremony meant so much. There were several exhibitions throughout the day, including weightlifting and boxing. Sergio Esquivel Cortes, one of Yucatan’s treasures in his own right, sang Gloria, one of his own compositions, during the closing ceremony.

Inauguration of Chuburna Puerto’s Fishing Pier

Yet another place in Yucatan leaves the ranks of “way out in” (name). At one time or another, we have seen places like Uman spoken of as way-out-in-Uman. Until quite recently, it was way-out-in-Chelem. We even remember Progreso and Chicxulub when they didn’t meet in the middle. Now, its Chuburna. Their long-awaited fishing pier, complete with an energy saving lighting system, a 200 meter platform and 43 meters available for birthing boats. Of course, the shipping and cruise companies are thrilled to have the new distributer road to their Progreso docks, and we are as well, but that fishing pier in Chuburna has been a long time coming and we are more than pleased and excited for those who live in the area. We also ask that our readers take a few minutes to see what the Chuburna Student Support Program has been up to lately. They have two sites that tell their whole story. The separate blog has great photos.

Water Monitoring on the Coast

It’s Semana Santa and the crowds along the beaches of Yucatan are bigger than they have ever been. Some of the people are tourists. Many have come on cruise ships that are larger and arrive more frequently than before. Others are new and returning renters and homeowners. Quite a few of the homes have just been completed. This crush of people makes it absolutely necessary that the waters along the coast of Yucatan are safe for any interaction they might have with people. That means that people in the water must be safe, as well as people who are eating the seafood captured in Yucatan’s waters. Toward that goal, state laboratories are monitoring the entire coast for any hint that a red tide may be developing, and they are monitoring the catches of the fishermen for any toxins that might be present. Thus far, no problems have been found and visitors to the beaches of Yucatan can dine and swim with no fear of getting sick.

Water in the City

There’s a new buzz term in the news this week: “culture of sanitation.” This means that the pressure of population growth, in Merida, has reached the point where citizens are going to have to become better stewards of the water they are allowing to return to the ground. Using private wells to obtain water for one home and adding many more septic tanks are not a suitable replacement for full fledged sewage and water treatment plants. Reference was made to the fact that the city has the equipment necessary to put in proper drainage, and has done so in some of the newer neighborhoods. Reference was also made to the extremely low cost to the consumer of water at this time. It looks as if these are the first discussions on raising water prices, as well as developing a drainage plan for the city. Perhaps it is time for a reality check, on the topic of water, for everyone, whether they live in Yucatan or not.

Creating Harmony and Security with Paint

This is the revival of a program that was widespread several years ago. In that first version, the buildings in the historic, central districts of colonial cities were given enough paint to cover the front of their buildings. The city with the biggest change, in our estimation, was Campeche. Now, Yucatan has some outlying fraccionamientos that are a beginning to be a bit run down. The State is providing homeowners with a gallon of vinyl sealer and a 20 liter bucket of acrylic paint. They say this is “critical care for harmony and security.” In fact, the name of the program is “Painting Your Wellness.” This rather reminds us of our mothers admonishing us to “Get up. Get dressed. If you look better, you’ll feel better.” In reality, it’s true! It will be interesting to see if this clean up, fix up, paint up campaign makes a difference for this first neighborhood of 2,500 homes.

Merida Takes Aim at Colon Cancer

Analyzing medical numbers often turns up problems that might be affecting large groups of people. Such was the case, recently, when it was discovered that a number of cases of colon cancer had been misdiagnosed as colitis. Further inquiry showed that there are only eight Colo-proctologists currently practicing in Merida. There has never been a medical area of practice in this city that was not addressed by its Board Certified physicians and this will certainly not be the first. Initial efforts are going into training all medical personnel in those skills and techniques necessary to make a proper diagnosis or referral. It is up to the patient to make certain to have any and all recommended tests for the possibility of colon cancer and see a specialist as quickly as possible if they have a problem. Look for Merida’s shortage of Colo-proctologists to soon be a thing of the past. Please be aware that this is not a cause for alarm, or that Yucatan has had an increase in its colon cancer rate. It is simply pointing out a shortage area and informing the public as to what is being done to change the situation. Many thanks to the pro-active specialists in Merida who saw this need and moved immediately to rectify the problem.

Solar Irrigation: New Maya History in the Making

It’s official. The Governor of Yucatan attended the beginning of solar irrigation in the Family Farm Program in a pumpkin field in the rural Municipality (County) of Cacalchen. Gone is the need for government subsidies to provide gasoline for the generators necessary to bring up and deliver water to these fields. Gone is the need for government supplied food pantries when irrigation equipment failed or gasoline was slow in arriving. Gone is the worst of the backbreaking labor farmers faced when trying to harvest crops that were drying out too fast. It’s a new day for farmers in rural Yucatan. They already have secure markets for every crop they produce, so the only way to go now is up into the sunshine of the future. When we get questions about whether the children of these farmers will stay on and farm, the answer is easy. Some do now, but others already obtain degrees in marketing, engineering, and international relations. With these degrees, they will be the international negotiators of the future and their families’ success will be assured. Congratulations to all of Yucatan for embracing solar energy in this very practical way.

Exhibition and Sale: Crafts Made in Cancun Prison

On Saturday, March 28, 2015, the best work of 150 artisans who currently reside in the Center for Social Readjustment (prison) in Cancun was for sale at the “Magic Hands” flea market, located in Cancun’s Hotel Zone. The handicrafts available for purchase included both woven and embroidered hammocks, natural beauty products, accessory creations, jewelry, and carved and painted figurines. It seems that this is the first time the prison in Cancun has allowed prisoners to put their work for sale outside of the prison walls. This led us to remember visiting the prison in Merida, where some crafts and art objects were for sale. It was a pretty dingy shop at the time, and hard to find. But we do know that the hammocks made by Merida prisoners are famous for their quality.

By Working Gringos
Maya DBN Architects and Builders in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Educated in the USA, Experienced in the Yucatan

Maya DBN Architects, led by Carlos de la Barrera, offers integrated architectural, interior design, construction, remodeling and restoration services in the entire Yucatan Peninsula. We have over fifteen years experience in a variety of projects.
Architect, Contractor and Builder in Merida Yucatan Mexico
Carlos de la Barrera grew up in Merida, Yucatan. After attending the School of Architecture at UADY in Merida, he went on to obtain his B.A. degree in Architecture with specialties in Interior Design and Planning from the University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. After spending time working in architecture and interior design in Ohio and Florida, Carlos returned to his hometown of Merida and began working with English-speaking clients to design, build or renovate homes in Merida and throughout the Yucatan Peninsula. Carlos and his team at Maya Architects and Builders have worked with many happy clients from the USA, Canada and other countries on Kitchen built by Maya Architects and Builders in Merida Yucatantheir first and subsequent homes here in Mexico.

Carlos says his mission is to “offer an integration solution to your project through a comprehensive and close collaboration between the client and the architect. We offer our talent and experience in design and construction, ensuring the correct use of the diverse regional materials in both traditional and avant-garde ways. Our final goal is to enhance the quality of life through the creation of architectural spaces that have their own unique identity, while existing in harmony with the natural and social environment.”

Client Testimonials

Carlos and his team have designed and/or built many homes in Merida and along the Yucatan Gulf Coast. Here is an example of a happy customer…

“We purchased and then renovated a home in Merida. We completed the project in June of 2010. We worked with Carlos de la Barrera on our project in Merida. The completed house is beautiful and more than we could have hoped for. We found working with Carlos to be easy and easy to manage through email, pictures, etc, as we were in the States for almost all of the project. We trusted Carlos completely and he came through. He went the extra mile and took us all around Merida to show us homes and what could be done. He even helped us get appliances… and a mattress! We would recommend Carlos to anyone looking to build or renovate in Merida.”
Swimming Pool built by Maya Architects and Builders in Merida Yucatan Mexico-Joel & Shawn, May 2011

“Renovating in Merida was new to my wife and me. We obtained half a dozen rough estimates for construction ranging from $350 USD per square meter to $600 USD per square meter. As a designer I wanted to work with an architect who had excellent communication skills. We visited Carlos Barrera on an existing jobsite and were immediately impressed with how thorough his renovation process was. I asked Carlos many questions about the construction process. On seeing my interest in the construction process, he went the extra mile to explain all aspects of the building process so that Architect from Merida Yucatan featured in Elle MagazineI could better understand exactly how things were done and how to get the best result with our limited budget. Upon awarding him the job, he commenced construction promptly and his crew worked tirelessly (including Mondays) to complete the build. I could tell that, to Carlos, building our house was as much a passion for him as it was for me. As my design inevitably evolved to incorporate new elements, Carlos made adjustments to the built process without any fuss. He sent videos and pictures regularly so that I was able to chart the progress from New York. As a local Meridano with strong ties to the community, he knew who to talk to get things done, whether it be a hardwood deck, or the specific variety of grass we requested. His financial dealings were completely transparent and we never felt we were being taken advantage of. On the contrary: on several occasions Carlos rejected a higher priced supplier in spite of the commission it would bring him. We are very pleased with the house and are building a second one with Carlos.”
-Adam, May 2011

Bathroom built by Maya Architects and Builders in Merida YucatanIn addition to many happy clients, Carlos and Maya Architects and Builders have had one of their most recent homes built in Merida featured in both the New York Times and in Elle Magazine, pictured on the right.

Design, Renovate, Build, Contract in Merida Yucatan

Whether you are looking to design a new home from scratch or renovate an existing structure, Carlos and his team have the knowledge, experience and creativity to help you achieve your goals within your budget and within your timeframe. Because Carlos trained and worked in the United States, he is familiar with the customs and expectations of Americans and Canadians, which makes it easier to communicate your needs and desires to him.

Contact Carlos de la Barrera

Give Carlos a call or drop him an email to begin the process of estimating your job with Maya Architects and Builders.

Call Carlos and get started on your house in the Yucatan today!
Phone: 999-252-3616
Swimming pool built by Carlos de la Barrera in Merida YucatanCel: 999-277-2312
Email: maya [dot] dbn [at] hotmail [dot] com

For more info and to see more photos in our photo gallery, please visit our website at www.mayadbn.com

 

 

 

 

This is a paid advertisement.

By Working Gringos

2015 Summer Internship

Location:Teabo, Yucatan, Mexico

Type: Full Time, Unpaid. 12 Week program

About Fundacion Cielo

Fundacion Cielo is a non-profit organization established in 2014. Our mission is to develop socioeconomic strategies that revitalize the local economy, enhances skills and breaks the cycle of inter-generational poverty in the Mayan communities in the Yucatan. Visit out website to learn more about Fundacion Cielo.

In 2014, Fundacion Cielo launched its first Summer Internship and hosted 4 incredible volunteers who worked to advance Fundacion Cielo’s efforts in the community. To learn more about their experiences, visit Fundacion Cielo’s Blog.

For the 2015 Summer Program, interns will be expected to work in several activities, based on interest and skills. We expect interns to plan, organize and execute activities aimed at advancing education, preventive healthcare, environmental conservation and entrepreneurship. Activities will be developed and tailored for specific age groups including children, teenagers and adults. Below is a list of main topics under each pillar:

  • Education: mentorship program, math regularization courses, English for beginners, arts and crafts, book club, etc.
  • Preventive Health: nutrition classes, delousing, dental care, addictions, exercise, etc.
  • Environmental Conservation: waste management, recycling, etc.
  • Entrepreneurship: Business plan development, basic financial analysis, etc.

Interns will also assist in monitoring and updating all social media outlets including Facebook, Twitter, website, keeping a summer blog and a weekly update to our donors.

From May 18th to May 29th interns, individually and in small teams, will work virtually in planning and developing the specifics of the summer program to be held in Teabo, Yucatan, from June 1st to August 7th.

Qualifications

  • Ability to work independently
  • Very organized and detail oriented
  • Demonstrated interest in development and/or entrepreneurship
  • Excellent written and communication skills
  • Spoken Spanish is a plus but not mandatory

Interns will be directly supervised and coached by a Fundacion Cielo representative in Teabo.

The entire program will be directed to Josefina Urzaiz, Co-founder of Fundacion Cielo.

www.hammockboutique.com | @hammockboutique
www.fundacioncielo.org | @cielofoundation

About Teabo

Our interns will be based out of Teabo, Yucatan, a small Mayan village of 7,000 people in the Yucatan Peninsula. For reference, Teabo is located 83 km south of Merida, the capital of Yucatan. Teabo is a developing town with challenging levels of poverty and marginalization. The Mayan language is widely spoken together with Spanish and living conditions have not changed significantly for the last 500 years. Teabo and the neighboring towns are however, very rich in Mayan history and traditions. People are very welcoming and are already excited to participate in all of our summer events. In this region, Hammock Boutique employs hundreds of families in our network of hammock weavers. To learn more about Hammock Boutique, visit our website.

The Mayapan Ruins are only a 15 minute drive and there are several cenotes – unique water formations in the Yucatan peninsula – where you will enjoy swimming in fresh water inside a cave.

Housing and Expenses

Fundacion Cielo is a young organization with limited funds. We are currently raising funds to build a Community Center in Teabo, where we can increase our impact and expand our reach to neighboring villages. Therefore, we expect our summer interns to raise at least US$400 that will be used to cover, housing, boarding and materials for the various activities throughout the summer.

Travel Arrangements

All interns are expected to arrive to Merida, Yucatan on before June 1st. Fundacion Cielo will facilitate transportation to Teabo. Merida Airport (MID) is the best option. Alternatively, Cancun (CUN) airport is 360Km from Merida. Buses from CUN Airport to Merida run frequently. For more information visit:

www.ado.com.mx

APPLICATIONS:

Submit application to info [at] fundacioncielo [dot] org on or before April 27th. Include CV and Cover Letter. Include any special qualifications, previous experiences or interests (i.e. yoga teacher, play an instrument, graphic arts). Candidates will be notified of their acceptance no later than May 1st.

By Working Gringos

Security Message for U.S. Citizens: Semana Santa Holiday Travel Precautions

With the approaching Semana Santa holiday season, the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico want to alert U.S citizens of the possibility of highway robberies and carjackings on popular transit routes into the interior of Mexico, including on toll roads (“cuotas”). Criminals are aware of increased travel in Mexico around the holidays and monitor highways to identify potential targets. Both private vehicles and commercial bus lines have been targets of highway robbery. Most criminal activity occurs after dark.

While U.S. citizens have, in the past, been murdered in highway robbery and carjacking incidents, in recent reports most victims who complied with robbers’ demands have reported that they were not physically harmed. In some cases, robbers have shot at vehicles that have attempted to flee. Robbers have used a variety of techniques, including roadblocks, bumping/moving vehicles to force them to stop, and running vehicles off the road at high speeds. While violent incidents can occur anywhere and at any time, they most frequently occur after dark and on isolated stretches of roads. To reduce risk when traveling by road, we strongly urge you to travel between cities throughout Mexico only during daylight hours, to avoid isolated roads, and to continue to use toll roads (“cuotas”), which are generally safer, whenever possible.

The Government of Mexico’s Programa Paisano provides support to U.S. residents returning to Mexico for the holiday season, including providing security information.

The current Travel Warning for Mexico provides more specific information by Mexican state. Travelers traveling by road are urged to review the sections on each state they will transit, as well as their final destination.

Maintain a high level of vigilance and take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security.U.S. citizen victims of crime in Mexico are encouraged to report incidents to the police and to the nearest U.S. consular office. We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Mexico enroll in the Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at www.Travel.State.Gov. STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency. If you don’t have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

Regularly monitor the State Department’s website, where you can find current Travel Warnings (including the Travel Warning for Mexico), Travel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution. Read the Country Specific Information for Mexico. For additional information, refer to “A Safe Trip Abroad” on the State Department’s website.

Contact the U.S. embassy or consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions. You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). Follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and download our freeSmart Traveler iPhone App to have travel information at your fingertips.

Embassy
Mexico City: Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone: +(52)(55) 5080-2000.

Consulates (with consular districts):
· Ciudad Juarez (Chihuahua): Paseo de la Victoria 3650, telephone. (011)(52)(656) 227-3000.
· Guadalajara (Nayarit, Jalisco, Aguas Calientes, and Colima): Progreso 175, telephone (011)(52)(333) 268-2100.
· Hermosillo (Sinaloa and the southern part of the state of Sonora): Avenida Monterrey 141, telephone (011)(52)(662) 289-3500.
· Matamoros (the southern part of Tamaulipas with the exception of the city of Tampico): Avenida Primera 2002, telephone (011)(52)(868) 812-4402.
· Merida (Campeche, Yucatan, and Quintana Roo): Calle 60 no. 338-K x 29 y 31, Col. Alcala Martin, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico 97050, telephone (011)(52)(999) 942-5700 or 202-250-3711 (U.S. number).
· Monterrey (Nuevo Leon, Durango, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi, and the southern part of Coahuila):Prolongacion Ave. Alfonso Reyes No. 150, Col. Valle Poniente, Santa Catarina, Nuevo Leon, 66196, telephone (011)(52)(818) 047-3100.
· Nogales (the northern part of Sonora): Calle San Jose, Nogales, Sonora, telephone (011)(52)(631) 311-8150.
· Nuevo Laredo (the northern part of Coahuila and the northwestern part of Tamaulipas): Calle Allende 3330, Col. Jardin, telephone (011)(52)(867) 714-0512.
· Tijuana (Baja California Norte and Baja California Sur): Paseo de Las Culturas s/n Mesa de Otay, telephone (011) (52) (664) 977-2000.

Consular Agencies:
· Acapulco: Hotel Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 – Suite 14, telephone (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300.
· Cancún: Blvd. Kukulcan Km 13 ZH Torre La Europea, Despacho 301 Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico C.P. 77500, telephone (011)(52)(998) 883-0272.
· Los Cabos: Las Tiendas de Palmilla Local B221, Carretera Transpeninsular Km. 27.5, San José del Cabo, BCS, Mexico 23406 telephone, (624) 143-3566 Fax: (624) 143-6750.
· Mazatlán: Playa Gaviotas #202, Zona Dorada, telephone (011)(52)(669) 916-5889.
· Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcalá no. 407, interior 20, telephone (011)(52)(951) 514-3054, (011) (52)(951) 516-2853.
· Piedras Negras: Abasolo #211, Zona Centro, Piedras Negras, Coah., telephone, (011)(52)(878) 782-5586.
· Playa del Carmen: “The Palapa,” Calle 1 Sur, between Avenida 15 and Avenida 20, telephone (011)(52)(984) 873-0303 or 202-370-6708(a U.S. number).
· Puerto Vallarta: Paradise Plaza, Paseo de los Cocoteros #1, Local #4, Interior #17, Nuevo Vallarta, Nayarit, telephone (011)(52)(322) 222-0069.
San Miguel de Allende: Centro Comercial La Luciernaga, Libramiento Manuel Zavala (Pepe KBZON), telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357.

By Working Gringos

The front dining room looking into the front bedroomThe front bedroomThe front bathroomThe peaceful back bedroom is full of lightThe back bathroom is spacious and privateFully equipped kitchenLovely stone fountain in the open courtyard
This open air living room opens right onto the patioSleeping Loft with fan and skylights

 

 

Casa Claire
Vacation Rental Home
Full of Light, Color and Space!

A delightful artist’s retreat and vaction rental in the heart of colonial Merida, Yucatan, a city where the arts are celebrated…

Casa Claire is a restored 250 year old residence with two air-conditioned bedrooms with attached private baths. One bedroom has a double bed, the other has two twin beds. There is additional comfortable sleeping for two in the spacious loft which overlooks the open courtyard at the center of the house.

The courtyard with lovely fountain is surrounded by open sitting and dining areas, and a well-equipped kitchen (stove and refrigerator, of course, but also microwave, mixer and coffee maker).

Above it all is a roof terrace, perfect for star gazing or catching a refreshing evening breeze.

The upstairs terrace

Enjoy the Indoor/Outdoor Life

By day, swing in the courtyard hammock or sit in a colorful hammock chair, and watch the clouds go by. Most ceilings in the house are 20 feet or more, with ceiling fans throughout, making Casa Claire open, airy and bright.

Relax in a colorful hammock chair

Excellent Central Location

If you can pull yourself away from the easy comfort inside the house, go outside and find the city of Merida practically at your doorstep. Turning left after stepping out the front door, it’s an easy five minute walk to the main square with its splended cathedral, museums, shops and people-watching, not to mention the adjacent Jose Peon Contreras Opera House and the State University.

The view of the dining area from the sleeping loft

Turn right, and it’s only a few minutes to Parque Santiago with its open fresh food and flower market, great local cuisine and beautifully restored cathedral. Go there on Tuesday nights and get a special treat! Live Big Band music under the stars and open-air public dancing!

Internet cafes, bookstores, laundry services, all-nite convenience stores, restaurants, bars, movie theatres, playhouses and much more are only blocks away.

 

Amenities

  • 2 bedrooms with attached private baths and air conditioning (for no more than four people)
  • Upstairs sleeping loft with sitting area that sleeps two, ceiling fan and skylights
  • Ceiling fans and 20-foot ceilings throughout
  • Original tiled floors
  • Fully equipped kitchen
  • Dining and living room open onto central open-air courtyard with gentle fountain
  • Upstairs roof terrace
  • No children under 10 years old. Please enquire about the pets.
  • Hammocks and comfortable seating
  • Housekeeping provided once per month; Can arrange to pay for more.
  • Cellular telephone in the home for the use of guests. Starts with $100 pesos credit; more can be purchased through easy-to-find ‘Amigo’ cards.

Courtyard fountain with stairs to the Roof

Prices

Casa Claire rents for $950 US per month or $350 per week, which includes housecleaning once per month (or once per week if rented for a week) but does NOT include electricity.

Casa Claire can be rented by the night (3 night minimum) for $50 US per night.

 

Contact Us Now!

If you are interested in renting Casa Claire, please email:

clairedunphy [at] yahoo [dot] com

If we don’t get back to you
within a reasonable timeframe,
please try again!

Thank you… we look forward to your stay!

By Working Gringos

English speaking periodontist and orthodontist in Merida Yucatan

HD Odontólogos… The Picture of Your Smile

The offices of HD Odontólogos are located on a quiet side street in Colonia México, north of the downtown area of Merida. In these sunlit, clean and airy offices, you can find the expert services of a dental periodontist, Dr. Arelly Carrillo, and of an orthodontist, Dr. Ruben Herrera.

Dr. Arelly Carrillo, English-speaking Periodontist in Merida Yucatan

Dr. Arelly Carillo is a dental surgeon who specializes in Periodontics. She is certified by the Mexican Board of Periodontology and is a graduate of the very well-regarded Autonomous University of Yucatán (UADY) in Merida. Now, Dr. Carillo is a Professor on periodontal subjects at UADY, teaching in both the undergraduate and postgraduate programs.

The office also provides the services and expertise of Dr. Ruben Herrera, an orthodontist. Dr. Herrera graduated from the Autonomous University of Nuevo León with a Fellowship in Advanced Orthodontics granted by the University of Texas. He is also additionally certified by the Mexican Board of Orthodontists.

Periodontal Dentistry

The American Academy of Periodontology describes a periodontist this way:

A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal disease, and in the placement of dental implants. Periodontists are also experts in the treatment of oral inflammation. Periodontists receive extensive training in these areas, including three additional years of education beyond dental school. They are familiar with the latest techniques for diagnosing and treating periodontal disease, and are also trained in performing cosmetic periodontal procedures.

When your dental needs are beyond the scope of your regular dentist, you need a specialist. Dr. Carrillo can communicate with you in English about your dental problems and how to solve them as quickly Dr. Arelly Carrillo, English-speaking Periodontist in Merida Yucatanand economically as possible. Your treatment will take place in her spacious and lovely offices, surrounded by views of gardens. If you want to listen to headphones, or need other ways of handling your anxiety about being at the dentist, please speak with her about alternatives and choices. Your comfort and care is her top priority!

Offices of Dr. Arelly Carrillo, English-speaking Periodontist in Merida YucatanDr. Arelly Carrillo provides the following services for her clients:

  • Personalized report about the health of your mouth
  • Professional teeth cleaning and tips for improving your oral health care routine
  • Scaling and Root Planning for Gum Disease (non-surgical periodontal therapy)
  • Surgical scaling and root planning. (performing a periodontal flap)
  • Placing dental implants
  • Surgical procedures such as: Crown lengthening, gingivectomy, lengthening of buccal mucosa for rehabilitation purposes
  • Osseous and soft tissue regeneration if needed (depending on the analysis of particular features and health status of the patient)

In addition, Dr. Carrillo will pay close attention to any complaints associated with periodontal tissues such as bad breath, dry mouth, mouth sores, signs of gum disease, infections or others. She will analyze your dental and general health, and work with you to create your healthiest mouth!

 

Hours and Contact Information

Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 5 to 9 PM and Saturdays from 9 to 2 PM.
Address: Calle 13, #113 between Calle 18 and 20, Colonia Mexico Norte, Merida, Yucatan C.P. 97128.
Office Phone: (999) 948-9943. Receptionist speaks perfect English.
Email: arelly [dot] hcodontologos [at] gmail [dot] com

 

 

 

 

This is a paid advertisement.

By Working Gringos

Can You Hear Me Now?

We sometimes wish there had been a video camera trained on us the first time we tried to use a cellular phone in the small town of Dolores Hidalgo in Mexico. It could have been a comedy hit on YouTube. We had bought a new cellular phone package and a pay-as-you-go card, called an Amigo card. This was a new concept to us at the time, having come from the land of two-year, ten-page contracts. We were excited to use our new purchase.

Our complete lack of both speaking and understanding Spanish made it totally impossible to activate the Amigo card in order to use our newly purchased cell phone. We must have listened to that Spanish recording ten times before finally, with much exasperation and embarassment, we employed our best charades skills to ask the teenage girl at the cash register of a restaurant to do it for us. That was a moment of intense powerlessness, and we have never forgotten it, though we can certainly laugh about it now. Eventually we figured out how to activate the “English” setting on the phone as well, which certainly helped. And then finally, seven or so years later, we know enough Spanish that we can figure it out (or not) in either language.

We wrote this original article years ago, and it has been a helpful resource for many people… even ourselves! We use it all the time. Now, in March 2015, we updated it and took out all the information about the prices for each type of phone call. Phone call prices have been coming down, they change all the time, and that’s not even figuring in the exchange rate changes! In addition, you can make free calls now, through Skype, WhatsApp or Google Hangout, among others. So when it comes to prices, you’re on your own… but keep in mind that as a rule, it is getting cheaper all the time!

Still Confused After All These Years

Despite our familiarity with our adopted home, we still are puzzled when it comes to telephones at times. The options keep multiplying, and they were confusing to begin with. We have a suspicion that we are not the only ones who struggle with this, so we researched the different protocols and we present them to you here.

A few notes. Most people in Mexico write their phone numbers differently. They tend to memorize and repeat phone numbers (and other numbers too) in groups of two or three. Americans and Canadians remember their numbers in the XXX-XXX-XXXX format. In Mexico, you might hear XXXX-XX-XX-XX or XX-XX-XXX-XXX. We use all of the different formats below so you can get used to the chaos. It’s amazing how just switching where the space goes in a number can confuse a person!

The instructions below are for phones purchased in Mexico. There are also, of course, calling cards that can be used at quickly-disappearing public phones. And there are of course, US or Canadian phones that can be activated now to work in Mexico for a low monthly cost. In our case, we have used a US phone with Verizon, which in 2015, charges $50 a month for coverage within Mexico, and some additional fees for data. With the ubiquity of Wifi connections now, those data download fees can be kept to a minimum.

In the instructions below, we had previously quoted costs, but now the costs are pretty much the same. There are other companies for land lines (Cablevision, Axtel, Nextel) and for cel phones (Iusacel, Movistar, Nextel) but costs do not vary much anymore. Of course, change is the name of the game in the phone industry, so take whatever prices are below with a grain of salt.

If you have anything helpful to contribute or if we have made a mistake, please tell us in a comment. We intend for this page to be a good reference for all who need it.

 

How To Dial A Phone in Mexico – From Anywhere to Somewhere Else

From a Land line to a land line in the same city in Mexico(example: Merida to Merida)

Prefix needed:  No prefix, no area code
Complete dialed number:  123-4567

This is the simplest option anywhere. The caller pays $1.5 pesos per minute plus IVA.  A house Telmex phone line will get the first 100 calls per month free. A business Telmex phone line pays for every call.


From a Land line to a cell phone in the same city (Merida to Merida)

Prefix needed:  044
Complete dialed number:  044-99-91-234-567 (US Format: 044-999-123-4567)

When asked, a person will usually give you his/her cellular phone number with the area code (in the case above “999”). Thus, “Mi numero celular está ‘99 91 234 567’.


Dialing a phone in Mexico

From a Land line to a cell phone in another town (Progreso to Merida)

Prefix needed: 045
Complete dialed number: 045-99-91-234-567

This will be a long distance call from your landline and the calling phone will pay the entire cost of the phone call.  The cell phone will not get charged for the long distance call.

For example, if the Progreso land line is (969)123 45 67 and you are calling a cell phone based in Merida,  you will dial 045 999 123 4567. You will use the same protocol, even if the person you are calling happens to be in Progreso at the time, if their phone is usually based in Merida (you’ll know by the Merida area code 999).

If you are calling from Progreso to a Progreso-based cell phone and the person happens to be in Merida for the afternoon, you dial 044 969 123 4567.

From a Land line to a land line in another town (Progreso to Merida)

Prefix needed:  01
Complete dialed number:  01 (999) 123 4567

This is larga distancia automatica nacional (automatic national long distance) and you will dial 01 before the area code and the phone number.


How to dial a phone number in MexicoFrom a Cell phone in Mexico to a cell phone in Mexico

Prefix needed:  None
Complete dialed number:  999-123-4567

To call a cell phone from another cell phone, regardless of where the person is located at the moment, just dial the area code and the numbers without a prefix.  The caller pays, by the way.


From a cell phone in Mexico to a cell phone in another town (Merida to Playa del Carmen)

Prefix needed:  None
Complete dialed number:  984-123-4567

Again, dial the numbers of the cell phone including the area code. The cost of this call will be paid by the caller.

From a cell phone to a land line in the same town (Merida to Merida)

Prefix needed: None
Complete dialed number:  999-123-4567 or 123-4567

You can either dial the area code and the 7 numbers or just the seven numbers. The caller pays.


From a cell phone to a land line in another town (Merida to Playa del Carmen)

Prefix needed:  01
Complete dialed number:  01-984-123-4567

Treat the number being called as a national phone number. The price depends on the plan you have, and will be paid by the caller.


From a cell phone to a US or Canada cell phone or land line

Prefix needed:  001
Complete dialed number:  001-408-123-4567

To dial an international phone number from Mexico to the United States or Canada, dial the prefix 001, followed by the area code (408) and the phone number. There is no difference in dialing protocol for dialing a landline or a cell phone number.

The price will depend on the plan you have, and will be paid by the caller in all cases. (In the US and Canada, the cell phone user may also pay to receive the call).

From a US or Canada phone to a cell phone in Mexico

Prefix needed:  011-52-1
Complete dialed number:  011 52 1 999 1 23 45 67

You will dial 011 to make an international call. Then dial Mexico’s country code, which is “52”. Follow this with a “1” to indicate that you are dialing a cell phone in Mexico. Then dial the area code and number.

If you are in the city where you have contracted for and/or purchased your cell phone in Mexico, you will not be charged for an incoming phone call. If you bought your phone in Merida, but are receiving this call on a weekend in Playa del Carmen, you will be charged something per minute (depending on your plan) for mobility (what we used to call ‘roaming’).


From a US or Canada phone to a land line in Mexico

Prefix needed:  011-52
Complete dialed number:  011 52 999 1 23 45 67

You will dial 011 to make an international call. Then dial Mexico’s country code, which is “52” and then the area code and number.


Dialing a Toll Free Number in US or Canada from Mexico

Sometimes you really need to call a toll free US number from Mexico. It won’t be toll free anymore but being able to do it still comes in very handy! Dial 001 and then dial 880 if your toll-free number begins with 800. Dial 881 for an 888 number. Dial 882 for an 877 number and dial 883 for all 866 numbers. For instance, if the number is 1-800-555-5555, you would dial 001-880-555-5555. That’s it… magic!

 

Think You Can Remember All That?

That’s it! Easy, right? If you are anything like us, we suggest you bookmark this page. Happy dialing!

*****

For information about buying a cell phone in the Yucatan, check out our article Shopping For Cell Phone Service in Merida.

By Working Gringos

Name: Brigitte Serrano
Contact email: brigitte_serrano [at] hotmail [dot] com

LOOKING FOR NANNY POSITION IN MERIDA YUCATAN
Having recently retired from the Airline Industry after 30 years, I am looking to secure a position as a live-in-nanny. I have experience teaching English in Mexico City at Conacyt and would welcome the opportunity to be a loving caregiver to your children, having raised 3 children of my own. I come with excellent references and any other information you may require. I am available May 1st, 2015.

Please feel free to contact me for further information.

By Nadine Calder

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Four

It was quite something to see how doña Raimunda enjoyed the narration, bursting out in laughter from time to time as don Hermenegildo gave some account of his rejected advances. And she had more than enough cause to do so: the pained grimace, the wistful look on his face, the timidity that rendered him childlike, and above all, the hesitant and solemn intonation he often gave to his words… all were triggers for the señora’s laughter.

He fell in love with a neighbor of his who had many admirers. What happened to him upon seeing that woman? He turned red when he passed by her house and he trembled upon greeting her while she blindly laughed at him.

Mexican love lettersIt seemed he might be her favorite, but those traitor nerves, that blood so restless that it rose to his face, caused him to decide it would be madness to speak to the charmer of his intentions.

Paper doesn’t tremble or blush. So there were letters and more letters.

That, however, couldn’t continue, and in fact did not continue, but for a reason very different from what he would have wanted. A friend of his revealed to him that everything he had written to the neighbor was now in the possession of a young man already accepted by her and who was regaling his buddies with don Hermenegildo’s stolen love letters.

“Laugh, señora, go ahead and laugh, as it was well deserved thanks to my foolishness. Everyone on the street except for me knew that they were kissing and cuddling at the shutters. You must agree, however, that a man who sets out to conduct himself with honor doesn’t deserve that treatment. As for me, he added shaking his head, it makes me feel bad all over. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

The second fortress he tried to conquer was the heart of a brunette with a maddeningly sweet gaze, daughter of a lieutenant colonel famous in the political revolutions and then aligned with the Government. Her house was on one of the streets that don Hermenegildo took on his way to court. He had been walking that way for a little more than a month when one night, the father, who had a sour temperament, came fuming at him, and after calling him a vagabond and other things that made him feel lower than dirt, ended up threatening to take a shot at him if he came anywhere near the house again.

Doña Raimunda was holding her belly, which was hurting from laughing so much.

“Just to go to the office I had to change streets!”

“But you had the consolation of knowing that this girl liked you”, the señora pointed out, looking at him and preparing to continue laughing.

“She never got around to telling me that, because I didn’t even ask her. The chance to talk never came up.”

“You didn’t talk to her, don Hermenegildo? And what were you doing for more than a month? Was she dissatisfied with you?”

“No, on the contrary. But the truth is that I’m no good at those things. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

“That’s understood. Being so shy. . . . Certain matters call for resolution. But didn’t you finally get a girlfriend, don Hermenegildo?”

“Get, yes. I got one.”

“Aha! What do we have here? And why didn’t you marry her? Could it be that her parents didn’t approve?”

“No, to be honest, not that. I have no complaint in that regard. But the misfortune that doesn’t seek me out from one side, comes from another. Since I become extremely agitated when I speak of love to a woman, I arrived at an understanding with her because a cousin of hers helped and encouraged me, knowing that my intentions wouldn’t be poorly received. I had to explain to her parents the Mexican gentlemenhonorable purpose of my frequent visits to the house because they told their daughter: serious matters must be handled formally. I complied with their request. When they asked me about the length of the engagement, it gave me a chill. I hadn’t thought about that. I set it at one year. I had hopes of bettering my situation, but the days and months flew by and I was continuing at the same level as far as my finances were concerned. She was as poor as I, so I couldn’t hope for anything more than my own resources. Many things could happen in six months and I asked for extra time. But what happened was that, in a very refined way, they dismissed me from the house, reminding me that I was going there to marry their daughter, and I was unable to do so. I could hardly prove myself so heartless as to take her from her home to kill her of hunger, and here you find me as single as I was born. This happened almost nine years ago. Convinced that he who was born to weep should not be tickled, I have renounced loving any woman because that is what my luck comes to, doña Munda. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

Don Hermenegildo was shaken, and when he took out his handkerchief to wipe the perspiration from his brow. The señora was certain that he also furtively dried a tear that escaped from his eye.

“Come now, don Hermenegildo, I won’t tell you that you’ve been very fortunate in these things, but let’s agree that to a great extent, you yourself are to blame.”

“I to blame, my señora!”

“You. Just why haven’t you taken much of a liking toward marriage?”

“I can swear to you that there were very few men of my age more inclined to consider marriage a man’s most perfect state.”

“Well, then, the fault, in the first place, is with your timidity; then…”

“But how would you want me to fix that? I can’t help it and, in fact, it torments and weighs on me.”

“And the last one, why didn’t you marry her? You say it’s because of your lack of resources. But although scarce, there were some, and others that God would surely have given you as he never fails those who need him. One thing that could have helped her, you would not have been so lacking in judgment as to snatch her from one poverty to place her in another. Look, perhaps that very thing would have bettered your situation, because it wouldn’t be the first time a person saves himself by paying attention to family responsibilities.”

Don Hermenegildo sat thinking about what he had just heard and, as if interrupting the train of thought that was absorbing him, he replied after a moment:

“All that is very nice, señora, but if those plans had fallen apart, what would have become of us?”

“Fine. You would have been poorer. Others have it worse.”

The señora’s words seemed to trouble her guest. She, encouraged by the apparent success she had obtained, dared to spring this question:

“And today, why don’t you get married?”

“But, señora, with the extra years that I’ve added on…”

“With those added years, you’re still not old.”

“And with such a low salary, I’d be crazy to think about that.”

“Come on. Cheer up and look for a girlfriend and I promise you that Felipe will help me see to it that you improve your possibilities.”

Her husband, who was just then arriving and who heard his name mentioned, asked:

“What’s this about? How are you, don Hermenegildo? A very good evening to you.”

“And to you, sir. How has your day been? You must be tired from all your business affairs.”

“The usual. The heat is what tires me more than anything. Today at noon, I felt a headache coming on.”

A Yucatan headache“You don’t say!” exclaimed the good gentleman with heightened interest. “And what did you take to get rid of it?”

“Nothing,” responded don Felipe as he came in to take a seat. “It left the same way it came. So then, what were you talking about?”

“I’m encouraging don Hermenegildo to get married. I’ve promised him that we’ll help him better his situation, and even, if he wants, be the godparents.”

“With much pleasure,” agreed the licenciado, seating himself in the chair and pushing it toward the wall to turn it sideways.

They went on talking about a variety of things and a little later the bachelor bade them farewell, wishing the entire family a good night, that the licenciado’s headache wouldn’t return and prescribing, in case it should, sweet marigold leaves.

****

Read Chapter One, Two and Three of One Last Effort (El Ultimo Esfuerzo).

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting March 23, 2014

Yucatan Living Festival of Trova: Merida Yucatan – March 22 – 31
All the best of Yucatan’s trova groups and individuals will be in Merida this week. These are the groups that will be singing for you during this week-long celebration of Trova, Yucatan’s signature style of music. They are the best of the best, and some of them are legends in Yucatan’s music world.

Sunday, March 22: Night of Trios, featuring: Trio Ensueño, Trio Trovanova, and Trio Trovenia, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Tuesday, March 24: Los Juglares in Concert, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Wednesday, March 25: Songs of the MAYAB: Maricarmen Perez and Jesus Armando, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Thursday, March 26: Las Maya Internacional, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Saturday, March 28: Yahalkab in Concert, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Sunday, March 29: 12:00 PM: Orquesta Tipica Infantil, the Children’s Choir, 12 Noon, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Sunday, March 29: 8:00 PM: Cantores de Yucatan in Concert. Performers include: Beatriz Cervera, Marilu Basulto, Lenny Sanchez, Cony Ancona, Angelica Balado and Trio Trovanova, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Tuesday, March 31: Orquesta Tipica Yukalpeten, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Location: All performances are in Teatro Daniel Ayala
Time: All performances are at 8:00 PM except Sunday March 29 includes a 12:00 PM performance.
Admission: All performances are Free!

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
March 29: Palm Sunday
April 4: Total Lunar Eclipse
April 5: Easter Sunday
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
This art exhibit opened this week. We have not found out how long it will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Salsa for Gringos
If you are in the mood to dance, you can be certain that Anny is organizing a class just for you! Two new salsa classes are beginning in Merida. We are listing them once here, then moving them to Yucatan Living’s Ongoing Events and Classes page.

Class #1 Begins on Tuesday March 17
Location:Teatro Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 10:30 AM Reoccurs weekly on Tuesday and Thursday
Admission: $400 pesos per month

Class #2 Begins on Wednesday March 18
Location: Liberdanza Dance Studio, Calle 24 #95-A x 13 y 15 in Chuburna de Hidalgo, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 7:00 PM Reoccurs weekly on Monday and Wednesday
Admission: $350 pesos per month
For More Information: call Anny at 923-3736 or (999) 125-0466 or e-mail: animex [at] prodigy [dot] net [dot] mx

Monday (Lunes) March 23, 2015

Yucatan Living The Choir of the City of Merida: Gloria, Gloria
As we draw closer to the end of Lent, look for many more of these wonderful performances at churches throughout Yucatan.
Location: Iglesia de San Juan, Merida, Calle 64 x 69
Time: 8:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Tuesday (Martes) March 24, 2015

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trovadores del Mayab
This will be a special performance of Trova by Trovadores del Mayab.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Tenant
(France 1993) A bureaucrat rents a Paris apartment where he finds himself drawn into a rabbit hole of dangerous paranoia. This is a psychological horror film, directed by and starring Roman Polanski. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) March 25, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Cantunis
(Spain 2007) In 1978, Barcelona launched a social program for Can Tunis, a neighbourhood where people hovered between life and death. Twenty years later, things are not going well. The movie shows how they fight the utter deterioration and indifference of inhabitants and authorities. A teacher tries to motivate his students. He knows that education makes them aware of their reality and offers them the only opportunity. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Ruth Bennett plays in Valladolid, Yucatan

Yucatan Living Ruth Bennett Performance
Ruth Bennett, the principal harpist for the State Symphony of the Yucatan is returning to perform another concert in Valladolid. Only 140 seats are available!
Location: Casa de Los Venados, Valladolid, Yucatan
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Life Itself
(USA 2014) Documentary about the life of Roger Ebert, one of the most influential US film critics of all time, died in 2012. Ebert wrote most of his life for the Chicago Sun-Times, published numerous books on cinema and was the first critic who received a Pulitzer Prize for his movie reviews. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) March 26, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: The Tiniest Place
(Mexico 2011) This 2011 Mexican documentary is described this way: “This is a story about mankind’s ability to arise, to rebuild and reinvent himself after surviving a tragedy. A story about a people that have learned to live with their sorrow; an annihilated town that re-emerges through the strength and deep love of its’ inhabitants for the land and the people.” In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living International String Quartet of Yucatan
Corelli – Concerto Grosso No. 8, Purcell – Chaconnem Albinoni – Concerto Grosso No. 1 and Mozart – String Quartet
Location: Monjas Church in Centro, Calle 63 x 64
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $200 pesos

Yucatan Living Classic Movie: Pandora’s Box
(Germany 1928). Director: G.W. Pabst. Starring: Louise Brooks. The rise and inevitable fall of an amoral but naïve young girl whose careless eroticism inspires lust and violence in those around her.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Foro Cultural in Merida YucatanForo Cultural at Escuela Modelo
A student of the school reached out to us to invite our readers to participate in this annual event. “Basically it is an event where students from prepa participate in things like poetry (kind of reading it out loud to the audience), there’s live music, photography from the students is displayed, there will even be some students selling art, and a book exchange as well. In the past there have also been some food stands (marquesitas, esquites, etc) and this year that’s likely to happen again. On behalf of the school, I’d like to invite any of your readers who would be interested in this event.”
Location: Escuela Modelo, on Paseo de Montejo just north of Walmart
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free, but feel free to bring a book to exchange.

Yucatan Living Movie: Despertar el Polvo
(Mexico 2013) This is the story of man who has suffered the transgressed living a life of crime and corruption. The neighborhood is the stage where he roams the streets invisible, ignored, lonely, lost in his misery. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: This Ain’t California
(Germany 2012) The “found footage” in this movie is not real Super 8. Instead it is from the 1980s and it is mocked up. In German with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) March 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Made in Mexico
(Mexico 2011) This movie, Made in Mexico, is a recent documentary/music video about the creative life and citizens of Mexico. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: I Don’t Want To Talk About It
(Argentina 1993). Director: Maria Luisa Bemberg. Starring: Marcello Mastroianni and Luisina Brando. Leonor, a widow in a small South American town, gives birth to Charlotte, a dwarf. Although the mother provides a rich childhood for her daughter, she erases any clues her daughter might see that would lead her to think she is different, i.e. burning books like “Snow White,” and destroying garden gnomes. In short, she simply doesn’t want to talk about it. The sheltered daughter grows up and captures the heart of a local boy, but then the circus comes to town. Probably in Spanish.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free. Also, this is an Adults Only film.

Yucatan Living Choir of the City of Merida: Gloria, Gloria Viernes
This will be yet another wonderful choir performance.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Stella Cadente
(Spain 2014) The film narrates the brief reign of Amadeo of Savoy in Spain, who in 1870 tried to tidy up and modernize the country which was ungovernable. The king was misunderstood abroad and quickly took refuge inside his palace. Outside his palace, the country was collapsing, and within it, he plays his court games with love, pleasure, beauty and melancholy. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Night on Earth
(France 1991) An anthology of 5 different cab drivers in 5 American and European cities and their remarkable fares on the same eventful night. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) March 28, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: The Substance
(Germany 2011) In 1943, the year in which the first A-bomb was built, Albert Hofmann discovered LSD, a substance that was to become an A-bomb of the mind. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Better Than Chocolate
(Canada 1999). Director: Anne Wheeler. Starring: Wendy Crewson, Karyn Dwyer, Christina Cox, Ann-Marie MacDonald and Marya Delver. Two attractive young lesbians, Maggie and Kim, meet in Vancouver, develop a romance and move in together. Soon, Maggie’s naïve mother gets a divorce and moves in with them. Then, a transsexual friend of theirs who is getting ready for a sex change operation also moves in and the mother learns the truth about all of them.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!

Yucatan Living Movie: This Is the End
(USA 2013) While attending a party at James Franco’s house, Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel and many other celebrities are faced with the apocalypse. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Leviathan
(Russia 2012) A documentary shot in the North Atlantic and focused on the commercial fishing industry. In Russian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), March 29, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary about Nature
Always a great documentary aimed especially for children.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Sunday Chamber Music: Dances of Europe
These performances are by the Chamber Orchestra of Merida. Today’s performance is directed by Pawel Marek Blaszkowski.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Dance: True Passions
A dance performance “to the rhythm of Jazz and Tango”.
dance in YucatanLocation: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Dallas Buyers Club
(USA 2013) In 1985 Dallas, electrician and hustler Ron Woodroof works around the system to help AIDS patients get the medication they need after he is himself diagnosed with the disease. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) March 30, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events planned for Today, yet! !

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle
First and Third Thursdays in February and March 2015. Local and Foreign Artisans Market: to benefit the Chicxulub Food Bank. Attractions include Slow Food Market Vendors, Jewelry by Jorge, Carvings by Martine, Olga Cuevas: Clothing Designer, Mano de Nano (aka Naomi Murphy): homemade mustard, salad dressing, marinades, granola, meat rubs, baked goods, and a variety of pickles, Anita’s Salchichones (German Sausage) and many many more !!!
Location: D’Mar Salon de Eventos, Calle 28x21y23, Chicxulub Puerto
Time: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Free to shoppers. Vendors contact for more information.
More Information: Call Nola (English): (999) 109-6319 or e-mail: muellemarket [at] gmail [dot] com or keep up with new announcements on the Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MuelleMarket

Yucatan Living OPERA YUCATÁN, A.C. – April 4th
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies with Adriana Lecouvreur in Cilea. Preview this performance.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Additional Scheduled Meetings: Saturday, April 11

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

16 April: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Mozart – String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K575 – OR – Tansman – String Quartet No. 3, Smetana – Quartet in E minor ‘From My Life’

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Name of Company: Ensisal Development Marketing Company
Job Location: Merida
Name of Contact: Daniel Bershad
Phone Number: 999-233-4236
Email Address: daniel [at] ensisal [dot] net
Job Description: Graphic design, full time; 9-2, 4-7 m-f
Job Requirements: Create brochures, images, ads, plat plans, etc. English is required.
Any Additional Information: Photoshop abilities, etc. ideally the Adobe suite.
Company Website: ensisal.com
Pay offered: 8000 pesos per month

By Khaki Scott

Spring Equinox Numbers Were Huge!

More than 200,000 people braved the risk of rain to see if Kukulcan, the Great Feathered Serpent, would have enough sun for his shadow to descend the staircase of the Castillo at Chichen Itza, or if the Rain God Chaac would be able to muster enough bad weather to obscure Kukulcan’s shadow. Kukulcan won the day and it was thrilling. Other archaeological sites also had larger than usual crowds. Oxkintok, one of our favorite, and rather out-of-the-way, sites, was open for the Equinox at dawn for the second time this year. Apparently, it too was built with the Equinox in mind. The site was opened at 5 am for anyone interested (and likely will be next year as well, so make a note!). Also, the price of admission at Oxkintok is only $47 pesos (as opposed to Chichen Itza, see below), and on Sundays it is free to Mexican nationals and anyone who can prove residency in Mexico. It looks as if much of the world is ready for spring and Yucatan is a great place to find it.

Spring at Yucatan’s Busiest Archaeological Sites

Rates have changed this year at two of Yucatan’s busiest archaeological sites: Chichen Itza and Dzibilchaltun.

At the Maya Ruins of Chichen Itza, the ticket price for domestic visitors is $145 pesos. The ticket price for foreign visitors is $216 pesos. Exempted from paying are pensioners and retirees over 60, individuals under 13, those who are disabled, as well as students and teachers with accredited documentation. Parking lots are available for vehicles and buses, as well as a heliport for those who arrive by air. Free transportation is available to move tourists from parking lots to the main section of the site. The hours of operation are the same at many of the archaeological sites in Yucatan state, i.e. 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM on a normal schedule. The light and sound show (Chichen Itza Kukulcan Nights) is usually available through a night tour. This past weekend, because it was the beginning of Spring, there was a weekend special that gave visitors the light and sound show without having to purchase the tour.

At Dzibilchaltun, the ticket price for domestic visitors is $101 pesos, and $130 pesos for foreigners. Exempted from paying are pensioners and retirees over 60, individuals under 13, those who are disabled, as well as students and teachers with accredited documentation. Parking is available for individual vehicles and for busses. The hours of operation for Dzibilchaltun are usually from 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM. This can change during both the Spring and Fall Equinox.

ADO Special “Coins” Program

The ADO bus system is again advertising its domestic bus tours known as “Coins.” Last year, after being encouraged to save the change in their pockets, on a daily basis for a year, Mexicans who never thought they could afford to travel were in the busses and gone on vacation. The program was so successful that ADO is promoting it again. We think this is a great idea for everyone. Start saving those coins and see Mexico!

Water Quality in Yucatan

One of the most common questions visitors to Mexico ask is about whether they should drink bottled water or trust tap water. New statistics still imply that bottled water is the best choice. Yucatan has 30 wastewater treatment plants in the entire state and, unfortunately, many are only able to treat one to five liters per second. Some larger treatment plants are treating 400 liters per second, but they are in the minority. The biggest offenders continue to be pork farms, corn mills, open landfills, and underground oil. When populations grow as rapidly as they have done in urban Yucatan, there are bound to be water problems. Yucatan has more water than any state in Mexico… enough to carry the state for 30 more years in fact. But for now, bottled drinking water is still recommended. Please support any and all water conservation programs.

Yucatan Loses Last Hero of WWII

Sometimes, we Americans forget that World War II touched families around the world, including here in Mexico. The legendary Squadron 201 of the Mexican Expeditionary Air Force fought its battles over the Far East. Three of their number were from the State of Yucatan: Resendil Varguez Magaña, Ricardo Quintal Pinzon, and machine gunner Lt. Ramiro Bastarrachea Gamboa. For their heroic actions during time of war, all three of these fine soldiers were awarded the Medalla Servicio el Lejano Oriente (Medal of Service in the Far East). Don Ramiro died, at the age of 93, just this past week. A large family, many friends, a proud state, and a grateful nation are left to mourn his passing.

Punishable Crime: Cutting the Ears and Tail of Pets

For many years, animal rights activists tried to talk to the owners and veterinarians of some pet breeds about the dangers of cutting the ears and tails of pets. Finally, their numbers were sufficient to pass animal abuse laws and veterinarians are bound to warn owners who request such services now that it is a punishable crime. Evidently, it has been a crime under animal abuse laws for some time but, without the specific language it has now, some pet owners and veterinarians simply ignored the law. Veterinarians have also finally begun to advise against the declawing of cats. Hopefully, this specific legal language is present in Yucatan’s animal abuse laws and, if not, perhaps it will be soon.

Migratory Health Issues

The IV Global Congress of Qualitative Health Research was held in Merida this past week. Representatives of seventeen nations where on hand, seeking proposals for offering quality health care as a human right. Notable among the nations represented were Brazil, Chile, the People’s Republic of China, Colombia and South Korea. As the population of the world continues to migrate, it is an error to ignore the fact that migrants bring health issues with them. Some of those health issues are related to economy and environment, and their new home nations must be prepared to take them on at that point. Universities and social groups around the world are working together to develop a global system that will ensure the basic human right to appropriate health care for everyone, no matter where they migrate in the world. That is a monumental project and everyone working on it should know how deeply appreciative the world is of their willingness to dedicate themselves to this cause.

Bus Drivers in Training for New Transport System

There will soon be 40 new buses in Merida, all connected to a central dispatcher. There are 90 bus drivers, who have been divided into three groups of 30 so they can learn the new system. These will be the buses of the new Metropolitan Circuit and a huge leap forward for Merida’s transit system. There will be more bus stops now too. With luck, the bus drivers will enjoy their new system as much as we hope the people will. We haven’t heard if these buses are the same combustion engine designs that now ply the streets of Merida, but we are hoping they might be powered by something cleaner. Vamos a ver! (We’ll see!)

Ministry of Education Fights Childhood Obesity Online

After being presented with the fact that Yucatan is first in the nation of Mexico in its rate of obesity, the State Government departments of education and health partnered with UADY to develop the Comprehensive Care Program to Combat Obesity in the State of Yucatan (PIAOY). This is an excellent program that is all online, and it is also being taught in schools. The online program helps parents to take charge of their own obesity issues so that they can work with their children to build a new and healthy lifestyle. To learn more about this program and to share it with friends, please visit the PIAOY website.

Expat Passed Away in Progreso

On March 15, Richard Wilson died of a heart attack in his home in Progreso, Yucatan. He was affectionately called “Dickie” by his friends and was only 66 years young. The entire expat community mourns his passing and many have remarked that beach life will never be as much fun again without Dickie’s antics. Although we did not know Dickie, it speaks volumes when his friends laugh out loud at the mention of his name and then begin their next sentence with “Now – you have to understand – Dickie was a character…” Hopefully, someone will be able to laugh at memories of each of us after we are gone. Rest in Peace, Dickie.

By Working Gringos

Hotel Caribe in Merida Yucatan - Colonial hotel in downtown Merida

Hotel Caribe… Step Back in Time in Downtown Merida

Do you want to stay in a hotel in downtown Merida where you are surrounded by history and authentic architecture? Do you want to stay in the historic centro of Merida for a reasonable price?

Hotel Caribe is just that place… a place where, for just a moment, you can forget the world outside… step back in time, enjoy the tranquility and grace of a former Merida convent school with all the conveniences of a modern hotel.

The beautiful musical notes of authentic Yucatecan trova singing and guitar will delight you every afternoon at their restaurant and bar, where you can enjoy Yucatecan cuisine from the extensive variety on the menu. If you would rather eat in your room, room service is available from 7 AM until 10 PM daily.

Swimming Pool at Hotel Caribe - Colonial hotel in Merida centro YucatanStay there, and enjoy sitting by the swimming pool, a drink in hand and enjoy a spectacular view from the third floor… you can see the rooftops of downtown Merida, including the domed roof and towers of the Catedral. Hotel Caribe is in the perfect downtown Merida location, surrounded by the Plaza Grande, the Catedral san Idelfonso, the MACAY museum, the Olimpo museum and cultural center, the Jose Peon Contreras theatre and much more. You can walk just a few blocks to the Luis Galvez main mercado, or to parks like Santa Lucia, Mejorada, Santiago and others.

Hotel Caribe has 53 lovely hotel rooms. All the rooms are equipped with air conditioning, wireless Internet, satellite color television, safety deposit boxes, hair dryers and telephones with extensions.

For reasonable extra fees, guests can also enjoy laundry services, medical assistance, car rental, tours, in-room massages, irons and ironing boards and parking. Parking is free from 7 PM to 7 AM. During the day, parking costs only $10 pesos per hour (about $10 USD per day). The parking lot is located one half block from the hotel, on Calle 59, between Calle 58 and 56.

In the lobby, there is an English-speaking concierge who loves to help guests find their way around Merida, including finding the best day trips, tours, restaurants, shopping, museums and more.

Hotel Prices

Effective rates from 3rd March 2015 to 14th December 2015. Taxes are included in the prices below.

Standard Room
Standard room at Hotel Caribe, colonial hotel in Merida centro Yucatan MexicoSingle or Double beds

  • Monthly Rate: $1500.00 USD, American breakfast included
  • Weekly Rate: $400.00 USD, American breakfast included
  • Daily Rate: $57.14 USD, No meals included

We accept cash, credit cards and bank deposits.

Special Complimentary Offerings

Superior room at Hotel Caribe, colonial hotel in Merida centro Yucatan Mexico

  • One child under 12 years old is free of charge in a room shared with 2 adults.
  • If there is a free Superior class room available, they will upgrade you for free!
  • American breakfast included for weekly or monthly guests.
  • Free wireless Internet everywhere in the hotel.
  • Free parking service from 7 PM to 7 AM. During the day, parking is only $10 pesos per hour.
  • Swimming pool open from 8 AM to 8 PM, for guests only.

Our Policies

Deposits for Reservations
A first night deposit or a credit card number is required to hold your reservation. They require this deposit 30 days in advance in case of groups and 72 hours for individuals.

Cancellations
There is no charge for cancellations if you cancel more than 72 hours in advance (for individuals) or 30 days in advance (for groups). If you cancel after that, or do not show up for your reserved room, you will be charged for one night.

Dining at Hotel Caribe in downtown Merida Yucatan

Exclusive Offerings For Yucatan Living Readers

For 20% of your meal at the restaurant in Hotel Caribe (not including liquor…), print out this page and bring it to Hotel Caribe. (To print the page, just “right-click” anywhere on the page. You probably don’t want to print all the pages, so just print the first page with this offer).

Contact Hotel Caribe

Address:
Calle 59 x 60 no. 500, on the corner inside Hidalgo Park. Just a half block from the Plaza Grande. Col Centro C.P. 97000, Mérida Yucatán México
Tropical Evenings at Hotel Caribe in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Toll Free USA & Canada:
1 888 8226 431 or (+52 -999) 924-9022.
Ask for Cuxtali Cetina (Pronounced “Coosh-tahl-ee Set-teen-ah”)

Email:
reservaciones [at] hotelcaribe [dot] com [dot] mx

Website:
www.hotelcaribe.com.mx/

****

This is a paid advertisement.

By Working Gringos

Yucatan and The Love of Reading

If you take a poll, in Mexico, and ask young people how often they read a book, your view of the educational level of the next Mexican generation is going to be on life support. However, if you ask the right question, i.e. how often do you read a book online?, then you will see that Mexicans are reading more than ever before and have a love for reading that is truly unlimited. This week, we learned a new word that describes an entire new category of bloggers. A booktuber is a videoblogger who uses their blog to promote books and generate interest and new readers. Booktubers are, most often, young and masters of using social networking to promote their blogs. We are pleased to report that the booktuber species has begun to develop a strong presence right here in the State of Yucatan. During the recent literary festival in Merida, they were accepted as part of mainstream literature and interest is growing by leaps and bounds. This is wonderful news and we want to thank every booktuber and congratulate every book-reader in Mexico!

Merida Hack Day: I Am a City Changer! March 20 – 22, 2015

One Hundred young people from the ages of 18 to 29, who are interested in applying innovative, entrepreneurial and social action through software development, program design, and communication and marketing have been invited to form teams and compete to see which team comes out on top. The jury is composed of recognized experts and the committee includes representatives from the authorities, academics, NGOs and private companies. Each member of the winning team will receive a scholarship for 6 months in order to make their project a reality. As software designers ourselves, we will be watching to see what Yucatan’s talented young people come up with on Merida’s Hack Day!

When Is Semana Santa 2015?

For those who are trying to make plans for the Easter Holidays, it is important to know the dates of Semana Santa (Holy Week). This is the week when people are on vacation and families usually get together for reunions. Expect most government offices to be closed during this entire week, and don’t be surprised if some businesses are closed as well.
• March 29, Palm Sunday
• March 30, Easter Monday
• March 31, Holy Tuesday
• April 1, Holy Wednesday
• April 2, Holy Thursday
• April 3, Friday
• April 4, Easter Saturday (or Holy Saturday)
• April 5, Easter Sunday (or Easter Sunday)
• April 6, Easter Monday, a holiday in some communities

Tianguis Turistico de Mexico 2016: Merida Strong Contender

The Tianguis Turistico de Mexico is the largest tourism and trade fair in Mexico. Whatever city is chosen as its host can expect a huge shot in the arm of its local economy due to the many attendees from around Mexico and the world. At this point, Merida is the strongest contender to host this event in 2016. Merida has the infrastructure and it has the security. With private and governmental supporters already on board, everyone is holding their breath to hear the final decision.

Job Requirement: Three Hours of Exercise or Sports Daily

In the course of a week, we read a mountain of material sent to us by various news agencies. This story struck our eye because it is about the firemen of the Fire Department of the Maritime Rescue Base. The Municipality of Progreso has delivered sports equipment for volleyball and soccer to these professional firemen who are required to spend three hours of every shift either doing exercise or playing sports. It was explained that, in this way, the firemen seek to maintain dexterity, agility and the quick reactions required by their work. We have a hard enough time managing to walk a mile or two once or twice a week. We can only imagine having a job that requires three solid hours of hard exercise or sports day in and day out. For all that our firemen do for us, we are deeply appreciative of their service.

Where in the World is Naturalist Jim Conrad?

It dawned on us this week that we haven’t heard from Naturalist Jim Conrad in a while. That usually means that he is off on yet another exciting new adventure somewhere in Yucatan. Then, as we opened the website for Hacienda Chichen, there was Jim, in a beautiful photo at the very top of their Hacienda Chichen Activities page! Jim Conrad is currently living and volunteering in Hacienda Chichen’s Nature Reserve. He continues to write his Naturalist Newsletter, but now includes conducting eco-tours. For anyone who wants to know more about the flora and fauna of Yucatan, we highly recommend reading all of Jim Conrad’s web pages, as well as signing up to receive his newsletter.

Kiteboarding and Kitesurfing in Yucatan

This past weekend, the Third National Kiteboarding Tournament was held in Progreso, Yucatan. In mid-March, you can expect to see Kitesurfing Tournaments as well. This is a great time to go back and take a look at these two sports and at the opportunities to take kiteboarding and kitesurfing vacations here in Yucatan. There are three destinations to choose from: Progreso, El Cuyo, San Felipe and Rio Lagartos. If you are a beginner, classes are available. We’ve got the wind, now all we need is you!

Ornamental Fish Trade Up 250% in 10 Years

The First National Expo Aquarium Fair has just been held in Mexico City. There, it was learned that over 60 million ornamental fish are produced in aquaculture programs in Mexico each year. The State of Morelos produces about 32 million of these fish. The next largest producer is the State of Yucatan, which produces about 15 million ornamental fish per year and exports about 70% of production to the United States. This industry has grown so large now that it has attracted the support of the Federal Government. It now has a national market that collects the fish and exports them from a central location in Mexico City. It is wonderful to note that the ornamental fish industry in Mexico is also associated with the veterinary departments of the various UNAM campuses, which speaks to the health of this very successful aquaculture project. This is another case of Yucatan taking a small resource (bees, citrus trees, pumpkin seeds, ornamental fish found in cenotes, etc), taking care of that resource, and going on to become one of the premier producers in the world.

Pumpkin Seeds: Working Hard to Meet Demand

Speaking of pumpkin seeds, as of the end of 2014, one of the most important small, sustainable agricultural products of Yucatan turns out to be pumpkin seeds, which are now marketed as snacks to casinos and hotels in Las Vegas, Nevada. The six women’s groups in Chemax, Yucatan, have used a government grant to get them well on their way to a goal of being able to cultivate 100 hectares of pumpkins so that the seeds will provide a boost to their rural economy. Knowing the women’s agricultural groups in Yucatan, plenty of other projects will soon be devised to handle the rest of all those pumpkins. Chemax is the municipality that lies between Valladolid and Quintana Roo on the far eastern border of the State of Yucatan. Chemax is actually a diamond in the rough – just a short drive to most of the major tourist destinations on the Yucatan Peninsula and now billed as the location of low mountain trails for hiking, ATV activities, and motorcycle riding. To download GPS information about the Best Trails in Chemax, visit their website.

SAGARPA and Livestock in Yucatan

We often miss the fine points when we read the news in a foreign language. Recently, it was reported that SAGARPA has invested 300 million pesos in the livestock industry in Yucatan. That is incorrect. SAGARPA has invested 260 million pesos in productivity programs and 40 million pesos in other components for all of the Yucatan Peninsula. That includes Campeche, Yucatan and Quintana Roo. The productivity process programs are not just for raising cattle either. As you will remember, Yucatan has been long on raising cattle but short on slaughter houses, which causes a significant increase in costs as beef must be shipped to the north to be processed. This new SAGARPA investment is to benefit small and medium sized farmers through the incorporation of new technologies, training and funding for equipment, and money to purchase capital goods to make raising cattle more profitable. With the world population growing as it is, increases in the production of protein (specifically meats) is also growing, with Mexico standing in 7th place in world production of beef cattle and, last year, all previous export records for the exporting of Yucatan’s beef were broken. This is an opportunity this state has no intention of wasting.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting March 16, 2014

Yucatan Living Festival of Trova: Merida Yucatan – March 22 – 31
All the best of Yucatan’s trova groups and individuals will be in Merida this week.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
March 20 at 4:45 PM: Spring Equinox
March 29: Palm Sunday
April 4: Total Lunar Eclipse
April 5: Easter Sunday
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Special Photographic Exposition: Women of the Mountain March 6 – 19
Photographs by Pedro Tee, award winning Mexican photographer. These photos look beautiful and a visit here makes a great ending to a day spent at Uxmal.
Location: Salon Kabah & Lobby of Hotel Hacienda Uxmal Plantation & Museum in Uxmal, Yucatan, Mexico.
Time: During Museum hours
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Salsa for Gringos
If you are in the mood to dance, you can be certain that Anny is organizing a class just for you! Two new salsa classes are beginning in Merida. We are listing them once here, then moving them to Yucatan Living’s Ongoing Events and Classes page.

Class #1 Begins on Tuesday March 17
Location:Teatro Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 10:30 AM Reoccurs weekly on Tuesday and Thursday
Admission: $400 pesos per month

Class #2 Begins on Wednesday March 18
Location: Liberdanza Dance Studio, Calle 24 #95-A x 13 y 15 in Chuburna de Hidalgo, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 7:00 PM Reoccurs weekly on Monday and Wednesday
Admission: $350 pesos per month
For More Information: call Anny at 923-3736 or (999) 125-0466 or e-mail: animex [at] prodigy [dot] net [dot] mx

Monday (Lunes) March 16, 2015

Yucatan Living National Holiday
It is Benito Juarez’s birthday today. Benito Juarez was the first Mexican president who was of indigenous origin… and the last. He is almost universally revered in Mexico.

Tuesday (Martes) March 17, 2015

Yucatan Living Film Forum: Screening of “Leaving No Footprint”
(Mexico 2000). Director: Maria Novaro. Starring: Aitana Sanchez-Gijon, Tiare Scanda, Jesus Ochoa, Martin Altomaro, Jose Sefami and Silverio Placios. This film won Best Latin-American film at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival, plus awards for the best aerial photography and special effects. Synopsis: Aurelia, a single mother, who works as a make-up artist in Ciudad Juarez, is determined to change the fate of her children. Ana is an international trafficker of pre-Hispanic art who is fleeing a policeman who is obsessed with her, and requests that Aurelia helps her by transporting the stolen art in her car.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances! Elgar – String Quartet in E minor Op. 83 and Haydn – String Quartet in D minor Op. 76 No. 2.
Location: Hacienda Xcanatun
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Ensueño
The Trio of Dreams is one of the signature trova trios in the State of Yucatan.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: My Life in Pink
(France 1997) Ludovic is a transgender girl who is coming out. She talks of marrying her neighbor’s son and can not understand why everyone is so surprised about it. Her family and neighbors struggle with her actions. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) March 18, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Twenty Feet From Stardom
(USA 2013) This is a tribute to the background singers, who are on stage, but are secondary compared to the famous singers they support. Their voices provide harmony to the best bands in popular music. In English.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances! Elgar: String Quartet in E minor Op. 83 and Hayden: String Quartet in D minor Op. 76 No. 2.
Location: Hacienda Xcanatun on the road to Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $200 pesos. Call for reservations 930-2140.

Yucatan Living Movie: Life Itself
(USA 2014) Documentary about the life of Roger Ebert, one of the most influential film critics in the United States of all time, died in 2012. Ebert wrote most of his life for the Chicago Sun-Times, published numerous books on cinema and was the first critic who received a Pulitzer Prize for his movie reviews. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) March 19, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Back to Nadia
(Spain 2011) Nadia was an 11-year-old girl In the Taliban Afghanistan. To be able to survive, Nadia had to dress up as a boy. She did that over the next 11 years; until 4 years ago, when an NGO took her out of the country and she was established in Cataluña, Spain as a woman. Last summer, Nadia went back to her country for the first time and the cameras joined her. In Persian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Classic Movie: Queen Cristina
(United States 1933). Director: Rouben Mamoulian. Starring: Greta Garbo and John Gilbert. Synopsis: Set in 17th century Sweden. During the 30 Years War (1618 – 1648) Sweden’s King Gustabo Adolfo died in battle, leaving his infant daughter, Cristina, with all of the problems and responsibilities of the throne. When she grows up, she is under pressure to marry Prince Carlos Gustavo, a national hero. However, Cristina has fallen in love with Don Antonio, Count of Pimentel and Ambassador of the King of Spain to Sweden.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Public Safety Lecture at V.E.L.
You are cordially invited to attend a Public Safety Lecture at the Valladolid English Library. The lecture will be given by Carlos Marsh Ibarra, Director of Public Security in Valladolid.
Location: Valladolid English Library
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Art Opening: Gestational Spaces by Lorraine Toohey
Come enjoy this fascinating exhibit, “an exploration in drawing and sculpture of the nature and meaning of gestational space”. Food and drinks provided.
Location: Galleria la Eskalera (Calle 70 #474-B x 57, Centro Merida)
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Great Beauty
(Italy 2013) Jep Gambardella has seduced his way through the lavish nightlife of Rome for decades, but after his 65th birthday and a shock from the past, Jep looks past the nightclubs and parties to find a timeless landscape of absurd, exquisite beauty.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Friday (Viernes) March 20, 2015

Yucatan Living Mamma Mia’s Donation to Chicxulub Food Bank
Mama Mia’s Pizza and Seafood Restaurant will be donating a percentage of all its sales during this event to support the Chicxulub Food Bank. If you feel the need for a great pizza, or burger or even ceviche, please drop by and give them a try. Their food is good and their offer to support the Chicxulub Food Bank is for a very worthy cause. They are fully licensed to sell alcohol AND if it is a warm day, they are also fully air-conditioned with free Wifi.
Location: oOn the street that goes to the Chicxulub pier, on the east side of the street, just before you get to the pier.
Time: 1:00 PM – Until…
Admission: Prices are affordable and part of every purchase will go to support the Chicxulub Food Bank

Yucatan Living Movie: David Wants to Fly
(Germany 2010 ) In search of enlightenment young David follows his idol David Lynch and uncovers the billion-dollar industry behind Transcendental Meditation. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Life Begins Today
(Spain 2010). Director: Laura Mana. Starring: Pilar Bardem, Rosa Maria Sarda, and Mariana Cordero. Synopsis: A group of elderly people attend a course in sex, which tries to help them understand that their body is still alive. This is an adults only film.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free This is an Adults Only film.

Yucatan Living Exhibition: FACES
This event is an exhibition of Alison Palmer’s Masks and Photographs. Some of the masks made by students in the February mask-making workshop will also be shown. Music will be by Steve Katz of Blood, Sweat & Tears.
Location: SoHo Galleries, Calle 60 # 400-A x 41 y 43
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Free, with selected pieces for sale

Yucatan Living Movie: Stella Cadente
(Spain 2014) The film narrates the brief reign of Amadeo of Savoy in Spain , who in 1870 tried to tidy up and modernize the country which was ungovernable. The king was misunderstood abroad and quickly took refuge inside his palace. Outside his palace, the country was collapsing, and within it, he plays his court games with love, pleasure, beauty and melancholy. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
(US 2013) When his job along with that of his co-worker are threatened, Walter takes action in the real world embarking on a global journey that turns into an adventure more extraordinary than anything he could have ever imagined. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) March 21, 2015

Yucatan Living Merida English Library Saturday Lecture Series
You are cordially invited to come to MEL to hear an update, from Jack Robinson, on the effort to transform a large tract of vacant land in central Merida into Gran Parque la Plancha.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 x 68
Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Waste Land
(USA 2010) An uplifting feature documentary highlighting the transformative power of art and the beauty of the human spirit. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Fundraiser for AANY: A Taste of French Food Under the Stars
This event is a fund-raising hors d’oeuvres and cocktails party to benefit AANY (Artistas y Artesanos Nuevos de Yucatan). We do hope that everyone is able to attend.
Location: Calle 62 #367, x 43 y 45 Merida, Colonia Centro
Time: 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM Saturday
Admission: 190 pesos per person, 350 pesos per couple (in advance) + 10 pesos for late admission at the door. Contact Anne-Marie at mayee42 [at] gmail [dot] com for more information and reservations.

Yucatan Living Movie: Good Herbs
(Mexico 2010). Director: Maria Novaro. Starring: Ofelia Medina and Ana Ofelia Murguia. Synopsis. Dalia is separated from her husband and lives with her infant son Cosmo. She works at an alternative radio station and receives financial assistance from her father. Her mother is an ethnobotany biologist who works in UNAM’s Botanical Garden. Maria’s life changes when she has to deal with her mother’s premature Alzheimer’s disease. Good Herbs is a story about the chemistry of the brain, the chemistry of plants, and human emotions. Probably in Spanish.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Performance: The String Quartet in the Classical Period
This is a performance by the International String Quartet of Yucatan
Location: Canton Palace, On Montejo
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Ballet of the City of Merida: Suite de El Corsario
This is a love story between a pirate and a slave. 40 dancers will be on stage. This program was first presented in the Paris Opera in 1856.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Saturday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office. Purchase yours early!

Yucatan Living Movie: Great Expectations
(USA 1998) A Modernization of Charles Dickens classic story finds the hapless Finn as a painter in New York pursuing his unrequited and haughty childhood love. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Last Days Here
(USA 2011) Bobby Liebling was the charismatic singer of 70′s hard-rockers and doom pioneers, Pentagram. Today dying in his father’s basement smoking crack and heroin, a zombie with overwhelming sores and skin mottling, toothless and disjointed infections, he flirts with death daily. The film begins with the encounter between Liebling and Sean “Pellet” Pelletier, friend and manager who will try to revive the career of the late metal myth. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), March 22, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary: The Amazing Earth
Explore oceans and mountains to understand the catastrophic past and violent present of our planet. Did you know that the summit of Mount Everest was once part of the ocean floor? This documentary answers this and other questions about our amazing planet.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Visit the Czech Republic through music. From the land of the Bohemian, the orchestra presents the music, legends and landscape of the Czech Republic. Concerto for Violin by Dvorak is in the repertoire for violin and is composed of three movements, composed in 1883, and was first presented in Prague. On this occasion, it will be played by the Portuguese violinist Emanuel Salvador who is part of the Orchestra of North Portugal. Don’t forget… this month the performances are NOT at the Peon Contreras.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living Chamber Sundays: The String Quartet in the Classical Period
This is a performance by the International String Quartet of Yucatan.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Enemy
(Canada 2013) A man seeks out his exact look-alike after spotting him in a movie. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) March 23, 2015

Yucatan Living The Choir of the City of Merida: Gloria, Gloria
As we draw closer to the end of Lent, look for many more of these wonderful performances at churches throughout Yucatan.
Location: Iglesia de San Juan, Merida
Time: 8:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Note that performances of OSY in March will take place at Teatro Manzanero on Sunday, March 1st. During the month of March there will be NO Friday performances, thus /tickets/seating may be limited.
Sunday, March 22: Del Clasicismo al Romanticismo – Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Liszt

Yucatan Living Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle
First and Third Thursdays in February and March 2015. Local and Foreign Artisans Market: to benefit the Chicxulub Food Bank. Attractions include Slow Food Market Vendors, Jewelry by Jorge, Carvings by Martine, Olga Cuevas: Clothing Designer, Mano de Nano (aka Naomi Murphy): homemade mustard, salad dressing, marinades, granola, meat rubs, baked goods, and a variety of pickles, Anita’s Salchichones (German Sausage) and many many more !!!
Location: D’Mar Salon de Eventos, Calle 28x21y23, Chicxulub Puerto
Time: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Free to shoppers. Vendors contact for more information.
More Information: Call Nola (English): (999) 109-6319 or e-mail: muellemarket [at] gmail [dot] com or keep up with new announcements on the Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MuelleMarket

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Additional Scheduled Meetings: Saturday, March 28 and Saturday, April 11

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

26 March: in a Centro church, Location to be announced – $200 pesos
Corelli – Concerto Grosso No. 8
Purcell – Chaconne
Albinoni – Concerto Grosso No. 1
Mozart – String Quartet

16 April: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Mozart – String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K575 – OR – Tansman – String Quartet No. 3, Smetana – Quartet in E minor ‘From My Life’

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club http://www.yucatanpoloclub.com/ website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

YL: Were you ever professional employed as a chef or in the food business before you came to Merida?
David Sterling: In the late ’70s I worked part time on a very low rung of the ladder (pantry) at a French restaurant in Southfield, Michigan. I did that to support myself while pursuing a MFA in design from Cranbrook Academy of Art. In just two years, I developed a loathing for hands-on work in the restaurant business and never went back. However, I did take my skills and apply them to my own little catering company, serving friends and acquaintances, which I operated casually for a couple of years after graduate school. Later, in my design and marketing business in New York, many of our clients were in the food industry; we designed identity, packaging, signage, even some interior spaces for restaurants and packaged foods enterprises. While the French training I received at the David Sterling With Yucatan Cookbookrestaurant has served me well, nothing could have prepared me for the lessons to be learned in the humble kitchens of Yucatecan women.

YL: What does it mean to be part of the William and Betty Nolin Series?
David Sterling: My publisher, the University of Texas Press, would be identified as an “academic publisher” rather than a “commercial publisher”. As such, they receive grants from various non-profits to publish many of their books. Mine was lucky enough to be sponsored by William and Betty Nolin whose particular area of interest is the art, history and culture of the Western Hemisphere. Diana Kennedy’s Oaxaca al Gusto is part of the same series.

YL: Did you enjoy the process of writing a book? What was the hardest part about it for you?
David Sterling: The process of writing the book was exhilarating, if at times exhausting. I was so obsessed with it (and harried by deadlines!) that I would often – almost daily – wake up at 4 AM and start clacking away at the keyboard. And the work continued until the early evening, weekends included. It is rather like dealing with a hurricane or some other force of nature: The Book loomed ahead of me on the horizon and I really could do nothing but write and think about it, not to mention the hours of historical research and all the interviews and travel it required. And let’s not leave out the recipe testing. In light of my obsession, it might not be surprising that the hardest part of writing the book was getting to the end. I developed a major case of postpartum depression on the day I submitted the final galleys. Thankfully, I was able to commiserate with Diana Kennedy, and she told me the same thing always happens to her, and that the only remedy is just to start writing another book. And that’s exactly what I did.

YL: It seems you traveled a lot around the Yucatan Peninsula to research this book. What was your most treasured experience that you remember from those travels?
David Sterling: There are so many, but the one that leaps to mind is the scene in Tetiz where doña Sara taught me how to make merengues. The process was absolutely fascinating: Italian meringue whipped by hand – in point of fact, the hand of the family patriarch! – is piped out in tidy little domes onto crude paper-covered tables, and then baked from above merengues from Tetiz in David Sterling's Yucatan Cookbookby placing red-hot coals atop a large steel drum that covers the merengues. But it wasn’t just the process… It was being welcomed by the family, and spending time with them. They prepared almuerzo (lunch) each time I visited. Like so many of the women and families I met, they were surprised to discover that a gringo could be so interested in their food, and beyond delighted and generous to share their stories and recipes with me.

YL: OK, this is just curiosity… you say that the panucho of today “bears only a faint resemblance to its predecessor of the 1950′s”… what would a 1950′s panucho have looked like?
David Sterling: The original panucho evolved in the early 20th century as a means of making use of leftovers. By Wednesday, Monday’s frijol con puerco had been stripped of all the meat, so creative cooks puréed and strained the leftover beans to make frijol colado – which then became the filling for panuchos. The creamy purée was put into the hollow of a fresh tortilla along with a slice of boiled egg, then fried and topped with our ubiquitous pickled onions. Behold! the Primal Panucho was just that simple! I’ve only seen them still prepared this way in the market in Tixcocob. As you might imagine, they are ridiculously inexpensive. By mid-century, the panucho had become so popular that panucherías – shops that sell panuchos – had sprung up across the city and into the pueblos. Naturally, competition increased. So, the next incarnation featured meat – in this case, pavo en escabeche, turkey cooked in vinegar and black pepper with lots of white onions. The invention was surely something to lure customers away from the plain ones with just beans! It is also rare today to find that 1950s version of the panucho, although I have prepared them myself and they are fabulous! Nowadays, folks put on just about any topping: fried shrimp, octopus in its own ink, grilled chicken or relleno negro (turkey in charred chile sauce). The one constant is that tortilla base filled with frijol colado. Even the slice of boiled egg has been lost somewhere along the way.

YL: Where can this book be obtained south of the border if you don’t want to spend to have it shipped by Amazon?
David Sterling: In Mérida, they are sold at LA68 gallery as well as at Casa Catherwood. But the only place I can guarantee a steady stock is here at my cooking school, Los Dos. The best thing is to contact us directly at info [at] los-dos [dot] com to ensure someone is here to receive you – and for me to autograph your book!

YL: This book is amazingly comprehensive… you seem to have thought of everything. Now that the book is printed, is there anything you wish you had included but did not? Anything you decided to leave out?
David Sterling: I submitted a document of 250,000 words. It was whittled down to just 180,000 words for publication. Yes, a lot hit the cutting room floor. A lot of it was best left out – just too much! – although there were quite a few recipes from Valladolid that I reconstructed that I wish could have been included. During my research, I was lucky enough to chance upon a vintage cookbook dating to 1910, full of Yucatecan recipes, mostly unique to Valladolid, entitled La verdadera cocina regional. Coincidental to your question, I have just uploaded two of those “outtake” recipes to our website: Pollos en alcaparrado, a heady stew of ham, chicken and chorizo with capers, raisins, olives and almonds in white wine. And Rosquitas de almendras… something like a marzipan “doughnut cookie” with Italian meringue glaze. I will probably add more of these as time goes on, too, since all of these recipes were fascinating historically, as well as delicious.

YL: I noticed one of the reviews said they wished you would do a book like this for every region of Mexico. I have a feeling you probably couldn’t live long enough to do that. Do you have any interest or plans to do another regional cookbook?
David Sterling: Hey, I’m only 35! Well, even if that were true, there is no way one person in a single lifetime could possibly focus as intensely on each region of the country as I did for Yucatán. Furthermore, while my publisher is extremely pleased with the sales of my book, I know from my own perspective, and what I know of Mrs. Kennedy’s book on Oaxaca, that broad public interest in these regions is quite limited. The hottest selling titles right now are books that “make Mexican easy” (think “crockpot cooking”) and that is not something that interests me. So my expectations of doing another deep, comprehensive regional book and attaining some kind of commercial appeal are quite limited. I was lucky with Yucatán, since it has been on many peoples’ radar for the past several years. That said, I do have a few tricks up my sleeve, and as noted earlier, I am hard at work on another book. This one will cover more regions of the country, looking at the cuisine through a special lens and writing in much the same “ethnographic” style as I did for Yucatán. (To say any more would be giving away the show!)

YL: You mention that maybe the key essence of Yucatecan cooking is ‘smoke’, and yet I have seen press releases about NGO’s going to Maya villages, replacing traditional smoky firepits with less smoky stoves. This is done for health purposes, one of which is to avoid asthma in children. Do you think this trend will have an effect on the taste of traditional Yucatecan cuisine in the future?
David Sterling: I applaud those efforts wholeheartedly. I have spent enough time around those fires and come home permeated with smoke to understand the hazards. I have yet to see one of those stoves in use here, but I did just see what must be something similar in Michoacán. They are really quite brilliant, because they are designed in such a way as to permit smoke to touch and flavor the food, and yet to direct the smoke up and away from the cook. The ones I saw were simple affairs made essentially of mud bricks, covered tightly with more mud, with a chimney going up and out. This kept all the delicious smoke where it belonged. But for our own health, if we are going to worry about smoke, we should perhaps worry about the carcinogens that are created during the process of grilling or smoking foods in the first place. I don’t worry about it. I just ate dinner at Hartwood in Tulum, where absolutely everything is cooked in a wood burning oven or over a wood fire. I felt that I must be savoring the flavors of 1000 years ago (talk about paleo!) when everything would have been cooked that way. It was the best meal I’ve had in years. And these new stoves, at least from what I saw in Michoacán, still achieve that lovely flavor. Finally, as I mentioned in that section of the book, a kind of smokiness is imparted to foods in Yucatán in other ways, too, simply because women use well-worn pots that are covered with grease and smoke accumulated during years of duty.

YL: Your book is practically a history lesson about the Yucatan… certainly one that is easily accessible for English speakers. And it is equally a tourist guide. Have you had any government support or overtures that they may help distribute or publicize your book to help grow Yucatan tourism?
David Sterling: I am not a cynical person, and yet I am a realist and have come face to face on many occasions with local bureaucracies. (The same would surely happen beyond Mexico.) In April of 2014, I had a launch and book signing event at Hacienda Xcanatún. We invited top-level bureaucrats in several levels of the government, including Turismo. Not one of them came or sent “regret” Yucatan Cookbook by David Sterlingmessages. We had sent copies of the book to all of them in advance to entice them to come, and to “prove” the seriousness of the event and the book. Recently, I learned that the governor only received a book about a week ago through some other channel. Who knows where that first one went? Word was that he loved it, but that is the last I heard. I do believe that the promotion of Yucatán as accomplished by SECTUR and local affiliates is pretty sophisticated and slick, but it is very standard, good old “Mad Men”-style advertising. They don’t really seem to think outside the box. Yucatán has just spent time in Germany and I don’t know what other countries at tourism fairs. In my view, boxes of my books should have been there for the promotional value implicit in it.

YL: I notice you mention Sian Ka’an and lobster, and the honey from Felipe Carrillo Puerto, but those seem to be the only mention of anything from Quintana Roo. Are there any other dishes that are native from that very popular area that you did not include?
David Sterling: During the final flickers of the Caste War, Quintana Roo became a refuge for the Mayas as they scattered east to escape the onslaught; Chan Santa Cruz still plays a big role in the region. However, there were two issues with the food that I found there: (1) even when it was really typical “Maya” food, it was rarely something you couldn’t find anywhere else in the peninsula, so repetition became a problem; and (2) the closer you get to the coast, the food has become strongly influenced by modern trends. Not that I have any problem with that, but it just loses its uniqueness and appropriateness for a book about Yucatán. But look closer, too! There are at least a couple of other recipes I can think of in the book that are from Quintana Roo: the huachinango in Tulum, and also if you check out the recipe for Queso relleno, you’ll see the inclusion of a variation that uses seafood instead of pork, which I found in Playa del Carmen and cite that.

YL: What are your favorite Merida cocina económica?
David Sterling: I have enjoyed so many through the years that it seems unfair to highlight just one. Still, I do have a personal connection with “La Cocina de Mamá” on Calle 70 at Calle 67. It’s the one I featured in my chapter called “The People’s Food.” Doña Elsy is one of the most warm and loving people I’ve ever met, and she brings a great sazón to her food. Like all cocinas económicas, it serves good, basic home style food with no frills. But doña Elsy is the real attraction.

YL: To which restaurant would you send a first time tourist to taste the best “authentic” Yucatecan food?
David Sterling: Without question, Hacienda Teya. I avoid the word “authentic” in favor of “typical”, however. (Is there such a thing as “authentic meatloaf”, as just one example?) Teya is totally typical and representative of the cuisine, but most important, it is consistent. That’s the unfortunate problem with so many restaurants here… they vary radically from one visit to the next. Teya, on the other hand, never disappoints. Readers should know, too, that the hacienda has a charming, small garden of unique local plants. Allspice, guanábana, achiote, and jícara can all be seen. When I take students there I always grab an allspice leaf from the tree (Pimenta dioica) and crush it. It smells exactly like allspice, and is sometimes used in our cuisine. And if you’re lucky, you’ll see a little native deer (Mazama species) that occasionally comes fearlessly close to the gate.

YL: Congratulations on winning the Art of Eating award… what do you intend to do with the prize money?
David Sterling: Thank you, it is quite an honor, especially considering one of my culinary heroes, Harold McGee, served as one of the jurors. I have earmarked every peso of the prize for research and travel on the next book.

****
Buy David Sterling’s Yucatan: Recipes from a Culinary Adventure here from Amazon.

David Sterling’s Los Dos Cooking School.

Hacienda Teya in Merida, Yucatan.

About Harold McGee on his blog about cooking.

Diana Kennedy’s website.

The Art of Eating Award.

By Nadine Calder

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Three

For several days, don Hermenegildo had been anxious and uneasy thinking about a conversation he had had with doña Raimunda, the wife of the licenciado don Felipe Ramos Alonzo.

They were passing the time speaking of various matters and gradually got around to the subject of the love that parents feel for their children and the joys that these bring to the domestic scene when the señora, abruptly cutting to the heart of the matter, asked her partner in the conversation:

“And you, why don’t you get married, don Hermenegildo?”

The unexpected shot fired at him, as much as the missile it discharged, was for a moment unsettling to the prudish don Hermenegildo, who felt a sea of blood rush to his face.

Señora, I don’t marry because . . . it’s been many years since I’ve thought of those things; believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

Chapter Three El Ultimo Esfuerzo“But why don’t you think of those things?”, doña Raimunda put forth determinedly.

“Well, I don’t think of those things . . . for various reasons; age is one of them.”

“Age! But you’re still young. How many men much older than you get married every day?”

“It’s true, and for that they’re considered out of their minds.”

“Let’s get this clear, don Hermenegildo; let’s get this clear. Those considered out of their minds are those who marry when they’re ancient, and more so when it’s with a young girl who could be their granddaughter; but you, hombre, you’re capable of knocking down a wall with one punch.”

“I wish, mi señora. My hair has already started to turn gray; believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

“One or two gray hairs don’t mean anything; and it’s easy to see that you’re not old but on the contrary, ruddy and healthy-looking.”

At the compliment wrapped in those last words, don Hermenegildo blushed and his voice caught in his throat. This mortified him even more and, making an effort, he observed:

“But who would you have marry poor don Hermenegildo López?”

“She who wants to have a good husband, attentive, affectionate, moderate.”

Don Hermenegildo, after bowing solemnly and ceremoniously to each one of these laudatory epithets, exclaimed:

“That concept honors me exceedingly and more so coming from you; but not all women believe the same, doña Raimunda.”

“But I’m guessing that you’ve never been in love. How do you know that others don’t think the same?”

“They don’t think the same, my lady, I know what I’m talking about. I was young and I also tried to get married; but God wants me to die single as I was born, and single I must die.”

“And where do you get this idea? Why would God have wanted you not to marry?”

“I don’t know the reason why, but in whichever of my ventures, I was very unfortunate. You laugh when I complain about my luck, but it is the truth. When I was born, my mother died. What worse could have happened to me? Nothing. But something worse did happen. Shortly after that, it seemed that I would die, too, because a wet nurse could not be found to feed me. I grew up without the pleasure Chapter Three El Ultimo Esfuerzoof the maternal care enjoyed by all children. My father did not have many assets and he wanted to provide my sister and me with an education, so he put her in a school and I went to the Seminary after having acquired the basics in a co-educational school. I was beginning the study of Latin language and culture when my father died. And don’t you want to believe that I was born under a bad star? Now if only I were a lawyer! Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

Don Hermenegildo had forgotten the point of the conversation in order to blurt out to the señora one more time the unhappy story of his life. She, desirous of continuing their interrupted exchange or, more probably, of abandoning her guest’s lamentations, diverted him from the important telling of yet more misfortunes that had befallen him upon the death of his father, saying to him:

“But you didn’t tell me why you didn’t get around to getting married.”

“Well, I was headed there, mi señora. I was saying that I am ill-fated, and it can’t be any other way. My arrival into the world was the death of my mother.”

“Now you’re back to leaving me without knowing why you haven’t married.”

“My bad luck, doña Raimunda. My bad luck. There has not been one woman who would love me.”

“Ah! If you’re waiting for them to come looking for you . . . “

“But I have gone looking for them, and they have not been interested. And not just one, but several. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

“Frankly, I cannot make sense of it. Who knows if they would have gotten along with you, if you had expressed yourself clearly? When it comes down to it, those are things that women hold close and share only with persons in whom they have great trust.”

“Great trust, doña Raimunda! How much greater than that which you are kind enough to offer me without my deserving it? God would not forgive me if I were reserved with you.”

That was where doña Raimunda wanted him and there she led him, using her skillful knack to hear what for a long time she had desired to know and don Hermenegildo had escaped revealing.

Five years earlier, her husband called upon the clerk to make some copies for him and put some papers in order. This was work that he was to perform for two hours every day, and since then he had been a frequent visitor of the señora, and he apparently continued to be as unrepentant a bachelor as he was when she met him.

Never had she heard from him a romantic memory nor had she known of anyone who had been courted by him. Aside from one or another polite gesture, not unusual for a man who prided himself on being urbane, he showed no signs of being affected when he was near a beautiful woman. So it was that with this opportunity, and when don Hermenegildo let it be known that in his youth he wanted to get married, her curiosity was increasingly piqued to know if an unhappy love affair was keeping that earlier man a confirmed bachelor. For that reason she had besieged him with any and every observation, and she now knew that, in doggedly testing the close friendship that united don Hermenegildo with the family of the señor licenciado Felipe Ramos Alonzo, the victory was hers.

And in truth, aside from the obsession he had with his pompous connections, it was doña Raimunda who heard with patience, and even with affection, the constant history of his shattered existence. Her onslaught, then, was well-aimed, and don Hermenegildo began to shake the dust from his romantic recollections buried years before in the depths of his memory.

By Working Gringos

Relaxing Pool at Casa Pocito Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Peaceful Sitting Area in Casa Pocito Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Full Equipped Kitchen in  Casa Pocito Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Comfortable Bedroom in  Casa Pocito Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Central Courtyard at Casa Pocito Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

Colonial Vacation Rental In Merida

The key to a relaxed, luxurious vacation in Merida Yucatan is here, at Casa del Pocito. Experience the magic of Merida and the surrounding Yucatan Peninsula from the privacy of an historic home in the Centro. Just behind the massive wooden entry doors is a place of peace and simple luxury.

Luxury Everywhere at Casa Pocito Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Casa Pocito’s Kitchen

Merida, now known as the Gateway to the Mayan World, is the perfect place from which to visit colonial cities, Mayan pueblos, the beaches along the Yucatan Gulf Coast and the Mayan ruins, including Uxmal and Chichen Itza, one of the New 7 Wonders of the World.

And what better way to end the day than in your own colonial villa? Cool off and relax in your private pool, enjoy your own music and even entertain friends in your own tropical garden patio.

Your Private Pool and Tropical Garden

For the price of a hotel room, this privately owned townhouse is offered as a vacation rental to those seeking privacy, unstructured days and independent adventures in travel. This is not your typical B&B or hotel experience. Casa del Pocito offers an opportunity to immerse yourself into the local culture, color and richness of this undiscovered colonial Mexican city.

Casa del Pocito is available as a vacation rental home all year round. For more information, please go to our website:

www.casapocitoyucatan.com

Relax and Enjoy at Casa Pocito Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Spacious Living Room at Casa Pocito Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

By Working Gringos
Light-filled living room at furnished rental apartment in MeridaLiving room and kitchenLiving roomClean and tiled kitchen in furnished apartmentFull refrigerator in kitchenBedroom deskBalcony off living room in furnished rental apartment in MeridaStairs leading to apartment for rent in Merida

 

 

Budget Apartment

for Rent

in the Centro Historico

If you are looking for a private accommodation but don’t want to spend a lot of money, this 1 bedroom, 1 bath furnished vacation apartment rental may be just for you.

Shared downstairs patio at apartment in Merida

 

Everything You Need

This vacation rental apartment is nothing fancy, but it has everything you need to have a home in the Centro Historico of Merida. There is a living room with windows that look out onto the street, an open kitchen with a refrigerator, microwave, two-burner hotplate and a toaster oven. Of course, the kitchen also has utensils, dishes, and everything you need to serve and eat your meals.

The bedroom is spacious (about 260 sq. ft.), with a full-size bed, a dressing table and a desk. The bedroom has air conditioning, allowing comfortable sleeping even in the hottest season.

 

Another beautiful bedroom at Casa Colibri

 

Private and Peaceful

The apartment shares a small central courtyard with the owner’s apartment downstairs, and then an outdoor staircase leads to the private entrance. There are ceiling fans throughout, and windows to let in the breezes. There is a balcony off the living room, a small terrace off the bedroom for air, and a spiral staircase providing access to the roof of the building. There is cable TV service, and a radio in the apartment. Internet access can be arranged easily (through Cablemas).

 

Dressing table in bedroom

 

Best Location in Merida

Not only is the apartment located right between the Santa Ana and Santiago areas of Merida, but it is on the same street as the Merida English Library, a valuable resource for any English-speaking traveler and a convenient place to pick up reading material, meet local expats and find out about all sorts of activities.

If you stay here, you will be only blocks away from Santiago and Santa Lucia Parks, Santa Ana Park, Paseo de Montejo and the Plaza Grande.

Prices

This 700 sq. ft. vacation rental apartment rents for the following prices:

In December, January and February:

  • 2 weeks for $449 USD, plus Electricity.
  • 1 month for $599 USD, plus Electricity.

Other months:

  • 2 weeks for $399 USD, plus Electricity.
  • 1 month for $549 plus Electricity.

We have a one year lease for $449 USD per month, not including utilities.

All prices include housekeeping service once per week, and WIFI is included in the rental price.

We require a 1 month deposit for rental periods 1 month or more, refundable upon inspection by the property manager, and (in the case of longterm rentals) upon proof of utility payments. We regret that this apartment is not suitable for either pets or children. Smoking is allowed.

Contact Us Now!

If you want to rent this apartment, or have further questions, please…

Contact: Luis Gillum
lougillum [at] yahoo [dot] com
Local Phone: (999) 923-5319

Facade of the vacation rental apartment

 

By Working Gringos

YL: When did you move to the Yucatan and from where did you move?
Joshua: I moved to Mérida in 2007, sight unseen! One of the big reasons we choose to come to Mérida was because we discovered YucatanLiving.com and read every article we could find on the website. It was a huge inspiration to us. Like finding a super insider guide to everything. Your website got us so excited to come to Merida and see everything we had read about for ourselves.

YL: Why did you move?
Joshua: The plan was to move to Mexico for six months so that my kids and I could learn a little Spanish and skip winter. What we didn’t expect was that we would end up staying! Our first six months went by in a blink of an eye and we hadn’t seen everything yet, so we couldn’t leave! I work online so deciding to stay was an instant decision.

YL: Why did you choose the city you now live in over other places in the world?
Joshua: We chose Mérida by typing into Google “Best tropical place for Canadians to live.” The very first result we found was an old forum website called “Merida Insider” (no longer online). I made a post on there asking questions and a bunch of very helpful expats replied. I ended up talking to a couple of people on the phone and they all pointed us to Yucatan Living. After reading everything on this website, we just decided to come. It took about two months from the moment we thought about it to make the final call and move to Merida. It all happened really fast.

YL: Did you buy a house right away or rent first? Do you think you made the right decision?
Joshua: Our very first home in Merida was a beautifully done colonial about a block from la Ermita. We stayed there about six months, and then rented a house around the corner for another year or so. After that we purchased a house in Santiago (Gringo Gulch).

YL: Are you doing now what you intended to do when you moved here? If not, why not?
Joshua Gatcke at Chichen Itza in YucatanJoshua: Yes, I have been a web/interface designer for about 16 years and I continued with my clients from Canada and the US when I arrived in Mexico. I am still doing a lot of design work, but I am now teaching people how to make online businesses and training people to build effective websites locally and online.

YL: What are the most interesting things about living here for you?
Joshua: By far the best part about living in Mérida is the people. It is impossible to be lonely here. All I have to do is walk out my door and I will run into someone I know. I love how friendly everyone is and how Mérida is a decent size city with everything you need, but still feels like a small town in a lot of ways. The location is perfect – close to the beach, easy for visitors and family to get to from Cancun, and a great home–base for visiting other parts on Mexico. We love going to D.F. (Mexico City), for instance. I love all the cultural events, art, music, & crafts that are here. There is always so much to do and see.

YL: What do you absolutely love about living here?
Joshua: That is a hard question because there are so many things… one thing that sticks out is that every day is summer! Being from Canada and living somewhere without 9 months of winter has a huge impact on how I live. I spend most of my time outside every day. I love the people. I have so many great friends here and everyone is just a phone call away. It’s not like Canada where you have to make a 2 week appointment to hang out with people. I see my friends almost every day for coffee or to have something to eat.

YL: What do you miss from your “former life”?
Joshua: The biggest thing that comes up is food selection. Calgary is so multi-cultural that you can eat just about any type of food you want, whenever you want. I miss Vietnamese food with a passion! Or any type of Mediterranean food. Or real Indian food. I would kill to get some more variety in Mérida, but it’s coming along. It seems that every week I hear about a new restaurant opening up with a new concept. There are a lot more choices now then even a few years ago… so I will just be patient. Plus, nothing beats tacos el pastor or a killer pozole!

YL: What don’t you miss from your “former life”?
Joshua: I think people are more open and nice here. I don’t miss winter. I don’t miss the cost of living in Canada. I don’t miss the fast pace of life. Really, I don’t find myself yearning for home… ever.

YL: What is your favorite local food?
Joshua: Tacos el pastor, relleno negro, pozole (even though it’s not local), poc chuc, all the botanas at places like Eladios. Micheladas!

YL: What is your favorite time of year here and why?
Joshua: Whenever it’s not 45 degrees Celsius! Seriously, pretty much all the time.

YL: Where do you take guests who visit you here to show them something really special?
Joshua: Parqué de Santiago is my favourite place in the whole city. Just to hang out or eat. It’s a really special place for me. Of course I take them to the Plaza Grande. There is a great cafe there called Cafe la Cabaña that you will find me at most days. Outside of the city I usually try to bring people to at least one awesome cenote, Uxmal or another ruin and Progreso is always a crowd pleaser.

YL: The last time you went out to dinner, where did you go and why?
Joshua: I really enjoy eating in the markets etc. But I also love places like Rescoldos, La Tratto en Santa Lucia, Piedra del Agua, etc.

YL: How is the city where you live different for residents than it is for tourists?
Joshua: I think people need time to adjust here, especially in centro where there is so much traffic, buses and people. As a tourist, I think you have to be a special breed of traveler to really enjoy all that Mérida has to offer. If you are looking for “all inclusive” style vacation, don’t come here. But if you want to dig in and meet some locals, have a good time and don’t mind walking everywhere, there is a lot to enjoy. I love the colonial buildings in centro and the art displays and music. About half the people that come to Merida love it… the other half hate it. I guess it just depends on Joshua Gatcke at Chichen Itza in Yucatanwhat interest you. If you live here, you eventually learn to relax and stop expecting everything to be like home. I’m not sure I answered this question properly, but I don’t think of Merida as a place you can really know as a one-time tourist. It takes time to find all the little details that make it so special.

YL: Do you have friends from the local community or do you pretty much hang with the expat crowd?
Joshua: Both. It’s impossible not to make friends here. I think the expat crowd generally does a great job of assimilating into society. I think it would be hard for people to stick to hanging with just expats and I would be sad for them.

YL: If you are working or own a business, what is it like owning and running a business here or working here? How is it different from doing the same thing in your country of origin?
Joshua: Business in the Yucatan is a whole lot different than anywhere else. I’m not sure if I am ever going to figure that out! I have banged my head against the wall more than a few times. I find that there are very different sensibilities than I am used to working in Canada or the US.

YL: Do you find it more or less difficult to make a living here than in your country of origin?
Joshua: I work online, so the answer is no. I would be doing the exact same thing in Canada. The difference in the cost of living makes a big difference for the lifestyle that I am able to afford, and I am really grateful for that.

YL: Are your work habits different here?
Joshua: Yes! I work a lot less here than I used to back home. A lot of that has to do with the cost of living, but I have also adopted the habit of taking long lunches or coffee in the middle of the day with friends and family. I am not as wound up and stressed out. The pace of life is slower and more enjoyable. I also take more holidays. It seems that every second day is a holiday here, and who am I to argue with all of Mexico? “when in Rome” !

YL: Did you speak Spanish when you moved here? Where did you learn Spanish (if you did)? Is the language barrier a problem for you in your daily life?
Joshua: I came here with 2 Spanish words: “hola” and “cerveza”. I learned the rest here. It was a wonderful experience learning a new language as an adult. I feel like knowing Spanish really adds to my creativity. I still have a lot of learning to do!

YL: What interesting Spanish word or saying have you learned lately? What does it mean and how did you learn it?
Joshua: When someone says “gracias” to you, you can say “no hay de queso (caso), no mas de papa…” it’s a line from a famous comedian “Chaparron” (I have been told…). It’s just a funny way to say thank you. It is a play on words… hard to explain in English. Another famous saying that I really like is from Frida Kahlo… “Te amo mas que a mi propio piel…” (I love you more than my own skin), a portion of a poem by her. I am always finding romantic or beautiful sayings and quotes… they go well with all the beauty here.

YL: Are you a Mexican citizen? Do you plan to become one?
Joshua: I am not. But I would love to be… maybe if I keep studying my romantic Spanish quotes, I can find a way to be come a citizen!

YL: Have you traveled much within Mexico? If so, where and what has been your favorite location to visit? What did you see there that you liked so much?
Joshua: I am in love with D.F. (Mexico City). There is so much to see and do there! I will be going back as much as possible. There is a lot of art and culture there. Too much to write here. I recommend everyone goes there.

YL: How are you treated by Mexicans? Do you feel resented or welcome?
Joshua: I love the people here. Everyone is so nice and welcoming. I have felt a couple of times that some people maybe feel resentful of the expat community sometimes, but that is a rare case. I think people are amazing here and as a Canadian I have learned a lot about being genuine and caring from my Mexican friends.

YL: How do you feel about the economic prospects of Mexico? Of the Yucatan?
Joshua: There is so much opportunity in Mexico… this country has everything. Especially online, I feel like there is so much that hasn’t been done yet. I am very excited about the economic prospects of Mexico. I feel like there are huge business opportunities in service markets and manufacturing. There is a lot of innovation and creativity in Mexico and every day I see new opportunities. I constantly hear a lot of people grumble about how Mexico is on the brink of falling into total collapse or complaining about the economy, when in reality there is so much to be optimistic about. Mexico is doing great things and will continue.

YL: What are some changes you are hoping for in the city in which you live? Do you see any progress towards these changes?
Joshua: Mérida is growing fast! A lot of people from other parts of the country are moving here and I feel like the diversity is fantastic for the city. I think we will continue to see an expansion of services and business that are available here as the city grows.

YL: What are your plans for the future here?
Joshua: I’m not 100% sure. I would like to continue to do more personal teaching around business and design. I am working on a course right now to teach people to start their own online business. I would love to use my training as a platform for less and less client work and transition to full time teaching.

YL: What is the one most important piece of advice you would give someone buying property and/or planning a move to the Yucatan?
Joshua: Work with a local real estate agent. There are a million great deals here. I am always finding properties for amazing prices. Buy downtown. Like all major cities in Canada and the USA in the 70’s, they expand outward but then eventually contract… that is when you start seeing urban living concepts. I am seeing that happening now. The centro is slowly transforming from the ghost town of grandparents to the hip new place to be and it will pick up speed. Imagine if you wanted to own downtown in any major USA or Canadian city now! A lot of local people look at me like I am crazy when I say that… “why would anyone want to live in centro?!” they ask with a semi confused look on their faces. I just smile ;)

YL: If you could say something to all the people of Mexico, what would you say?
Joshua: Thank you from the bottom of my heart! Mexico has changed my entire outlook on life and filled my heart to the brim. Every day I wake up thankful that I have the chance to live here. Thank you for welcoming me into your world and teaching me so much. Also, thanks for tacos el pastor!

YL: Is there anything else you would like to add for our readers (people interested in or considering moving to the Yucatan, former Yucatecans, people planning to visit for an extended tour…)?
Joshua: Just come here. It’s the best choice I ever made in my entire life.

****

Joshua loves helping people turn their ideas into real business online and off. He also offers design/communication and web design training, perfect for beginners all the way to seasoned professionals. If you are interested, contact him at joshua [at] 99lime [dot] com or 999-910-7350 (Merida Cell). You can see his website at 99lime.com.

By Nadine Calder

For the introduction and beginning of this story, please click this link: Intro and Chapter One of One Last Effort.

****

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Two

Next to the lawyer’s house, there lived a federal second lieutenant, married for a few months; next, and due west, a doctor. Then there was another building inhabited by a proprietor of rental coaches and after this, the corner store. Facing the store lived the widow to whom we referred when speaking of doña Raimunda’s gatherings, in a zaguán-style house with four windows, two of which were on the same street and two around the corner.

That corner was a meeting place every night for five or six youths who whiled away the hours conversing happily, just as likely to be seated on the bench in front of the store as standing on the sidewalk across the way, or strolling down the street one by one or two by two, and not infrequently in a group.

And just as many as not came with romantic intentions. The daughter of the carriage owner had her boyfriend. Two of the four sisters, fruit of a carpenter’s marriage, weren’t lacking theirs, either. And it is worth noting that one no less than Guadalupe, the daughter of the widow doña Prudencia, besides belonging to the most well-to-do family on the street, was like a woman, the most beautiful you could meet there.

It’s true that she was still little more than a child, but her femininity was already manifesting itself elegantly, rounding her figure and imparting to her eyes that expression they acquire as they forget childish pastimes and envision other horizons. More premature in manifesting itself, however, had been the vanity of dressing up and adorning herself, as even when she was still in school, the widow’s daughter had become scrupulous in dressing, and she would not leave for class unless she had powdered her face in front of the mirror, gracefully arranging the part of her hair that fell to the front and smoothing her dense, dark eyebrows that were arched so artistically. And in keeping with that, when she noticed that some man was watching her, she turned her face aside, smiling in spite of herself and displaying the pretty dimples that adorned her cheeks.

Doña Prudencia made her abandon her studies in light of her age and because, so they say, she had learned enough. Lupita, as she was generally called, had been in a high school of modest pretensions in which the girls were instructed in Christian doctrine, needlework, and a few more courses, enough only for the woman to learn to take care of herself, take care of her house, and acquire the knowledge necessary for life. This didn’t satisfy the good señora, and desirous of taking pains to give her daughter the best instruction, she enrolled her in a school in which were taught literature, world history, French, etc., etc.

Doña Prudencia was beside herself with satisfaction when her daughter said ma mere or something similar to her.

“And what does that mean?” she asked her the first time she heard it.
“My mother, mamá; hey! don’t you know that?”
“How can you expect me to understand that nonsense? If you don’t speak to me in Castilian . . .”

She never ceased to admire the way in which the girls of the times studied so many subjects. She herself had barely learned to read poorly and to write even more poorly. As a result, it was not unusual that upon seeing for the first time the geographic atlas she bought for her daughter, she was amazed that at such a young age, the girl was taught with such a big book.

In truth, Lupita had not learned much of anything in either of the two establishments. Not for any lack of intelligence, but because she did not study, and her mother did not try to make her do so, figuring, without a doubt, that it was the instructors’ responsibility to inspire in her the knowledge available to her only in school.

And that proved to be true. It was rare that Lupita did not figure among those who had to recite some poetry during awards ceremonies, because if her talents at the podium were not admirable, on the other hand, neither the place nor the occasion was bad for allowing one of the most beautiful ornaments of the school to show herself off to good advantage.

door in Merida YucatanAfter leaving this school, Lupita had remained at liberty to indulge her every whim at any hour of the day except for the few times she was pressed into service as her mother’s secretary. Her piano class, which was every other day, was not very demanding, and she entertained herself with the instrument at times, more setting out to learn dances or other danceable pieces than to grudgingly study the lesson. Housework is a gift from God. The maids knew that and, to some extent, so did the mother, who once in a while put in an appearance in the kitchen and scolded if some piece of clothing had gone without mending. The rest of the time, the good señora never thought of the good she could have done her daughter by getting her used to understanding domestic chores, something indispensable to the good education of a woman. And she left her to languish in perpetual idleness that allowed her to spend the dead hours falling in love with herself in the mirror, pondering in which house of a friend her age she would spend the afternoon or the next Sunday, or what is worse, gorging herself on whatever novel she could get her hands on, the more romantic, sinister, or filled with gallant adventures, the more greedily read.

Manuel, doña Prudencia’s other child, had a different life. Upon his father’s death, he insisted on going to run the plantation, and there he spent the better part of the year, becoming more dull than he already was, which was no small amount, and working for his family without neglecting in doing so the cultivation of land bordering on his mother’s land, which he bought with savings from what he working at a hacienda in Yucatanearned as manager. A worker like few others, he spent up to a month without coming to Mérida.

In the afternoon, after eating, Lupita opened the window nearest the zaguán that faced the aforementioned street, which was more densely inhabited and busier than that on the other side of the house.

In a rocking chair set in one of the doors, she seated herself with a novel in her hand and didn’t take her eyes off it except to change position, turning her beautiful bust to the street, with the intention of seeing if someone was coming. When such was the case, feigning attention to the book, she watched out of the corner of her eye to see if the passerby had noticed her and if so, with interest.

In the evenings, Asunción, the daughter of the carriage owner, used to go to converse with Lupita until the arrival of the young men on the corner, when she would return home to better attend to her own affairs, as she was at the point of finalizing an understanding between herself and a young mechanic, with whom she had celebrated some preliminaries in the doorway of her house.

Lupita, for her part, was not neglecting her own interests. At various times she leaned out the open window, played a little on the piano or seated herself in the parlor to talk with her mother when the latter had not gone to doña Raimunda’s house, and not infrequently she would go to one of the shutters facing the other street.

From this location, she could see the group on the corner. In it was Fermín Dorantes, who for her and only for her spent so much time every night waiting for the opportunity to talk with her. She could downtown scene in Merida Yucatanalso hear the voice of Luis Robles. Poor Luis! How in love he was! And he was a good boy, and very nice, although a little crazy. But Fermín had beat him out and Luis knew it. Still, it did not matter. Every night, there among the first arrivals, and very resolutely, when he saw her in the window, he approached. The poor boy! Naturally, Lupita went inside.

“Go ahead, my dear, go inside,” Luis then exclaimed. “I like the ones who make me work” and he continued his fresh remarks.

One night, she was caught off guard and while she looked unawares to one side, he approached from the opposite.

“Listen, Lupita, do you want me to throw myself down from the cathedral tower? Just so you can see how a man fractures his skull?”

And without answering him, the girl went inside because she couldn’t contain her laughter.

“Even that, my dear, just the pleasure of seeing that little mouth smile.”

And all in a loud voice, even though the neighborhood was within earshot. That Luis!

yucatantalize me foreverWhen Fermín was at the shutter talking with her, the things that happened to him! It was unbearable! He began to sneeze, to cough, to wheeze. Naturally, the conversation didn’t last long and Fermín became furious and demanding. One of these days they would kill each other. Poor Luis! The truth is, a man cannot help but be sad upon seeing another man talking with the one he loves.

Lupita had similar reflections. At times she wondered if she might like the slighted suitor as a boyfriend better than Fermín. But Fermín was a good boy, very responsible and a hard worker, and although a little gangly, not a bad guy and she liked him very much.

Luis didn’t show himself to be less enthusiastic, but it was said that he loved all women. For this reason, Lupita would have responded to him only to see if, as her boyfriend, he would dare to love another.

And he has a reputation . . . What a shame! because he is very bright and likable.

In reality, the young woman loved neither one nor the other. The two glorified her vanity about being beautiful and nothing more. Fermín arrived at that stage when Lupita was dying to hasten the time when she could lengthen her dresses and find herself old enough to flaunt and be found dazzling with her beauty. It would not be long after first having a boyfriend that she would be elevated to the status of woman, and so it happened after a prelude of only a few days. Later Luis Robles appeared on the scene, and from that time on, no one on the street other than she had two suitors. What pleasure!

By Working Gringos

Hello there! We are a responsible British couple in our 30s looking to housesit in Merida over the coming months.

We are available immediately (March 2015) and are planning on being in Merida up until November 2015. We are here in Merida volunteering and improving our Spanish.

We are happy to do short term or long term house sitting. It goes without saying that we would pay all bills during our time at the property. Happy to tend to plants/animals!

We have positive references from colleagues/previous landlords if you would like.

Please get in touch if you’d like to have a chat.
Email: margaretoleary [at] hotmail [dot] com
Phone: 999 197 25 21 or +447708548253 (Whatsapp only)

Hope to hear from you!

Maggie and Richard

By Working Gringos

Comfortable Living Room at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

Living Room at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico
Kitchen at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

Bedroom at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

Master bedroom at Casa Granada in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Master Bedroom at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

Elegant Bathroom atCasa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

Sitting Area at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

Refreshing Pool at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

 

 

Casa Granada

Casa Granada is a two bedroom, two bath colonial vacation rental in the heart of Merida’s historic centro.

Tucked away behind a beautiful facade on Calle 62 just north of Calle 47, this Merida vacation rental is only a two block walk from Santa Ana Park, a lovely grassy city square with flamboyanes trees that bloom in the spring, shading park benches that look out to a central fountain. Many events are held in Santa Ana Park during the year, and it is the site of the Santa Ana Mercado. The mercado sells fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as sundry items, gifts and clothes. Half of the mercado is a lively food court, ringed by a handful of local cooking establishments who serve up delicious Yucatecan food daily. Just one block beyond Santa Ana is Paseo de Montejo, with all its attractions. Walk five blocks in the other direction down Calle 62, and you will find yourself in the Plaza Grande, the center of Merida.

Casa Granada is an airy, open house with the sound of water from the central courtyard fountain that can be heard in every room. The living room, dining room and kitchen are bright with skylights, open to the courtyard or enclosed with glass doors to be air conditioned for comfort.

The two spacious bedrooms look onto the back garden, where original hand-built stone walls surround an inviting swimming pool. A patio equipped with outdoor furniture is the perfect place for enjoying a coffee in the morning or dining al fresco on a tropical night. And there are plenty of those here in Merida! You are sure to enjoy them in Casa Granada.

Romantic Getaway at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

The following amenities are available to guests of Casa Granada:

  • 2 bedrooms, with a king bed in the master bedroom and a full bed in the guest room
  • 100% cotton sheets
  • All linens provided
  • 2 bathrooms, one with indoor shower
  • 1 outdoor shower
  • Salt water swimming pool
  • Professionally landscaped courtyard & patio
  • Washer and drier
  • Fully-equipped kitchen with gas stove and oven
  • All rooms open to courtyards
  • Ticul stone floors, Mexican Talavera tile counters
  • Ceiling fans in every room
  • Air conditioning throughout
  • 20-foot beamed ceilings
  • Beautiful and comfortable designer furniture
  • Dining room that seats six
  • Internet connection
  • Cell phone provided with minutes included
  • Wine, flowers and breakfast food provided upon arrival
  • Bilingual property manager
  • Weekly maid service

Prices

All prices are in USD

May 1, 2014 – October 31, 2014 = $125/night; $800/wk

November 1, 2014 – December 13 = $150/night; $950/wk

December 14, 2014 – January 4, 2015 = $200/night; $1,250/wk

January 5, 2015 – March 31, 2015 = $170/night/$1,000/wk; $3,300/month

April 1, 2015 – April 30, 2015 = $140/night; $850/wk; $2,200/month

May 1, 2015 – October 31, 2015 = $135/night; $900/wk

All dates have a 4 night minimum.
Monthly rates upon request.
Rates include all utilities except electricity.

Contact

If you are interested in renting Casa Granada, please contact Delphia Lamberson at hokeholt [at] earthlink [dot] net. She will return your email promptly!

Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan

Courtyard at night at Casa Granada Vacation Rental in Yucatan, Mexico

 

By Working Gringos

Name of Applicant Jacob Lieberman
Email Address jacob77 [at] inbox [dot] com
Phone Number 321-215-7176 (USA)
Type of Work Desired sales
Job Location Desired Yucatan area
Resume or Qualification Description 20+ years of sales experience
Any Additional Information B.A. in psychology

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Sales Representative – Redesign by Goodwill, Gilbert, AZ 2013 – Present
• Responsible for the sales of new and donated furniture, and overseeing product placement in store.
• Orders all new furniture for the store and ensures current orders are fulfilled satisfactorily.
• Verifies delivery dates, condition of shipments received and maintains quality customer support.

Travel Agent – Sunlover Travel Destinations, Melbourne, FL 2011 – 2013
• Specialized in all lodging and accommodation reservations for cruise ship packages.
• Responsible for providing accurate itineraries to customers, answered all concerns expeditiously.
• Provided cost-effective accommodation packages, maintaining a high customer satisfaction rating.

Loan Officer – Foundation Title, Melbourne, FL 2006 – 2011
• Responsible for refinancing loans and providing short-term notes for construction projects.
• Analyzed and reviewed financial / credit history, in order to make determination of final approval.
• Answered client questions on application process and policies governing approval / disapproval.

Sales Representative – Pruitts Furniture, Phoenix, AZ 2003 – 2006
• Recommended products based on customer needs and interests, and explained product features.
• Consulted with customers about prices, availability, usage, credit and contract terms, and delivery.
• Ranked in the top five for overall sales revenue in the sales department.

Store Manager – Metropolitan Mattress, Phoenix, AZ 2002 – 2003
• Ensured merchandise was inventoried, priced / displayed effectively to maximize potential for sale.
• Assisted customers in finding what they were looking for while promoting merchandise.

Store Manager – W. Simmons, Los Angles, CA 1992 – 2002
• Supervised three direct reports, monitored overall store sales and customer service performance.
• Created positive team environment and motivated employees to succeed.
• Assigned duties / responsibilities, diligently worked on promoting a strong public relations image.
• Ensured 100% resolution of all customer complaints. Recognized for managerial ability.
EDUCATION
University of the State of New York, Albany, NY, Psychology (1984)

By Working Gringos

My name is Maggie O’Leary, I’m from England and my email address is margaretoleary [at] hotmail [dot] com. My phone number is 999 197 25 21.

I am looking for work giving private English lessons, from individual classes to group lessons tailored to the student. I am happy teaching English to all ages! I am a qualified teacher (Postgraduate Certificate in Education) with 3 years experience teaching in a Primary School, and in addition I have taught English to adults and teenagers in Uruguay.

I am a dynamic and creative teacher, to be flexible with location and times in line with what suits my students.

By Khaki Scott

Green Gold Recovery On the Way

Since December, the State of Yucatan has been distributing the money necessary to clean old fields and get new crops of sisal growing. Major sisal municipalities include Acanceh, Baca, Bokobá, Cacalchén, Cansahcab, Chicxulub Pueblo, Cuzamá, Dzemul, Dzidzantún, Hocabá, Hoctún, Homún, Huhí, Hunucmá, Izamal, Kinchil, Mocochá, Motul, Muxupip, Seyé, Sinanché and Sum Hidalgo, as well as Tahmek, Tekal Venegas, Tekantó, Telchac Pueblo, Temax, Tepakán, Tetiz, Teya, Tixkokob, Tixpéual, Xocchel, Yaxkukul and Yobaín. Thousands of rural workers will see jobs return and local economies flourish. The return of this natural fabric to the international market is exceptionally good news in rural Yucatan.

Bringing Prosperity to the Rest of the Municipality of Merida

We often think of Merida, the city, and Merida, the municipality (county) interchangeably. But nothing could be farther from the way it really is. In fact, Merida (the city) is the capital of both the State of Yucatan and the Municipality of Merida. It recently became abundantly clear that many in the outlying towns and villages of the Municipality of Merida felt that they had to move to into the city in order to make a better living for their families. This phenomenon was creating pressure on Merida’s city services and depopulating the rural areas of the municipality. As it turns out, the people whose homes were in the rural areas really wanted to stay there, so a new program was begun. Now, the Municipal Government of Merida has invested in rural public works, community gardens and in the development of irrigation for grasslands so that rural families will be able to enjoy a stable and sustainable economy.

New Hostel for Cancer Kids and Families

Merida, Yucatan has recently been listed as one of the best places in Mexico with respect to the treatment of cancer. This includes the treatment of cancer in both adults and children. With advances in medical technology come changes that must be made in how treatment is delivered. This means that children with some forms of cancer are now required to remain in Merida for longer periods of time, which requires family members to also remain in Merida. Hotels are out of the question, but the Mexican Association of Aid to Children with Cancer, A.C. (Amanc) is stepping up and providing the solution. Within two months, the doors of a new hostel will open in Merida. They will serve three meals a day, and mothers can rest, bathe, wash clothes and return to the hospital on a free shuttle. Amanc serves children with cancer who are being treated in all local hospitals and provides a wide range of services, including airfare if a child needs to go to D.F. for special treatment. To learn more about Amanc, visit the Amanc website .

Cleantech Challenge Mexico 2015

This is a contest between sustainable entrepreneurial proposals. It is open to students, entrepreneurs, researchers, professions and society in general. The contest is in search of the best projects that have social, economic and environmental impact, regardless of the age or condition of the participants. Previous Cleantech Challenges have had participants as young as 13 and as old as 86, so come one, come all. Winners receive huge cash prizes, along with investment from private equity funds that have the capacity to co-invest millions.
Deadline to Apply: April 4, 2015
Regional Winner Award: May 18, 2015 in TECNIA Park Anahuac University

Yucatan Hosting IT Seminar in Florida

For the past decade, the IT industry in Yucatan has been growing at a rapid rate. Today, there are over 200 IT development companies in Yucatan and they are responsible for approximately 5,000 jobs. Yucatan already has software marketing relationships in Colombia, Peru, Brazil, and Los Angeles, California. The next three most important IT markets are Boston, San Francisco and Florida. This week, Yucatan will be hosting its first seminar in Florida, reaching out to the 30,000 companies there that are linked to technological developments, 13,000 of which work in software development. Software development leaders of global markets will also be on hand. Look for even greater accomplishments in the field of IT software development coming from Yucatan from this point forward.

Yucateca Heroine: Danilu Vales Gamboa de Rosel

This lady is the President of Asociacion Yucateca Pro Deficiente Auditivo (Ayproda), A.C., a civil organization dedicated to working with local, national and international resources for the sole purpose of improving the lives of not only deaf Yucatecos, but of their families as well. Twenty-seven years ago, this daughter of one physician and young wife of another was informed that her first-born son was deaf. This young psychiatric nurse and mother momentarily hit bottom, then rose up like a Grecian Goddess of War to travel as far as was necessary to learn as much as necessary and to meet as many specialists as necessary to bring back help for the deaf children of Yucatan and their families. She formed Ayproda, whose members are all the family members of deaf children and they slowly began to make advances. Today, Ayproda is able to serve all of the children who are born deaf in Yucatan. Programs include diagnostics, prevention, parental education, education for teachers, distance learning, rehabilitation, and audioverbal therapy. To learn more about Ayproda, visit the Ayproda website.

Davis Cup (Tennis) Elimination Round in Merida Ends in Tie

On Friday, March 6, 2015, an elimination round in the run up to the Davis Cup was played in Merida, Yucatan. It was attended by members of the Mexican Tennis Federation, as well as the International Tennis Federation. One topic that did come up was how the heat was possibly going to affect the outcome. At the present time, temperatures in Bolivia are 50 F lower than they are in Merida. Not to be discouraged, the Bolivians spent the days leading up to the matches practicing in Merida’s weather and they say the heat was not a factor for them. It is events like this that are putting Merida on the map as a preferred destination for international sporting events and that is not lost on the Departments of Tourism in Merida, in Yucatan, or in Mexico. In a cliff-hanger of a match, this Davis Cup regional match ended in a tie!

International Day of Women March 8, 2015

This year, the number of women and girls in Yucatan supercedes that of men and boys by approximately 40,000 individuals. This means that 50.71% of the population is now female, as compared to 1990, when only 48.78% of the population was female. Women vote and women often hold the purse strings, especially to household expenses, so the race is on to finally finish granting them all of the human rights due them. Even then, some say it will still be another 80 years before women’s rights are gained worldwide, but Yucatan might get there first. Look for more girls than ever before to gain access to excellent educational opportunities, as well as access to more reproductive health options. From there, the young ladies and women of Yucatan have already shown themselves to be superior in every way and we expect no less in the future.

An Amazing Walker in Cancun’s 5K for Women’s Day

Four years ago, señora Guadalupe Labrada viuda de Torreda came to Cancun to visit her children, fell in love with the city and moved to Cancun on the spot. Lupita (her nickname) loves anything that has to do with health, wellness, exercise, joy and happiness. Obviously, the Yucatan Peninsula is the place for her! Oh! Did we forget to say that Lupita was 96 years of age when she moved to Cancun? – or that she finished the Cancun 5K for Women’s Day at the age of 99? – and 3K of the Cancun 5K for Women’s Day now at 100 years of age? If Lupita can, anybody can! So get up, get out, and get busy.

Second UFO Alert Report: No UFO’s Spotted

People from 43 towns in Yucatan, Campeche, and Quintana Roo stood outside, in the middle of the night, for hours, and watched for UFO activity. Some were desperate to see alien crafts in the night sky, while others were desperate to see nothing (which is what happened). One or two individuals watching from Campeche and Quintana Roo had stories of previous sightings, as did the members of a police patrol who came out to see what was going on. Otherwise, it was an uneventful (and completely tongue-in-cheek) evening that we expect will be happily repeated soon.

By Working Gringos

Living Room at Casa Marina Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan

Cozy Living Room for a Wonderful Vacation in Yucatan

Dining Room at Casa Marina Vacation Rental in Yucatan

Main Bedroom at Casa Marina Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Guest Bedroom at Casa Marina Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Bathroom at Casa Marina Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Art Studio at Casa Marina Vacation Rental in Yucatan Mexico

Lush, Tropical Garden at Casa Marina Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

Casa de Los Artistas

This wonderful two-bedroom artist’s house is just one and one half blocks from Plaza Santiago, a bustling city center with a daily market, cocina economica restaurants, a fountain, children’s playground, church and open square. Every Tuesday night, Santiago comes alive with music, as a live Big Band serenades the neighborhood and the neighbors come out to dance under the stars.

Casa de Los Artistas provides a lovely space, with living quarters centered on a beautiful, intimate patio with a seating area with a marble bistro table. The back patio is planted with splendid bougainvillias, a fig tree, three orange trees, papaya, cacti… all provided with substantial shade from a copse of ramones trees. The patio is especially inviting during the heat of the day, providing a place to lie swaying in the hammock by the pool with a pina colada as the fresh catch purchased earlier from Santiago market simmers on the barbecue.

The house is furnished with many marble and ironwork tables and a mahogany bed. The bedroom and kitchen face the patios, each with French doors providing excellent cross ventilation. There is a small swimming pool for cooling off in the tropical air and a fountain that fills the patio with the sound of water.The scent of the orange trees in bloom might remind the visitor of the poetry of Garcia Lorca and maybe even forgotten corners of the gardens of the Alhambra.

From Casa de los Artistas, it is just a ten minute walk to the Plaza Grande, the José Peón Contrera Opera House, the Merida English Language Library, the Merida Centennial Zoo, multiple museums and central shopping. The house is also close to Clinica Mérida, one of Mérida’s leading hospitals.

 

 

Amenities

  • 1 double bed
  • 1 single bed
  • floor fans
  • ceiling fan
  • full kitchen
  • marble dining table
  • marble coffee tables
  • patio tables
  • patio
  • hammocks
  • WIFI
  • pool and tropical garden
  • washing machine
  • CD-radio
  • original pasta tile floors
  • A/C in master bedroom
  • iron protectores throughout

Relax in the Pool at Casa de los Artistas Vacation Rental in Yucatan

Prices

$750.00 USD per month April-November
$250.00 USD per week
$1200.00 USD per month December-March
$350.00 USD per week
Utilities and cleaning services not included. Cleaning fee of $75 USD.

 

Casa de los Artistas  Vacation Rental in Yucatan Mexico

 

Contact

E-mail us at goldencalf [at] mindspring [dot] com

 

By Working Gringos

This Week… starting March 09, 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
March 20 at 4:45 PM: Spring Equinox
March 29: Palm Sunday
April 4: Total Lunar Eclipse
April 5: Easter Sunday
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Special Photographic Exposition: Women of the Mountain March 6 – 19
Photographs by Pedro Tee, award winning Mexican photographer. These photos look beautiful and a visit here makes a great ending to a day spent at Uxmal.
Location: Salon Kabah & Lobby of Hotel Hacienda Uxmal Plantation & Museum in Uxmal, Yucatan, Mexico.
Time: During Museum hours
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) March 09, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events Planned for Today… yet!

Tuesday (Martes) March 10, 2015

Yucatan LivingTuesday of Trova: Trio del Sureste
The Trio of the Southeast is one of a group of trova trios that keep this traditional music alive and relevant to the times. They are always crowd pleasers.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Fantastic Planet
(France 1973) This futuristic story takes place on a faraway planet where blue giants rule, and oppressed humanoids rebel against the machine-like leaders. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) March 11, 2015

Yucatan Living Ceremony in a Sacred Mayan Cave
Join Astrea and a local cave guardian in exploring one of Yucatan’s sacred caves, and participate in a ceremony there. Reserve your spot now by emailing mundoastrea [at] gmail [dot] com or call/WhatsApp 999-357-9172.
Location: Meeting places in Merida and Progreso.
Time: 9:00 AM in Progreso, 9:30 AM in Merida. Return by 5:00 PM
Admission: $450 pesos. $100 pesos for lunch following ceremony, provided by local villagers.

Yucatan Living Movie: El General
( Mexico 2009) Past and present collide when the filmmaker Natalia Almada gets some recordings of his great-grandfather Plutarco Elias Calles , a revolutionary general who became president of Mexico in 1924 . In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Contemporary Dance: Good Intentions at 01:19:00
This is the work of Argentinean choreographer Luis Biasotto. It is an international award winning production.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $50 pesos General, $25 pesos students and INAPAM

Yucatan Living Movie: Heli
(Mexico 2013) Heli must try and protect his young family when his 12-year-old sister inadvertently involves them in the brutal drug world. He must battle against the drug cartel that have been angered as well as the corrupt police force. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) March 12, 2015

Yucatan Living International T’oh Festival Kickoff
The next amazing T’oh Bird Festival will kickoff at a conference today.
Location: Universidad Marista de Merida, Auditorio Vicente Victoria Herrera FMS
Time: 10:00 AM
Admission: Free. More information at www.festivalavesyucatan.com

Yucatan Living Movie: Club Sandwich
(Mexico 2013) Hector and his young mother Paloma go on holiday. Out of season their hotel is deserted. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Contemporary Dance: Good Intentions at 01:19:00
This is the work of Argentinean choreographer Luis Biasotto. It is an international award winning production.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $50 pesos General, $25 pesos students and INAPAM

Yucatan Living Movie: Trance
(UK 2013) An art auctioneer who has become mixed up with a group of criminals partners with a hypnotherapist in order to recover a lost painting. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Life Itself
(USA 2014) Documentary about the life of Roger Ebert, one of the most influential film critics in the United States of all time, died in 2012. Ebert wrote most of his life for the Chicago Sun-Times, published numerous books on cinema and was the first critic who received a Pulitzer Prize for his movie reviews. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Friday (Viernes) March 13, 2015

Yucatan Living Fourth Annual Festival Alas de Yucatán (Wings of Yucatan) 2015
The headline proclaims that Sisal is “Decorated with Wings” during this fourth annual festival. While many associate Sisal only with flamingos, we are learning that Sisal is far more than that because of its proximity to lush mangroves. Activities available this year will include: Bird watching, cycling, walking in the swamp, craft workshops, Mayan ceremonies and even Cuban music and other Latin rhythms. Specialists in all of the areas of natural resources of the area, including ornithology, will be on hand to answer questions, as well as will be residents of Sisal and its neighboring areas. This is a great chance to see Sisal as you have never seen it before.
Location: Former City Hall in Sisal
Time: 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Bastards
(Mexico, 2008). Director: Amat Escalante. Starring Kenny Johnston, Jesús Moisés Rodríguez, Rubén Sosa and Nina Zavarín. Fausto and Jesus, two undocumented Mexicans living in Los Angeles, are hired to carry out the well-paying job of killing a woman. This movie examines why different people, all in the same circumstances, behave so differently. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Concert: Rock and Blues
The Merida English Library presents its Music in the Gardens concert series. This concert features Steve Katz, formerly of Blood, Sweat & Tears, on guitar and vocals.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 between 66 and 68, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: $100 pesos. Tickets are sold out.

Yucatan Living Gastronomic Festival from the Lombardia Region
This is the first time this has been held, so we don’t know much about it. But the owners of this restaurant have recently emigrated from Italy, so we’re sure that whatever is going on will be very authentic!
Location: La Casona Della Nonna (Calle 43 #496 x 58 y 60, Centro Merida)
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: $230 pesos per person
Reservations Necessary: Cell: (999) 209-4205 or Whatsapp: (967) 130-9395

Yucatan Living Movie: Winter Dream
(Turkey 2013) Aydin, a retired actor, has a small hotel in Central Anatolie with his young wife Nihal, from whom he is emotionally distant, and his sister Necla suffering from her recent divorce. In winter, as snow covers the steppe, the hotel becomes their refuge but also the focus of their distresses. In Turkish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) March 14, 2015

Yucatan Living Merida English Library Saturday Lecture Series
Merida English Library presents Jack Robinson talking about the Gran Parque la Plancha.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 x 68
Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Night Tour to Izamal
This tour will take you to the Magical Town of Izamal, the Casa de la Fundacion (a private and beautifully renovated colonial home), and the Light and Sound show at the Izamal Convent, plus giving your support to Impulso Universitario, A.C.
Location: Begins at Impulso Universitario, Calle 62 #383 x 45 y 47, Centro. Free parking is available.
Time: 2:00 PM to 10:00 PM when the tour returns to its starting point.
Admission: $80 USD or $1,200 pesos. Deadline to register: March 6
Register at: contacto [at] impulsouniversitario [dot] org [dot] mx or call (999) 928-4727

Yucatan Living Workshop: Paper-Mache Mask Making
This workshop will be both days, Saturday & Sunday March 14 & 15
Location: SoHo Galleries (Calle 60 #400-A x 61 y 43, Centro Merida)
Time: Saturdays 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM, Sundays: 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM
More information: info [at] sohogalleriesmx [dot] com or call 928-5710
Admission: $25 USD per class

Yucatan Living Movie: Maria’s Clouds
(Germany 2014) During her visit to Sils Maria in Switzerland, Maria Ender, a veteran actor looks back to examine her life. Emotionally recalling her years of success, she longs for the time in which everyone loved and recognized her. Envy takes hold when she meets Jo-Ann, a young talent who will play the role that made her a star. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
More Scheduled Meetings: Saturday, March 28, Saturday, April 11

Yucatan Living Contemporary Dance: Good Intentions at 01:19:00
This is the work of Argentinean choreographer Luis Biasotto. It is an international award winning production.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $50 pesos General, $25 pesos students and INAPAM

Yucatan Living Movie: Mr. Nobody
(Belgium 2009) A boy stands on a station platform as a train is about to leave. Should he go with his mother or stay with his father? Infinite possibilities arise from this decision. As long as he doesn’t choose, anything is possible.. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Stella Cadente
(Spain 2014) Narrates the brief reign of Amadeo of Savoy in Spain , who in 1870 tried to tidy up and modernize the country ungovernable . King misunderstood abroad and quickly refuge inside: outside his palace, the country is collapsing , and within it , abandons his court games , love , pleasure , beauty and melancholy. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), March 15, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary: Six Degrees That Could Change the World
Global warming had long been a controversial topic – was it real? Was it not? Then, in 2000, scientists discovered that the ice at both poles is melting and causing a series of natural disasters.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Visit the Czech Republic through music. From the land of the Bohemian, the orchestra presents the music, legends and landscape of the Czech Republic. Concerto for Violin by Dvorak is in the repertoire for violin and is composed of three movements, composed in 1883, and was first presented in Prague. On this occasion, it will be played by the Portuguese violinist Emanuel Salvador who is part of the Orchestra of North Portugal. Don’t forget… this month the performances are NOT at the Peon Contreras.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living Movie: Leon : The professional
(France 1994) Mathilda, a 12-year-old girl, is reluctantly taken in by Léon, a professional assassin, after her family is murdered. Léon and Mathilda form an unusual relationship, as she becomes his protégée and learns the assassin’s trade. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) March 16, 2015

Yucatan LivingNational Holiday
It is Benito Juarez’s birthday today. Benito Juarez was the first Mexican president who was of indigenous origin… and the last. He is almost universally revered in Mexico.

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Note that performances of OSY in March will take place at Teatro Manzanero on Sunday, March 1st. During the month of March there will be NO Friday performances, thus /tickets/seating may be limited.
Sunday, March 22 – Del Clasicismo al Romanticismo – Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Liszt

Yucatan Living Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle
First and Third Thursdays in February and March 2015. Local and Foreign Artisans Market: to benefit the Chicxulub Food Bank. Attractions include Slow Food Market Vendors, Jewelry by Jorge, Carvings by Martine, Olga Cuevas: Clothing Designer, Mano de Nano (aka Naomi Murphy): homemade mustard, salad dressing, marinades, granola, meat rubs, baked goods, and a variety of pickles, Anita’s Salchichones (German Sausage) and many many more !!!
Location: D’Mar Salon de Eventos, Calle 28x21y23, Chicxulub Puerto
Time: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Free to shoppers. Vendors contact for more information.
More Information: Call Nola (English): (999) 109-6319 or e-mail: muellemarket [at] gmail [dot] com or keep up with new announcements on the Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MuelleMarket

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Scheduled Meetings: Saturday, March 28 and Saturday, April 11

Yucatan Living Art Opening: Gestational Spaces by Lorraine Toohey – March 19, 2015
Come enjoy this fascinating exhibit, “an exploration in drawing and sculpture of the nature and meaning of gestational space”. Food and drinks provided.
Location: Galleria la Eskalera (Calle 70 #474-B x 57, Centro Merida)
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Fundraiser for AANY: A Taste of French Food Under the Stars – Saturday March 21, 2015
This event is a fund-raising hors d’oeuvres and cocktails party to benefit AANY (Artistas y Artesanos Nuevos de Yucatan). We do hope that everyone is able to attend.
Location: Calle 62 #367 x 43 y 45 Merida, Colonia Centro
Time: 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Admission: 190 pesos per person, 350 pesos per couple (in advance) + 10 pesos for late admission at the door.
Contact Anne-Marie at mayee42 [at] gmail [dot] com for more information and reservations.

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!
March 18 & 19: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Elgar – String Quartet in E minor Op. 83
Haydn – String Quartet in D minor Op. 76 No. 2

26 March: in a Centro church, Location to be announced – $200 pesos
Corelli – Concerto Grosso No. 8
Purcell – Chaconne
Albinoni – Concerto Grosso No. 1
Mozart – String Quartet

16 April: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Mozart – String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K575 – OR – Tansman – String Quartet No. 3
Smetana – Quartet in E minor ‘From My Life’

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2
Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

Pending approval from the City of Merida:
“The String Quartet in the Classical Period”
21 March: Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropología de Yucatán – 8 PM performance
22 March: Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Note: During the month of March there will be NO Friday performances, thus /tickets/seating may be limited.
Sunday, March 22 – Del Clasicismo al Romanticismo – Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Liszt

Yucatan Living Exhibition: FACES – Friday March 20
This event is an exhibition of Alison Palmer’s Masks and Photographs. Some of the masks made by students in the February mask-making workshop will also be shown. Music will be by Steve Katz of Blood, Sweat & Tears.
Location: SoHo Galleries, Calle 60 # 400-A x 41 y 43
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Free, with selected pieces for sale

Yucatan Living Festival of Trova: Merida Yucatan – March 22 – 31
All the best of Yucatan’s trova groups and individuals will be in Merida this week.

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

I am looking for a job in the Hospitality field. I am employed at a Five Star Five Diamond Resort as a switch Board Operator. I also have some concierge experience.

Contact Pamela Carrasco at eagleriver5147 [at] hotmail [dot] com“>eagleriver5147 [at] hotmail [dot] com

Professional Summary

Friendly and enthusiastic [As well as professional] with [5+] years of specialization in [Five Star Service with in the hospitality industry]. Able to learn new tasks quickly and proficient in growing key customer relationships. Represent establishment with friendly, professional demeanor at all times.

Skills

Critical Thinking
Active Listening
Social Perceptiveness
Speaking
Judgment and Decision Making
Time Management

Experience

Switch board operator: The American Club – Kohler, Wi
Transmit and receive messages, using telephones or telephone switchboards. Answer inquiries pertaining to hotel services, guest registration, and travel directions, or make recommendations regarding shopping, dining, or entertainment. Contact housekeeping or maintenance staff when guests report problems.

Mail Clerk: Advocap – Fond du Lac, WI
Stamp dates and times of receipt of incoming mail. Fold letters or circulars and insert them in envelopes. Remove from machines printed materials such as labeled articles, postmarked envelopes or tape, and folded sheets. Accept and check containers of mail or parcels from large volume mailers, couriers, and contractors. Add ink, fill paste reservoirs, and change machine ribbons when necessary. Answer inquiries regarding shipping or mailing policies. Seal or open envelopes, by hand or by using machines. Affix postage to packages or letters by hand, or stamp materials, using postage meters.

Sales: Sears – Fond du lac, WI
Answer customers’ questions about merchandise and advise customers on merchandise selection. Itemize and total customer merchandise selection at checkout counter, using cash register, and accept cash or charge card for purchases. Take inventory or examine merchandise to identify items to be reordered or replenished. Pack customer purchases in bags or cartons. Stock shelves, racks, cases, bins, and tables with new or transferred merchandise. Stamp, attach, or change price tags on merchandise, referring to price list. Receive, open, unpack and issue sales floor merchandise. Clean display cases, shelves, and aisles. Design and set up advertising signs and displays of merchandise on shelves, counters, or tables to attract customers and promote sales.

Education
Bachelor of Arts : Social Work, Marian University – Fond du Lac, WI

Community Service
Advocate for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victims at ASTOP, Fond du Lac WI
2009-2012

By Working Gringos

Company: Red Wing Shoes
Location: Merida, Yucatan
Position Offered: Accountant Administrator
Contact in the U.S.: Laurie Groteboer
Phone: 651 354 9095 (USA)

We prefer that all applicants apply on our website (link below) or contact me by email at: laurie [dot] groteboer [at] redwingshoes [dot] com

Job Summary
Responsible for all the finance and administrative functions within the RWSC Merida, MX garment manufacturing facility

Job Responsibilities
· Manage the daily plant accounting processes and system transactions to ensure accurate recording of materials, labor and overhead for the units that are produced in the facility
· Understand and create the reports for all transactions for VAT, IVA, IMEX, payroll and other tax related transactions.
· Purchase production supplies and trim items from suppliers to support the day to day operations
· Produce accurate and timely financial reporting. This includes monthly operating statement, balance sheet and various analysis reports.
· Complete balance sheet reconciliations.
· Create annual budget and quarterly forecasts.
· Develop a thorough knowledge of accounting software support and company IT systems Analyze system transactions errors and partner with appropriate functions to create solutions. Train plant personnel on the MOVEX system and operational transactions.
· Prepare monthly reporting of raw material at the Merida facility, as well as other sub-contractor locations in Mexico

Required Education and Experience
Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting or related degree and 5-10 years of experience; 5 years of experience in accounting and two years of experience in inventory management; or equivalent combination of education and experience.
Thorough knowledge of and experience with VAT/ IMEX tax rules, as well as accounting, budgeting and administrative skills. Excel is a must. Requires good organizational skills and the ability to multi-task. Knowledge of ERP systems a plus.
Public accounting experience and experience in an operational/Manufacturing environment are beneficial
Candidates must have appropriate work authorization for Mexico and be able to speak and write fluently in both Spanish and English.

Applicants must apply directly to our website found on this link: Merida Accountant Administrator

By Nadine Calder

Editor’s Rather Lengthy Introductory Note: After seeing a plaque in Valladolid marking the birthplace of Delio Moreno Canton, Nadine Calder began reading about this journalist, poet, novelist, playwright. While some of his poems had been translated into English, to the best of her knowledge, his two novels set in Merida had not. Neither Nadine nor this editor imagine that either of these novels would have a large audience nowadays. They represent the time in which they were written, at least as much as the place, so most contemporary readers may find the stories overly sentimental. The fact that they offer a glimpse of old Merida is the reason that Nadine was interested in translating Canton’s works, and the reason that we are interested in publishing them here for our readers.

Nadine Calder was a college English teacher, and her undergraduate degree was in Spanish. She has studied in Mexico, and therefore has some background in Spanish and Mexican literature. The translation was painstakingly slow and aided by multiple references, including Spanish-teacher friends in California.

What follows is the first chapter of the translation of Moreno Canton’s earlier novel, El Ultimo Esfuerzo (One Last Effort). Written in the third person, the story includes a variety of characters, situations, and street scenes (for example, one prominent señora takes every opportunity to mention that her home features a zaguan). A second edition was published in 1947 by the University of Yucatan, whose library made a copy for Nadine so that she could make the translation. As far as we can determine, the novel is unavailable for sale, even in Spanish. A public-domain copy of the 1896 original is on Google books, and it is available free online. If, like Nadine, you want a bound copy, you can place an order for one with the Harvard Bookstore rather than print it out yourself. Moreno Canton died in 1916, so it is our understanding that there are no copyright issues. In deference and out of respect for Nadine’s hard work, we request that these translations not be reproduced from these pages without Nadine’s permission.

So here begins our experiment. We will publish one chapter per week here in Yucatan Living, until the entire book is published on our website. We hope that our readers who are interested in the history of Merida and its literature will enjoy the fruits of Nadine’s hard work.

****

The Author

Delio Moreno Cantón was born in Valladolid, Yucatán on March 11,1863. He attended school there until the age of fourteen, when he was sent to Mérida to enroll in the Catholic High School of San Ildefonso, Delio Moreno Canton, authorwhere the Hotel Caribe is now located. He would go on to study law while writing poetry and beginning a career in journalism. He eventually wrote a thesis arguing in favor of the legalization of divorce, which was then indissoluble in Yucatán. He became a lawyer in 1890 and participated in politics, continuing to write poetry, novels, and plays. He unsuccessfully ran for governor of Yucatán as a progressive reformer in 1909 and 1911 and he died in Mexico City in 1916.

Introduction to One Last Effort

Moreno Cantón’s academic, literary, social, and political backgrounds merge in his first novel, One Last Effort (El Último Esfuerzo), which was published in 1896. An introduction to the book’s second edition in 1947 calls it an “enchanting amusement, brimming with Yucatecan, rather Meridano, humor.” It goes on to describe the book’s quixotic bachelor, don Hermenegildo López, as “a fully realized character, almost a portrait” of a type still walking the streets of Mérida half a century later.

Other characters caught up in the mischief, gossip, and ambiguities of love and marriage include doña Raimunda, the neighborhood’s self-appointed social director, doña Prudencia, widow of a plantation owner, and her daughter Lupita, and the young men vying for Lupita’s affections. There are lavish preparations for the celebration of doña Raimunda’s saint’s day and the intrigues of a political campaign. There are hopes, ambitions, and disappointments. Treating his characters with humor and affection, Moreno Cantón’s vocabulary is carefully chosen and his sentences complex as he attempts to convey the intricacies of human behavior that he so precisely observed in Merida many years ago and preserved so we could read about them today.

We hope you enjoy this window back to another time in Merida!

****

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter One

The street is neither narrow nor wide. It can’t be said to be in the center of the city but neither is it on the outskirts. Some people who live on it enjoy some degree of social standing and as there’s no Title Page of One Last Effortshortage of young women who, in addition to being young, are beautiful, it is free of the air of desertion that reigns on many other streets since, from the early evening hours, it is visited with considerable frequency by suitors. Several are the doors that open then, allowing the houses’ interior light to pass into the street, and it is not unusual to hear the sound of a piano with which an enthusiastic student tries the patience of the neighbors.

The house of Señor Licenciado Felipe Ramos Alonzo is similar to the street: neither good nor bad. Its design is that of a zaguán, the wide central hallway that leads from double front doors all the way through to the patio, a feature much to the liking of his wife, who takes care to mention it whenever the opportunity presents itself; but the house isn’t especially graceful, with few bedrooms in addition to the parlor which, although not much different from the other rooms, boasts yellow-colored walls painted with white rosettes. The licenciado would have had wallpaper installed, but upon hearing what it would cost, he decided that it was too great a luxury for the current times, and his doña Raimunda agreed with him, even venturing the opinion that paint is better and more elegant.

The chairs were unremarkable, but the mirror, oh! The mirror was undeniably the best in the neighborhood; and it could not have been otherwise, because as the señora firmly maintained, it had cost one hundred and fifty pesos, and to a cousin of hers, she even once claimed more than two hundred.

Not many more months would pass before a piano, on a par with the mirror, would arrive to complete the furnishings, when Felipito, already twelve years old, would complete the music theory class he was studying at school upon his father’s recommendation and his solicitous mother’s insistence.

Facing the mirror, covered with gauze to protect it from fly specks, was the seating area, carpeted and composed of two pairs of rocking chairs and a sofa; but usually the only people received there were those of some importance or with whom the family was not well acquainted, as ordinarily, friendly visits took place in the doorway, spilling out onto the sidewalk to the extent that during the rainy season, passersby bad-mouthed the poor upbringing of those who thereby obliged them to step down into the muddy gutter.

Woman in YucatanAs the licenciado was usually out, doña Raimunda’s visitors were doña Prudencia, widow of a plantation owner, at times her daughter Guadalupe, one or another of the remaining neighbors, principally married women, and almost always, don Hermenegildo López, a character in his fifties, given to complaining about his misfortunes but the model of courtliness.

It was rare, upon the bells’ ringing the angelus, that good old don Hermenegildo would not show up at the end of the street in search of his seat at the traditional gathering at the house of Señor Licenciado Felipe Ramos Alonzo. It seems I can still see him coming with his tall stature, his step careful and measured, leaning on a gnarled walking stick.

Upon arriving at the doors, already wide open——although before early evening only one of the zaguán’s doors stood open——he would knock lightly to announce himself, and then entering the parlor, inquire in detail about the family, if Felipito’s health continued to be good, and about everything else that could possibly show his attentiveness. Then putting down his hat, he would take a chair and go out to seat himself irreproachably in it, without ever crossing his legs or striking a pose for which he might be accused of abandoning or forgetting the most exquisite of social graces. There he would remain until doña Raimunda should come out or one of his fellow visitors show up, his scant tuft of hair exposed to the elements, frequently killing time by smoking his holoch cigarettes, rolled in corn husk, the only ones he liked, to satisfy his modest taste for tobacco; but that did not mean he would not accept, always if it were offered, one rolled in paper or a cigar, which regularly received his praises in grateful compensation for the gift.

His suit was his everyday suit, a garment of venerable antiquity that in every one of its parts showed the faithfulness and prolonged service they had given their owner. Pants that must have once been dark-colored, threadbare and frayed on their lower edges from rubbing against his shoes, and with big, thick patches on the seat. In truth the latter could not be seen unless don Hermenegildo bent over, as ordinarily they were hidden by the tails of his frock coat, no less honorable for its age, olive-colored today but black in its better times. Such a condition would not have befallen it, however, nor its accompanying vest and pants, due to the indifference of the appreciative owner as it was essential that he, before going out, give all of them a good brushing to get rid of any stains and dust, robbing them of the already scant nap that remained on them.

This is not to say that the situation had come to the point that don Hermenegildo’s trunk would have remained empty with the absence of the suit the good gentleman habitually wore. He had one other that he conserved like gold dust for grand occasions and that was not very new, but it was certainly the best that he had. The frock coat was a bit out of style and the buttons placed at the base of the tails were different from those in front because it was not possible to find identical replacements when the originals were lost. But in any case, with the better suit or the other one, he went down the street magnanimously, bowing ceremoniously to greet everyone, an action always accompanied by uncovering his head with the subtle gesture of his tipping his hat to the person to whom the greeting was directed, earning him points for his respectability and no little credit as a courteous man.

And for good reason. He had been born unlucky relative to other matters. He was left defenseless upon the death of his father just when he was going to begin the study of Latin in the seminary in order to later acquire the title of lawyer, which would have given him an honorable profession in the arts. And he was now living in poverty, suffering from extreme scarcity which his meager salary as a court clerk could not relieve, but…

“I can’t complain,” he used to say to a certain friend to whom he repeated the same thing for the hundredth time. “You are my witness that I have nothing, that my luck couldn’t be worse, still, everyone loves me; believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

And he spoke of his rewarding friendships and of the attentions they showered on him. When they saw him arrive at the house of señor so-and-so, the wife would ask him about his health. If it was the dinner hour, the daughters would together insist that he take part in the meal. In the home of señor someone-or-other, it was worse. Whenever they saw him pass by, they would call out, sweetly reproaching him for the fact that it had been two days since they had seen him. What! If in the most distinguished houses, the señor, the señora and the children all went completely out of their way for don Hermenegildo when he walked by, it is that they know very well that while he may be without resources, for his part he gives his all for each one of those persons.

“That’s why you see that when something has to do with señor so-and-so, there is Hermenegildo López as the one who most… well he is among gentlemen the grateful one. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

****
Continue reading with Chapter Two of El Último Esfuerzo!

For those who like to follow along in Spanish, you can find the Spanish version on Google in Google Books here.

By Working Gringos

Handyman

Merida · Yucatan

Maintenance, Repair and Building Services for homeowners
in Merida, Yucatan

Service (in English!) With a Smile

Services provided include (but are not limited to..)

  • Ironwork (repair, building, painting, installation, & much more)
  • Electricity (fixtures, outlets, troubleshooting, & much more)
  • Plumbing (repairs, installations of toilets, sinks, & much more)
  • Gardens (landscaping, installing water features, & much more)
  • Painting (including impermeabilizante for roofs, & much more)
  • Air Conditioning (service, repair, installation, & much more)

Call Handyman When You Need Something Done

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL… just call us!

We have worked with many expatriates here in Merida, doing everything from building a wall to a house, fixing a faucet to fixing a fosa septica. WE even accept Mastercard and Visa!

Do You Need a Handyman?

You hire an architect to design your house, a contractor to build it. But who do you call to maintain it? To fix a problem? Who do you call to install a gate or fix an air conditioner? Who do you call when you find a leak and don’t know a plumber? Who do you call when a door sticks or a lock won’t turn? Who do you call to fix a hole in the roof or a whole lot of little things?

About Handyman

Jorge Sosa worked in the maquiladora industry in Merida for over 18 years, building and maintaining factories and businesses for US corporations in Merida. Now, he has brought his best workers to his new business, making their skills, experience and expertise available to the homeowners of Merida!

No Job is Too Small!

Call Handyman
999-920-4163
044-999-947-0944 (cel)
Or email
handyman [at] prodigy [dot] net [dot] mx

By Working Gringos

This Week… starting March 02, 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
March 20 at 4:45 PM: Spring Equinox
March 29: Palm Sunday
April 4: Total Lunar Eclipse
April 5: Easter Sunday
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) March 02, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events Planned for Today… yet!

Tuesday (Martes) March 03, 2015

Yucatan LivingTuesday of Trova
As the annual Festival of Trova begins, try not to miss any of these performances.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Forbidden Zone
(USA 1980) The bizarre and musical tale of a girl who travels to another dimension through the gateway found in her family’s basement. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) March 04, 2015

Yucatan LivingMovie: Cuates de Australia
(2011 Mexico) The stark landscape of a remote stretch of plains in Coahuila, Mexico is as harsh as it is spectacular. The inhabitants of Cuates in Australia – rancheros, mostly – work from dawn ‘til dusk every day to eke out their survival, as their water supply dwindles and clouds drift by yielding not a drop of rain. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie (Goya): Pan’s Labyrinth
(Mexico 2006) No, you should not let your children watch this movie. It is a soulful film, but due to graphic violence, lots of blood and fantastical but terrifying creatures, this film is not suitable for children under 13 years in age. This is truly an R rated film – a beautiful, imaginative fantasy yet brutal and quite violent.
Location: Recinto Rendon Peniche (Calle 42 x 44 y 46, Colonia Industrial)
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Nomadak TX
(2009) A documentary that follows a globe-hopping musical due from the Basque Country in Spain. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) March 05, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Club Sandwich
(Mexico 2013) Hector and his young mother Paloma go on holiday. Out of season their hotel is deserted. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: A touch of Sin
(China 2013) Four independent stories set in modern China about random acts of violence. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Maria’s Clouds
(Germany 2014) During her visit to Sils Maria in Switzerland, Maria Ender, a veteran actor looks back to examine her life. Emotionally recalling her years of success, she longs for the time in which everyone loved and recognized her. Envy takes hold when she meets Jo-Ann, a young talent who will play the role that made her a star. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Friday (Viernes) March 06, 2015

Yucatan LivingMovie: Ilo Ilo
(China 2013) Ilo Ilo chronicles the Lim family as they adjust to their newly arrived Filipina domestic helper, Teresa, (Angeli Bayani) who has come, like many other Filipinas, in search of a better life. In English.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Her
(USA 2013) A lonely writer develops an unlikely relationship with his newly purchased operating system that’s designed to meet his every need. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Leviathan
(Rusia 2014) Kolya lives in a small village on the Barents Sea, north of Russia. It has a garage next to his house, where he lives with his young wife Lilia and her son Roma, from his previous marriage. The village mayor want to steal his land, his home and his workshop for their projects. In Russian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) March 07, 2015

Yucatan Living Merida English Library Saturday Lecture Series
“Caribbean Flamingo Conservation Success in Yucatan and Future Challenges” . Presenters from Ninos y Crias, a local non-profit, will provide fascinating facts about “our flamingos” and more.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 x 68
Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Opera at the Movies: Macbeth
Location: Sala Mayamax in Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Opera Talk: 11:30 AM, Opera Begins: 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Workshop: Paper-Mache Mask Making
This workshop will be both days, Saturday & Sunday March 7 & 8. A second workshop will be held Saturday & Sunday March 14 & 15
Location: SoHo Galleries (Calle 60 #400-A x 61 y 43, Centro Merida)
Time: Saturdays 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM, Sundays: 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM
More information: info [at] sohogalleriesmx [dot] com or call 928-5710
Admission: $25 USD per class

Yucatan LivingMovie: H2O
(Mexico 2012) Mexico City grows unchecked. Before an area surrounded by lakes, now supplying water to this city is a real problem. H2Omx records shortages, waste and serious water pollution problems. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Rocky Horror Picture Show
(USA 1975) A newly engaged couple have a breakdown in an isolated area and must pay a call to the bizarre residence of Dr. Frank-N-Furter. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Life Itself
(USA 2014) Documentary about the life of Roger Ebert, one of the most influential film critics in the United States of all time, died in 2012. Ebert wrote most of his life for the Chicago Sun-Times, published numerous books on cinema and was the first critic who received a Pulitzer Prize for his movie reviews. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), March 08, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary about Nature
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Concierto Didactico – Mozart, Prokofiev, Britten and Tchaikovsky. This week features a program called A la Eslava with music by Dvorak and Tchaikovsky. Don’t forget… this month the performances are NOT at the Peon Contreras.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living Merida Music Festival
Bands included are: CopyPaste (with an added Tribute to Amy Winehouse), Los Twangs (with old fashioned Rock-n-Roll), Lanugo, Lasgori, Maydel and her Cuban Band, atcada Do Fogo (all percussion), Divas (a tribute to the rock of the 80s) and more. This is a great way to spend a lovely day at a beautiful hacienda listening to great music… don’t miss this!!
Location: Hacienda Dzibikak, Carretera Uman-Hunucma, Km. 5 C.P. 97393 Uman, Yucatan
Time: 1:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Admission: $300 pesos for general admission ($350 pesos at the door the day of), $1000 pesos for VIP tickets which include all food and drink in the Hacienda, $50 pesos for round trip bus from Hennessy’s every half hour starting at 1:00 PM. Tickets are available at several places in Merida. More info on the website. Tickets are also available at the beach by calling Jeff or Judy at 969-935-7700 or 9999-91-29-43.

Yucatan Living Movie: The Trial
(USA 1962) An unassuming office worker is arrested and stands trial, but he is never made aware of his charges.In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Ringo Starr and his All Starr Band
An icon of the music comes to Merida. Do not miss the opportunity to listen live to one of the musicians who marked an era, accompanied by some very accomplished artists in their own rights. This is a unique and unrepeatable concert not to miss.
Location:Coliseo Yucatan, on the road to Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission:from $425 pesos to $1825 pesos . Buy your tickets in advance here.

 

Monday (Lunes) March 09, 2015

Yucatan LivingNo events planned for today… yet!

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Ceremony in a Sacred Mayan Cave: Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Join Astrea and a local cave guardian in exploring one of Yucatan’s sacred caves, and participate in a ceremony there. Reserve your spot now by emailing mundoastrea [at] gmail [dot] com or call/WhatsApp 999-357-9172.
Location: Meeting places in Merida and Progreso.
Time: 9:00 AM in Progreso, 9:30 AM in Merida. Return by 5:00 PM
Admission: $450 pesos. $100 pesos for lunch following ceremony, provided by local villagers.

Yucatan Living Concert: Rock and Blues – Friday March 13, 2015
The Merida English Library presents its Music in the Gardens concert series. This concert features Steve Katz, formerly of Blood, Sweat & Tears, on guitar and vocals.
Location: in the Garden of the Merida English Library
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: $100 pesos. Seating limited. Beverages available.

Yucatan Living Night Tour to Izamal: Saturday – March 14
This tour will take you to the Magical Town of Izamal, the Casa de la Fundacion (a private and beautifully renovated colonial home), and the Light and Sound show at the Izamal Convent, plus giving your support to Impulso Universitario, A.C.
Location: Begins at Impulso Universitario, Calle 62 #383 x 45 y 47, Centro. Free parking is available.
Time: 2:00 PM to 10:00 PM when the tour returns to its starting point.
Admission: $80 USD or $1,200 pesos. Deadline to register: March 6
Register at: contacto [at] impulsouniversitario [dot] org [dot] mx or call (999) 928-4727

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Note that performances of OSY in March will take place at Teatro Manzanero on Sunday, March 1st. During the month of March there will be NO Friday performances, thus /tickets/seating may be limited.
Sunday, March 8 – Concierto Didactico – Mozart, Prokofiev, Britten and Tchaikovsky
Sunday, March 15 – Republica Checa en la musica – Dvorak and Smetana
Sunday, March 22 – Del Clasicismo al Romanticismo – Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Liszt

Yucatan Living Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle
First and Third Thursdays in February and March 2015. Local and Foreign Artisans Market: to benefit the Chicxulub Food Bank. Attractions include Slow Food Market Vendors, Jewelry by Jorge, Carvings by Martine, Olga Cuevas: Clothing Designer, Mano de Nano (aka Naomi Murphy): homemade mustard, salad dressing, marinades, granola, meat rubs, baked goods, and a variety of pickles, Anita’s Salchichones (German Sausage) and many many more !!!
Location: D’Mar Salon de Eventos, Calle 28x21y23, Chicxulub Puerto
Time: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Free to shoppers. Vendors contact for more information.
More Information: Call Nola (English): (999) 109-6319 or e-mail: muellemarket [at] gmail [dot] com or keep up with new announcements on the Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MuelleMarket

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Scheduled Meetings: Saturday, March 14, Saturday, March 28, Saturday, April 11

Yucatan Living Merida English Library Saturday Lecture Series: October – March
• March 7: Merida English Library presents Xi Chocolatl: The History of Chocolate in Mexico.
• March 14: Merida English Library presents Jack Robinson talking about the Gran Parque la Plancha.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 x 66 y 68, Merida centro.
Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Most lectures are free, some have a nominal fee

Yucatan Living International T’oh Festival Kickoff – March 12
The next amazing T’oh Bird Festival will kickoff at a conference today.
Location: Universidad Marista de Merida, Auditorio Vicente Victoria Herrera FMS
Time: 10:00 AM
Admission: Free. More information at www.festivalavesyucatan.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Rock and Blues – Friday March 13, 2015
The Merida English Library presents its Music in the Gardens concert series. This concert features Steve Katz, formerly of Blood, Sweat & Tears, on guitar and vocals.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 between 66 and 68, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: $100 pesos. Tickets on sale now at the library. Seating limited. Beverages available.

Yucatan Living Gastronomic Festival from the Lombardia Region – Friday March 13, 2015
Location: La Casona Della Nonna (Calle 43 #496 x 58 y 60, Centro Merida)
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: $230 pesos per person
Reservations Necessary: Cell: (999) 209-4205 or Whatsapp: (967) 130-9395

Yucatan Living Workshop: Paper-Mache Mask Making – March 14 & 15
Location: SoHo Galleries (Calle 60 #400-A x 61 y 43, Centro Merida)
Time: Saturdays 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM, Sundays: 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Admission: $25 USD per class
More information: info [at] sohogalleriesmx [dot] com or call 928-5710

Yucatan Living Art Opening: Gestational Spaces by Lorraine Toohey – March 19, 2015
Come enjoy this fascinating exhibit, “an exploration in drawing and sculpture of the nature and meaning of gestational space”. Food and drinks provided.
Location: Galleria la Eskalera (Calle 70 #474-B x 57, Centro Merida)
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!
18 & 19 March: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140
8pm performance
Elgar – String Quartet in E minor Op. 83
Haydn – String Quartet in D minor Op. 76 No. 2

26 March: in a Centro church, Location to be announced – $200 pesos
Corelli – Concerto Grosso No. 8
Purcell – Chaconne
Albinoni – Concerto Grosso No. 1
Mozart – String Quartet

16 April: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140
8 PM performance
Mozart – String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K575 – OR – Tansman – String Quartet No. 3
Smetana – Quartet in E minor ‘From My Life’

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140
8 PM performance
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2
Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

Pending approval from the City of Merida:
“The String Quartet in the Classical Period”
21 March: Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropología de Yucatán – 8 PM performance
22 March: Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Note: During the month of March there will be NO Friday performances, thus /tickets/seating may be limited.
Sunday, March 15 – Republica Checa en la musica – Dvorak and Smetana
Sunday, March 22 – Del Clasicismo al Romanticismo – Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Liszt

Yucatan Living Exhibition: FACES – Friday March 20
This event is an exhibition of Alison Palmer’s Masks and Photographs. Some of the masks made by students in the February mask-making workshop will also be shown. Music will be by Steve Katz of Blood, Sweat & Tears.
Location: SoHo Galleries, Calle 60 # 400-A x 41 y 43
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Free, with selected pieces for sale

Yucatan Living Festival of Trova: Merida Yucatan – March 22 – 31
All the best of Yucatan’s trova groups and individuals will be in Merida this week.

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Khaki Scott

Local Expatriate Wins Big Award!

Expatriate David Sterling runs the popular Los Dos Cooking School, one of the first places in Yucatan to offer cooking classes in the local cuisine. Since he came to Merida in 2002 (and before from New York Art of Eating best book of the year, YucatanCity), David Sterling has been researching and learning about Yucatecan food and cooking. Last year, he published a very comprehensive book about the cuisine of Yucatan, called Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition (The William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere) (click on that link to order it from Amazon and support Yucatan Living…). We are happy to announce that Chef Sterling’s book today won a very prestigious award, the Art of Eating Prize for best food book of the year. You can read more about David’s book and the wonderful accolades it has received at the Art of Eating article announcing the $10,000 cash prize. Felicidades, David Sterling!

Maine University Students Absorb Mayan Culture

Programs of Cultural Immersion in Yucatan (PICY) has just held its First Yucatan Intercultural University Forum. The students who shared their experiences are from Maine. One worked with an educational project for two years. The eleven others lived with local families throughout the state, and worked on gathering data for a number of cultural studies. One student lived with the family of a midwife, another lived with a family that faces communication issues with returning migrant relatives, and another went to live with a family in the smallest village in Yucatan. At the end of the 12 weeks, they came away with a treasure trove of stories that will help intercultural relationships far into the future for everyone involved.

Italy and Yucatan Join Hands in Both Places

Things can happen fast when all of the pieces of a potential project are already in place, and that’s just what has happened between Yucatan and Italy. Between the 12th and 15th of February, Italy and Yucatan both participated in an International Tourism event in Milan. Plans were already in place to increase flights between Merida and Milan, so the necessary money for upgrades was approved and those round trip flights will begin on April 13. Yucatan has invested $400,000 Euros to support the Yucatan in Italy program in that country for 2015. The Mexican Embassy will have free guides to “20 Wonders of Yucatan,” along with a free book on colonial churches in Yucatan. In the meantime, the Italian expat community has grown to such numbers in Merida that they now have formed their own group (la Sociedad Italomexicana Dante Alighieri de la Península de Yucatán) in Merida. Opening with 60 members in Merida, they are not simply all about being Italian. This group is truly dedicated to supporting cultural exchanges and to supporting a culture that has been kind enough to make room for all of us, no matter our expat nationality. Not to be left out, the Municipality of Merida is currently conducting courses in the Italian language for tour guides and will soon be offering tours in that language. Congratulations to Italy and to Yucatan, fast developing into intercultural role models for nations around the world.

Amazing Numbers for Health Week in Yucatan

This week is the First National Health Week in Mexico and Yucatan, as usual, is leading the way in planning and organization of the delivery of 195,000 doses of vaccines to the children of Yucatan state. Vaccinations against preventable diseases, such as polio, as well as education about diarrheal diseases and respiratory infections for those who are responsible for the care of children under five years of age, are expected to bring health information and health care delivery to over 600,000 contact points this week alone. Some of us have never seen a case of diphtheria, whooping cough or tetanus. Those of us who are old enough to remember all of the diseases mentioned above know the value of a week that will change the future for an entire generation of Yucatan’s children.

Invitation to Illegal Foreigners from INM

The National Institute of Migration (INM) has opened a program that will both regularize extranjeros (foreigners) and exempt them from fines of up to $7,000 pesos. The invitation is for anyone of any nationality. The only people who cannot get their visas straight under this program are those who knowingly attempted to obtain legal immigration status fraudulently, or who are subject to criminal prosecution, or those who have been convicted of a felony. Mexico is interested in regularizing as many foreigners as possible so that they can receive basic human rights benefits that are freely available throughout the country. The program will run from now until December 18, 2015.

Twenty New Tourist Paradores Coming to Yucatan

Ecotourism is here to stay, and Yucatan will soon be home to 20 new paradores to prove it. Paradores are partially owned and/or financed tourism areas that showcase local natural resources, such as cenotes, walking or biking trails, or areas that are breeding grounds for exotic or rare animals. These areas include restaurants, perhaps small, eco-friendly hotels or hostels, and areas where local food and crafts can be purchased. As of now, we know about new paradores coming to Rio Lagartos, Homun, Tecoh and Valladolid. We should hear something about the rest soon. Funding for these projects in Yucatan will also provide a sales catalog that will be distributed throughout the tourism industry.

Progreso Breaks Cruise Passenger Record

Progreso received 7,881 visitors in one day to break all past records for daily cruise ship visitors. The two ships both belonged to Carnival Cruises and both came to Progreso from Cozumel. One of the ships was headed back to Galveston, Texas, and the other was headed home to New Orleans, Louisiana. Cruise ship tourism has been on the increase for the past six months, supported by the hard work of the current administrations of the State of Yucatan, the cities of Merida and Progreso, and the state and federal ministries of tourism.

Childhood Rate of Obesity Down 5%

Well, this is certainly good news. The rate of childhood obesity has been addressed on two fronts. First, the provision of health services for those children who already suffer from obesity. Then, attention was turned to educating families and children so that they never have to face the high blood pressure and diabetes that, all too often, comes with childhood obesity. Between both of these sets of aggressive attention, the rate of childhood obesity has fallen 5% in Yucatan. It is expected that this rate will continue to fall and will pick up speed as it does so. Information is power and Yucatecos treasure their children above everything else, so everyone hopes that continued attention to stopping childhood obesity will result in a healthy society overall. In the meantime, congratulations are surely in order for those parents who have created an environment in which their children need never fear childhood obesity in the first place.

Chichen Itza: Second Most Visited Tourism Site

As new tourism numbers continue to come in for last year, it has just been learned that Chichen Itza was the second most visited site in Mexico for 2014, even though its numbers were down by 91,542 visitors since 2013. This means that Chichen Itza recorded 2,111,875 visitors for 2014. The number of visitors to Chichen Itza, accompanied by the numbers of visitors to Teotihuacán, Monte Albán, Palenque and Uxmal, accounted for 47% of all visitors to Pre-Columbian cities. The new Chichen Itza Light and Sound Show is part of the reason for people to come and visit this Wonder of the World again and again.

Rolly Brook, Our Online Friend

Rolly Brook was 68 when he became an expat in Mexico and 83 years of age when he died just last week (February 25). By that time, Rolly Brook had shared the last 15 years of his life with expats and potential expats. He was the leading resource person for information concerning all forms of visas, as well as all forms of insurance, especially health insurance in Mexico. Rolly was a mentor to other forum administrators who watched in awe as he dealt with the difficulties of administering and monitoring a forum. … and Rolly, along with two friends, wrote “the book” on Moving to Mexico. All of us – even those of you who are only considering becoming an expat in Mexico – have lost more than we can imagine. Please take some time to go back through Rolly’s blog My Life in Mexico and read about what daily life as an expat was like for him.

Don’t Forget to Talk About the Good Things

Merida, Yucatan, Thursday, February 19, 2015. An article in SIPSE talked about a recent meeting in which we think you might be interested. The representative, in Mexico, of Safe Communities for Latin America and the Caribbean, Maria Isabel Gutierrez Martinez called for the dissemination of information concerning successful government programs, and for the preserving and improvement of successful government programs, in order to raise the quality of life for citizens.

When verifying the certification process of 21 programs in the Municipality of Merida, the Director of the Institute CISALVA, the certification center for Safe Communities for Latin America and the Caribbean, spoke of the need to show successful government programs to the world, as well as to continue talking about social conflicts.

“We have to show the good things we have, to demonstrate to the world that not only bad things happen in Mexico. We have to show the world the good things that are done in Mexico as a result of government actions, and the impact of those good things on the lives of the people who live in the communities… We must show the success stories of leadership and governance of a mayor, [leadership and governance] for his team, and also for civil society in the community where they do many good things,” she said.

The movement for safe communities – which was born in Colombia – is recognition of good deeds and the sustainability of those good deeds that are done by a government to their community. She recalled that some 350 communities in the world are part of Safer Cities, “a comprehensive security movement,” which the councilors can access electronically for free, to hear cases of successful safety programs, good governance, and budget transparency, among others.

In regard to the difference between the programs available in the Safer Cities Program vs. other cities worldwide, the Mayor of Merida, Renan Barrera Concha, acknowledged that one of the problems of municipal governments in Colombia, Mexico and the world “has been the lack of permanence of many programs that have permeated positively in society and must be reinvented or redesigned every three years.”

We are happy to hear that some of the problems have been acknowledged and that people in government are working to keep Merida and the Yucatan safe for all of us.

By Working Gringos

Since we first wrote about dentists in Merida, we have had even more dental experiences here. We have had to go beyond simple cavities and checkups, though of course, we still do those. We have developed dental problems which have resulted in everything from root canals to implants to gum surgery. And we have come to appreciate even more the increasingly professional cadre of English-speaking dentists who are available to serve all our dental needs here in Yucatan.

Root Canals and Crowns

Most dentists who discover that you need a root canal will refer you to a specialized dentist who makes it his (or increasingly here in Merida, her) business to do root canals. Something you might find a little Dental XRays in Merida Yucatandifferent here in Merida is that most of the time, your dentist will bring the specialized dentist to his office for your convenience. In our experience, each time we have needed a root canal, the dentist doing the root canal has been scheduled to perform the task under the watchful eye of our regular dentist. And after the surgery is done, the regular dentist takes over with the temporary and permanent crown. Of course, the crowns are created by one of the many dental crown providers here, many of whom also provide crowns for dentists in the United States.

Dental X-Rays

Once you need something other than a dental cleaning, or maybe even as part of your checkup, you may need either a full or partial X-ray of your mouth, or your dentist might request a panoramic X-Ray of your mouth. While your dentist in Merida may have the ability to take a few X-rays on the spot in their office, full and more complicated X-Rays are performed by various service providers throughout Merida. Most recently, we went to a dental services office located near the hotel zone just off of Avenida Colon. The waiting room was full, but people moved in and out quickly. There seemed to be only one room for service, and a number of professionals providing those. In the lobby was a small retail section, selling some hard-to-find types of dental floss and other teeth care products. We went in for both a panoramic X-ray and a full mouth X-ray, with each tooth being X-rayed individually. The entire process took about 75 Dental supplies in Merida Yucatanminutes, including re-shooting about six teeth to make sure each print was perfect. The entire set of X-rays cost $1200 pesos (about $80 USD at today’s exchange rate).

Dental Implants

As we age and as the technology becomes more prevalent, we hear more and more about implants. And we’ve even been the lucky recipients of one, with all the work done here in Merida.

When our regular dentist found out we needed an implant, she first sent us to a maxillofacial surgeon who operates out of the Star Medica Hospital in the Alta Brisa section of Merida. Dr. Rodrigo Flores Flores specializes in everything from dental reconstruction after an accident and surgery for facial deformities to tooth extraction and implants. His clean and fairly standard office overlooks the Alta Brisa Shopping Center from the fifth floor, but that is little distraction when he is yanking on your mouth extracting a tooth. Trust us on this.

We spent many an hour in Dr. Flores’ office during the (what turned out to be…) twelve month process of extracting a bad tooth, growing bone around an implant and being pronounced “ready” for the crown on top. Not once in those many hours were we in pain. We may not have liked the sensation of having our tooth pulled, but it was amazingly never painful. Dr. Flores proved himself to be a very patient, careful and sensitive dentist, and since the implant was done, we have not spent another moment thinking about that tooth. We were very happy with Dr. Flores’ services, and we have heard from friends in Merida about other successful implant stories from other dentists as well. And of course there is the matter of cost. In the USA, we’ve heard prices ranging from $1500 USD to over $4000 USD per tooth. The entire process for us was $18,000 MXN, about $1400 USD at the time.

Recently, we met with another dentist in Merida who wanted us to know about the availability of a new technology here in Yucatan. Dr. Ricardo Peniche Rodriguez operates his office out of another Merida hospital, CMA (Centro Médico de las Américas, located just south of the Walmart in Merida). This hospital is much older than Star Medica and therefore, seemingly less modern. But in this office, Dr. Peniche performs some of the most advanced dental services available in the world. The technology that he specializes in (he’s actually one of Latin America’s experts on implants) is a brand new one called All on Four.

All on Four

Having gone through a dental implant process as well as having a large number of teeth crowned, we were interested to hear about this All in Four process which appears to be sweeping the dental world. After hearing about it from Dr. Peniche, we researched it on the internet of course. Reading about the ease of the process, the speed with which it can be accomplished and the naturalness of the results almost made us want to save up all our money and get both arches done immediately!

The All on Four procedure is an implant procedure that replaces an entire arch of your mouth at once. Instead of removing all your teeth and getting dentures or multiple implants, this procedure creates four implants into your arch, and fastens to those anchors an entire set of teeth. These are permanent teeth that never have to be removed, replaced or, as far as we can see, paid much attention to anymore. The link we provided below with frequently asked questions says that this technology is 98% effective… those are pretty good odds.

Dr. Peniche showed us how the All on Four technology works. It is a process that makes use of very modern technology, including 3D modeling of your mouth. The dental surgeon actually performs the All on Four Implantssurgery on a model of your mouth in the computer, making adjustments as he or she goes along. Once the procedure is perfected, an actual 3D model of your mouth is created, with holes where the surgeon needs to operate. The time spent in your mouth, therefore, is minimal and programmed so there are no mistakes. The other advantage is that it takes a lot less time than multiple implants. If you live out of town, Dr. Peniche says, two visits within a six month period is all that is needed to get an entire arch replaced.

Did we mention that Dr. Peniche speaks perfect English and travels around the Americas lecturing about and teaching this new technology? He works with the finest suppliers, including Nobel Biocare (as do others in Merida). His office may not be a large, swanky place like some of the dentists we have visited in cities in the United States, but apparently his care, along with many of the dentists in Merida, is just as professional.

Gums Matter

Of course, no further discussion about teeth and dentistry can proceed without addressing the issue of gums and gum disease. Unfortunately, gum disease strikes many people and as we have learned, must be attended to if you do not want to lose all your teeth. (Although, if you’ve already lost them, it is good to know about that All on Four technology, isn’t it?)
Reception at Arelly's Office in Merida Yucatan
When gum disease struck our household, we were not looking forward to dealing with it. But we were assured that taking care of it was more important than filling any cavities or replacing any faulty crowns. So one of us (we will not mention WHICH one…) acquiesed to going under the knife. Because that is what gum surgery entails… knives and other torture devices. We hesitate to make too big a deal about this, but one person we talked to who had had gum surgery described it as “being worse than childbirth”. We are not sure we agree, but we are not sure we do NOT agree either.

As luck would have it, we were sent to a periodontist in Merida that looked like something out of a dental brochure. The offices, located in Colonia México, were spacious and spotless in what appeared to be a renovated private home on a very quiet street (lots of parking). The receptionist at Dr. Arelly Carrillo Avila’s office speaks perfect English, having spent many years in California. Dr. Arelly is an intelligent, professional and beautiful dentist, trained and raised in Merida. The room in which the dental torture takes place looks nothing like a dungeon… it is bright, exceedingly clean and has a view of a lovely backyard garden through floor to ceiling windows. Who would suspect what goes on in there?
Arelly Carrillo Avila in Merida Yucatan
In our case, the gum surgery took place on a Saturday. Dr. Arelly spent over three hours anesthetizing, cutting, scraping and stitching gums. It was not a pleasant experience for the patient, but headphones, audio books and music helped. Afterwards, prescribed medications against pain and swelling also helped. Within a week, all was well again and the gums were saved, as were the bones and teeth. We were not glad we had to go through that process, but we were happy to have found such a professional provider, setting and such good results. The fact that the cost was closer to $800 USD than the $3000 USD the procedure would have cost in the United States did not hurt either.

Dentistry in Merida

You remember that expression, “You’ve come a long way, baby?”. That is how we feel about dentistry in Merida. In early 2002, most dentists were still older men and the offices we visited were less professional than we were used to. Now, in 2015, we realize that all our dentists are at least twenty years younger than we are, and many of them are female. We have heard that the dentistry classes at UADY, the local dental university, have more females than males graduating. There are many dentists now that speak English, where that trait was a rarity ten or so years ago. Every expat we know gets their dentistry done at home in Merida, and we have met many people who travel to Merida just for dental work. And they save enough money doing it that they can pay for their trip!

If you need dental work of any kind, and you are worried about doing it in Mexico, look no further. Merida has quality dental care at reasonable prices. And, like us, you might find that the savings you realize from getting your dental work done in Mexico takes some, but not all, of the pain away. Probably a few margaritas, a visit to a beautiful hacienda and a swim in the pool will take care of the rest!

****
All on Four technology described in Wikipedia

Star Medica Hospital

Centro Médico de las Américas

FAQ about All in Four dental implants

Nobel Biocare All on Four technology

By Khaki Scott

Weather: Cold and Wet

During this past week, over a period of approximately four days, the weather in Yucatan went down, in some places, to as low as 5 C (41 F) and 9 C (48.2 F), with scattered rain. This might not sound so bad to someone who lives in Canada or the northern United States, but they might have a different take on it if they tried those temperatures in houses built for the tropics, sleeping in hammocks with just a rebozo (shawl) to keep you warm. This was Norte # 36, complete with strong winds, and the winter is not over yet.

Progreso’s Impressive Carnival Numbers

We always have to laugh when we see old travel pages online that describe Progreso, Yucatan, as a “sleepy little fishing village.” Progreso has probably come farther, faster, than any other small city we can think of in the Yucatan. This year, 300,000 visitors attended Carnival in Progreso! We would imagine that some of that crowd live in Merida and drove up on a daily basis, but the crowds were definitely large and varied. With increasing numbers of local participants, plus domestic and foreign tourists, Progreso’s Carnival is ready to enter competition with those from other beach towns on both a national and international level. In the meantime, Progreso also produced 39 young athletes headed for the Mexican Youth Olympics, four young ballerinas who just participated in a dance contest and workshop in Merida, and hosted a group of foreign podiatrists who came to provide services to those who cannot otherwise afford them. If you are looking for a sleepy little fishing village, Yucatan still has them, but Progreso graduated from that category and never looked back.

Yucatan Classical Ballet Company Comes Home

The Yucatan Classical Ballet Company has been on tour in North Carolina, where they danced at the BeBe Theater. Asheville and Yucatan have a long history together. It often feels as if there is always a flow, in both directions, of cultural events between Asheville and Yucatan. Asheville is an official Sister City to Valladolid and, several times every year, we have cultural productions from Asheville performed in Merida. Merida is also home or a vacation destination for many residents of Asheville. Now that Yucatan’s Classical Ballet is back here at home, look for regular performances to begin again.

Second UFO Alert: What Did You Do Last Weekend?

Saturday, February 21, 2015. Carnival was over and all was quiet. Everyone was supposed to rest in preparation for the festivities that will happen during upcoming Semana Santa. And it was quiet, but no UFO aficionado was sleeping. Instead, they were all outside, at official locations throughout the Yucatan Peninsula, watching the sky for UFOs. This began as a fun little event that was only going to take place in Merida, Ticul, and Valladolid… but it did not take long for the news to spread throughout Yucatan, Campeche and Quintana Roo. The only requirement for joining was to let the organizers know where the group would be and how many they expected to be watching. The hours were 9:00 PM until midnight or 1:00 AM, but some vowed to keep looking for UFO’s until dawn. There was no fee for adding a location and no fee for attending at any of the more than fifteen locations, and no special equipment to buy. The organizer simply wanted the stories of anyone who saw something odd in the sky that night. Findings of this event will be made available through a short film and at the Paranormal Museum in Merida (Calle 63-B #230 x 8 y 10, Colonia Cortes Sarmiento. Admission: $30 pesos adults and $20 pesos children, students and ISEN). For those of our readers who are not familiar with newspapers in Yucatan, the people here (including the expats) love a good mystery or legend and almost every major paper has an Enigma column. If you would like to participate in the next UFO Alert, e-mail the organizer at misterios03 [at] hotmail [dot] com.

Marriage of Mars and Venus

Sunday, February 22: Yucatan is strategically located so that star gazers were able to see any number of wonderful events in the night sky. This time, it was the coming together of the images of Mars (the man) and Venus (the women). Although this event began at 5:00 PM, the angle here in the Yucatan made it visible for two hours.

Africanized Bees Attack Again

Since the beginning of this year, there have been three attacks on people by Africanized bee swarms that were growing in public buildings. These attacks occurred in the Atrium of the Cathedral in Merida, at Rogers Hall College, and now at the Merida Psychiatric Hospital. Several victims had to be hospitalized due to anaphylactic shock. Please keep an eye out for bees whenever you visit large public places and call the authorities if you have bees at your home.

City Council of Child Participation in Merida

There is to be a new arm of the City Council in Merida, made up of 19 sixth graders. Their job will be to consult with the City Council on issues that are important to young people. They will submit proposals and ideas on the problems they encounter in their family, school, environment and community. Merida, and all of Yucatan, has a long history of including children in government in this manner. This is part of what makes this state so stable when others are not always so. The City Council of Merida will also be working with the Municipal institute for women to find grant money for women and children who are victims of domestic violence. It looks as if we are off to a great 2015 in Merida!

New Culture of Urban Forestry in Yucatan

Through the years, residents of towns and cities have planted trees that ended up being in the wrong place or the wrong species. In other cases, residents have moved away and trees have either grown wild, grown through building walls, or become diseased. Many urban trees have been injured when their roots were cut so that new streets could be opened. Now, in a joint action by civil agencies, universities, industries and society at large, urban trees throughout the state will be cared for, removed or, in some cases, replaced with the proper species. This is yet another important step in successful urban planning. The new urban forestry activities will begin in Merida, so don’t be surprised if traffic is slowed in places because of tree work.

Congenital Heart Defects in Yucatan

National statistics show that Yucatan has approximately 300 babies born with congenital heart disease every year. But the good news is that the babies born with this in Yucatan have world class health care available to them. The babies who have congenital heart disease are identified at 16 weeks gestation through ultrasound. After that, the Augustine O’Horan General Hospital, ISSSTE and IMSS in Yucatan, Quintana Roo, Campeche, Tabasco, and Chiapas, plus the Cardiology Department of the Regional Specialty Hospital in Merida, all swing into action. Approximately a quarter of these babies will need surgery in the first year of their lives. All of the cardiology departments in Merida have a working relationship with the Division of Cardiology at Children’s Hospital in Mexico City, and the Regional Specialty Hospital has a 30-year relationship with Mercy Hospital of Iowa in the United States. The children’s cardiology program is called Cable Lifeguard and assists in the comprehensive care of up to 20 children with complex cardiac problems per year. With no identifiable cause for congenital heart disease, the children who suffer from it in Yucatan have a safety net of world class care to support them as they overcome all of their obstacles. As an aside, we wondered about care for children not covered by insurance. As it turns out, these hospitals and their foundations are not without hearts. Costs for the care of uninsured babies, especially surgical costs, are absorbed by the hospitals ISSSTE and IMSS, and that also includes Mercy Hospital of Iowa.

Dengue Fever Numbers Down 70% in Yucatan

Two factors are affecting the dengue fever numbers in Yucatan. First, temperatures have been low this winter, slowing the breeding of mosquitoes. Second, the people are working hard to clean not only their own property, but any vacant properties nearby, which also denies mosquitoes a place to breed. Health officials request that anyone with symptoms of dengue fever (headache, intraocular pain, fever of 39 C (102.2 F), nausea and vomiting) please do not self-medicate. Immediately begin oral hydration and seek medical attention.

Chicken Pox Cases Doubled

The number of cases of chicken pox, in January 2014, was 126. This year, for the same month, there were 234 cases of chicken pox in Yucatan. This disease is spread through the air and by touching the lesions on an infected person. While the rash is usually a benign viral disease of childhood, it remains in the human body, near the spine, and can reappear as painful and sometimes deadly shingles in adults. Some child care centers are closing due to high numbers of chicken pox. This results in more children in public places. Hand washing, covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze, and staying out of crowds of children will help stall this outbreak.

Merida: “Safe City” Designation

For the past year, Merida has been going through the long process necessary to achieve certification as one of the Safe Cities of Latin America and the Caribbean. This is a program that began in Colombia in 1989 and is gaining ground now around the world. This is an honor earned by a rigorous certification process. The name does not mean that a city has no crime. What it means is that a city has zero tolerance for situations within their culture that stifle success for some groups but not others. Instead of working from the outside to simply bring down numbers of crimes, this program’s focus is on creating a sustainable cultural environment, supported by permanent governmental programs, that makes it possible for every group in a society to grow and flourish. Mexico’s only stumbling block was starting government social programs over with every new election. But that has changed and Merida now has 26 government programs of social support that are completely sustainable, permanent and under review. It is expected that, within four short more months, Merida, Yucatan will become one of the few certified Safe Cities of Latin America and the Caribbean. To learn more about this program, please visit the parent organization’s website: Institute Cisalva.

By Working Gringos

This Week… starting February 23, 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
March 20 at 4:45 PM: Spring Equinox
March 29: Palm Sunday
April 4: Total Lunar Eclipse
April 5: Easter Sunday
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) February 23, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events Planned for Today… yet!

Tuesday (Martes) February 24, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Road to Guantanamo
(United Kingdom 2006). Directors: Mat Whitecross and Michael Winterbottom. Starring Riz Ahmed, Farhad Harun, Wagar Siddiqui and Afran Usman. Part documentary, part drama. This is the story of three British young men of Pakistani descent who travel to Pakistan to attend a wedding. They end up in Guantanamo, accused by the U.S. of being terrorists. This is an extraordinary film on the topic of one of the most terrible products of the American invasions of the Middle East. Probably in English, probably with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingTuesday of Trova: Trio Los Andariegos
As the annual Festival of Trova begins, try not to miss any of these performances.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Jodorowsky’s Dune
(USA 2013) The story of cult film director Alejandro Jodorowsky’s ambitious but ultimately doomed film adaptation of the seminal science fiction novel. In English with Spanish subtitles. This has universally been hailed as an amazing and wonderful documentary, so do try to see it!
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) February 25, 2015

Yucatan Living Concert: AnimeFest by the Chamber Orchestra of Merida
This is a wonderful event, addressing a growing interest in Animé among the people of Merida for quite some time now. Do come and enjoy!
Location: Universidad Tecnologica Metropolitana, Circuito Colonias x 46
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Navajazo
(Mexico 2014) An imagined apocalypse is presented to us through portraits of characters struggling to survive in a hostile environment, where the only thing they have in common is the desire to live, no matter the cost. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Concert: Silly Love Songs by the Choir of the City of Merida
We don’t get to hear nearly enough from this wonderful choir. And everyone loves a silly love song or two, right?
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: A Band Called Death
(USA 2012) A documentary on the 1970s punk trio Death, and their new-found popularity decades after they disbanded. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) February 26, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Bad Hair
(Mexico 2013) A nine-year-old boy’s preening obsession with straightening his hair elicits a tidal wave of homophobic panic in his hard-working mother. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Cinema Classics: Documentary: Koyaanisqatsi
(United States 1984). Director: Godfrey Reggio. There are no spoken words in this movie, but it does not need them. Amazing photography and videography. If you have not seen it, do!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Joan Sibila
This is a presentation of the singer’s new CD, Album Rosa.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $50 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Back to the Future
(USA 1985) A young man is accidentally sent 30 years into the past in a time-traveling DeLorean invented by his friend, Dr. Emmett Brown, and must make sure his high-school-age parents unite in order to save his own existence. In English with Spanish subtitles. A classic!
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Mommy
(Canada 2014) A widowed single mother, raising her violent son alone, finds new hope when a mysterious neighbor inserts herself into their household. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Friday (Viernes) February 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Shakespeare and Victor Hugo’s Intimacies
(Mexico, 2008) Twenty years ago, Rosa met Jorge, a young tenant in her lodging house at the corner of Shakespeare and Victor Hugo streets in Mexico City. But after Jorge’s sudden death, Rosa began to discover a darker side of the man who had become her closest friend. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Latin American Movie Anthology: Frio Sol de Invierno (Cold Winter Sun)
A young man gets out of a psychiatric hospital and returns home to find a devastated neighborhood. He forms a relationship with a prostitute and her young son. Probably in Spanish, no guarantees about subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Art: Art Alive
A show including art by Maestro Juan Pablo Bavio and his students. Participate in the raffle of an art piece of 100 x 80 cm.
Location: Juan Pablo Bavio Gallery, Calle 59 x 70
Time: 8:00 to 11:00 PM Friday
Admission: $50 pesos including ticket for the raffle.

Yucatan Living Arab Dance: Maktub “It Was Already Written”
This is a performance by the Padme Magusha Dance Company.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: $50 pesos

Yucatan Living Concert: Silly Love Songs by the Choir of the City of Merida
We don’t get to hear nearly enough from this wonderful choir.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas,Av. Colon x Calle 20
Time: 8:30 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Be Kind Rewind
(UK 2008) Two bumbling store clerks inadvertently erase the footage from all of the tapes in their video rental store. In order to keep the business running, they re-shoot every film in the store with their own camera, with a budget of zero dollars. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Maria’s Clouds
(Germany 2014) During her visit to Sils Maria in Switzerland, Maria Ender, a veteran actor looks back to examine her life. Emotionally recalling her years of success, she longs for the time in which everyone loved and recognized her. Envy takes hold when she meets Jo-Ann, a young talent who will play the role that made her a star. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) February 28, 2015

Yucatan Living Merida English Library Saturday Lecture Series: Mexican Wines
Discussion of Mexican wines and limited tasting. Presented by Elliot Diaz, owner of local wine store, Taninos Por Todos.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 x 68
Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $ 100 pesos. Attendance limited.

Yucatan Living Movie: Waste Land
(USA 2010) An uplifting feature documentary highlighting the transformative power of art and the beauty of the human spirit. Top-selling contemporary artist Vik Muniz takes us on an emotional journey … In Portuguese with Spanish subtitles. Especially inspiring if you are an artist of any kind!
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!

Yucatan Living Movie: Beetlejuice
(USA 1998) A pair of young lovers flee their New England town, which causes a local search party to fan out to find them. That hardly begins to describe this amazing movie classic starring Michael Keaton. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Leviathan
(Rusia 2014) Kolya lives in a small village on the Barents Sea, north of Russia. It has a garage next to his house, where he lives with his young wife Lilia and her son Roma, from his previous marriage. The village mayor want to steal his land, his home and his workshop for their projects. In Russian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), March 01, 2015

Yucatan Living AFAD Open House
Come see the dogs and cats and get ready to adopt one!
Location: AFAD Animal Shelter in Periferico
Time: 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Documentary about Nature
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Note that this performance of OSY will take place at Teatro Manzanero on Sunday, March 1st. During the month of March there will be NO Friday performances, thus tickets and seating will be limited.
Sunday, March 1 features a program called A la Eslava with music by Dvorak and Tchaikovsky.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living Movie: Poltergeist
(USA 1982) As a family moves into their new home, they notice strange events that mostly affect their young daughter. One of Stephen King’s most famous ghost stories brought to film. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) March 02, 2015

Yucatan LivingNo events planned for today… yet!

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Musical Performances
La Escuela Superior de Artes de Yucatán will be performing three events in honor of the music teacher who was recently abducted and killed, Luis Luna Guarneros. The suspects have been apprehended (see article here), and these events are being held to commemorate his life and his dedication to the musical life of Merida. Certainly attendance by the expatriate community would be appreciated.
• Wednesday, February 25: At the Armando Manzanero Theatre (Calle 62 x 61), 8 PM, Quod stellae in caelo (Stars in the Firmament) with chorus, band and orchestra. The program will include some pieces from Carmen Burana.
• Thursday, February 26: At the Centro Cultural Pro Historia Peninsular (ProHispen at Calle 19 #94 x 18 y 20 in Colonia México), 8 PM, Battalia à 9 (Chamber music)
• Friday, February 27: At Templo Expiatorio de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Monjas) (Calle 63 x 64), 8 PM, Memoriam Concilium Musicae with Band and Organ. There will also be a mass in the Monjas church which the music will accompany. The music on this evening will include music by Bach, the Coronation Mass and Hallelujah Chorus by Mozart. It should be a pretty amazing evening.
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Merida Music Festival: Sunday March 8
Bands included are: CopyPaste (with an added Tribute to Amy Winehouse), Los Twangs (with old fashioned Rock-n-Roll), Lanugo, Lasgori, Maydel and her Cuban Band, atcada Do Fogo (all percussion), Divas (a tribute to the rock of the 80s),
Location: Hacienda Dzibikak, Carretera Uman-Hunucma, Km. 5 C.P. 97393 Uman, Yucatan
Time: 1:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Admission: $300 pesos for general admission ($350 at the door the day of), $1000 pesos for VIP, this includes all food and drink in the Hacienda, $50 pesos for round trip bus from Hennessy’s every half hour starting at 1:00 PM. Tickets are available at several places in Merida. More info on the website. Tickets are also available at the beach by calling Jeff or Judy at 969-935-7700 or 9999-91-29-43.

Yucatan Living Concert: Rock and Blues – Friday March 13, 2015
The Merida English Library presents its Music in the Gardens concert series. This concert features Steve Katz, formerly of Blood, Sweat & Tears, on guitar and vocals.
Location: in the Garden of the Merida English Library
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: $100 pesos. Seating limited. Beverages available.

Yucatan Living Night Tour to Izamal: Saturday – March 14
This tour will take you to the Magical Town of Izamal, the Casa de la Fundacion (a private and beautifully renovated colonial home), and the Light and Sound show at the Izamal Convent, plus giving your support to Impulso Universitario, A.C.
Location: Begins at Impulso Universitario, Calle 62 #383 x 45 y 47, Centro. Free parking is available.
Time: 2:00 PM to 10:00 PM when the tour returns to its starting point.
Admission: $80 USD or $1,200 pesos. Deadline to register: March 6
Register at: contacto [at] impulsouniversitario [dot] org [dot] mx or call (999) 928-4727

Yucatan Living Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan (OSY) in March
Note that performances of OSY in March will take place at Teatro Manzanero on Sunday, March 1st. During the month of March there will be NO Friday performances, thus /tickets/seating may be limited.
Sunday, March 1 – A la Eslava – Dvorak and Tchaikovsky
Sunday, March 8 – Concierto Didactico – Mozart, Prokofiev, Britten and Tchaikovsky
Sunday, March 15 – Republica Checa en la musica – Dvorak and Smetana
Sunday, March 22 – Del Clasicismo al Romanticismo – Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Liszt

Yucatan Living Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle
First and Third Thursdays in February and March 2015. Local and Foreign Artisans Market: to benefit the Chicxulub Food Bank. Attractions include Slow Food Market Vendors, Jewelry by Jorge, Carvings by Martine, Olga Cuevas: Clothing Designer, Mano de Nano (aka Naomi Murphy): homemade mustard, salad dressing, marinades, granola, meat rubs, baked goods, and a variety of pickles, Anita’s Salchichones (German Sausage) and many many more !!!
Location: D’Mar Salon de Eventos, Calle 28x21y23, Chicxulub Puerto
Time: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Free to shoppers. Vendors contact for more information.
More Information: Call Nola (English): (999) 109-6319 or e-mail: muellemarket [at] gmail [dot] com or keep up with new announcements on the Muelle Market-Bazar del Muelle Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MuelleMarket

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Scheduled Meetings: Saturday, March 14, Saturday, March 28, Saturday, April 11

Yucatan Living Merida English Library Saturday Lecture Series: October – March
• March 7: TBA
• March 14: TBA
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 x 66 y 68, Merida centro.
Time: 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Most lectures are free, some have a nominal fee

Yucatan Living Ringo Starr and his All Starr Band: March 08
An icon of the music comes to Merida. Do not miss the opportunity to listen live to one of the musicians who marked an era, accompanied by some very accomplished artists in their own rights. This is a unique and unrepeatable concert not to miss.
Location:Coliseo Yucatan, on the road to Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission:from $425 pesos to $1825 pesos . Buy your tickets in advance here.

Yucatan Living Concert: Rock and Blues – Friday March 13, 2015
The Merida English Library presents its Music in the Gardens concert series. This concert features Steve Katz, formerly of Blood, Sweat & Tears, on guitar and vocals.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 between 66 and 68, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: $100 pesos. Tickets on sale now at the library. Seating limited. Beverages available.

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By Working Gringos

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