By Working Gringos

It’s July 2015 and it is time for a change!

For the month of July, we will not be adding anything new to the Yucatan Living website. We will do our best to maintain the calendar during this time, so that you won’t miss any important events.

However, the bulk of our efforts this month will be spent birthing a brand new and much enhanced Yucatan Living. We started Yucatan Living TEN years ago… and it is definitely time for an update. We want you to be able to find things easily, sign up for our newsletter easily, and read Yucatan Living on your tablet or smart phone. But of course we don’t want to lose any of the content we have built up over the years, any of the wonderful photographs or any of you!!

So sit tight and stay tuned!! Disculpe la molestia, as they say in these parts, but we are working hard here to bring you a new and improved Yucatan Living.

And, eek!! It’s already July 5th!! Time to get to work!!

By Khaki Scott


Muna: Organic and Sustainable Agricultural Project

A new company, Ad Naturam, has put in an agricultural project at Rancho San Pedro Xocchel, in the Municipality of Muna. The object of the project is not just to grow a few crops and sell them at a local market. They want this project to alter the life course of everyone involved. In the three years this project has been functioning, it has supported economic growth throughout the area, and has provided meaningful self-employment training and opportunities for over 400 at-risk young people. They use rainwater for irrigation and microbiology to generate nutrients for their plants. The fruits of their work (pun intended) include 26 different species of fruit trees. The Ad Naturam website is in English, but is not yet complete. Please bookmark that page and keep up with what’s happening with this amazing program.

Born to Win: The Green Sky Initiative

This Ad Naturam project is worthy of its own kudos. The object of the Green Sky Initiative is to reduce and prevent crimes by young people by providing them with adequate training to not only work in the fields, but to work for themselves in the fields. Here, they learn about subsistence gardening, greenhouses, experimental plots, and shade houses. When they finish the program, they are competent professionals in their field and can do anything from work for someone else to operate their own business. With 400 success stories and counting, we wonder how a project like this would play in countries that believe in throwing teens in prison, only to have to deal with the criminals they become there. Look for much more in the future from Muna and Ad Naturam!

How Long is Summer Vacation?

Last summer (2014), parents lobbied for a two-month summer vacation from school for their children so that they could spend more time on family vacations and take advantage of some of the great sales that heavy tourism seasons bring. They didn’t get two months. They got one month instead. Now, this year, they’re back, still asking for two months of vacation from school. The State Secretary of Education’s office is looking at the calendar now to see if there is any way possible to get the time for them. Negotiations may continue into next year, with new, longer summer vacations in 2016. So, how long is summer vacation? There is no way to know at this point. Please watch the news for further developments as the Office of the Secretary of Education says they will make an announcement as soon as they know themselves. As of now, classes begin on August 24. Also, please remember that teachers will be in workshops on the last Friday of every month, so there will be no classes on those days. Christmas vacation will be Tuesday, December 22 through Wednesday, January 6 and Easter vacation will be from Tuesday, March 22 through Monday, April 4. There are a few other dates when children will be out of school, but those are one at a time, so should not be significant for expats.

Aprendamos Juntos AC (Learning Together AC)

Two decades ago, four young mothers, each with an intellectually-disabled child, came together and formed an organization that would change not only everyone it touched, but the entire social order of Yucatan itself. All they wanted for their children was equal treatment, kindness, and an education that would allow them to contribute something to the community. What they got was human rights, inclusion in regular classes in more than 20 schools, great educations, regular jobs (at which they do excel), a training center for intellectually-disabled adults, classes for the arts, ten teachers with special education degrees, fundraising opportunities, and social network accounts. Not bad for people who are members of a group that, at one time, could only hope to be a manageable part of the population. These ladies are wonderful – all of them. Many thanks to Leticia Romero Osorio, Liliana Valdes La Vallina Portela, Rosa Maria Bano Garcia and Carmen Bujaidar Tobias for all of your efforts on behalf of your own children and the children of so many others. It is you who are the true treasures of Yucatan. Please do visit Aprendamos Juntos online to learn more.

Traditional Food: How Much Would You Pay?

Oh! This certainly gives one pause for thought! It seems that, in an era when palates are being assaulted from every corner by fast food joints, street food vendors, and food trucks, some of the higher end restaurants in Merida have gone back to basics and discovered a gold mine. They are actually preparing traditional Yucatecan foods, with traditional Yucatecan ingredients, in traditional Yucatecan ways and the results are a raging hit. Their pricing is running from $1,000 pesos to $5,000 pesos per plate. However, in exchange, customers are getting the pleasure of experiencing real Yucatecan food, served in a beautiful, traditional environment, with exotic ingredients. This is truly the flavor of Yucatan. Close your eyes, relax, and think that over. It might just be worth the price after all.

ComeDog Feeding Stations May Be Here Soon

The concept of ComeDog feeding stations for homeless animals began in Colombia. The ComeDog system also has water for the animals. It was such a success there that it has begun to expand around Latin America. Now, the ComeDog feeding stations are in several places in Mexico and may soon appear in Yucatan’s beach communities. These feeding stations have added benefits, other than simply meeting the nutritional needs of the dogs. These added benefits include:

    1. With full stomachs and future food security, dogs are less likely to show signs of aggression.
    2. Being used to humans will make it easier to capture the dogs for vaccinations and/or spay/neuter programs.
    3. Non-aggressive, healthy dogs will not present a public health problem, with respect to such things as rabies.

Everyone who loves animals would at least like to see this project tried here in Yucatan. It’s working in D.F., and we have no doubt that it will work here as well.

Local Restaurants Partner With Local Producers

In Merida, a dozen restauranteurs have signed on to participate in a project with the Yucatan Ministry of Rural Development to acquire raw materials from local producers on the basis of what is harvested each season. Of course, organic chicken and eggs will be available year-round, but this may mean adjustments in restaurant menus when different fruits and vegetables are harvested at different times. This is a challenge for chefs who look at this as an opportunity, rather than an inconvenience. The twelve restaurants that will be participating in this project use approximately 190 thousand pesos per month to purchase these materials. That will be a significant amount of money to keep and turn over in the local economy. It shouldn’t take long to see what kind of creativity this generates, but everyone wishes all concerned nothing but success.

Beach Restoration Continues in Yucatan

The State of Yucatan is constantly working on conservation and restoration projects, financed both with their own funds and with federal funds earmarked for specific projects. At the present time, they have declared the beaches west of Progreso to be stable and have been in the process of restoring beaches east of Progreso. At this point, they are refining their work and getting ready to replant the beaches with dune plants, which have a significant impact on protecting beach integrity The overall goal is to have all of Yucatan’s beaches at approximately 30 meters (98.42 feet) wide. This is a complex issue that will not soon be resolved, as much because of the power of the ocean and global weather changes as because of man’s on-land activities.

Cenotes in the City

Did you know that there are 145 registered cenotes in the Municipality of Merida? Almost all of them are on private property and kept in good repair by their owners. Some are on public property and were discovered only when attempts were made to make improvements. We all remember, just recently, when a large cenote was found when digging in preparation for remodeling and building the new market in the vicinity of Mercado Lucas de Galvez. This one has not been fully explored yet, but is known to be pre-Hispanic and part of the City of T’ho. Even the new Costco has its own cenote, discovered when they were building the new parking lot. They have beautiful lights in that cenote at night. Tourist programs that will share these wonders with the world, while still protecting them environmentally, are currently in development.

Orphaned Baby Wildebeest at Animaya

Pancha, the zebra, first lived at “El Centenario” Zoo in Merida. When he began to show signs of aggression, he was sent to Animaya. Everything went well, so he was put in with the wildebeests and other zebras. One wildebeest had a new baby and Pancha took it well. Then, a second wildebeest had a new baby and Pancha killed the mother. The orphaned wildebeest baby is now 15 days old and has a staff of five to see to his every need. He is beginning to grow and, like babies everywhere, is starting to talk to strangers at the gate of his private enclosure. After this kind of pampering, we wonder who is ever going to have the heart to tell him he is a wildebeest, or will he just forever be a wonderful “meet and greet” ambassador for Animaya? Either way, he is one lucky baby. No word on a name for him yet but, if past history is any indicator, we expect a naming contest on the horizon soon.

Baboon Dies of Chronic Malnutrition

There is a photo of this poor animal, but it is just too heartbreaking to use. As most are aware, Profeco confiscated 20 circus animals, this past week, when they were abandoned in Xmatquil. They were outside of the City of Merida, but still in the Municipality (County) of Merida. As of now, no one knows who abandoned them or who their legal owner is. All of the animals received the health care they needed and they remain at Animaya while their paperwork runs its course, but it was just too late for one baboon. Everyone is waiting for July 9, when a new law against animal shows like this one goes into effect. Since that law will come with requirements to surrender animals that are properly documented, and have fines for those who are not, it is believed that more than a few circus owners will resort to abandoning animals. Of course, that is probably what happened this time. By choice, this sort of tragedy is unacceptable as part of the cultural consciousness of the people who call this area home and we applaud them for calling the authorities when they found the animals and for fully supporting the new laws that will go in place on July 9.

By Working Gringos

From this website: https://www.esl101.com/esl-jobs/country/mexico/full-time-language-school-director-position-merida-yucatan-mexico

Employer Name: Capacitacion Del Sur Este, S.C.
Number of Positions: 1+
Job Start Date: ASAP

City: Merida
Local Currency: Mexican Peso
Salary per month in local currency: 15,000 MXN

Required Nationality: Native English Speaker preferred
Required Degree: Bachelor’s Degree
Required Major: Business

Teaching Experience Required: Preferred
Certification Required: Preferred
Capacitacion Del Sur Este, S.C. is looking for Full-time Language School Director position in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico.

Requirements:

Native English Speaker preferred
Bachelor’s Degree in Business
Teaching experience preferred

We offer:
15,000 MXN salary plus commissions per month
Benefits and performance bonus provided

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting June 29 , 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Izamal: An Invitation for Everyone June 25 – July 26
The Municipal Government of Izamal, Yucatan, in compliance with its commitment to promoting the Culture and Arts of the Municipality, through the House of Culture and the Regional Arts Center, invites you to come and celebrate with them throughout the next month. Individual events are listed below. Do plan on making a trip to the wonderful and magical city of Izamal.

Monday (Lunes) June 29, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Chronicle of a Disaster Foretold
Note: This documentary is part of Documentary Series Mondialisation that lasts from May 31 through July 26.
(France, 2001). For over twenty years, the AIDS epidemic has threatened the future of all of humanity, especially on the African Continent. How is it that even with the urgency of an announced global catastrophe, neither individuals, institutions nor governments have succeeded in stopping the spread of this disease? This documentary contains the testimony of those who are involved in the struggle for life and makes us look closely at sometimes cynical political reality.
Location: Visual Arts Center, Calle 60 x 45
Time: 8:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Tuesday (Martes) June 30, 2015

Yucatan Living Flute Quartet: Featuring Gabriela Loolbej Sánchez Chan
You will probably have the opportunity to experience more of these beautiful evenings of music in Merida than any other place in the Americas.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas
Time: 8:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Little Children
(United States 2006). Director: Todd Field. Starring: Kate Winslet, Jennifer Connelly, Patrick Wilson, and Noah Emmerich. The lives of two lovelorn spouses from separate marriages, a registered sex offender, and a disgraced ex-police officer, intersect as they struggle to resist their vulnerabilities and temptations in suburban Connecticut. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) July 01, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Klip
(Serbia 2012) Jasna is a beautiful teenager living in the poor southern suburbs of Belgrade. She likes to film everything around with a mobile camera phone. She makes videos of friends, family and Djole – the boy of her dreams. Jasna’s father is battling a terminal illness and her desperate mother accompanies him throughout this terrible battle. In Serbian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Bad Hair
A nine-year-old boy’s preening obsession with straightening his hair elicits a tidal wave of homophobic panic in his hard-working mother. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) July 02, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Rupestre
(Mexico 2014) The director of this film, Alberto Zúñiga, accepts the invitation of cultural promoter Jorge Pantoja, founder of Tianguis Popular, to document the history, life and motivations of a group of rockers that transformed the history of urban music of Mexico. Over 40 respondents give their testimony about the origin, importance and validity of the cultural movement that say Zuniga is like between rock’n’roll before 1980. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: At the Abyss “The Big Sleep”
(United States 1946). Director: Howard Hawks. Starring: Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. Private detective Philip Marlowe is hired by a rich family. Before the complex case is over, he has seen murder, blackmail, and what might be love.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: The Chamber Orchestra of Merida
This small orchestra is one of the best we have ever heard. Enjoy music under the stars!
Location: Parque de Santa Lucia, Calle 60 x 55
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico
This is opening night of the Cirque de Soleil performances in Merida, which will continue into July.
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil is set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: 9:00 PM
Tickets: on Sale at different locations

Yucatan Living Movie: The Five Obstructions
(Denmark 2003). Director: Lars Von Trier. In 1967, Jorgen Leth made a 13-minute short film called The Perfect Human, a documentary about human behavior. In 2000, Lars von Trier challenged Leth to shoot five remakes of the short, each hampered by a condition that the director had to scrupulously respect. The result, five variations on the same theme, is an intelligent exercise in the art of filmmaking.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) June 26, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: 20,000 Days on Earth
(United Kingdom 2014). Directors: Ian Forsyth, Jane Pollard. Documentary. 20,000 Days on Earth is an ode to creativity, original and full of lyricism, with music by Nick Cave. The film combines drama and reality, showing the routine of a fictional day in the life of a rock star, an intimate portrayal of his artistic process. This is the debut of the innovative visual artists Ian Forsyth and Jane Pollard as directors, with an original soundtrack by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Izamal: Opening of the Visual Arts Show
This show is of the work of visual art students. Themes are Alternative Realities, plus Myths and Legends.
Location: Galeria and Jardin del Centro de Arte y Cultura
Time: 7:00 PM at the Galeria and 7:30 PM at the Jardin del Centro de Arte y Cultura
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Rear Window
(United States 1954). Director: Alfred Hitchcock. Starring James Stewart and Grace Kelly. A wheelchair bound photographer spies on his neighbours from his apartment window and becomes convinced one of them has committed murder.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: One Minute for Conductors
(Spain 2013) More than 130 young conductors participate in the Antonio Pedrotti International Conducting Competition, in the Italian city of Trento. During one week they will have to pass several auditions to convince the international jury that one of them is the most talented young conductor they are looking for. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Last Temptation of Christ
(United States 2015). Director: Martin Scorsese. Stars Willem Dafoe, Harvey Keitel and Barbara Hershey, with appearances by Nehemiah Persoff, as a rabbi and David Bowie, as Pontius Pilate. The life of Jesus Christ, his journey through life as he faces the struggles all humans do, and his final temptation on the cross. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) July 04, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Like Father Like Son
(Japan 2013) Ryota Nonomiya is a successful businessman driven by money. When he learns that his biological son was switched with another child after birth, he must make a life-changing decision and choose his true son or the boy he raised as his own. In Japanese with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: To Catch a Thief
(United States 1955). Director: Alfred Hitchcock. Starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly. When a reformed jewel thief is suspected of returning to his former occupation, he must ferret out the real thief in order to prove his innocence.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Independent Music Tour
This performance is under the direction of Jairo Couoh Pech.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: I Killed My Mother
(Canada 2009). Director: Xavier Dolan. A teenager gradually developed a visceral hatred of his mother, a passive woman who conveys feelings of guilt. Everything about her is irritating, from her vulgar behavior to her bad taste in clothes. But, as many reproaches as the boy sent her way, she continued to feign indifference. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Sky Over Berlin
(Germany 1987 ) An angel tires of overseeing human activity wishes to become human when he falls in love with a mortal. In German with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movies: 4th of July Marathon Ghibli – Eight Hours of Movies
My Neighbor Totoro
In the 50s, a Japanese family moved to the countryside. Two daughters, Satsuki and Mei, befriend Totoro, a spirit of the forest. The father is a university professor who stimulates the imagination of his daughters by telling them tales and magical stories about goblins, ghosts and protective household spirits, while the mother is ill in the hospital.
Princess Mononoke
In order to heal the wound caused by a mad boar, young Ashitaka goes in search of the deer god because only he can release the spell. Throughout his journey, he discovers how the forest animals are fighting men who are willing to destroy Nature.
Spirited Away
Chihiro is a ten year old girl who is traveling by car with her parents. After passing through a tunnel, they come to a fantastic world, where there is no place for human beings. This world is only for first and second class gods. When she discovers that her parents have been turned into pigs, Chihiro is lonely and frightened.
Howl’s Moving Castle
This is the story of Sophie, a young woman who lives with the burden of a terrible curse that gives her the appearance of an old woman. Sophie decides to seek help from the wizard Howl, who lives in a walking castle. But perhaps it is Howl who needs the help of Sophie. In Japanese with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 12:00 AM Saturday
Admission: $95 pesos

Sunday (Domingo), July 05, 2015

Yucatan Living El Mundial de la Cochinita
All the Cochinita you can eat and Horchata you can drink. Profit benefits institution VYDAS.
Location: Siglo XXI Convention Center on the road to Progreso
Time: 8:00 AM Sunday
Admission: $100 pesos per adult and $60 pesos per child

Yucatan Living Documentary about Nature
Location: Museum of Natural History, Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Emiliano Buenfil and La ChanCil Tropical
This performance is under the direction of Sandra Gayou Soto. Do try to see this one. They are wonderful!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Izamal: Classical Dance: “Atravesando Fronteras” (No Borders)
Location: Jardin del Centro de Arte y Cultura, Izamal
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: A Married Woman
France 1964). Director: Jean Luc Godard. This movie tells the story of 24 hours in the life of Charlotte (Macha Meril), a married Parisian woman who has an affair with another man (Bernard Noel). When she becomes pregnant, Charlotte will have to decide which of the two men in her life is the father of her child. Narration is by Jean-Luc Godard. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) July 06, 2015

Yucatan Living No events to report yet

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan LivingThe Roar of Freedom – Monday, July 6
“The Roar of Freedom” was written to remind you that you are on a mission here on Earth. That we’re all here to play a game in a body; a game called “live your dream”. Every player can now go through roar of freedom in Merida Yucatanthe process that The Roar of Freedom stands for, freeing our minds to live from our Hearts again. During his personal journey, immersing himself deep into the Mayan culture, Tom dug up the “3-Step Program To Free Your Mind.” At its core resides an ancient Mayan method that you, too, can easily apply to twenty-first century daily life, to break FREE and live YOUR dream! Come tonite for a brief presentation of the book and to be empowered by the “Roar of Freedom” meditation/tool, a journey into the Heart, and/or Silent transformation ritual.
Location:Flow Holistic Center/Moniques Bakery
Time: 7:00 to 9:00 PM Monday
Admission: $150 pesos or buy the book for $330 pesos and get in free! You can decide at the end of the workshop!

Yucatan Living Merida English Library Wine Tasting – Thursday, July 9
July’s Evening of Merida Magic will be held at “iiches,” which is Maya for “great friends.” This restaurant cannot help but be a winner. It is being opened by Elliot Diaz, of Tanino’s, and its chef is Luis Barocio, owner of Escuela Culinaria del Sureste in Merida. Do plan on attending this great event.
Location: iiches Restaurant (directions in your ticket)
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: MEL members: $250 pesos, non-members: $300 pesos .Tickets now on sale at the Merida English Library.

Yucatan LivingValladolid English Library Lecture – Thursday, July 9
It is a great pleasure for Valladolid English Library to invite you to the “Past to Present: Cultural Heritage and Collaborative Archaeology in the Maya Region” Presentation. The lecture will be given by Patricia McAnay, Ivan Batun Alpuche, Sarah Rowe and Maia Dedrick.
Location:The Palapa Xoco Loco at Casa Hamaca, Valladolid
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: $50 pesos donation appreciated

Yucatan Living Jehovah’s Witnesses Special Assembly – Saturday, July 18, 2015
This event is in English: The lessons of the Bible will be presented in everyday terms for everyday life. This event is open to the public and about 400 people are expected to attend, with not all of them being Jehovah’s Witnesses. This is a semi-annual event that attracts interested people from around the entire Yucatan Peninsula.
Location: Assembly Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses
Time: 9:40 AM to 3:55 PM
Admission: Entry and seating are free.
More Information: Larry Zedwick

Yucatan Living Izamal: Two Summer Courses for Kids July 20 – July 31
The first one is: Knowing Bees, Sweet Companions of the Mayab
For: Ages 9 to 12
Time: Monday – Friday: 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Admission: Free (space limited, enroll as soon as possible)

The second class is: Development of traditional musical instruments in the Mayan world
For: Ages 9 to 16
Time: Monday – Friday: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Free (space limited, enroll as soon as possible)
Location: CECIDH SEGEY (former tourist hostel, now cultural center)
More information: Call: 01 (988) 954-0346

Yucatan Living 7th Annual Habla Teacher Institute – August 1-7, 2015
Pre-Institute Workshops July 30-31, 2015 (included in overall institute cost)
The concept of this year’s institute will be storytelling as a way of developing original work across all mediums of expression. In tribute to Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude and Márquez’s memoir Living to Tell the Tale are this year’s core texts. They will also respond to photographs from Mexican photographers Graciela Iturbide and Flor Garduño. They will use these texts to demonstrate universal processes for developing literacy and language that can be applied in any setting and with any age group. For more information visit their website www.habla.org

Yucatan Living Valladolid English Library Summer Camp
July 20th to July 31st and August 3th to August 14th
They have two 2-week sessions:
July 20th to July 31st for young people from 12 to 15 years old;
August 3th to August 14th for children from 6 to 11 years old.
They would like to offer scholarships to help families in town. In the last Easter camp, they offered scholarships for police families. If anyone is interested in providing one or more scholarships, please let them know right away so they can begin to look for qualifying families!
Location: Valladolid English Library vel [dot] library [dot] 1 [at] gmail [dot] com
Time: TBA
Admission: $350 pesos per child. Family discount second child, third child.

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: Various
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar – Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Khaki Scott

There’s Big Money in Garbage

It has been obvious, for years, that humans could not continue to literally bury the planet in garbage. Burying it doesn’t work. Landfills can be overwhelmed in no time at all. The thing to do is find a use for as much of the garbage as possible by recycling it. The good news from Merida’s landfill is that, through aggressive recycling management, they are now able to recycle 50% of the 800 tons of garbage that goes to the landfill every day. The next best news is that Merida’s parks and gardens will soon benefit from the new, specially formulated, compost that Merida is manufacturing from organic garbage that is put through a digester that doesn’t use oxygen. Much of the compost will be for sale, but a bit will be held back for use in maintaining city properties and park gardens, as well as for small, backyard gardens. Reciclados del Sureste (TRS) S.A. de C.V. is the name of the recycling company that is handling the work at the recycling center and they have brought this facility to the point of being hailed as the best facility of their kind in the country. Large items, such as mattresses, tires, furniture and metals are put to the side for recycling specific to their industries. The goal here is to come as close as possible to recycling 100% of the garbage brought to landfills in Yucatan. At the beginning of the First Environmental Expo-Forum (see below), everyone sat up and began to take notice when they realized that, by not recycling as much as possible, they have been losing almost $226 million pesos per year. Needless to say, recycling is an idea whose time has come.

Merida, Yucatan: First Environmental Expo-Forum

This past week, a new expo came to Merida, and it’s all about doing business in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way. The future isn’t coming. The future is here, and it is time to incorporate all of the information we can on the subjects of sustainable development, the green economy, and the kinds of social development necessary to make it work. Sustainable energy is the first topic on everyone’s mind. Reindustrialization, with an eye to caring for the environment, comes next. It is important to note that Yucatan is not simply going off on its own environmental tangent here. Instead, much help and advice is being gained from Mexico and from such international organizations as the United Nations.

Consumer Protection (Profeco) Ready for Summer

A lot of money flows into Yucatan’s businesses every summer. Tourists and Mexican vacationers abound in restaurants, shops and entertainment venues. Local folks, both expats and Yucatecos, have fun shopping at some of the best sales of the year in a growing number of shops and malls. Profeco exists to make sure they all get what they pay for and has announced an aggressive program of inspection in all kinds of businesses, including some churches, throughout the summer months. If you ever feel that you have been the victim of false advertising, or some other type of scam, please do not hesitate to make a complaint with Profeco. Visit the English pages of Profeco here.

Yucatan’s Women Business Leaders

Elsy Ramos Palomeque, president of the Mexican Association of Women Entrepreneurs in Yucatan, has announced that Yucatan is the highest ranking Mexican state with respect to women leading businesses. A full 41.3% of all businesses in the State of Yucatan are led by women and many of them are successful entrepreneurial efforts with very modest roots. We love it that kudos are given to women for being responsible in the areas of finance and human resources, and for repaying loans at a better rate than men. From cattle ranching to running a trinket booth at a local mercado, Yucatan’s women are on their way up and, now, they have national recognition for their efforts.

Merida’s Animation Industry Entrepreneur

Young Oscar Pinzon Marrufo founded Pythagoras Animation Studios when he realized the huge future in animation and the fact that Yucatan had no resources dedicated to animation and the training of new generations of professionals in the field. With a solid education and training background, there is no reason that Yucatan cannot produce the best animators in the business on an international scale. This young man should get a prize for bravery. He actually started his business with no money, no computer, and a team that had to be paid. It took him five long months, working around the clock, just to break even, but he is on his way now and has the respect of business men and women everywhere. Look for great things to come from the animators lucky enough to be able to put Pythagoras Animation Studios in their resumes as the place they learned their craft.

Exchange Rate: $15.35 Pesos = $1.00 USD

We aren’t going to discuss the why of the exchange rate between the Mexican peso and the United States dollar. That is a bigger subject than we have space to allow. However, it has come to our attention that a significant number of our readers are new or potential expats and/or tourists. They want to know what the exchange rate means to them. Here is one example. Suppose you come to Mexico with $1,000 USD in spending money on your vacation. The first thing you will do is go out to eat, where you will discover the menu prices listed in pesos. What you think you want to order for lunch is $195 pesos. It looks good, but how much is that in dollars? Actually, that is only $12.71 USD (at today’s exchange rate of $15.4). I think you can afford that. Don’t you? But what if the exchange rate changes? What if the exchange rate goes down to $14.77 pesos per USD? Then, your lunch would actually cost you $13.21 USD. That isn’t a lot of difference, but it is something you should be aware of, especially if we ever go back to an era of big swings in exchange rates. This might not have much of an effect of eating one lunch in a restaurant, but it could make a big difference in what you can afford for rent. Take some time to play with converting pesos into and back from the currency of your country so you won’t get caught unaware when you come to Yucatan.

Dangers of Technological Devices

The National Association of Mental Health in Mexico is warning the Mexican people that addictions to technology-based communication devices (smartphones in particular) is causing symptoms that mirror schizophrenia. It is believed that this has its roots in the social isolation of the individual. Recommendations are that the addict takes a break from his or her electronic device for at least long enough to have one meal a day with real people. It seems that face-to-face relationships can make all the difference in these situations, where relationships based on contact through technology do not. In Mexico, there are 80 cell phone lines per 100 inhabitants and 41% of the population uses the internet. This might be a good time for all of us to take stock of our internet and phone habits, and make changes if necessary.

Valladolid English Library Summer Camp

July 20th to July 31st and August 3th to August 14th
They have two 2-week sessions:
July 20th to July 31st for young people from 12 to 15 years old;
August 3th to August 14th for children from 6 to 11 years old.
They would like to offer scholarships to help families in town. In the last Easter camp, they offered scholarships for police families. If anyone is interested in providing one or more scholarships, please let them know right away so they can begin to look for qualifying families!
Location: Valladolid English Library vel [dot] library [dot] 1 [at] gmail [dot] com
Admission: $350 pesos per child. Family discount second child, third child.

Warning to Exotic Bird Traffickers

It seems that elements of organized crime have found a lucrative market in the trafficking of exotic birds. Worldwide, this is a $10 billion dollar per year business. However, it is the parrot trade that comes from the southeast states of Mexico that affects Yucatan. Studies by the University of Chicago show that these parrots are sent exclusively to the United States and amount to a $40 million dollar per year profit for the traffickers. That is all that Profepa needed to hear. They know who the courier companies are and have increased monitoring of these companies. Profepa believes they can stop the trafficking of endangered birds within one year and have already begun the operations necessary to do so.

MID Scrambles for Planes

School isn’t even out yet and already the airport in Merida (MID) is having trouble finding enough planes to add flights for all of the people who want to come to, or through, Yucatan. They expect 200,000 passengers in July and August, with most of those visitors being domestic travelers. As of now, most flights are sold out and the airport is working with other carriers and airports to get planes that hold more passengers. Afternoon and night flights seem to be bigger airplanes and may be all that is available. The airport is confident that they can renew a few old relationships and contracts, and finally meet the need. If you are flying to Merida in the next two months, you need to shop for your tickets now, or check to see if they still have a seat open that’s flying into Cancun. It is an easy matter to take the bus from Cancun to Merida.

Bimbo Cuts Sugar 5% to 35%

Grupo Bimbo is not a small company. It owns plants in 22 countries in the Americas, Europe and Asia. They have over 10,000 products and 100 brands. They bill themselves as the most important baking company in the world, and they just may be. Now, they are turning their eyes toward strategies for healthier living. Bimbo is changing its recipe for sweet breads, and reducing sugar by between 5% and 35%, using stevia when necessary, to get back the necessary sweet taste. Our hats are off to anyone who can successfully mitigate the Mexican sweet tooth. To their credit, Bimbo is also in the process of developing a diet and exercise program to try and help resolve Mexico’s problem with overweight and diabetes.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting June 22 , 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) June 22, 2015

Yucatan LivingNo events to report at the moment

Tuesday (Martes) June 23, 2015

Yucatan Living Concert: Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan: The Marriage of Figaro
Tonight’s performance features Josue Ceron and Irasema Terrazas.
Location: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living Movie: The Devil’s Backbone
(Mexico, Spain, Argentina 2001). Director: Guillermo del Toro. Starring: Fernando Tielve, Federico Luppi, Marisa Paredes and Eduardo Noriega. Carlos, a 12 year old boy, is sent to an orphanage after the death of his father in the Spanish Civil War. He soon discovers that the orphanage is a place where dark and tragic secrets are hidden.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas
Time: 8:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Miss Violence
(Greece 2013). Director: Alexandros Avranas. Starring: Themis Panou, Reni Pittaki, and Eleni Roussinou. On her birthday, 11-year-old Angeliki jumps off the balcony to her death with a smile on her face. An investigation is started as to the reason for this apparent suicide, but the family keeps insisting that it was an accident. In Greek with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) June 24, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Entre Sombras
(Mexico 2014) In a final attempt to resolve their marital problems, Eric and Mari make ​​a road trip to the jungles of southeastern Mexico. Just when his luck seems to be changing, she disappears. Confused and devastated, Eric begins the journey back to the capital, encountering on his way an enigmatic character, Narciso, who becomes his traveling companion. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: A Proletarian Winter’s Dream
(Germany 2014) Three Georgians go to a palace to clean up for an art opening that they are not allowed to see. Their class consciousness pushes them to think about the workers’ struggle. They swipe food from the reception and tell stories ranging from adventures with San Francisco de Assisi to a spiritualist session in the Soviet Union. In German with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) June 25, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: 20,000 Days on Earth
(United Kingdom 2014). Directors: Ian Forsyth, Jane Pollard. Documentary. 20,000 Days on Earth is an ode to creativity, original and full of lyricism, with music by Nick Cave. The film combines drama and reality, showing the routine of a fictional day in the life of a rock star, an intimate portrayal of his artistic process. This is the debut of the innovative visual artists Ian Forsyth and Jane Pollard as directors, with an original soundtrack by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Muros
(Mexico 2014) We follow a vagabond on his trips to conflict zones in different parts of the world, where they have built walls of segregation. The tramp find stories of people that manage to transcend their mental walls as well as physical walls. They are the walls jumpers. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico
This is opening night of the Cirque de Soleil performances in Merida, which will continue into July.
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living Movie: The Amazing Catfish
(Mexico 2013). Director: Claudia Sainte-Luce. Starring Lisa Owen, Ximena Ayala, and Sonia Franco. Claudia, a lonely young woman, works in a supermarket. One night, she ends up in the hospital with a severe case of appendicitis. There, she meets Martha, the woman resting in the bed next to hers. Martha, who lives alone with her four children, gains Claudia’s trust. When she gets out of the hospital, she spontaneously offers that Claudia should go home with them. Getting to know this family makes Claudia feel at ease. And, for the first time, she experiences a sense of belonging in this peculiar little tribe. As Martha’s health weakens every day, the bond Claudia has with each member of the family grows stronger. In Spanish.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) June 26, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Mommy
(Cananda 2013). In a fictitious Canada, a law allowing parents unable to control their problem children to send them to a special center is approved. However , Diane “Die ” Despres , a widowed mother with character, decides to educate her teenage son Steve, who has ADHD and can turn be violent. Her neighbor offers his help. The relationship between the three will become increasingly closer, and questions emerge about the mystery of his life. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Circus Performance: Trapeze Artists (Argentina)
This is not the big Cirque du Soleil Mexico show that everyone has been waiting for, but this is a great way to see a really good performance. This event features Maximiliano Chiprut and Felipe Lanari.
Location: Central Patio of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Concert: Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan: The Marriage of Figaro
Tonight’s performance features Josue Ceron and Irasema Terrazas.
Location: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living Movie: Court
(India 2014) The body of a worker is found inside of a sewer in Bombay. Moreover, a popular singer is arrested and accused of conducting a provocative song, which may have prompted the worker to commit suicide. In Hindi with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: I Heart Huckabees
(United States 2004). Director: David O. Russell. Starring: Jason Schwartzman, Jude Law, and Naomi Watts. A husband-and-wife team play detective, but not in the traditional sense. Instead, the happy duo helps others solve their existential issues, the kind that keep you up at night, wondering what it all means. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) June 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Shorts by FICUNAM 2015
(Mexico 2015) FICUNAM 2014 brings us a selection of four short films: Rhoma Acans, B-boy, Odessa and El Soldado Adri . These films present different situations and paths that will take us between apparently distant worlds. From literature to sports, dancing to gypsy nomadism. In Portuguese and Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Pan’s Labyrinth
(Spain 2006). Director: Guillermo del Toro. Starring Ivana Baquero, Ariadna Gil, and Sergi Lopez. In the Spain of 1944, the bookish young stepdaughter of a sadistic army officer escapes into an eerie but captivating fantasy world. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: My American Friend
(Germany 1977 ). American dealer Tom Ripley tries to test the integrity of Jonatham Zimmermann , a humble manufacturer of frames that is terminally ill. Ripley introduces a gangster who gives him a lot of money in exchange for working for him as a murderer for hire. At first he rejects the offer, but, thinking of the precarious future awaiting his wife and son after his death, ends up accepting the deal. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), June 28, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary: Butterflies and Moths
Come and meet some of the most seductive creatures of nature. See how they transform from caterpillars to flying adults, and discover why these delicate insects have enthralled and inspired human beings from the beginning of their history.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Viva Esencia
This performance is outside and under the direction of Felissa Estrada.
Location: Merida en Domingo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 3:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan: The Marriage of Figaro
Today’s performance features Josue Ceron and Irasema Terrazas.
Location: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras, Calle 60 x 57
Time: Noon Sunday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living Movie: Pierrot Le Fou
(France 1965). Director: Jean Luc Godard. Starring: Jean-Paul Belmondo, Anna Karina, Graziela Galvani. Pierrot escapes his boring society and travels from Paris to the Mediterranean Sea with Marianne, a girl chased by hit-men from Algeria. They lead an unorthodox life, always on the run. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) June 29, 2015

Yucatan Living No events to report yet

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Jehovah’s Witnesses Special Assembly – Saturday, July 18, 2015
This event is in English: The lessons of the Bible will be presented in everyday terms for everyday life. This event is open to the public and about 400 people are expected to attend, with not all of them being Jehovah’s Witnesses. This is a semi-annual event that attracts interested people from around the entire Yucatan Peninsula.
Location: Assembly Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses
Time: 9:40 AM to 3:55 PM
Admission: Entry and seating are free.
More Information: Larry Zedwick

Yucatan Living Izamal: Two Summer Courses for Kids July 20 – July 31
The first one is: Knowing Bees, Sweet Companions of the Mayab
For: Ages 9 to 12
Time: Monday – Friday: 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Admission: Free (space limited, enroll as soon as possible)

The second class is: Development of traditional musical instruments in the Mayan world
For: Ages 9 to 16
Time: Monday – Friday: 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: Free (space limited, enroll as soon as possible)
Location: CECIDH SEGEY (former tourist hostel, now cultural center)
More information: Call: 01 (988) 954-0346

Yucatan Living 7th Annual Habla Teacher Institute August 1-7, 2015
Pre-Institute Workshops July 30-31, 2015 (included in overall institute cost)
The concept of this year’s institute will be storytelling as a way of developing original work across all mediums of expression. In tribute to Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude and Márquez’s memoir Living to Tell the Tale are this year’s core texts. They will also respond to photographs from Mexican photographers Graciela Iturbide and Flor Garduño. They will use these texts to demonstrate universal processes for developing literacy and language that can be applied in any setting and with any age group. For more information visit their website www.habla.org

Yucatan Living Valladolid English Library Summer Camp
July 20th to July 31st and August 3th to August 14th
They have two 2-week sessions:
July 20th to July 31st for young people from 12 to 15 years old;
August 3th to August 14th for children from 6 to 11 years old.
They would like to offer scholarships to help families in town. In the last Easter camp, they offered scholarships for police families. If anyone is interested in providing one or more scholarships, please let them know right away so they can begin to look for qualifying families!
Location: Valladolid English Library vel [dot] library [dot] 1 [at] gmail [dot] com
Time: TBA
Admission: $350 pesos per child. Family discount second child, third child.

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: Various
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar – Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

The afternoon before her saint’s day, Doña Raimunda and her domestic help were caught up in a frenzy. She had sent out a number of invitations, and it was necessary to make preparations that corresponded to the family’s social position, so she personally was working with the servants.

The pandemonium was most intense in the kitchen and the second patio. There, a woman had grabbed a dead turkey by the legs, its head bloody, and was shoving it into a caldron of boiling water so that the feathers would be easier to remove. And she was battling with Felipito, who was doing his best to snatch the biggest feathers from the victim’s tail, putting the servant woman in danger of burning herself, for with her free hand, she was protecting her face from the water’s hot steam. Elsewhere, the señora, with her bulk stuffed into a butaque, sweaty and with her sleeves rolled up almost to her shoulders, was chopping mint and chiles verdes which she placed in a pot of blood, blood with which had escaped the life of a fat suckling pig who, with its stiff legs and blanched body, was receiving the last of the scrubbings given by a strapping Indian youth, near whom was the sharpened knife he would soon use to gut the animal.

Whether or not they had the capers and olives, if they had gone to pick up the special bread or if the crates of beer and wine were already in the house were questions that, with others like them, could be heard amidst the comings and goings of the maids in their different errands to the kitchen or to the other rooms. The continuous alerts to this one or the other one to get busy or pay more attention to what she was doing competed with the señora’s shouts calling to order the lively Felipito, who was rummaging around everywhere and stealing pinches of the egg yolks ready for the relleno.

Finally the pit for burying the pig and converting it into an appetizing delicacy was hot. The coals of the burnt firewood were spread out with a stick, and on the stones that gave off sparks from the fire was the bed of banana leaves on which the animal would spend the night, marinated up to its eyes and open at the abdomen, still boasting in its interior the kidneys, liver, and plump blood sausage, no less smeared in spices than the body in which they had functioned when kindly covered by the intestinal membrane. After that, another layer of leaves and then the merciful earth which before the sun cochinita ready to eat in Yucatanappeared would have to be removed again to disturb the final repose of the pigpen’s pampered guest, who fortunately was insensitive to suffering the voracity with which the invited guests would surely set upon the tender and succulent meat, giving a tragic climax to the brief history of its life.

It would have been around ten in the morning when friends began to arrive. Guadalupe, who was among the first, was seated in a rocking chair alongside doña Raimunda. The latter, wearing a new dress, was being showered with cards and gifts and receiving the congratulations of those who entered. Don Hermenegildo excused himself for not having arrived earlier as he had been detained on the street greeting his distinguished friend señor don Ricardo Villaverde, who had just returned from his trip to Paris. He repeated to the señora the pompous congratulatory messages that he had rehearsed and seated himself with a beatific air to await the beer that they ordered for him.

The Ortegas were also there, Isabel and Josefa, with their mamá and their brother Perico, and Chonita and some other young people, neighbors or relatives, not to mention three lawyers and two law students, invited by señor don Felipe when he was at the courthouse.

The glasses of brandy, vermouth, and beer, according to individual tastes, circulated constantly, arousing enthusiasm and talkativeness, and to complement that, the orchestra appeared to the applause of the young people who saw its arrival as an invitation to dance.

Party in historic YucatanThe first piece began and no one dared to get up and look for a partner, although everyone secretly wanted to. The music ended with their doing nothing other than having another drink, which persuaded the boldest to approach don Felipe and say:

“Don’t you think something’s missing from this music?”
“What’s missing?” asked the licenciado.
“Well, the dancing.”
“Yes, they should dance; I agree with you. Come on, Belita, Marucha, dance. But if you don’t go looking for them,” he added addressing the men, “they aren’t going to start. Play, maestro.”

And the orchestra began again. Lupita stepped out when invited by one of the lawyers and don Hermenegildo followed her with his eyes, envying her companion.

“And you, why aren’t you dancing?”, the guest of honor asked the bachelor.
“I, señora, I’m no good at these things. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”
“Well, today everyone is good at it and everyone is going to dance, including me. So get ready because there is no excuse. And dance with Lupita,” she added leaning toward him and lowering her voice.
“And take advantage of the occasion to talk to her. Ay, don Hermenegildo, if you don’t say something to her today, don’t even come back to this house, because we will no longer be friends. Now you know what’s at stake.”
“Don’t think that, doña Munda, don’t. I’m already feeling encouraged and I think the day has come.”

And while he did indeed say he was feeling encouraged, the courage was not his own but that lent him by the drinks he had consumed. Still he didn’t decide to dance the following piece, and when it ended, the table was ready.

To the table! was the phrase that was then heard and that various voices repeated. To the table, where the golden and aromatic piglet was already in place, the substantial turkey emitting its inviting fragrance, the steaming soup and other dishes, on which most of the gazes were fixed with interest, arousing the greed of their appetites.

People seated themselves where they could, and the serving of the soup began, the attentive don Hermenegildo distinguishing himself by his courtesy. A little later the bottles of wine began to be poured into the glasses.

Words were exchanged, laughter rang out, and enthusiasm grew as the meal progressed.

“Chonita, you haven’t touched that serving that they brought you.”
“Did you see the mouth that señor Méndez opens with every bite?”
“Do you want a piece of the pork skin? It’s crisp and very good.”
“That glass, don Hermenegildo; you’ve hardly touched it.”
“The feast’s saint isn’t drinking anything. Don’t set a bad example.”
Doña Asunción is going to leave the table sick today. It’ll be a long time before the poor thing is seen in front of a turkey again.”

Drinking wine in YucatanAnd the conversation continued and the warmth of the liquor increased.

“You haven’t had any wine, Isabelita,” said the master of the house as he approached her. He picked up the glass she had in front of her, and “Come on! to Raimunda’s health. Surely you won’t say no.”

The young woman drank part of the glass.

“So little?”
“But I drank some earlier.”
“A little more. Now,” he continued softly, “do me the favor of standing up and enlivening this group by getting them to drink, don Hermenegildo above all.”
“That I’ll happily do.” And armed with the glass and a bottle, she went directly to the bachelor.
Don Hermenegildo, a glass of wine.”
Señorita, you are very kind; but you’ll permit me to drink no more than a small amount because I’ve already had enough. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”
“Half to doña Raimunda’s health and the rest to mine.”

Seeing himself condemned without forgiveness, he stood up carefully and raised the glass to his lips.

Speech!, called out almost if not everyone.

The clerk was a man of forethought, and at home he had written a toast which he then learned by heart. However, he was shaking with fear that the words wouldn’t come out right, even more so having Lupita’s brilliant eyes in front of him.

“On this joyful occasion of raising my glass . . .”
“Make it rhyme!” shouted the master of the house.
“He is rhyming it!” one of the students observed ironically.
“No, señores, in rhyme, I cannot . . .”
“But you’ve written rhymes. Improvise.”
“I was a child when I wrote them. I no longer know how to.”
“Improvise! improvise!,” doña Asunción repeated with her mouth full.
“Fine, now let me speak as I can; later, we’ll see.”
“Let him speak!”
“On this joyful occasion of raising my glass to finish off the wine that’s in it, my heart is filled with emotion upon seeing the happiness of a friend who honors me with her friendship and who is blessed with such beautiful qualities.””
“Bravo-o-o!”
“Let doña Asunción speak!”
“But don Hermenegildo hasn’t finished.”
“Then continue.”
“Therefore,” the speaker continued nervously, “seeing that you come from all over to congratulate this exemplary wife and mother and are well aware of her virtues, I simply wish that not the slightest cloud dampens the heavens of her happiness.”

Don Hermenegildo sat down blushing at the “bravos” that rang out in the dining room along with the noise of the spoons and plates dancing across the shaking table.

“He learned that part about the slightest cloud in the heavens of her happiness in some gossip column,” observed the same student to the other.

More toasts followed and meanwhile, don Hermenegildo wracked his brain preparing the promised rhyming verse. Suddenly, he ran into a snag. He thought it would be very appropriate and nice to end it with his name, and the way to do that had already occurred to him, saying for example:

“ . . . wishing every happiness,
to you, Hermenegildo López”

but in order to come up with what was missing prior to that, he needed a word that rhymed with López and this wasn’t coming to him. Golpes wasn’t consonant, nor did he want to wish that the señora would be spared a “strike” or a “blow”. Soples wouldn’t work either; dobles even less; galopes, this one, yes! This word was certainly consonant with López, aside from the difference in the final letters. Galopes. Very well, as long as he could make it work. But what in the devil did the word galopes, which could only apply to horses, have to do with doña Raimunda, especially on her saint’s day?

Fortunately for him, the young people were more eager to dance than to listen to verses. They all got up and a student offered his arm to Lupita.

Doña Raimunda, wanting to play a trick on don Hermenegildo, called Isabelita Ortega over and charged her with inviting him to dance. The wine had caused the bachelor’s blood to stir and he felt like his head was walking on air. This time his caution was abandoning him and he was witty and making jokes.

He didn’t offer any objection whatsoever, and in a good mood began to remember his best times. There he was, as ceremonious as ever, bowing to the ladies to include them in the dance.

Now he was wound up. He didn’t need any added stimulus because at the next piece he resolutely steered himself toward Lupita. She was amazed to see him so changed by the wine and even more, while they were dancing, to hear him talking incessantly and flirting with her, free of all shyness.
Drink!
His intoxication hadn’t reached the point of making him a nuisance, and it certainly drew him out of his customary gravity and restraint, making him talkative to the point of seeming rejuvenated, even more so with the artificial color that was creeping into his cheeks with the wine.

“I need an answer from you right now, Lupita. If you tell me no, it’s over. Death. So, what is it? Have you made up your mind to kill me?”
“But I need to think about it.”
“Surely you’ve had enough time. Surely you’ve known since that night doña Raimunda told you. She says she’ll be the matron of honor; that is, if you give your consent. How can you not consent? If you’re so good and so lovely.”
“Give me a week to think about it.”
“A week! I’ll die. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about. I’m desperate. How about three days, Thursday?”
“Fine, I’ll answer you on Thursday.”

Once an impression has been made, especially with the enthusiasm generated by wine, it grows easily. Don Hermenegildo, once having taken the first step, stopped at nothing. Not even his nerves, those miserable nerves, hindered him from saying to Lupita whatever occurred to him. She, who for her part, had felt the influence of what she had drunk no less than he, and upon noticing the favorable change in the clerk, was steadily finding him less ancient and more worthy of consideration. So much so that she had already decided that on Thursday, she would accept his proposal.

Don Hermenegildo felt satisfied.

When the music ended, after dancing with the young woman for the third time and still guiding her by the arm, he approached the lady of the house, who had been observing him with astonishment and delight.
Drink up!

Doña Mundita, do me the favor of asking for two glasses of wine. Lupita and I are going to drink to your health.”
“No, don Hermenegildo; thank you, but I’ve already had many.”
“There’s no way out. It’s to the health of the fiesta’s saint, and what’s more, I don’t believe that you would dare to snub me.”

The glasses arrived and Lupita, taking control of the situation herself, said:

“Doña Raimunda, you drink part of it.”
“Child, I’ve taken a drink with every person who is here.”
“Come on, mi señora,” interjected don Hermenegildo. “To the health of your husband and Felipito, and for the sake of these eyes of mine.”

The two women laughed at the bachelor’s romantic outburst. Doña Raimunda sipped half the glass and Lupita drank the rest.

Don Hermenegildo downed his own without batting an eye.

It was almost nighttime when the dance ended. The moment for farewells arrived, but the guest of honor was nowhere to be seen. She found herself in her room writhing in pain from the nausea she suffered after all the happiness they had wished upon her.

By Working Gringos

Name of Applicant: Yamel Toledo
Email Address: yameltoledo [at] gmail [dot] com
Phone Number: 9991223060
Type of Work Desired: I’m looking for a temporary job in Merida for this summer. I have experience in teaching ballet, gymnastics, English and math. I also have experience in administrative areas. I can translate. I can babysit. I am quick learner so I can adapt to any job.
Job Location Desired: Mérida, Yucatán.
Resume or Qualification Description: Experience with children and teaching in different disciplines. Experience in management jobs. I work well under pressure. I am professional and mature.

By Working Gringos

Old Mexican banknoteAfter her husband’s death, when Guadalupe looked into the state of her affairs, she was shocked to discover that only nine thousand seven hundred pesos remained in the trading house, an income of ninety seven pesos a month. With that, however, she could get by, thanks to the fact that her family was small and to that spirit of management and economy that distinguishes her sex.

It would be unfair to say that she didn’t sincerely regret her husband’s death. But time provided her with the comfort that heals the wounds of this world and she began to notice that she was not well-suited to the solitude in which she was living.

Calavera BrideAs it happened, she came to hear all that was being said about Antonia Pacheco’s engagement to Luis Robles, vividly interesting to her as she thought fondly of him at times, remembering the crazy things he used to do and say to her. With their engagement, she gave up the hope that, seeing her free again, the journalist might think about walking her to the altar, and little by little she was sadly becoming convinced that her circumstances had changed and that she no longer offered the same interest that had once caused that group of young men to gather on the corner of her house and fight for the honor of her smiles.

And that Fermín Dorantes? Since his disappearance when Pancho Vélez began to court her, she hadn’t seen him again anywhere nor had she heard anything more about him. Had he died? Had he gotten married? She didn’t succeed in learning any of this.

Perhaps later she would find a new husband, although she wasn’t rich anymore and, considering the money-minded youth of today, she would need to gild her widowhood in order to hold her own.

She hadn’t been without a suitor, it’s true. But what a suitor! Worse for the wear and with hungry eyes, he ran a shoe store not far from her house. How the times change! Such nerve! How much better don Hermenegildo was!

CantonBut, my God, to settle for don Hermenegildo was a lot to ask of her who seemed to have a right to aspire to something more. However, if she thought about it, many in her situation had settled for someone like him. Besides, he was lively and well-educated; a little old-fashioned, to be sure, but it was obvious from his appearance that he was a decent person, and everyone respected him. At any rate, it was a good idea not to disregard him in case no other should appear.

But if don Hermenegildo didn’t talk! With that timidity of his, everything attracted attention, but no real results. The most that he did was to counsel her that she shouldn’t give up on marriage, and to say that a man always gives respectability to a home. He didn’t dare to say “I say this because I want this.” If it weren’t for doña Raimunda finding him out, perhaps even she wouldn’t know his intentions.

When it comes to falling in love, you have to make yourself known. That’s all there was to it! Poor man! He’s very shy. Now, that Luis Robles . . . what a pity!

By Khaki Scott

Record Voter Turnout in Yucatan

On Sunday, June 7, 2015, Mexico went to the polls for mid-term elections. The national average for voter participation is 45%. This was an election for federal legislators, as well as for some local mayors and deputies. When the votes were counted, the State of Yucatan was proud to report a 68% voter turnout. While not all voters cast their votes in all of the elections, they did make their wishes known and took the crown of the best voter turnout in the five states of the South. Yucatan Living extends our congratulations to all of the winners in this election, and to those who campaigned in a respectful and orderly manner. We look forward to your success and to the success of our adopted state.

Sansevieria Trifasciata Tonic

Don’t recognize the name? How about Mother-in-law’s tongue? Or in Yucatan, beef tongue, the language of tiger, or the sword of St. George? Whatever you call it, this plant grows everywhere in Yucatan. It makes a great houseplant or landscape plant. While it doesn’t flower north-of-the-border, it does have flowers in Yucatan between June and October. Up to now, the big plus for this plant is that it grows and multiplies to the point of being almost indestructible in the face of heat and drought. Now, however, we are told that this plant has medicinal purposes, and that it can aid in the healing of liver and spleen swelling. The instructions are to crush the leaves with a little water to extract the juice. Then, one can take one to three teaspoons of this juice per day. We do warn you that they say this is bitter, so you might want to make a tea with about 20 grams of leaves. This should give you the two cup per day recommendation. In addition, the fiber can be used to make hammocks and the plant, when kept indoors, has the wonderful property of purifying the air. We are not physicians and do not lend our names to recommending this plant as a medication. However, the information here is from the “Catálogo de plantas medicinales de uso común en Yaxcabá, Yucatán.” More information about this and other plants is available at La Casa del Catorce (Calle 60 x 59 y 61, Centro Merida) or by e-mailing dorstenializmor [at] hotmail [dot] com.

Home Health Comes to IMSS

Any time that vulnerable populations have to go to a physician’s office or hospital and wait for health care services, they are being exposed to the chance of infections. This is especially true of the elderly, small children, and chronically ill populations. Now, IMSS is going to provide home health services to these patients. This will keep them from having to spend long wait times in doctors’ offices and hospitals, as well as preventing the long hospital stays they often need for no other reason than having their situation monitored. Home health is a cheaper, safer alternative and we know it will improve their quality of life, as well as the quality of life for their families. Good idea, IMSS!

Canton Palace: History Continues

As residents of Yucatan, we all get used to new historical finds that are thousands of years old. It isn’t often that we hear of anything from the 20th century referred to as historically significant. But here it is: authentic 20th century graffiti drawn by children on the walls of Canton Palace. These drawings have all been traced to the 1940’s and were uncovered during the recent renovation of the building. Canton Palace, in historical terms, is a “new” building, only finished in the first decade of the 20th century and continuously inhabited since then. However, this graffiti is now part of its history and the drawings will be preserved. Who knew that Wonder Woman would live on this way, in the magical land of the Maya?

The Amazing Value of Educational Tourism

The global reputation of excellence at Yucatan’s colleges and universities continues to climb and so does the economic benefit of educational tourism to the State of Yucatan. When we stop and think about this, it makes perfect sense. There are approximately 5,000 foreign students attending undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Yucatan. They come from other states and from around the world. In addition to their educational expenses, they pay for their transportation, food, clothing, housing, and entertainment. Each has a family back at home, and their families come to visit them at school. These 5,000 students and their visiting friends and families now account for up to 15% of all tourism in Yucatan, and educational tourism is currently bringing in an estimated $500 million pesos per year into the economy of the state. And the number of foreign students just keeps on growing. While we certainly appreciate the economic value of educational tourism, we want our foreign students to know that they are deeply appreciated for their value as part of the cultural fabric of our cities and universities. Their success is contributing, in a significant way, to the global reputation of this state.

A New Trend in Real Estate: Foreign Students’ Families

The parents of college students, around the world, are all too aware of the cost of visiting their offspring. Not only are the parents responsible for the educational expenses of their college students, but now they find themselves faced with travel expenses for themselves as well. They want to visit and maybe do a little shopping, so they begin by pricing a hotel. Sticker shock soon shows them the that, over a period of time, the cost of visiting their college age child is excessive, and more so if they have more than one child in college. It is usually at this point that parents realize, if there are employment opportunities in the vicinity of the university, their child is likely to stay on in the university’s city after graduation. These reasons taken together make it cheaper and easier, in the long run, to either lease or buy a house in Merida – and that is exactly what these families are doing. After a study from Infonavit found that families of students from the interior of Yucatan are just as likely to lease or purchase a home in Merida as are the families of students from other states and countries, the universities sat up and took notice. Now, the boom is in full swing and has been growing for at least two years, with more than one campus offering residential spaces for lease or for sale. It looks as if college students and their families are of more value to Yucatan than anyone would ever have thought.

Profepa Shuts Down Illegal Timber

This past week, Profepa shut down nine facilities that process or store illegal lumber in southeast Mexico. It is interesting to note that only one was in the State of Yucatan, and it was a storage facility found out in Ria Lagartos Biosphere Reserve. Yucatan takes the life of every tree seriously, so it would not be a very smart move for lumber criminals to attempt illegal logging activities in this state. That having been said, it is important to know that fire prevention and control is one of the major reasons this kind of logging is, and will continue to be, illegal. Beyond the benefit of environmental impact ( i.e. helping to lower temperatures, forests provide homes and food for wildlife), these trees also help to control forest fires. Nothing burns faster, or causes more of a threat to life, than huge fields of burning, dry scrub. If there are clear-cut fields that have appeared since fire brigades received their last update, then this is the equivalent of an incendiary bomb that has been hidden in plain sight. Many thanks to Profepa, as well as to the Navy, to federal, state and local law enforcement, and to SEMARNAT, for their efforts and contributions to fire fighting and the protection of our people, wildlife, and trees in the State of Yucatan.

Gastronomy Students Heading Home from France

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After two and a half weeks of study at the Lyceé Professionnel Olivier Guichard Guérande de Francia, students working toward a culinary arts degree at UTM in Merida are heading home. While img src=”http://www.yucatanliving.com/article-photos/france.jpg” alt=”" title=”Yucatecan Students in France” width=”300″ height=”224″ class=”img-right” /> they were in France, Yucatan’s students shared the food of Yucatan with their hosts. These exchange projects, both in France and in Yucatan, are important because the cultural, culinary and linguistic experiences provide life-long transformational experiences for students in both nations. The world is a new place and these young exchange students will have their place in the construction of its future.

Relevance of School to Actual Work

How many times has a staff uttered a collective groan when they first hear that their employer has hired a brand new college graduate? It would be nice if reality could be put into a textbook, but the differences in workplace scenarios are such that this is often impossible, leaving the new graduate as the least popular member of any team they join. Nowhere is this more important than in situations where lives and the health of patients are at risk. To meet this need, the Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad de la Península de Yucatán (Hraepy) and Universidad Modelo have signed an agreement in which students in all related medical curricula will be introduced to the realities in the world of work at the hospital. This will enable students to make a smooth transition with maximum safety of the patients. This is certainly a win-win situation for students, patients, and the staff members in hospitals wherever these new graduates choose to begin their careers.

Yucatan: Second Least Corrupt State

This week, Yucatan was named as the second least corrupt state in Mexico – right behind Aguascalientes. We are going to give our adopted home a few extra points that we think are relevant. First, Aguascalientes is about as big as a minute (2,112 sq. mi.) versus Yucatan’s 15,260 sq. mile area. Second, Aguascalientes has 11 municipalities to work with, while Yucatan has 106 municipalities. The population of the entire state of Yucatan exceeds that of Aguascalientes by only about 800,000 people, but they are spread out over a much larger area. These differences alone could significantly impact the ability of the much more localized population of Aguascalientes to monitor corruption. These observations do not even take into account the many different ethnic groups in Yucatan, or factor in attitudes of any sort. However, we will vote for Yucatan in any race that anyone wants to choose. Congratulations to Yucatan on being named the Second Least Corrupt State in Mexico – even if we know you are (really) first!

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting June 15 , 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) June 15, 2015

Yucatan Living Photography Workshop: Module III: Criticism and Curation
This workshop starts today and goes until June 19. Teacher: Mauricio Alejo. For more Information and registration, call: 999-335-7916 or e-mail: toloc [dot] colectivo [at] gmail [dot] com. Facebook: Tolocolectivo

Tuesday (Martes) June 16, 2015

Yucatan Living Concert: Fifth Tempo, Contemporary Trova
This performance is under the direction of Alberto Avila. The one characteristic that keeps trova relevant is that it preserves the past, while not being fearful of innovation.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Four Guitars in the 20th and 21st Centuries.
This is a performance by Tempo 1: Arturo Hernandez, Martha Nava, Yohualli Rosas and Francisco Porras.
Location: Sala de Arte in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: I Play for You, Tango!
This is a performance by Silvia Kater and the Pablo Ahmad Trio
Location: Teatro Daniel Ayala, Calle 60 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Palomo Jazz Trio “Interplay”
This event is under the direction of Alberto Palomo.
Location: Casa de la Cultura del Mayab, Calle 63 x 64
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Storytelling
(United States 2001). Director: Todd Solondz. The director of “Happiness” continues, without a hint of piety, in the acid-satirical genre, with its ironic and perverse style, to put back into question the values of family and American society. This time, it focuses on the kinds of institutional literature that causes problems for teachers on the topics of color, cerebral palsy and the sadomasochisms of an amateur Lolita.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Jazz in the World
This performance is under the direction of Alberto Palomo and features the MAP Trio and Gina Osorno.
Location: Casa de la Cultura del Mayab, Calle 63 x 64
Time: 9:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) June 17, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: The Scarlet Letter
(Germany 1973). In the town of Salem in the seventeenth century, in an atmosphere of exacerbated Puritanism, a woman has an adulterous relationship and becomes pregnant. The community tries to force her to reveal the father’s identity and refusing, she is forced to wear an accusatory badge. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world.
18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance. Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2
“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”

Yucatan Living Interpreting Contemporary Yucateco Composers
This is a performance by Juan Palacios, Raul Alvarado, Frank, Edelmiro, Marisela Vargas, Rodrigo Ruiz, Gaspar Palacios and Leslie Juarez.
Location: Centro Cultural La Iberica, Calle 74 x 45
Time: 7:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Victor Celis Composer
Location: Sala de Art in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Voice with Guitar
This is a performance by the very talented soprano, Mia Monforte. Every performance is special.
Location: Universal Council Hall of UADY, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Tom Kubin’s Soul Train
Get on board… Don’t miss the chance when you have it!
Location: Casa de la Cultura del Mayab, calle 64 x 63
Time: 8:30 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Mexico and the Songs of the 60’s
This is a performance by the well known Voices Without Frontiers Choir (Coro Voces sin Fronteras), under the direction of Carlos Tello.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells of the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) June 18, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family suffered a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of Ida’s roots, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Traditional Yucateca Trova Tribute to Composer Armando Rodriguez
Tonight’s performance is by Armando Rodriguez and Invited Guests.
Location: Centro Cultural Iberica, Calle 27 #526 at Calle 74
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Beauty and the Beast
(France 1946). Director: Jean Cocteau. Starring: Jean Marais, Josette Da, Marcel Andre, Mila Parely, Nane Germon and Michel Auclair. A beautiful young woman takes her father’s place as the prisoner of a mysterious beast who wishes to marry her.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Celebrating 100 Years
Pastor Cervera, Jose “Pepe” Dominguez and Jose Antonio “Monis” Zorrilla’s “Gustavo River” String Quartet. The director for tonight is Russell Montanez.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 in Santa Ana (across from the park)
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Latin American Songs
This will be an excellent performance by Rossana Chin, Soprano, and Zuleika Diaz, Piano.
Location: Manuel Cepeda Peraza Central State Public Library, Calle 55 x 62
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Soloist
This screening is a fundraiser for the benefit of Casa del Buen Samaritano, A.C., Merida’s first homeless shelter. The shelter will be located next to Cottolengo, at km 23.5 of the Periferico.
Location: Cinemas of Siglo XXI. No information is given on the version of this movie.
Time: 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $50 pesos
More Information and Pre-sale Tickets: Maria Cristina Lopez (999) 189-1498 or Maria Gabriela Mijangos (999) 178-2209.

Yucatan Living ReLe Art Installation # 14
This installation features the work of Special Guests of the Master’s in Teaching and Production of Visual Arts, ESAY Merida-CFPAV La Arrocera Campeche.
Location: ReLe: Calle 65 #349-B entre 38 y 40, Centro Merida
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living VEL Thursday Night Lecture: LOTERIA
This is an evening of fun and games. Play LOTERIA, a traditional Mexican game with awesome prizes. Please do come out and play. We look forward to seeing you win!
Location: Casa Hamaca’s Xoco Loco, Valladolid
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: $50 pesos per person donation to VEL buys your first card. Additional cards: $25 pesos each. You can also purchase both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and snacks from Casa Hamaca’s Xoco Loco.

Yucatan Living Musical Evening: Ensemble of Clarinets
Cesar Reyes is the artistic director for this performance.
Location: Museum of the City of Merida, Calle 65 x 56
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living (Musical): The Devil and Daniel Johnston)
(United States 2005). Director: Jeff Feuerzeig. Starring: Daniel Johnston, Mabel Johnston, Bill Johnston. Daniel Johnston, manic-depressive genius and singer/songwriter/artist is revealed in this portrait of madness, creativity and love. Probably in English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 59 y 61
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Tribute to Michael Buble
After a short visit back home in Texas, James Meador should be in rare form tonight as he and the Taboo Jazz Orquesta pay tribute to Michael Buble.
Location: Teatro Daniel Ayala, Calle 60 x 59, Merida centro
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz Bolero
This performance is by Osmani Collado and Invited Guests.
Location: Casa de la Cultura del Mayab, Merida Centro
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Jauja
(Various 2014) A father and daughter journey from Denmark to an unknown desert that exists in a realm beyond the confines of civilization. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: After Hours
(United States 1985). Director: Martin Scorsese. At the end of their working day, a lone employee of a computer company (Griffin Dunne ) becomes involved in a series of strange circumstances in one of the worst neighborhoods in New York. There, he will live a long and wild night. English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) June 19, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Mika, My War of Spain
(Argentina 2013). Director: Fito Pochat. Starring: Cristina Banegas and Arnold Etchebehere. Hippolytus and Mika were the uncles of directors living in Argentina when they went off to fight in the Spanish Civil War. Hipolito was killed within a month after the beginning of the war and Mika became captain of the Republican forces. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Special Event: The Golden Epoch of the Composers del Mayab
If you have not heard the Rondalla Yucatan, this is the performance for you!
Location: Centro Cultural Iberica
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Yucatan’s Musical Magazine
It’s been a long time since we’ve seen this group of folks together. This is going to be a wonderful concert. It is in honor of the Alfredo Cortes Aguilar Folkloric State Ballet. Headliners include: Maricarmen Perez, Tony Espinosa, Dueto Bingo Show, Maru Boeta, Trio Trovanova, Mario III and Copania, the Luis Perez Sabido Youth Orchestra of the Mayab, and the Alfredo Cortes Aguilar Folkloric State Ballet. That is a lineup that you won’t find anywhere else in the world!
Location: Teatro Daniel Ayala, Merida centro
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Musike Quartet (Cuarteto Musike)
This quartet’s members are Mahonri Aban, Cristopher Canche, Juan Mendez and Francisco Granados.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 in Santa Ana, across from the park
Time: 7:30 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Visconti Trilogy #2: Death in Venice
(France 1971). Director: Luchino Visconti. Starring Dirk Bogarde, Bjorn Andresen, Silvana Mangano, Marisa Berenson, Mark Burns, and Romolo Valli. In this adaptation of the Thomas Mann novel, avant-garde composer Gustave Aschenbach (loosely based on Gustav Mahler) develops a troubling obsession with a beautiful adolescent boy while on vacation with his family. Tragedy and corruption enter in with the onset of a deadly pestilence. A real classic.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Circus Performance: Trapeze Artists (Argentina)
This is not the big Cirque du Soleil Mexico show that everyone has been waiting for, but this is a great way to see a really good performance. This event features Maximiliano Chiprut and Felipe Lanari.
Location: Central Patio of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living ReLe Art Installation # 15
This installation is by artist Luciano Sanchez Tual.
Location: Galeria ESAY: Calle 55 # 435 entre 48 y 46, Centro Merida
Time: 7:30 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: G & M “An Elegant Duet”
This is a performance by Gaby Ruz and Maydel Garcia, two very elegant ladies.
Location: Remate Paseo de Montejo x 47, Merida
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Musical Evening: Ensemble of Clarinets
Cesar Reyes is the artistic director for this performance.
Location: Centro Cultural Casa BANAMEX, Calle 63 x 60
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan: The Marriage of Figaro
Tonight’s performance features Josue Ceron and Irasema Terrazas.
Location: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living VALLADOLID: Popular Music: Dance With Me
This is a performance by Marisela Vargas.
Location: Valladolid
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Music: Night of Latin American Music
The performer tonight is Rodrigo Argaez.
Location: Sala de Arte in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Inheriting the Diva, Retro Concert
This is going to be a great little concert. April Gongora is just a pleasure to watch on stage. This performance also includes Milethza and Juan Ramon Gongora. Musical direction is by Lazaro Gonzalez.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Shorts Mexico
(Mexico 2014) A wide range of shorts produced in Mexico. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Orphanage
(Spain). Director: Juan Antonio Bayona. Laura moves her family to an old orphanage where she grew up, for the purpose of opening an orphanage for disabled children. Soon, her child’s imagination is consumed by fantasy and she suspects a negative spirit is threatening her family. In Spanish.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) June 20, 2015

Yucatan LivingMovie: Maria’s Clouds
(Germany 2014) During her visit to Sils Maria in Switzerland, Maria Ender, a veteran actor looks back to examine her life. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2
“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance, Saturday
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance,, Saturday

Yucatan Living Movie: Ludwig
(Italy 1972). Director: Luchino Visconti. Starring Helmut Berger, Romy Schneider, Trevor Howard and Silvana Mangano. Historical evocation of Ludwig, King of Bavaria, from his crowning in 1864 until his death in 1886, as a romantic hero.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Quinteto Acierto (Success Quintet)
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Traditional Yucateca Trova: Troveando with Trovanova
Tonight’s performances are the final shows of Yucatan’s Spring Cultural Festival, so each one is special.
Location: Centro Cultural Iberica, Calle 74 x 45
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Always Piazzola
This is a performance by the Vivace String Quartet. The members of this quartet are: Sergio De la Vega, Cristian Franco, Edgar Sulu, and Adrian Carrillo.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 at Parque Santa Ana
Time: 7:30 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Music Fest 2015
Music festival in Yucatan with the collaboration of the French Alliance. Check list of performances here .
Location: Different locations in Merida
Time: June 20 and 21, various times
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living CELESTUN: Popular Music: Memories
This is a performance by Francisco Ivan. Come early and walk on the beach at sundown.
Location: Celestun
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Urban Musical Expressions: Ceiba Flava
This is Ceiba Flava’s 15 year anniversary concert. These are the ones you really want to see. When young groups survive to have these kinds of events, you know they are special.
Location: Parque de Las Americas, Calle 21 at Avenida Colon, García Ginéres
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Songs of Soul
This is going to be a great performance by Alicia Cascante, Soprano.
Location: Teatro Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie (Musical): Don’t Look Back
(United States 1967). Director: D.A. Pennebaker. Starring: Bob Dylan, Albert Grossman, and Bob Neuwirth. This is a documentary covering Bob Dylan’s 1965 tour of England. It includes appearances by Joan Baez and Donovan. In English.
Location: Sala de Arte in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Viva Esencia
This performance is outside and under the direction of Felissa Estrada.
Location: At the Remate of Paseo de Montejo
Time: 8:45 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Hellboy
(Spain 2004). Director: Guillermo Del Toro. At the end of World War II, Nazi magicians conjure up Hellboy, a demon who grows up among the allies to become an agent for paranormal research and defense. In Spanish.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: 20,000 Days on Earth
(United Kingdom 2014). Directors: Ian Forsyth, Jane Pollard. Documentary. 20,000 Days on Earth is an ode to creativity, original and full of lyricism, played by musician Nick Cave, a cultural icon. The film combines drama and reality, showing the routine of a fictional day in the life of a rock star, an intimate portrayal of his artistic process. This is the debut of the innovative visual artists Ian Forsyth and Jane Pollard as directors, with an original soundtrack by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), June 21, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary: The Arctic and Antarctic
Explore the lives and legends of the beautiful polar kingdoms.
Location: Museum of Natural History
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Viva Esencia
This performance is outside and under the direction of Felissa Estrada.
Location: Merida en Domingo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 3:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Symphony Orchestra of Yucatan: The Marriage of Figaro
Today’s performance features Josue Ceron and Irasema Terrazas.
Location: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras, Calle 60 x 57
Time: Noon Sunday
Admission: Tickets available at the box office

Yucatan Living Movies: Alphaville
(France 1965). Director: Jean Luc Godard. Alphaville is a futuristic city on another planet. Journalist Ivan Johnson is there on the trail of Professor Von Braun, who has created a machine that takes over the minds of the people of the city. Both Dick Tracy and Flash Gordon have died in the attempt to capture Von Braun. Now to see if Ivan Johnson can do the job. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) June 22, 2015

Yucatan Living No events to report yet

 

Marriage of Figaro in Merida Yucatan

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living The Marriage of Figaro
Another fabulous opera performance coming up by the Yucatan Symphony Orchestra!
Location: Teatro Peon Contreras, Calle 60 x 59
Dates: June 19, 21, 23, 25 and 27
Tickets: Tickets on sale at the box office

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: Various
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living 7th Annual Habla Teacher Institute – August 1-7, 2015
Pre-Institute Workshops July 30-31, 2015 (included in overall institute cost)
The concept of this year’s institute will be storytelling as a way of developing original work across all mediums of expression. In tribute to Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude and Márquez’s memoir Living to Tell the Tale are this year’s core texts. They will also respond to photographs from Mexican photographers Graciela Iturbide and Flor Garduño. They will use these texts to demonstrate universal processes for developing literacy and language that can be applied in any setting and with any age group.
For more information visit their website

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar – Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

When we moved to Merida, some of our first close friends here were members of a growing number of expats who identified themselves as part of the LGBT community. The Maya culture has always apparently seen gender as more of a spectrum than a black-and-white affair, and as far as we could tell, the local Yucatecan culture did not seem to particularly notice or care if an expat was gay or straight. There seemed to be a few transgender Yucatecans in the neighborhood of Ermita, according to one of our friends, and they were totally accepted by their families and by the community.

Since that day, the gay community seems to have slowly, and then increasingly, discovered that there is a certain freedom living in Merida and being gay… not to mention all these great houses and renovation opportunities. As the news has spread, the community has grown.

In this article, we are going to take a look at the history of the gay community here in Yucatan. And then ask some of our friends and acquaintances to give us their first hand experiences of being gay in Merida.

The History of LGBT in Mexico and Yucatan

Pete Sigal, an associate professor of history at Cal State LA, wrote a paper called “Gender, Male Homosexuality and Power in Colonial Yucatan” (linked at the end of this article). From this paper, we basically learned that male and female homosexuality was deemed a sin by the Spanish conquerors, and that accusations of or rituals involving homosexual acts Xochipilli Lombards_Museum_163were used as shows of power over the conquered. Despite the conquerors mentality, the Maya culture is known for being accepting of sexual diversity, as noted in this Wikipedia article about the LGBT community in Mexico. There is even a Maya god, pictured to the right, named Xochipilli, who was called the Flower Prince, and is the Maya patron saint of homosexuals and male prostitutes… despite the fact that he was married to a human female named Mayahuel.

From Wikipedia, you can also get a broader picture of homosexuality in all of Mexico. And it is there that we found information about a formative event in the history of the LGBT community and Yucatan, the Dance of the 41 Maricones.

In 1901, despite the fact that sexual acts between consenting adults were officially legal now (thanks to the Napoleonic Code and the banishment of the Spaniards), other more general laws were used to arrest 42 men, half of them dressed as women, who were attending a ball in Mexico City. The scandal was well reported, and documented by a series of prints by Jose Posada that were widely circulated (see banner at the top of the page). But if 42 people were arrested, why is it called The Dance of the 41 Maricones? We wondered that too! It turns out that the 42nd person arrested was the nephew of the sitting president of Mexico, Porfirio Diaz. That nephew, despite his involvement, was allowed to go free apparently, and only 41 arrests showed up on the books. As part of their punishment, after being made to sweep the streets of D.F. dressed as women, the arrested men were sent to Yucatan, where the Caste War was still going on. Well, apparently only half of the 41 men made it to Yucatan, that godforsaken place that we call home. It may be that this is the modern beginning of Merida and the Yucatan as a haven for the gay community.

Wikipedia notes that less than a year later, there was also a raid on a lesbian bar. But soon thereafter, events leading up to the Revolución hijacked the national attention and these scandals fell by the wayside.

In the 1930′s, when Mexico City was growing in international popularity, there were gay bars and baths in various sections of the city. Even during this time of incredible growth and open-mindedness… “Those involved in homosexual activity continued to live with their families. There were no homophile publications or organizations, so homosexual activity was practiced clandestinely or privately.” During World War II, there were about 15 or so gay bars in Mexico City, two of which allowed dancing. But after a grisly murder in 1959, the mayor of Mexico City closed down every gay bar in town.

Same Sex Marriage Progress

As a predominantly Catholic country, Mexico’s acceptance of the gay community has been slow in coming, but it seems to be gaining traction in the last few years. In today’s Mexico City, same-sex marriage is not only legal (it was legalized officially in 2009), but a marriage in D.F. must, by law, be recognized in all 31 Mexican states. In Yucatan, same sex marriages were explicitly deemed illegal in 2009, but this law has been continually challenged since then. In 2013, a male same-sex couple requested permission to marry in Yucatan, and eventually it was found that they did have the right to marry. In 2014, the first lesbian marriage took place in Yucatan. Despite a few same-sex marriages happening in civil courts, this issue is still an ongoing battle in the state of Yucatan. Similarly, in Quintana Roo, some officials began conducting same-sex marriages in 2011. A lesbian couple tried to wed in Tulum in 2013, and after being denied, then having the denial retracted, the couple was wed in August 2014. A bill to legalize same-sex marriage explicitly is apparently due to be voted on in Quintana Roo this year. In Campeche, a lesbian couple applied for a marriage license in 2014, and after various legal machinations, were married in August of that year. Recently, the PRD announced that there are various same-sex marriages pending in Campeche and the laws are being reviewed.

A study conducted by Vanderbilt University in 2010 reported that 37.8% of Mexicans support same-sex marriage. A different poll conducted in July 2013 found a significant increase in support for same-sex marriage, with 52% of Mexicans in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage. We even heard from a Yucateco friend who lives in an ex-hacienda that in last week’s elections, his small village elected an openly gay man to be their next mayor. Our friend gave us the impression that this man’s gay status gave him an advantage in the election.

So, today things are changing rapidly. Mexico itself is dealing with the gay agenda. Today expatriates from around the world are settling in Merida, and throughout the Yucatan Peninsula. A certain percentage of that expat community self-identifies as members of the LGBT community, so we asked some of the ones who have lived here for awhile to tell us their impressions of being gay in the Yucatan.

The following are their replies:

Mitch Keenan, of Mexico International Real Estate, 20 years in Yucatan:

I’ve been so “out of the loop” with gay life in Merida that I honestly don’t know what’s happening. I haven’t been to a gay bar, parade or political event in years. It’s not that I wouldn’t like to go or be more involved, but my work is more than a full time job and living in the jungle effectively distances me from a lot of what goes on in Merida and with the gay community.

I went to a party the other night that was kinda “gay”. There were a lot of gay men there. But, now that I think about it, there were quite a few straights as well.

Honestly, one of the aspects I most enjoy about the Merida expat community is that it is nothing special to be gay. It just seems like the norm. Or maybe not the norm but it’s just a non-issue.

One of the things I hated about the gay community in the USA, is that it was so GAY! In your face GAY. Way over the top gay. The press had a field day with the gay parades… all the fairies, effeminate men dressed like women and butch women dressed and acting like men. Honestly, it depressed and disappointed me.

I worked as one of the co-chair persons for an organization called “NO on 2″ in Denver. We formed after the voters of Colorado passed a ballot initiative that was basically prejudicial to GLBT persons (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romer_v._Evans). The purpose of our organization was to raise funds and public awareness so that we could overturn the bill. We were successful, but it was a very public battle and we received a lot of hate mail, death threats, bomb threats, etc. As co-chair, I especially received a lot of attention.

I didn’t mind so much the negative, mean and evil commentary coming at me from the Christian Right, but I also got a lot of flak from the “gay” community in Denver and Colorado. I was expected to march in the gay pride parade in Denver. I refused to do so because I believed the parade did more harm than good to “gays” in the general public’s view and did not induce sympathy towards the LGBT plight. I ended up with as many battles with the people I was fighting to protect as the people who we were fighting against.

Anyway, we won the battle in Colorado. Unfortunately, the entire thing left me with a bad taste for gay politics and many aspects of the gay community, which to this day I find discomforting.

In the beginning, back in the 90′s, I chose Merida because not only was it gay-friendly, but my partner and I were able to conduct our business as a gay couple and it wasn’t an issue with most Meridanos. At least not to our faces and, I don’t believe, behind our backs either.

I like being able to be myself in Merida and it is a non-issue. It’s like being normal or something like that… :)

Canadian Male, 69 years old, 11 years in Yucatan :

Living in Canada for fifty-eight years, I had never heard of Merida, although I had been in Mexico on three previous trips to Cancun and Puerta Vallarta. Being married for thirty-two of those years, I had never had occasion to explore the presence of a gay community or even a chat line. Coming out and ending my marriage, I met another Canadian who had been teaching in the Yucatan. He suggested I accompany him on a trip to Merida in 2004. While briefly living here, he had become aware of a gay community and had had a brief relationship with a younger Mexican architect. Online from Canada, we met another gay couple from the US who befriended us when we finally arrived here in November 2004. Through them, we were introduced to other gay men, both foreign and Mexican.

Living at the beach, we found ourselves amongst other foreigners, who for the most part accepted us as a gay couple. The majority of them were heterosexual couples. There were opportunities for meeting gay Mexicans online, some of whom we met those first few years here. Most were closeted. Amongst them were doctors, lawyers, architects, teachers, musicians, artists, etc. We also became aware of a large number of younger, closeted Yucatecan gays. Very few were openly gay.

In Canada we had both been in long term heterosexual relationships. There was no real gay community outside Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. I had been from a blue collar town. Encounters with other gay men were casual. Most of the men on the chat lines, such as Gay.Com, were older. Younger men were less disposed to ‘out’ themselves publicly on such sites in the late 90’s.

Xochipilli_1In Merida, we have seen considerable numbers of middle-aged gay foreigners who have entered into relationships with younger gay men, most of whom are closeted to their families. Younger gay Yucatecans appear to be oblivious to the foreigners’ ages. Of course, there are some to whom the moneyed foreigners are an attraction for obvious reasons. The majority of gay Yucatecans online are between the ages of 18 and 35. There are fewer above the ages of fifty.

Yucatecans appear to have no real concerns with gay foreigners unless they become involved with their own sons. We have experienced no significant discrimination here in over ten years and we have traveled through twenty-seven states! Perhaps it helps that we are more mature gay men and are not really involved in the gay community, nor do we frequent gay bars or participate in Gay Pride events.

The numbers of gay expats have increased over the years since we moved here, as have the numbers of young, gay Yucatecan men. Gay foreigners are investing heavily in Merida’s centro, remodeling homes and starting up businesses. There still seems to be no strong gay community. Gay expats integrate fairly easily into the culture and society.

Gay rights are slowly evolving since the first gay marriage here, although in other parts of Mexico the laws are changing more quickly. As a gay couple we have IMSS, the national health insurance. Immigration accepts us as a couple, although we were not allowed to name each other as our spouses, even though we are legally married in Canada. We are openly gay whenever we require health-related treatments at Star Medica or Clinica Merida. Our doctors are aware that we are a gay couple. We own no property here, so we can’t speak to that.

Yucatecans are generally warm and loving people in public. PDA (public displays of affection) are acceptable between men and women, men and men, women and women, but only to a certain degree. As gay men, we rarely hold hands in public or kiss even briefly, nor do we dress flamboyantly. That perhaps is a small reason why we experience no discrimination.

We cannot speak of the Lesbian community, although we have a very small number of expat Lesbian friends who are coupled. Likewise our knowledge of the transgender community is nil at this time.

American Male, 86 years old, 30 years in Merida:

I first heard of Mérida from a gay friend in about 1965 when I was living in Key West. He mentioned gatherings of young men in a place called Merida. I heard nothing more about Mérida until cheap flights from Miami were offered. A few years later, the chairman of the company where I worked wanted to go to Merida. As an employee, I thought it was a good chance to schmooze with the chairman, who was also gay. When we got to Merida, we met a young gay man who worked for Americans in Merida. He and a student had a small apartment near Santiago. It seemed to be a meeting place for their group of young educated gay men.

I ended up renting their maid’s quarters for a writing studio and came to Merida from time to time for two week stints to write. After I resigned from my job, I came to Merida more frequently. Mainly I kept to myself, but when I wanted company, the two young men from whom I rented the room graciously included me. As far as I know, at the time there was only one rather sleazy gay bar down near the market. I went only once. The Kabuki and other discos had not yet arrived. Friends mostly gathered in the Main Square. The atmosphere seemed quite open and accepting. There were also streets near centro where prostitutes sold themselves. I had been told that Calle 60 and 62 were for men of particular interests, one street was for passive men and the other for active. I assume that this was the sixties or seventies, although it may have been going on when I was here earlier and I just didn’t notice. We bought our house on a whim in about 1985. It was the spacious garden that attracted us most. We had no idea that we were around the corner from a number of other US citizens, in the center of what became known as Gringo Gulch.

How have things changed since then? It is difficult to separate the dramatic change in the entire community from my impressions regarding the gay community. I rode a bike back then. Overall, there were fewer cars and they were mostly rattletraps. A party was a bottle of brandy, a bottle of rum and tostados. I am pretty sure meeting people in public places is more dangerous today, as it wasn’t then. My Yucateco friends tell me that the bad guys are from outside, not from Yucatan. I am sure the internet has had a powerful influence. I did not know of openly gay guesthouses when I first started coming here. The openly gay guesthouses that advertise on the internet have brought men looking for “boys”. Several discos opened, but I don’t know what is happening with discos now. Younger gay men seeking to make a living, primarily in real estate, have moved to Merida. They have encouraged a gay clientele. As I saw in Key West, gay men have had a significant influence in rejuvenating real estate in Merida’s centro and also at the beach.

An older women friend who lived on Calle 53 near where the English Library was founded said to me that she had never known a gay person before she came to Mérida. She may not have been inclined to hang out with gays before coming here, but she said she would have been hard put to find a Bridge partner if she hadn’t been gay-accepting. Before the Merida English Library was created, there was a book shelf where we could exchange books in English on an honor system, and there were monthly gatherings at the offices of the American Consulate. During that time, I was at a restaurant and, thinking I recognized a white haired couple at the next table, I went over and said hello. The minute I said that, I saw that clearly I had made a mistake. I backpedaled, by saying perhaps we had seen each other at the American Consulate’s First Friday parties. The husband retorted that they had gone only once and found that there were only a bunch of drunks and queers. Oops!

How do I compare Mérida with Key West? In many ways they seem similar. I believe the indigenous population is amenable to the eccentricities of the expatriate. I think that the “newcomers” are having a dramatic impact on the central part of the city, as they did in the restoration of the historic district of Key West, and as they did in the part of Brooklyn when my partner and I lived before moving to Key West. The Latin, as compared with the Protestant culture, is much more malleable. It is my impression that older men are found more attractive in the Yucatan than they are in the United States. There seems to be in general a greater respect for abuelos (grandfathers).

How do Mexican men vs Maya men treat gay men? I suspect Maya men are less threatened and more accepting of gay experiences than other Mexican men. There are many openly gay and transsexual men in places such as Tixcocob and Motul. A gay school teacher with a Maya family name assured me that the Maya of Yucatan are much more accepting of gays that in other parts of Mexico.

Are gay women treated differently? I don’t know. The lesbian women I know seem quite comfortable here, but I don’t know the lesbian community. My Meridano informant tells me, however, that there is a lesbian community. Transgender? Again, I don’t know. I am told that there are gatherings of transgender/cross dresser folks, but I have no personal experience.

We didn’t move here to get away from discrimination, but we feel as comfortable here as we did in New York or Key West. If we still lived in a small town in the USA, as we once did, the answer would be different.

Is there a distinct gay community? I’m not sure. The gay folks I know, Méridano or expatriate, are part of an open and accepting community, not an exclusive community. I personally have found exclusively gay gatherings boring. The expatriate community when I first moved here was rather unified. Now, with the influx of more and wealthier expatriates, the community has broken into clusters. I am told that there are gay clusters in the northern part of the city, and I have heard of a private club somewhere in the north, but I have no personal knowledge of them.

One time a man who lives in our block was drunk and shouted invectives at me. Neighbors came out and tried to shush him and apologized to me. That was the only time I have seen or experienced any negative treatment. About twenty years ago, a very obvious and obnoxious man lived in the area where a number of expatriates, gay and straight, were concentrated. He owned a big sports car. Young men were seen hanging around the place. He tried to open a bar near Santa Lucia under a friend’s name. One afternoon the police came and escorted him to the airport, telling him not to return. There is another incident in which men involved with the music community were accused in the newspaper of being pederasts. Some of it may be true and some of it was probably political. These are the only incidents that I can recall in the many years that I have been coming to and living in Merida.

My partner of forty-six years and I were recently married in Santa Fe, New Mexico. We were encouraged to pursue the option of marriage here, but were told we would have to sue. Of course things are changing almost as fast in Mexico as in the US, I suspect because of Mexico’s tradition of separation of church and state. We know of three gay priests. One is a close friend and although we are not Catholic, we plan to have a consecration event here sometime soon.

I asked an older American what attracted him to Mérida and his response was, “the boys, of course.” I don’t think he meant underage and yet I am offended by that thought. The open and accepting nature of the community, the excellent symphony, the museums, the Maya culture—I could go on and on—are far more important.

American Female, 64 years, 10 years in Merida:

When we moved in early 2005, we seemed to be the only lesbians in town. Of course, that was not true, but we didn’t meet others for awhile. We met lots of gay men and many straight men and women. And no one seemed to care or make an issue of sexual orientation — expat or Mexican or Mayan. There was very much a “live and let live” attitude in Merida that still exists.

We had not been discriminated against as lesbians (but don’t get me started on gender inequality!) in the U.S. But we were disgusted by the second election of George Bush and decided it was time for a new country and experience. We were not discriminated against in Merida that I could tell. As women, we often had the good fortune to be assisted by a gallant stranger who, for example, helped carry something heavy for us.

I would not say there is a visible lesbian community but we are just part of the expat mix. Once we met people and made friends, we were included as people not as lesbians. That applies to being part of expat or part of Mexican communities in Merida in my experience. An adorable gay man might be a flavor of the month and asked by everyone everywhere, while this would not happen for a woman, any woman, until she was familiar and had made friends. And making friends is not hard to do.

When we purchased a home, did construction, or opened a bank account together, we had no issues of discrimination.

The expats in Merida love “new blood” to perk up things socially. There are people and groups for everyone to fit into or to be friendly with. There have been gay bars that seem to move and change over time. They are not the basis for the gay social scene however, because there is not a gay social scene or not an exclusively gay social scene that I am aware of. There is an expat social scene that can include everyone of every variety.

It seemed to us that at first, the expat community was primarily gay – gay men, to be exact – but it has evolved to be more heterosexual couples and recently more young working people rather than retired gay ones. But it’s a mix. And honestly, we do not think it has ever mattered what your sexuality is or where you come from or how much money you have, as long as you are nice.

American female, 65 years old, 8 years in Merida:

When we first heard about Merida, about 10 years ago, it was from a straight couple that we were friends with in Oakland, California, our home town. And it was not in the context of the “gay” community. We have lived in the S.F. Bay Area most of our lives; gay men, lesbians, bisexual and transgendered people have lived together with the straight community in a very special way there. We had no expectation that there would be a lesbian community in Merida.

Once we came for our first visit, we got it that Merida was a huge community for gay men both Mexican and extranjero. This meant nothing to me as a lesbian.

I am a woman first, so my initial concerns have always been about my safety as a woman. I feel as if our interactions with people here in Merida have more to do with how we treat people in general, and little to do with my lesbianism. That said, I know that people are informed by their culture, and this culture by and large does not value my relationship or other LGBT peoples relationships in general. There seems to be an implicit “don’t ask don’t tell” mentality, which is nice because it is not outwardly hostile, but it is still not embracing me or my lifestyle.

The change we have experienced has come from making strong, loving relationships with Mexican lesbians. We are the adoptive grandma’s of a young child here who has two moms and that relationship has opened doors for us into a more intimate opportunity to experience family etc. In general, lesbians here are discriminated against pretty much the same as anywhere else in the world. I feel this is mostly because women are discriminated against in general, not necessarily because we are lesbians.

We come from a very special place in the Bay Area, and we had no expectation that that would be duplicated here. As at home in California, we have friends who are gay, straight, bi, asexual and almost every other possibility except transgendered. I don’t think I could live anywhere that LGBT people were not obvious and out in general.

Yes, we are treated differently, because men in general are treated differently than women. I experience my Mexican lesbian friends and acquaintances as very strong, capable, fun-loving women. I think they are very successful in the worlds they live in, but I also know that in general they are not “out” to their greater community.

In the expatriate community that I know of, there are three lesbian couples. As far as I know, we are all visible to the extranjero community as lesbians. I have no idea about the Mexican lesbian community. We have our friends, our “family”, but I cannot speak to the greater Mexican lesbian community here in Merida.

I moved here because my partner and I wanted an adventure in our life, we wanted to live in another culture, learn the language, experience the likenesses and differences, and challenge our belief system. We have done all of that and are very happy for it.

I know there is a bar scene, I know there is the park scene, I know there is the same “pick-up” scene that exists in every large city in the world, but most of that involves gay men. As far as the lesbian community, I don’t know what young lesbians are doing to meet each other; there is no distinct place that I know of. I think here it is much like it is in the U.S. Young lesbians go to bars to meet, they have parties, they find ways to socialize. But as far as I know there is no lesbian ‘community”.

I have felt the same discrimination here being a lesbian as I have felt anywhere else in the world. I do not feel free to be physical with my partner in public, and I often feel dismissed by men. But truly I believe that is the same sexism I have experienced my whole life. Men really don’t like to take direction from women, they don’t particularly appreciate our insights into problem solving. This may be exacerbated by my being a lesbian as well, but I think just being a woman is problem enough.

In terms of legalities, we have not had a problem buying, selling property and having things put in joint trust. I really have not gotten very involved in any general way with a gay rights movement here. I feel the veneer of acceptance here is easier than open hostility, but I do not feel the culture in general is ready to accept sweeping change like “gay marriage”. I know it exists in D.F. and I am very proud that that is a reality here in Mexico. However, there are so many ways that LGBT people are discriminated against in general and that Mexican people are kept from expressing their true potential, that it is very difficult to point to specific LGBT issues as more discriminatory than all the issues that need to be faced here.

I am a 65 year old woman who has faced all the discrimination that all women are challenged to overcome. Being a lesbian whether here or in the states is just another wrinkle in that challenge. I have not found it any harder here, I have not found it any easier. We as women have a long way to go before there is even a hint of equality. I believe lesbians can be great leaders in that march to equality, and my experience of Mexican lesbians only reinforces that sense of strength and possibility.

One last comment from an expat friend originally from New York:

It was a non-issue the day I moved here 14 years ago, and it has remained a non-issue to this day.

****
This article was written to give anyone who does not live in Merida some information about the history and current state of affairs of being gay in Merida and the Yucatan.

Obviously, this is a limited view, as any view would be. The issues surrounding being gay, same-sex marriage and equal rights are many, and not what we are addressing here on Yucatan Living. The contributors to this article are all established members of the Merida expatriate community, known and respected by both expatriates and Yucatecans. It is our wish that any foreigner moving to Merida and the Yucatan Peninsula would conduct themselves with respect for their host country and the expatriate community, while enjoying the same freedom of expression that we all enjoy living here.

We invite your respectful comments or questions.

****
Gender, Male Homosexuality and Power in Colonial Yucatan, Pete Sigal

Homosexuality in Mexico

Same sex marriages in Mexico

Despite the spelling and other mistakes, we were happy to see that Casa Sisal was included in this list: 17 of The Most Beautiful LGBT Friendly Wedding Venues.

By Working Gringos

Job Offered at Dunhill Worldwide in Merida
Contact Josh Padilla: ja [at] dunhillworldwide [dot] com

Looking for a full-time, energetic, inside Sales Representatives/Recruiter to join our amazing team.

Job Requirements:
o Native English speaker
o Sales experience
o Energetic / Positive attitude
o Self-motivated
o Outbound call center experience is a bonus
o $8,500 MX/month salary + $40,000 – $100,000 MX per sale commission

Please let me know if you have any further questions.

By Khaki Scott

Weather: Wet and Windy

There seems to be far more tropical activity in the Pacific than in the Atlantic at this time. Unfortunately, a good bit of that Pacific activity is cutting across Mexico and keeping Yucatan wet and windy. Strong rain and temporary street flooding can be expected. The good news is that most of the strongest storms miss Yucatan or pass through quickly enough to avoid real damage. Plus, as this Pacific weather crosses Mexico, it has the effect of stopping Atlantic storms from moving northward toward Yucatan. Thus far, 2015’s hurricane season can be described as busy enough to be watched, but far enough away to keep Yucatan in a relative zone of safety. You can watch these storms as they happen on Intellicast.

Merida: Hurricane Gadgets and Apps

For those who live in Merida, or who think they might like to live there, there is good news this week concerning hurricane preparation. Merida now has a multifaceted program to keep citizens up to date on hurricane activity. First, there is the Civil Protection website, which covers everything from active radar to emergency phone numbers and shelters. The site is comprehensive for hurricanes, fires, floods, and cold fronts. But now there are new tools available for residents of Merida. There is a new gadget for computers that automatically alerts people, when they turn on their computers, whether there is any alert and they get a cellphone text message (just send the word “report” to 999-129-5959 to receive forecasts and warnings). Access to these apps is available from the Civil Protection website. It is easy to find in the rolling banners at the top of the page. Now is the time to explore the Civil Protection website and to make your own hurricane readiness plan. It is far better to have a plan and not need it than to need a plan and not have it. Thankfully, Merida seems to be ready for any weather-related event that may arise.

New Archbishop of Yucatan to Arrive July 28

Bishop Gustavo Rodriguez Vega has been appointed by Pope Francis as the new Archbishop of Yucatan. He is currently the Bishop in Nuevo Leon. Prior to coming to Yucatan, he will travel to Rome to receive the pallium (ecclesiastical vestment) and celebrate with the Bishops there. Although the new Archbishop has never been to Merida, he has developed relationships with Mayan and Catholic priests over a number of years. He says that he wants to be a good shepherd for all Catholics and a good friend to the people of Yucatan. He says that he is a northerner, but doesn’t get angry if he hears something negative about them. He also hopes that his northern accent doesn’t appear to be rude. Acknowledging that Yucatan is a quieter environment than that of the north, he intends to take more time for the more than 200 social work projects and programs that are his responsibility in the Archdiocese. As Archbishop of Yucatan, he will also be engaged in comprehensive programs intended to bring justice and solidarity to all of Latin America. Toward this goal, he has been a member of the Department of Justice and Solidarity of the Latin American Episcopal Conference for the past four years and, after his appointment as Archbishop, will travel to Bogota, Colombia, to serve as its Chair. The new Archbishop of Yucatan is only 60 years of age and everyone is looking forward to the effect his fresh eyes and shepherd’s heart will have on this state.

Corporate Google and PriceWaterhouseCoopers Workshop

This past week, Corporate Google and PriceWaterhouseCoopers hosted a workshop for Yucatan’s entrepreneurs at the Gran Mundo Maya Museum of Merida. The workshop was organized by the Wave Group Mexico. The purpose of the three day workshop focused on how to develop a local business internationally. They covered topics related to image and marketing corporate images, doing business internationally, the legal issues involved in doing business internationally, and the technology issues that are associated with web platforms and digital systems. The goal of these workshops is to ensure that more entrepreneurs survive the first few years of doing business and go on to become successful in a global market.

Krispy Kreme Hosting Opening Picnic June 13

Merida’s first Krispy Kreme will open to the public on June 13, with a picnic in front of the store. The store is located on Prolongacion Paseo de Montejo. The physical address is Calle 54 # 369, Fraccionamiento Benito Juarez Norte, near other restaurants and automobile agencies. If you are going to the picnic, it begins at 7:00 AM. Be there early because the first 100 customers receive special discount tickets and a box of 12 donuts for a year. Krispy Kreme Doughnut Corporation was born in the United States in 1937, and came to Mexico in 2004. They came to Merida by popular demand as Yucatecos visiting Mexico City flew home with boxes upon boxes every trip they made.

Sea Turtles Arriving in Yucatan

Sea turtles have been spotted laying their eggs on beaches in both Dzilam Bravo and Progreso. Last year, Yucatan alone was able to secure over 700,000 eggs in the eight camps that were under guard. This is extremely important to the future of the endangered hawksbill turtle, which is one of the species that lays its eggs on Yucatan’s beaches. This year, there will be a total of 16 guarded turtle camps, with patrols from Celestun to El Cuyo. If you find a turtle nest, please report it to the authorities so that those eggs can be protected as well.

UNAM Growing and Marketing Seahorses

It has taken the specialists in the Academic Unit of UNAM Merida just four years to develop a technology package that allows them to breed and market seahorses. Their project is part of the larger breeding program of ornamental fish. It seems that seahorses are a coveted species by collectors, but their capture in the wild is against the law both in and outside of Mexican waters. This means that the price of seahorses can run more than $800 pesos in Mexico, and even more in other parts of the world. The group has also successfully developed growing programs for anemones, soft corals, hard corals, and shrimp used to clean tanks. The marketing of these species can be extremely profitable, so a growing and marketing manual has also been developed for those who would like to begin this business. According to UNAM, they are not going to keep this process a secret. Instead, they are willing to work hand-in-hand with anyone who wants to establish a commercial project using this technology. The work is being done at the Sisal Unit, which will soon make the manuals available to anyone interested in this subject.

Shooting at Political Rally in Peto

When this story first broke, there were all sorts of rumors about how many had been killed by guns and machetes at a political rally in Peto. The emphasis in these early stories implied that this was a political clash. When all was said and done, one young man, age 18, was dead, five were in the hospital, in Merida, from gunshot and stab wounds, and three had been treated for injuries sustained when they were hit by thrown rocks. This incident, according to the State Attorney General, was in no way political in origin. Instead, it was a clash between two local gangs. A total of six people have now been arrested, one of whom is the one who used the shotgun. They are currently being held and preliminary hearings will begin, for this case, this week. It is important that readers not rush to judgement when hearing the word gang in Mexico and automatically replace it with drug cartel. In Yucatan, these gangs are made up of marginalized young people in outlying areas, or in marginalized areas of cities. The SSP is doing an excellent job of policing and the State of Yucatan has embarked on heavily funded artistic and cultural programs as a means of keeping young people off the streets. We extend our sympathy to the family of the young man who lost his life, and thank the police for quickly apprehending the culprits.

Employee Poll: 100 Workplaces in Merida

Researchers from the Association of Executives in Human Management (Aedhu) and Marist University in Merida, are currently polling all levels of employees at 100 companies to help employers develop better systems of human resource management through an understanding of the role of human resources in Yucatan. The goal is not simply helping those companies better utilize their own employees. It is also to develop a roadmap for new companies to hit the ground running, with employees who are ready to operate and grow the company. Results of this study are expected by the end of June. With this kind of human resource information available to human resource managers, Yucatan will be one step closer to being one of the best places for industries of all kinds to relocate.

UADY: Street Dogs Near Campuses

Students at a number of UADY campuses have begun to care for the street dogs around their campuses, beginning with the Faculty of Education. They started out by feeding the dogs, even when they are on school vacations, because they saw that some were starving. That grew to vaccinations, baths and flea and tick collars. Now, they are rounding up the dogs for sterilization. As expats well know, none of this is free and the money usually has to be raised to fund such programs. Along the way, the students took up collections among themselves, then began learning the fine art of fundraising. They have held raffles, flea markets, candy sales and more along the way. In less than a month, they raised over $10,000 pesos. Now, with the help of the faculty and students in the Veterinary School, they are sterilizing the street dogs. They aren’t moving them, so these lucky dogs will continue to receive care for the remainder of their lives from the caring students at UADY. This is a miracle for the street dogs and evidence of the character of these UADY students.

Founder of Merida’s New La Leche League

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Four years ago, Elsa Ortiz Rincon, a young computer engineer, had her first baby in Merida. She is from Veracruz, so she had no family or close friends to help her. She knew the benefits of breastfeeding, img src=”http://www.yucatanliving.com/article-photos/breastfeeding.jpg” alt=”" title=”Breastfeeding Group in Merida Yucatan Mexico” width=”300″ height=”199″ class=”img-right” /> but had little knowledge of exactly how to successfully breastfeed. She soon realized that there is more to this topic than just the “how to” of it. Breastfeeding mothers have legal rights that most do not know. She set about to see to it that Merida’s breastfeeding mothers have all the information and support they need. Now, Elsa has two children and is the founder of the 500 member La Leche League of Merida. She leads the organization of activities during World Breastfeeding Week in Merida. The topic that week (August 1-7) will be Breastfeeding and Work. The La Leche League is an international organization, founded in 1956, with an advisory board made up of more than 50 specialists in pediatrics, obstetrics, nutrition, psychology, management and law. Elsa Ortiz Rincon is a star on the rise and Merida is lucky to have her. You can find out more about this group from their Facebook page.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting June 08 , 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) June 08, 2015

Yucatan Living Concert: PatBoy – Rap Music in Spanish and Maya
Don’t stay away because it’s rap. Maya is a great language for this sort of thing and it might just surprise you.
Location: Esplanade of the Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de las Americas, Calle 21 at Avenida Colon
Time: 8:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Tuesday (Martes) June 09, 2015

Yucatan Living Sierra Papacal Bird Watching Tour
This tour will participate in the Global Big Day, an initiative of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and contribute to their knowledge and conservation. All birdwatchers are invited to participate.
Location: Meet at Gran Plaza Merida in front of Sanborns
Time: 5:00 AM to 1:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: $200 pesos
More information: Marigel Campos +52 (999) 988-4436 or e-mail: infotoh [at] pronatura-ppy [dot] org [dot] mx

Yucatan Living Movie: Cronos
(Mexico 1993). Director: Guillermo del Toro. Starring Federico Luppi, Ron Perlman, Claudio Brook, Margarita Isabel and Tamara Shanath. A mysterious device designed to provide its owner with eternal life resurfaces after four hundred years, leaving a trail of destruction in its path.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Calle 21 at Avenida Colon
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Los Nobles
This is a performance by one of Yucatan’s oldest and best loved trova trios.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Royal Tenenbaums
(United States 2001). Director: Wes Anderson. Starring: Gene Hackman, Anjelica Huston, Ben Stiller, Luke Wilson, and Gwyneth Paltrow. Royal Tenenbaum and his wife, after having three children, have separated. Chas, the son who works in real estate, seemed to have an innate gift for international finance. Margo, the playwright daughter, received a Braverman Grant of $50,000 while still in high school. Richie, the son who was a junior tennis champion, won the US championships three years in a row. But all of the bright memories of the young Tenenbaums are suddenly erased by two decades of betrayals, failures and disappointments brought on by their father.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) June 10, 2015

Yucatan Living Spring Cultural Festival Opening
Come and hear the Orquesta Tipica Yukalpeten play in the newly remodeled Teatro Jose Peon Contreras.
Location: Jose Peon Contreras, Calle 60 x 57 centro of Merida
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Heart of Sky, Heart of Earth
(Germany 2011). Directors: Eric Black, Frauke Sandig. Starring: Josefa ‘Chepita’ Hernadez Perez, Floridalma Perez Gonzalez, Carlow Chan Chanuk. Language: Spanish and Maya. Filmed in Guatemala and Mexico, this movie deals with the rainforest, logging and saving the indigenous people.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Entre Sombras
(Mexico 2014) In a final attempt to resolve their marital problems, Eric and Mari make ​​a road trip to the jungles of southeastern Mexico. Just when his luck seems to be changing, she disappears. Confused and devastated, Eric begins the journey back to the capital, encountering on his way an enigmatic character, Narciso, who becomes his traveling companion. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) June 11, 2015

Yucatan Living June Concert: Chamber Orchestra of Merida: Meridana Watercolor
This is one of the best small orchestras you will ever see. Never to be missed.
Location: Lower floor of the Municipal Palace
Time: 11:00 AM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(United States 2013) Director: Horacio Alcala. Starring: Antonio Segura, Max La Sala, Damian Istra. An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and give viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. Filmed on location in 11 countries. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Traditional Yucateca Trova: If You Hear a Troubadour
This is a performance by the Zazil Kay Duet: Jorge and Jose Luis Moguel Martin.
Location: Centro Cultural Iberica, Calle 27 #526 at Calle 74
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living MEL’s Evening of Merida Magic (Wine Tasting)
Wine Guide Tom Kuhn and Chef Marcos Meneses of Postrecito will present three wines and the appropriate food pairings in a beautiful home on the edge of Centro.
Location: Corgis Bailando (information on location will be delivered upon ticket purchase). Tickets still available from the Merida English Library.
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Members: $250 pesos, non-members: $300 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Kwaidan “El Mas Alla”
(Japan 1964. Directors: Masaki Kobayashi, Lillian Gish and Lars Hanson. Starring: Tatsuya Nakadai, Rentaro Mikuni, Katsuo Nakamura and Ganemon Nakamura. A collection of four Japanese folk tales with supernatural themes.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Urban Musical Expressions: El Ensemble del Refugio and Concierto Funkadelico
This is a performance by Rogelio “Refugio” Garcia Hidalgo, Armaury Leon Sosa, Juan Mario Ortiz Garcia, Fernando Sanguines de Castro, Irving Daniel Galas “Chiclin” and Ricardo Tatto Perez.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 in Santa Ana (across from the park)
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Dances of Europe by Grupo Quo Vadis
This has become quite a popular performance as it makes its way around the city.
Location: Rogers Hall Peninsula College, Calle 21 at Paseo de Montejo Prolongación
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Inauguration of the Exposition: Strokes of Love and Teaching
This event is a tribute to Maestro Ramiro Cervera.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Calle 21 at Avenida Colon
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Traditional Yucateca Trova: Cradle of Troubadours
This is a performance by Groupo Yahal Kab, one of Merida’s favorites.
Location: Centro Cultural Iberica, Calle 27 #526 at Calle 74
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Musical: “Let’s Get Lost”
(United States 1988). Director: Bruce Weber. Starring: Chet Baker, Carol Baker, Vera Baker and others. This is a documentary on the life of jazz trumpeter and drug addict Chet Baker. It is a fascinating series of interviews with friends, family, associates and lovers.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 59 y 61
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music Duet: The Guitar in Time
This is a performance by the Rubio-Celis Duet: Manuel Rubio and Victor Celis.
Location: Sala de Arte in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 59 y 61
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Epic Horn Heroes
This is a performance by the Horn Ensemble of the South: Guido Ruiz, Heberth Gomez and Jesus Borges.
Location: Church of San Juan Pablo, Fraccionamiento Las Américas
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Beyond the Applause
Various artists will perform tonight.
Location: Teatro Daniel Ayala, Calle 60 x 59, Merida centro
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: A Pure Wood Acoustic Concert
This is a performance by Eduardo Rodriguez and Invited Guest Performers
Location: Casa de la Cultura del Mayab, Merida Centro
Time: 8:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Mika, My War of Spain
(Argentina 2013). Director: Fito Pochat. Starring: Cristina Banegas and Arnold Etchebehere. Hippolytus and Mika were the uncles of directors living in Argentina when they went off to fight in the Spanish Civil War. Hipolito was killed within a month after the beginning of the war and Mika became captain of the Republican forces. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Shanghai Calling
(United States 2012). Director: Daniel Hsia. Starring: Le Geng, Daniel Henney, Eliza Coupe and Sean Gallagher. A New York lawyer is sent to Shanghai on business, but it turns into a legal complication that threatens his career. With the help of a relocation specialist and contacts, he soon learns to appreciate the wonders of Shanghai. Chinese with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) June 12, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Pulp: a Film About Life, Death & Supermarkets
(United States 2014). Director: Florian Habicht. Starring: Nick Banks, Jarvis Cocker, Candida Doyle. PULP (the band) found fame on the world stage in the 1990’s. Twenty-five years (and 10 million album sales) later, they return to Sheffield for their last UK concert, where they share their thoughts on fame, love, mortality – and car maintenance. This documentary uses ordinary people in Sheffield. It is funny, moving, life-affirming and (occasionally) bewildering film.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Traditional Yucateca Trova: Our Trova on 6 Strings
This is a performance by Gil Gil, one of the most well known trovadors in Yucatan.
Location: Centro Cultural Iberica
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Morita
One of the many concerts throughout the city and state during this festival.
Location: Parque de Chenku in Merida
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Yucatecas Memories
This is a performance by the Compania del Centro Especial AYELEM. The performers are differently abled, but that certainly doesn’t stop them from becoming stars in Yucatan! Please attend this event and show these wonderful performers how much they are appreciated.
Location: Teatro Daniel Ayala, Merida centro
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Classic Trova
The performance tonight is by the Cuartet “In Crescendo:” Ana Laura Barradas, Gabriel Velazquez, Maximo Trejo, Adrian Carrillo, Norberto D’Vela and Cristina Cruz.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 in Santa Ana, across from the park
Time: 7:30 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Ludwig
(Italy 1972). Director: Luchino Visconti. Starring Helmut Berger, Romy Schneider, Trevor Howard and Silvana Mangano. Historical evocation of Ludwig, King of Bavaria, from his crowning in 1864 until his death in 1886, as a romantic hero.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Laura Moguel, Soprano: Dawn of the Yucateca Song
This very special performance is under the direction of Felipe de J. Cervera.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti: Avenida Colon por Calle 20, Colonia Garcia Gineres
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Loving the Music of Old
There are some very special headliners tonight. See this performance to understand how Yucatan’s music grew and flourished. Stars include: Mario Herrera Casares “Dzereco,” Daniel Herrera Casares “Nohoch,” Ivan Niquete and Fernando Herrera.
Location: Parque de Juan Pablo II, Avenida Xoclan – keep an eye on this venue. They sure do get a lot of great events!
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Diciotto Corde Guitars
This performance is by the Assembly Diociotto Corde: Erik Aldana, Guillermo Gallareta and Manuel Najera.
Location: Sala de Arte in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Musical: Year of the Horse
(United States 1997). Director: Jim Jarmusch. Starring: Neil Young, Jim Jarmusch, and Ralph Molina. This film documents Neil Young and Crazy Horse’s 1996 concert tour, with backstage footage from the 70’s and 80’s.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(France 2014). Director: Abderrahmane Sissako. Starring: Ibrahim Ahmed, Abel Jafri, Toulou Kiki. A cattle herder and his family who reside in the dunes of Timbuktu find their quiet lives, typically free of the Jihadists determined to control their faith, abruptly disturbed. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) June 13, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Stone Boy
(Mexico 2015) Directors: Pablo Aldrete, Miguel Bonilla, Jaime Romandia, Miguel Angel, Uriegas. Starring: Melissa Gedeon, Emilio Rafael, Melisa Gutierrez. Marina and her cousins, Tito, Tato and Tete, live in a colorful tropical valley of Huasteca, Tamaulipas. One day, the fair comes to town. In this fair is a stone boy, who supposedly turned to stone because he was angry with life. Marina and her cousins make a fantastic journey to the country of the senses, where residents’ ears, hands, eyes, mouths and noses will help the stone child regain human form. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Damned
(Italy 1969). Director: Luchino Visconti. Starring Dirk Bogarde, Ingrid Thulin, Helmut Berger, Helmut Griem and Charlotte Rampling. The dramatic collapse of a wealthy industrialist/Junker family during the reign of the Third Reich. English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Urban Musical Expression: Music, Camera, Action
This is a performance by the Ensemble Fantasya: Gabriela Loolbej Sanchez, Adrian Carrillo and Sergio de la Vega, with artistic direction by the impressive Carlos Camacho.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Traditional Yucateca Trova: The Music of the Mayab
This is a performance by the Latin American Ensemble: Jose Gerardo Gomez, Noel Antonio Dzib, Fernando Saguines de Castro and Victor Celis.
Location: Centro Cultural Iberica
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Sounds of the Yucateca Trova
Tonight’s performers are members of Cuarteto Blas Galindo and include: Edgar Sulu, Ricardo Huchim, Stanislav Grubnik, Nadezhda Golubeva, Ricardo Moo, Julian Lopes, Patty Achach (Soprano) and Manuel David (Tenor). They are under the musical direction of Sergio de la Vega.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 at Parque Santa Ana
Time: 7:30 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Musical: Sympathy for the Devil (One Plus One)
(United Kingdom 1968). Director: Jean-Luc Godard. Starring: Sean Lynch, Mick Jagger and Brian Jones. Godard’s documentation of the late 1960’s western counter-culture, this movie examines the Black Panthers, refers to works by LeRoi Jones and Eldrige Cleaver. References to the Rolling Stones are throughout the documentary.
Location: Sala de Arte in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: From Bella Italia to Mexico
Take an exciting musical journey with Fustavo Duran, Tenor and Mariana Palma, Soprano. Stage director for this performance is Juan Ramon Gongora.
Location: Chapel of Santa Teresita de Lisieux, Calle 11 x 38, Francisco Villa Poniente
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: The Best of Me
This is a performance by Macky Pinzon (Emmanuel Pinzon, son of Adalberto Pinzon). If you are wondering where the nickname came from, this young man cut his musical teeth on “Mack the Knife” and has trova in Merida Yucatanbeen growing in fame and success ever since. He is all grown up now and taking the world by storm.
Location: Parque de la Ermita
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Anoranzas
This performance is by Open Sound Duet: Rudy Vallado and Veronica Cabrera. They are part of the solid body of musical work that defines the sounds of Yucatan.
Location: Parque de la Colonia Aleman
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Devil’s Backbone
(Spain 2001). Director: Guillermo Del Toro. Starring: Marisa Paredes, Eduardo Noriega, and Federico Luppi. After Carlos, a 12-year-old whose father has died in the Spanish Civil War, arrives at an ominous boy’s orphanage, he discovers the school is haunted and has many dark secrets that he must uncover. In Spanish.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: 20,000 Days on Earth
(United Kingdom 2014). Directors: Ian Forsyth, Jane Pollard. Documentary. 20,000 Days on Earth is an ode to creativity, original and full of lyricism, played by musician Nick Cave, a cultural icon. The film combines drama and reality, showing the routine of a fictional day in the life of a rock star, an intimate portrayal of his artistic process. This is the debut of the innovative visual artists Ian Forsyth and Jane Pollard as directors, with an original soundtrack by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), June 14, 2015

Happy Birthday to Khaki, who is one of the three people who work tirelessly each week to bring you these events!

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Broque Music by Bieber, Locatelli and Handel
This is a performance by the Ensamble Ars Musicum Merida: Gocha Skhirtladze, Timothy Myall, Iliana Stefanova, Yana Akapova, Salvador Velazquez, Mauricio Velazquez, Nikolay Dimitrov, Alma Diaz Veselin Dechev, Nadezhda Golubeva, Stanislav Grubnik and Irina Decheva.
Location: Teatro Daniel Ayala, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Songs of My Childhood
Well, maybe not YOUR childhood, but the childhood of anyone who grew up in Yucatan. The Puppets Tito and Tita, along with their invited guests: Victor Celis and Cristina Woodward, seem just to make a Sunday in Merida complete.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 59
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movies: Star Wars Marathon
Duration: 7 hours. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Episode 4: A New Hope
Episode 5: The Empire Strikes Back
Episode 6: Return of the Jedi
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 3:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living Popular Music: The Copypaste
Members of this group include: Gina Osorno, Edgar Ibarra, Hugo Aguilar, Mizael Manrique.
Location: Casa de la Cultura del Mayab
Time: 7:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Songs for These Times
This is a concert by Andres Tinoco, a huge talent in Yucatan. His shows should always be on everyone’s must-see list.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 59
Time: 7:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Jazz Up, Stevie Wonder
This performance is under the musical direction of Mauricio Bonfiglio – and it just doesn’t get much better than that. If anyone knows how to present the music of Stevie Wonder, its Mauricio Bonfiglio! What a way to end the weekend!
Location: Parque de la Colonia Aleman
Time: 7:30 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Music: Playing in the 20th Century
We love Yucatan’s flutes! This performance is by the Kantulo’on Flute Quartet: Gabriela Loolbej Sanchez, Manuel Canche, Larixa Pino, and Joaquin Melo.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 at Parque Santa Ana
Time: 7:30 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Musical: The Soul of a Man
(United States, Germany 2003). Director: Wim Wenders. This is a “made for tv” documentary about the Blues. This film follows the exploits of three legendary blues men Skip James, Blind Willie Johnson and movie in Merida YucatanJ B Lenoir. Includes original recordings of songs along with performances from a variety of artists including Nick Cave. Bonnie Raitt, The John Spencer Blues Explosion and many more.
Location: Cineteca Nacional Manuel Barbachano Ponce in Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Nice and Tasty
A performance by Yucatan’s Nightclub Orchestra. This is a great group and everyone loves them!
Location: Parque de Santa Ana
Time: 8:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Urban Musical Expressions: Otakus Gamers vs Grupo Ragnarok
We admit that these groups are new to us. Perhaps that is all the more reason to try them out.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero
Time: 8:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Folklorisimo! Latin American Music
This performance is by Lizza Rodriguez.
Location: Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Popular Music: Dreams of a Musical Night: Concert of Eleven Voices
This performance features: Stephanie Solis, Rosy Briceno, Mayte Corona, Evelina Ceballos, Gricel Castilla, Kevin Llanes, Zaabdi Hernandez, Sarai Navarrete, Benazir Morales, and Omar Cervera. Choreography: Ariadna Motilla. Musical Director: Emilio Rosado. Stage Director: Tomas Ceballow.
Location: Teatro Daniel Ayala, Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) June 15, 2015

Yucatan Living Photography Workshop: Module III: Criticism and Curation
This workshop starts today and goes until June 19. Teacher: Mauricio Alejo. For more Information and registration, call: 999-335-7916 or e-mail: toloc [dot] colectivo [at] gmail [dot] com. Facebook: Tolocolectivo

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living VEL Thursday Night Lecture: LOTERIA June 18
This is an evening of fun and games. Play LOTERIA, a traditional Mexican game with awesome prizes. Please do come out and play. We look forward to seeing you win!
Location: Casa Hamaca’s Xoco Loco
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: $50 pesos per person donation to VEL buys your first card. Additional cards: $25 pesos each. You can also purchase both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and snacks from Casa Hamaca’s Xoco Loco.

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!
18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2
“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: Various
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living 7th Annual Habla Teacher Institute – August 1-7, 2015
Pre-Institute Workshops July 30-31, 2015 (included in overall institute cost)
The concept of this year’s institute will be storytelling as a way of developing original work across all mediums of expression. In tribute to Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude and Márquez’s memoir Living to Tell the Tale are this year’s core texts. They will also respond to photographs from Mexican photographers Graciela Iturbide and Flor Garduño. They will use these texts to demonstrate universal processes for developing literacy and language that can be applied in any setting and with any age group.
For more information visit their website

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar – Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

A Colonial Dreamhome in a Perfect Centro Location

Casa Panadero Facade in Merida Downtown area

Living Room at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Spacious living room looking to dining room in Casa Panadero Merida Yucatan

Dining Room at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Hand Made Furniture at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Comfortable and Cool Bedroom at Casa del Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Spacious Bathroom at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Master bedroom of Casa del Panadero Merida Yucatan

Sitting Areas at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Patio View at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Patio at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Plunge Pool at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just a few city blocks from the center of town in one direction, and from the Remate of Paseo de Montejo in the other diretion, Casa del Panadero stands proud and tall, one of a group of four special row houses in the exclusive Santa Ana district. Just blocks from a myriad of events and attractions, Casa del Panadero envelops its guests in the history and culture of Merida and the Yucatan in a way that few homes can claim.

Come stay at Casa del Panadero for a memorable vacation in a tropical colonial home. Wake up every morning knowing that there are a hundred things to do… or you can spend the day gloriously doing nothing in the comfort and beauty of your own home away from home.

Casa del Panadero is located in the center of the picturesque and historic district of Santa Ana, just two blocks from Parque Santa Ana and only five blocks from the Plaza Grande (the center of town).

This vacation rental home is a centuries-old house and a former bakery whose name means “House of a Baker.” The structural walls consist of stone and concrete typical of the colonial building era known as “mamposteria.” The 18-inch walls provide natural insulation and coolness, as do the 18-foot ceilings, the interior patio and the north to south facing. The floors all have some of the original “pasta tiles” unique to the colonials of Centro. The house was originally renovated from its state of abandonment by the famous architect, Salvador Reyes Rios, the same architect responsible for many hacienda restorations in the Yucatan.

 

Mexican Style Kitchen at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Santa Ana District in Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

Amenities

 

At Casa del Panadero, you will enjoy…

  • Two spacious bedrooms with King beds and 400-count 100% cotton linens
  • Each bedroom has an armoire and a vanity desk with mirror
  • Two separate bathrooms with showers
  • Dining room and two seating areas
  • A central, Mexican-style kitchen with refrigerator/freezer, microwave oven, toaster, four-burner Bosch stove, bottled water dispenser, coffeemaker and utensils
  • Furnished interior courtyard with tiled fountain that is visible from nearly every room in the house
  • Lush tropical garden with new filtered swimming pool with fountain, and outdoor shower
  • Local, bilingual property manager to meet guests and be available for emergencies
  • On your arrival, a bottle of wine will greet you, along with milk, juice, coffee and pastries
  • 32-Inch LCD TV, DVD player, and a selection of DVDs
  • Stereo/CD player with iPod hookup
  • Wireless internet (bring your computer for Skype-calling)
  • Printer, copier and scanner available to use with your computer
  • Two bicycles for your use
  • Amigo” local cell phone for local calls
  • Remote-controlled air conditioners in each bedroom and ceiling fans throughout the house
  • Washer/dryer, iron and ironing board
  • All new furniture, ironwork and artwork
  • Parking available in the front of the house
    on a non-bus, quiet street
  • Maid service, cooking service, and in-house massage
    service available by request and for an additional charge
  • A directory explaining the operations of Casa del Panadero and listings of some of our favorite restaurants, day trips, taxi drivers, and much of the local flavor of Merida and the Yucatan.

 

Prices

Rates for 2013

Low Season - May 1 to September 30
$150 USD per night, 4 night minimum; $900 USD per week (Every 7th night is free, making nightly rate $128.57)

 

High Season - October 1 to April 30
$200 USD per night, 4 night minimum; $1200 USD per week (Every 7th night is free, making nightly rate $171.85)

 

Holiday Season – December 15, 2013 to January 11, 2014
$225 USD per night, 4 night minimum; $1350 USD per week (Every 7th night is free, making nightly rate $192.85)

 

We can negotiate discounts with additional terms for stays longer than two weeks. 

 

Lush Tropical Garden at Casa Panadero Vacation Rental in Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

Policies

Daily maid service is not included, but may be available at an extra cost and should be arranged before arrival.

 

Maximum occupancy 4 adults. Children under 12 not allowed. Smoking allowed in interior courtyard or garden area only. Casa del Panadero cannot accommodate pets.

 

Contact Us Now!

www.casadelpanadero.com/

 

Come explore Casa del Panadero!

We just know you are going to love it…

 

 

By Working Gringos

“Why don’t you marry Lupita?”
Mexican bride Yucatan“Señora, for God’s sake!”
“Why are you so shocked? Is there anything else more natural? What better could happen to her than have the support of a dependable and honest husband like you?”
“Thank you, thank you for the praise,” responded don Hermenegildo, feeling the swell of satisfaction, “…but it’s settled; I’m not going back to thinking about marriage.”
“What?, ” replied doña Raimunda. “Are you saying that you’re old? Wrong. You’re not old yet.”
“Frankly, I don’t think I’m that old, but . . . it can’t be, señora; there is no way; believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”
“And the shortage of money isn’t a problem today; you have a good start and with what remains of her inheritance, you can live like rich people.”

That brief dialogue, nine months after the inauguration and thirteen after Lupita was widowed, had made a wreck of the bachelor’s nerves. How it grabbed hold of his mind and upended it, bothering him for part of the day and robbing him of hours of sleep during the night.

Well, doña Raimunda’s advice wasn’t completely misguided, nor was what she proposed to him something to stun the world.

Joven in Merida YucatanIf he dared! But impossible! One more disappointment. And Lupita was better than her mother. You’d better believe it! But to talk with her he would have to feel up to it and he didn’t. Lord, how luck was divided up in the world! Pancho Vélez had boldness to spare for wooing women and that had caused him harm. He, on the other hand, couldn’t even get married due to his timidity. Wouldn’t it have been better if Pancho Vélez had less audacity and he a little more courage?

But was it natural, having as he had so great a desire to marry, that he would allow himself to be so dominated by emotion? To say to a woman “Will you be my wife?” is not a crime, and the worst that can happen is that she says “No, go look elsewhere”. But, impossible. That would be miserable, and besides, God didn’t want him to get married. That was obvious. How many times hadn’t he seen matrimony slip through his fingers!

But why not make one last effort? That effort could hold the promise of happiness for him. Yes, it was necessary to try one more time; the last, to be sure, because he had already suffered many disappointments. For this reason he had to speak clearly to Lupita and without shaking. If great men had hesitated in the face of risky ventures, they wouldn’t have accomplished them. In order to achieve something, it is necessary to attempt it, and as he wanted to have a wife who would tend to him, who would caress him, who would make his life sweet and give him children . . . My God! What insanity! If he should one day have them . . . But it’s impossible. It is most unwise . . .

And why impossible? Was he perhaps decrepit? How many truly old men, and he could not really say that he was old, had children every day! What joy if Lupita should give him a son! And he would be sweet like his mother, and responsible and honorable like his father.

Victorian boy in MeridaWhat would he name him? Caramba! The name! The name seems such a simple thing and one has to choose it carefully. So he would choose one that sounded good… something like a prince’s name. And what joyful hours he would spend with the mischievous little guy seated on his knees and holding up his little hands to pull his hair and tug on his mustache. What a lively child! With all the grace and vivaciousness of his mother. He would have to take good care of him to see that he didn’t go out in the damp air and catch a cold.

If he were to get sick! That would certainly be a serious problem. He would have to ask permission to be out of the office in order to stay close to the cradle and take every opportunity to give the little angel his medications. Lest the mother neglected to give them to him!

And the poor bachelor, his head a volcano of thoughts there in his lonely hammock, viewed with distress the little one’s pale face, and he checked his pulse repeatedly to see if the fever had dropped. But he would soon return from those beautiful fantasies to the reality of the small room that housed him, for if his nephews’ loud snoring did not rouse him from his golden musings, the shouts of one of the younger children did.

With more frequency than before, he could now be seen at the young woman’s home, and she received him very kindly. He reported all their conversations to doña Raimunda, who never failed to suggest that he resolve the situation, all the while doubting that her protegé would one day bring himself to do so.

One night, Lupita went to visit the licenciado’s robust spouse and, as always, the chairs were placed on the sidewalk. The bachelor had not yet arrived, nor any of the others who, although not with the constancy of don Hermenegildo, were regular members of the señora’s group.

After talking about the scarcity and poor quality of household help and lamenting that meat and other articles of daily consumption cost an arm and a leg, doña Raimunda, ending a pause that ensued, asked her visitor:

“And what do you have to tell me about don Hermenegildo?”
“Why do you ask? Has something happened to him?”
“Nothing, fortunately. But as he is in love with you. . . “
“With me? This is the first I’ve heard.”
“You expect me to believe that he hasn’t said anything to you?”
“Nothing, honestly. He comes to the house, but like always, the same as any other visit.”
“Well, the poor guy is constantly longing for you. And what do you think?”
“What do you want me to think? I haven’t thought of getting married again.”
“Even so, don Hermenegildo is a responsible man, honorable and he isn’t old.”
“That’s true. But I haven’t thought about such a thing. And is he capable of falling in love with someone?”
“You hear what I’m saying. He is like never before. When he goes to see you, the next day he tells me what he talked about with you and says that you were just as beautiful as ever.”

Father and SonAt that the clerk showed up on the corner. Already his appearance had notably improved with his change of position. His threadbare suit and old-fashioned hat were no more, and this and a more abundant and substantial diet that allowed for new beginnings seemed to have truly rejuvenated doña Raimunda’s friend.

And not only in his person could the benefits of the electoral triumph be noticed, as he now lived in a house not so far removed from the center and better looking. The furniture had been changed and the sister and nephews received a modest replacement of their clothes.

Seeing him coming, doña Raimunda set about getting him to make up his mind to deal with his amorous wishes.

The requisite greetings offered, with all the ceremony and pompousness that our hero poured forth, he turned to the young woman after seating himself and asked:

“And how is it going?”
“Nothing new, don Hermenegildo; and you?”
“As always, Lupita, as always. And the baby? That child is just as charming as his mother.”

Just then he took a straw cigar that doña Raimunda offered him, and his hand was trembling as if frightened by its modest owner’s daring gallantry.

The plump matron couldn’t help smiling and exclaimed:

“Now then, tell Lupita that you’re not in love with her.”

With these words, don Hermenegildo, who had turned shy with the inopportune tremor, felt like his tongue was stuck to the roof of his mouth and he could think of no convenient way out. While Guadalupe smiled, he commended himself in prayer to the entire celestial court.

Street boys playing Merida YucatanHis angel of mercy was Felipito, who had been playing with other boys some distance away and was now approaching, howling loudly. Alarmed, his mother went to meet him, asking what had happened and learned that a playmate, older than he, had apparently caused a bump on his forehead with a rock, then immediately taken off running.

“That bad boy!” bellowed the indignant señora. “He has to come back here and answer to me. But it’s your fault for playing with them. Since their mother doesn’t educate them…”
“Arnica, mi señora. A little cloth with arnica, for whatever happens,” counseled don Hermenegildo. “In these cases, it’s a great remedy. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

And they brought the prescribed substance and Felipito received a careful rubbing over the injured area.

“And now, to bed,” doña Raimunda said to him giving him a shove. “That’s what you get for being disobedient.”
“Jesús, these boys! Girl, they make my blood boil. Wait until yours grows up a little and you’ll see. Here in the street, you know what it’s like. A game gets started early in the evening and it’s all shouting and racing around. For me, I don’t like Felipito involved in that, but the doctor insists that it’s advisable for him to jump and play because it’s good exercise for a child who’s thin. What’s more, the boy likes it and I understand that it’s natural for him at this age.”

By Working Gringos

Security Message for U.S. Citizens

Mexican Elections 2015

Mexican elections are scheduled for Sunday, June 7. U.S. citizens should avoid all election-related demonstrations and other activities that might be deemed political by the authorities. The Mexican Constitution prohibits political activities by foreigners; such actions may result in detention and/or deportation. U.S. citizens should monitor instructions or statements from the Government of Mexico for the most up to date information. Demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence. Protesters may block traffic on roads, including major thoroughfares, or take control of toll booths on highways. In some areas, protestors have blocked access to gas stations, and their presence at airports has caused flights to be delayed or suspended. U.S. citizens are urged to avoid areas of demonstrations, and to exercise caution if in the vicinity of any protests. Travelers who encounter protestors demanding unofficial tolls are generally allowed to pass upon payment. Travelers are urged not to exit from major highways onto secondary roads in rural areas.

We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Mexico enroll in the Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at www.travel.state.gov. STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency. If you don’t have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

Regularly monitor local media for news and official announcements regarding security, including updates from the Mexican National Electoral Institute, as well as the State Department’s website, where you can find current Travel Warnings, including the Travel Warning for Mexico, Travel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution. Read the Country Specific Information for Mexico. For additional information, refer to the “Traveler’s Checklist” on the State Department’s website.

Contact the U.S. Embassy/Consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions. You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). Follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and download our free Smart Traveler iPhone App to have travel information at your fingertips.

The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City is located at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, Mexico, D.F. and is open 8:00am to 5:00pm, switchboard phone number (dialing from the United States) 011-52-555-080-2000, http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/eacs_hours.html. If you are a U.S. citizen in need of urgent assistance, please dial the main switchboard number and ask to speak to an American Citizen Services staff member for assistance.

By Working Gringos

The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City and U.S. Consulates General in Mexico remind U.S. citizens that hurricane season is from May 15 to November 30 in the Pacific, and from June 1 to November 30 in the Atlantic. In the coming days, the Department of State will also issue a Travel Alert to remind U.S. citizens around the world of the upcoming season.

Be Prepared

U.S. citizens planning to visit places that are vulnerable to hurricanes should be aware of the chance of storms and make a plan in case of emergency. Even inland areas far from the coast can experience destructive winds, tornadoes, and floods from tropical storms and hurricanes. In the event of a tropical storm or hurricane, the Consulate will monitor the storm and send email messages to U.S. citizens who have enrolled with us. The Department of State may also issue a Travel Alert or Travel Warning to apprise the public of the situation.

Please check your passport and those of your family members to assure that they are still valid. As you may need to travel to the United States (or elsewhere) on short notice, it is important to have valid travel documents so that your trip is not unnecessarily delayed. If you plan to travel to the United States, please also ensure that any non-U.S. citizen family members also have valid Lawful Permanent Resident cards or U.S. visas or visit our website at mexico.usembassy.gov for more information on applying for a visa.

Your Checklist:

· Prior to leaving the United States, register your travel plans on the State Department’s travel enrollment website at https://step.state.gov/step/.
· Check with your tour operator, airline, or charter flight regarding services back to the United States in the event of a hurricane, and the possibility of early return if a storm is forecasted for your region.
· Activate your U.S. cell phone’s roaming service so that it works internationally to stay in regular contact with family and friends and advise them of your whereabouts.
· Research the region you are visiting and become familiar with local emergency procedures (http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_970.html).
· Pack an emergency supply kit (http://www.ready.gov/build-a-kit). Keep extra bottled water and non-perishable food items on hand.
· Keep an up-to-date list of local emergency phone numbers, as well as contact numbers for the nearest U.S. Embassy, Consulate General, or Consular Agency.
· Protect your vital travel documents from potential water damage by placing them in a waterproof container.
· Obtain travel insurance prior to your trip to cover unexpected expenses in the event of an emergency (http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1470.html).
· Ensure your medical insurance covers costs associated with emergency situations (http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1470.html).
· Consider what arrangements you will make for your pets. Please note that the Mexican authorities and the U.S. government do not make accommodations for the care or transportation of pets during storm-related emergencies or evacuations.
· Leave a detailed itinerary and your local contact information with a friend or family member in the United States.
· Make two photocopies of the biographic identification page of your passport, airline tickets, driver’s license, and any credit cards you plan to take. Leave one copy of each with family or friends at home, and pack the other copies separately from the originals. You may also wish to scan these documents and store them electronically, such as on a flash drive or in an email account. If using traveler’s checks, leave a copy of the serial numbers of your traveler’s checks with a friend or relative at home.
· Monitor local websites for storm-related information. In the country of Mexico, each state has a civil protection authority, called “Protección Civil,” that monitors storm progress and gives instructions on preparations, any need to evacuate coastal areas, etc. For Veracruz state, for example: http://www.veracruz.gob.mx/proteccioncivil/
· Please also visit the following U.S. government websites for more information:
Mexico Country Specific Information: http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_970.html
Hurricane Season “Know Before You Go”: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/emergencies/natural-disasters/HurricaneSeason.html
National Hurricane Center: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

You have received this email message because you are enrolled with us. We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Mexico enroll in the Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at travel.state.gov. STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency. If you don’t have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

Regularly monitor the State Department’s website, where you can find current Travel Warnings, (including the Travel Warning for Mexico), Travel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution. Read the Country Specific Information for Mexico. For additional information, refer to the “Traveler’s Checklist” on the State Department’s website.

Contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions. You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to have travel information at your fingertips.

The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City is located at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, Mexico D.F., 06500 and is open from Monday through Friday, 8:00am to 5:00pm, except for U.S. and Mexican holidays. Our telephone number during and outside of business hours is 011-52-555-080-2000. For a full list of Consulates General and Consular Agencies in Mexico please visit our website at http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/edirectory.html.

By Working Gringos

Type of Food/Restaurant: Snacks, botanas, traditional Yucatecan food
Name: El Cardenal Cantina
Neighborhood: Centro
Telephone: 999 923 3955
Address: Calle 63 x Calle 70, Merida centro
How to Get There from the Centro: If you are at the Plaza Grande, go east on Calle 63.
Air Conditioned: No
Outdoors: Yes
Wifi: Yes
Drinks: Full Bar
Payments: Probably cash and credit… anyone know for sure?
Hours: Noon to 9:30 PM
Website: Facebook Page
Notes: A favorite place to sit, visit, eat and drink. Enjoy the great outdoors of Merida in a cantina that was started almost one hundred years ago.

By Khaki Scott


Yucatan is New Sports Destination

It is summer and time for Mexico’s National Olympics finals. More and more of these types of events are being held in Merida and along the coast of Progreso because of the expanded convention resources here. Those resources include not only sports fields and arenas, but also thousands of hotel rooms and the ability to feed and entertain all of the athletes, their families, and their coaches. While voters get ready for elections, athletes around the world are working hard to bring in the rewards of medals and prizes. Yucatan is always a competitive leader. Of course, all sporting events are not happening in Merida. Take a look at where some of the children of Yucatan happen to be this week:

World Class Canoeing

Twenty-one year old Jonathan Ballina Esquivel is part of the Mexican national canoeing team that is participating in the World Cup in Duisburg, Germany. Next for this team is the World Championship in Portugal and the Pan American Games in Canada. They have a great place to practice in Progreso, an outstanding group of trainers and coaches, and the Gulf of Mexico to practice in. What more could a kid ask for in the summertime?

National Youth Hockey Olympics

Did you know that Progreso has a hockey school for children? The name of the school is Progreso’s Little Hockey School and it teaches the sport to children from six to sixteen. Earlier this month, three young students from this school participated on a team that played in the National Hockey Olympics in Guadalajara, and they took sixth place. Not bad for the first class to come through a brand new school. We will have to keep an eye on Progreso’s Little Hockey School and watch for great things in the near future.


They’ve Got to Come to Yucatan for Diving!

From synchronized swimming to high diving, the Kukulcan Sports Center is a world class venue. The World Series of Diving was held last weekend here in Merida. Yucatan has been developing a love of extreme sports for a long time now, and nowhere is that more evident than in high diving.

Not to Leave Out Boxing!

Yucatan also has three young boxers participating in the National Boxing Olympics in Monterrey. They are competing in the 44, 54, and up to 70 kilos divisions and expected to do extremely well. Yucatan loves boxing and its boxers, so look for lots more to come from these young people as time goes on.

Revised Hurricane Prediction

NOAA has revised down its 2015 hurricane prediction, in the Atlantic, to 70% below normal, 20% near normal and 10% above normal. This means six to 11 named storms, three to six hurricanes, and zero to two major hurricanes. The median Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE), in the Atlantic, is only 40% to 85%. Before you relax, keep two things in mind: (1) It doesn’t matter how many hurricanes form or how few. It only takes one to devastate a huge area of land, and (2) Don’t forget the Pacific Ocean. Hurricanes can and do come at Yucatan from behind. This year, as the Atlantic prediction fell to 70% below normal, the Pacific’s prediction rose to 70% above normal. In the Pacific, there is a chance of 15 to 22 named storms, seven to 12 hurricanes, and five to eight major hurricanes. The median Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE), in the Pacific, is 110% to 190%. Please bookmark the NOAA website to keep up with news about what’s happening with hurricanes and why.

Useful Hurricane Preparation Links

Hurricane Preparation for Pet Owners
Ask Yourself These Questions
Temporary Shelters in Yucatan
Emergency Numbers in Your Area
Current Satellite Images

Cenote Dangers: Can Anything Be Done?

Yucatan is averaging about one death per month in cenotes. This is due to swimmers either not knowing they should be wearing life jackets when swimming in cenotes, or simply ignoring the rules. There are no lifeguards at cenotes and no one to instruct swimmers. Instead, cenote owners rely on tourists to use common sense. Activists are beginning to lobby for lifeguards and safety posters, believing that 99% of all cenote deaths can be avoided this way. People are not known for using common sense in situations where they are excited and make assumptions based on awe and wonder, so lifeguards and safety posters seem to be ideas whose time has come.

Danger of Not Wearing a Motorcycle Helmet

In five months, 81 people have died in motor vehicle accidents, with most of the deaths related to motorcyclists not wearing helmets. One person dies every four days in Yucatan for this one reason. Alcohol is usually involved. At the very least, the drivers were distracted and the result falls into the category of recklessness. Excessive speed, recklessness, and alcohol are cited as the three main reasons for vehicle accidents and deaths in Yucatan. All are avoidable.

Pullmantur Begins New Cruise Route

With the expansion of the Port of Progreso, in both science and technology, there are going to be many more well-paid residents, in Merida and Progreso, who will be looking for great entertainment. Pullmantur is a cruise ship that is based out of Progreso and travels to Cozumel, Belize, Honduras, Grand Cayman and home to Progreso. At the present time, they have 11 starts planned. If you would like to travel that route, you have 11 weeks to do it. The ships they use will accommodate 2,800 passengers. There is an added benefit for local hotel owners as well. When a cruise leaves in the morning, travelers usually arrive in the area the night before and spend the night in a hotel. This will be of great benefit to hotels in both Merida and at the beach. It looks as if Progreso has got this growing thing down to a science and it couldn’t happen to a nicer sleepy little fishing village.

Language and Engineering Students: Aggies Now?

How many weeks does it take to become a full fledged Texas Aggie? We guess we’ll find out when Yucatan’s 30 Language and Engineering students come home from a ten week intensive study of Language and Engineering. Last year’s class was ready for the GRE (Graduate Record Exam) when they came back, so these students can look for a bright future in areas that include automation, cloud computing, advanced robotics, autonomous vehicles, 3D printing and aeronautics. Of course, the Spirit of Aggieland comes free with the course. Congratulations to the students and to Texas A&M for the coup of getting such a great group of students.

By Working Gringos

This Week… starting June 01 , 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) June 01, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Yucatan Living Hurricane Season Officially Begins
Be prepared!!

Tuesday (Martes) June 02, 2015

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Dueto Zasil-Kay
This group has become an audience favorite over the past two or three years. Their performances are always audience pleasers.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Parents
(USA 1989) A young boy living in 1950s suburbia begins to wonder where his parents get their meat from… oh dear. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) June 03, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Party Girl
(France 2014) An aging nightclub hostess decides to settle down and get married. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Medea
(France 1969). Director: Pier Paolo Pasolini. Starring Maria Callas, Giuseppe Gentile, Laurent Terzieff, Massimo Girotti, Margareth Clementi and Anna Maria Chio. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Orchestra of Merida: Meridana Watercolor
Just the name of this performance sounds wonderful. Knowing the members of the orchestra itself makes this really something to look forward to! And a concert at the Palacio Canton!! How wonderful!
Location: Canton Palace, Paseo de Montejo x 43
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Relay Art Installation #13
Manager: Gretta Brito
Location: ReLe, Calle 65 #349 B x 38 y 40, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Yucatan’s First Festival of Sexual Diversity
It will be exciting to be in Yucatan as this festival begins its first edition, and especially interesting to see how this festival evolves through the years.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas. Av. Colon x Calle 20.
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Jauja
(Various 2014) A father and daughter journey from Denmark to an unknown desert that exists in a realm beyond the confines of civilization. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) June 04, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Last Days Here
(USA 2011) Bobby Liebling was the charismatic singer of 70′s hard-rockers and doom pioneers, Pentagram. Today dying in his father’s basement smoking crack and heroin, a zombie with overwhelming sores and skin mottling, toothless and disjointed infections, he flirts with death daily. The film begins with the encounter between Liebling and Sean “Pellet” Pelletier, friend and manager who will try to revive the career of the late metal myth. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Entre Sombras
(Mexico 2014) In a final attempt to resolve their marital problems, Eric and Mari make ​​a road trip to the jungles of southeastern Mexico. Just when his luck seems to be changing, she disappears. Confused and devastated, Eric begins the journey back to the capital, encountering on his way an enigmatic character, Narciso, who becomes his traveling companion. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Inauguration of the Photographic Exposition: Witnesses. The Caste War 1847? 20?
This exposition presents the photographs of Serge Barbeau… should be interesting.
Location: Galeria de Arte Municipal de Merida, Calle 65 x 56
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The King of Comedy
(USA 1982) Aspiring comic Rupert Pupkin wants to achieve success in show biz by stalking his idol, a late night talk-show host who craves his own privacy. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) June 05, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: H2O
(Mexico 2012) Mexico City grows unchecked. Before an area surrounded by lakes, now supplying water to this city is a real problem. H2Omx records shortages, waste and serious water pollution problems. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Inauguration of the Exposition: From the Earthly – June 5 – July 5
This exposition features the works of Oaxacan artist Luis Jose Ramirez Cortes, with emphasis on more worldly than spiritual subjects.
Location: CEPHCIS, Santa Lucia Cultural Precinct, Calle 60 #469 x 53 y 55, Centro Merida.
Time: Opening: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Visconti Trilogy #1: The Damned
(Italy 1969). Director: Luchino Visconti. Starring Dirk Bogarde, Ingrid Thulin, Helmut Berger, Helmut Griem and Charlotte Rampling. The dramatic collapse of a wealthy industrialist Junker family during the reign of the Third Reich. In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living First Friday International Cocktail Party
Special 2×1 drink prices, free botañas, reduced parking. Get connected. Join old friends and make new ones at Merida´s biggest monthly gathering of ex-pats and Meridanos.
Location: La Hach patio bar– Fiesta Americana Hotel
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Dances of Europe
This performance, by Grupo Quo Vadis, under the direction of Pawel Marek Blaszkowski, has been a consistent crowd pleaser for weeks.
Location: Iglesia de “El Jesus” Tercera Orden (Church of Jesus Third Order), Calle 60 x 59
Time: 8:30 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Julia’s Eyes
(Spain 2010) The story of a woman who is slowly losing her sight whilst trying to investigate the mysterious death of her twin sister. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Buy Your Liquor Now
Liquor will not be sold in the country of Mexico over the weekend. Stock up now.

 

Saturday (Sabado) June 06, 2015

Yucatan Living Due to the National Election Tomorrow: No Alcohol Sale Laws in Effect
When? First Minute of Saturday to Last Minute of Sunday

Yucatan Living Writing and Publishing Workshop
This is a bilingual workshop. Participate in writing exercises. Explore different types of writing and learn about self-publishing.
Location: Biblioteca Publica, Lectura Salon, Calle 55 x 60 y 62, Centro, Merida
Time: 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM Saturday
Admission: Free
More Information: Contact Ria: Ria [dot] stonemail [at] gmail [dot] com

Yucatan Living Burrerías Puppet Show
A theatre group from Havana, Cuba presents a puppet show having something to do with burro rides. Bring all the kids!! More info here on Facebook.
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 66 N°377C por 41 y 43, Merida centro
Time: 11:00 AM Saturday
Admission: $30 pesos

Yucatan Living Opera Yucatan
LA SONNAMBULA de Bellini.
Location: Sala Mayamax, Gran Museo del Mundo Maya, on the road to Progreso
Time: 12:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family suffered a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of Ida’s roots, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Visconti Trilogy #2: Death in Venice
(France 1971). Director: Luchino Visconti. Starring Dirk Bogarde, Bjorn Andresen, Silvana Mangano, Marisa Berenson, Mark Burns, and Romolo Valli. In this adaptation of the Thomas Mann novel, avant-garde composer Gustave Aschenbach (loosely based on Gustav Mahler develops a troubling obsession with a beautiful adolescent boy while on vacation with his family. Tragedy and corruption enter in with the onset of a deadly pestilence. English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Cronos
(USA 1993) A mysterious device designed to provide its owner with eternal life resurfaces after four hundred years, leaving a trail of destruction in its path. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Entre Sombras
(Mexico 2014) In a final attempt to resolve their marital problems, Eric and Mari make ​​a road trip to the jungles of southeastern Mexico. Just when his luck seems to be changing, she disappears. Confused and devastated, Eric begins the journey back to the capital, encountering on his way an enigmatic character, Narciso, who becomes his traveling companion. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), June 07, 2015

Yucatan Living Election Day
No alcohol for sale. Might as well go to the movies!

Yucatan Living Movie: Band of Outsiders
(France 1964) Two crooks with a fondness for old Hollywood B-movies convince a languages student to help them commit a robbery. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) June 08, 2015

No events planned for today as yet. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: Various
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar – Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

House for sale in Santiago Merida YucatanThis house for sale is located just 3 blocks from the ever-popular Santiago park, with its live music and outdoor dancing every Tuesday night and its mercado that is open every day.

The house is within easy walking distance to the Plaza Grande, the center of Merida.

This contemporary brand new house has two stories with nine-foot ceilings. The first floor has an open kitchen, a living room, half bathroom, storage and laundry space. The second floor has a illuminated, airy and spacious House for Sale in Yucatanbedroom and bathroom, with floor to ceiling windows looking out over the patio and pool area. The floors throughout the house are polished cement with beautiful pasta tile inserts.

At the backyard there is a 26-foot long swimming pool, with enough space to build an additional one or two story casita.

House Details:

Lot Area: 144 meters / 1550 feet
Living Area: 97 meters / 1044 feet
Lot Length: 4.5 meters / 14.76 feet
Lot Width: 32 meters / 105 feet
Swimming pool: 2 meters wide by 8 meters long / 6 feet wide by 26 feet long
Bathrooms: 1 1/5
Bedrooms: 1
Laundry Space: YES
House for Sale in YucatanParking: NO
Neighborhood: SANTIAGO

Asking Price: $115,000


Contact Information:

Contact Maria La Garde

Phone: 55 29505683
Email: marialagarde04 [at] yahoo [dot] com [dot] mx

The house is for sale by owner.
****

This is a paid advertisement.

By Nadine Calder

Yucatan FlagXIII

The government’s four-year term was coming to an end and the employees, as well as those who hoped to become such, were already scrambling in the serious mission of determining who should replace the head of State.

There were two camps, each with its respective candidate. The first took the name of Gran Partido Liberal and the other, wanting to be no less, that of Gran Partido Liberal Porfirista. Despite the similarity of their names seeming to be based on their similarity of principles, they had a field day thrashing each other in their newspapers, opponents hurling a veritable avalanche of insults and epigrams at the respective candidates.

None of this would be important to us if our friends had not entered into the matter.

Señor don Felipe Ramos Alonzo was the main editor of one of the publications of the Gran Partido Liberal Porfirista and had gone to great lengths to finally convince don Hermenegildo that it would not hurt him to take on the management of that echo of public opinion.

“And what’s more,” he said to the bachelor, “on the day of triumph, the governor, who will know who worked in his favor, will give you a cut when it comes time for redistribution.”

“But do you think victory is likely?”

“Likely? Certain. Do you know who supports us in Mexico City? Among others, the Ministers of Government and Development, who you well know have a decisive influence on the President, who in addition knows and likes our candidate very much. We’ve learned that one week from now the opponents’ commission will be leaving for the capital, but we’ve already won the lead by appointing the Yucatecans who are in Mexico City, and on day four they should be presented to the Prime Minister of the Republic by the two Secretaries. You’ll see the letters on the next ship. All done; we win the elections.”

“But surely you’ve noticed that some of the capital’s dailies don’t appear to be very favorable. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

“That doesn’t mean anything. They don’t know what’s going on here and they publish what they’re paid for. José D. Góngora is charged with seeing to it that various stories sent to them appear in print, and there will be no shortage of newspapers that welcome them and promote our candidate and passionately defend him.”

Sea of Politics YucatanAnd so it was that our retiring fifty-year-old entered into the tumultuous sea of politics toward which he had formerly held a passive stance. He would make the commitment and his name would appear as manager of “La Aspiración Popular,” giving rise in his heart to a great affection for the candidate he barely knew.

At those times when the messenger regarding something from the opposing camp stopped by to deliver the obligatory update, Hermenegildo devoured the print as if in it they were notifying him of a pay raise, and the vicious attacks directed at his candidate left him as hurt and indignant as if they had been written about his father.

Among those who contributed to the support of the newspaper was Pancho Vélez, a relative of “La Aspiración Popular’s” candidate, and he could often be seen in the editorial office. What sparks and spluttering flew from his eyes and mouth when he heard the insolent remarks that mob made about his uncle! What threats he made to break one guy’s ribs or to wring that ungrateful wretch’s neck, when if they had a job, it was due to the work and grace of the same man they were now insulting.

The editors calmed him down, telling him that they would get even soon enough, to say nothing of the fact that the poor wretch, with the tuberculosis that was consuming him, was in no condition to go on the offensive.

Don Hermenegildo had been presented to the governor-in-the-making. With some frequency he went to pay an evening visit to him, who was always surrounded by many people, all of them desperate to bring good fortune to the State. Never did the bachelor utter a single word denigrating those who represented the other party and all his strategy consisted of praising his own.

What good people! Cigar Smokers in Yucatan How they deplored the fact that the separate branches of public administration couldn’t function in a way that corresponded to the culture that that important sector of the Republic had achieved.

And their Leader? What an excellent individual! If they won, and of course they would win, you would see what they stood to gain because he would put into practice his grand plans for the State’s progress. His great merit and importance were well noted because the most respected people hung on his every word. And when he was ready to smoke a cigar, more than one of his visitors hurried to take a box of matches from their pockets to offer him a light.

Don Hermenegildo looked at him and listened with the devotion the oracles would have shown the fortuneteller in the temple of Delphi.

It shouldn’t be thought, due to this new turn in his life, that the clerk forgot his old friends. He no longer went daily to doña Raimunda’s gathering, but he could often be seen there chatting for a while. He also visited Lupita, thereby finding food for his querulous spirit’s appetite in the lamentations of the poor girl, who saw the death of her husband rapidly approaching. But clearly, his principal occupation, after his obligations at the office, was the management of the newspaper and the candidacy of the Leader of the Gran Partido Liberal Porfirista.

At first he worried, despite assurances given him by the señor licenciado, that he would be defeated by all this. But time was passing and issue upon issue came out, many of them sizzling, and don Hermenegildo hung in there without anyone removing him from his position.

The same press that printed “La Aspiración Popular” also brought to public light “El Voto Libre” and “La Voz de Ocampo,” both with the same claims and written by the same people, although varying lists of collaboration could be seen on the front of each one. Many of the articles that could be found in this one appeared in the other, with little more to distinguish them than changing galleys and placing at the foot of them the name of the first newspaper that published them, or preceding them with some version of the following words:

“Our illustrious and courageous colleague ‘El Voto Libre’ brings to light the following article we are pleased to place here, as in it can be seen the shameful means utilized by the competition to raise their candidate from the depths of disrepute in which he finds himself and their attempt to obliterate the enthusiasm with which our own is acclaimed by all.”

XIV

As election time was approaching, the parties attacked each other more viciously. Commissions and letters came and went to the metropolis, and the arrival of the ships coming from Veracruz was awaited more eagerly than if they were carrying manna in their holds.

With only five days before the people would elect the one who would govern them, the mail that arrived from the capital must have carried something very important because it gave great enthusiasm to those who made up the Gran Partido Liberal Porfirista and left those of the Gran Partido Liberal down in the mouth and down in the dumps.

The campaign was won thanks to the work of señor don Felipe Ramos Alonzo and his companions. Therefore, the constituency would turn to the persons they had proposed for the Government.

Poor Pancho Vélez had not been able to enjoy his uncle’s triumph. Bit by bit, he continued deteriorating until he died at the end of September.

And the other side’s candidate? Would he have no consolation in his political failure? To be certain, nothing could be confirmed, although one person related that someone well acquainted with national palace secrets had written him that a Senate seat was reserved for him, as he, like the victor, was such a good friend of the president.

Señor don Felipe would be the local Member of Congress, a position which he preferred to that of Superior Court Judge, as it was more comfortable and because it wouldn’t prevent him from practicing his profession, hereinafter the more promising since his influence in the government would attract business. Besides the corresponding salary, it was later learned that the position paid one hundred pesos a month for service on a commission, which the outgoing party confirmed in the official newspaper, although no one knew that the commission was so comfortable that it took up no more of the lucky winner’s time than what was necessary to write out the receipt.

Naturally, our don Hermenegildo didn’t fail to benefit from the triumph, either, as he went from clerk to a more important office, where he put in only three hours a day in exchange for sixty pesos a month. He also gained the duty of inspector of who knows what, authorized by City Hall, that would give him a salary of fifty pesos. One hundred and ten pesos that he owed principally to the efforts of his unsurpassable friend señor don Felipe Ramos Alonzo, who also offered to give him abundant and well paid work with papers in his office. These were all steps forward that led the clerk to find himself in little less than abundance, comparing his present situation with the desperation of his former life.

Luis Robles returned from Mexico City a little after the new government took over. He came with his usual good humor and a more imposing presence than he had left with.

He had worked diligently as an agent of the triumphant electoral club, seeing that correspondence was placed in various newspapers, which were paid well, proclaiming the immense popularity of the most “honorable and eminent liberal who was called by his fellow citizens to govern the destinies of the people who acclaimed him everywhere.” The same that was said about the other candidate.

He also wrote not a few articles whose publication he paid for with the club’s account and which appeared as if written in different organs of the metropolitan press, which very reliably gave assurance that “numerous letters received from this important federal entity convinced them that the candidate in favor of that which they had dealt with several times, was the only one who could satisfy the noble aspirations of progressive Yucatecans”.

It was Luis Robles’s luck that the Gran Partido Liberal Porfirista would win in the contest with the Gran Partido Liberal and, with favorable responses to some previous letters to the Leader, he packed his belongings and came by the first steamship.

Today he was satisfied with himself as owner and Diosa de Fortunamaster of his Fortune, walking again through the old theater of his student life and soon to give birth to “La Voz Pública,” an independent weekly, for which he would receive from the Treasurer General every month the sum of one hundred and fifty pesos. The newspaper would, furthermore, be recommended to all those who composed the large employees’ guild and, from then on, was counting everyone in the State Treasury Department as sure participants to whom it was very easy to charge subscriptions, deducting them when paying salaries.

What more could Luís Robles ask for? Defending the Government was an enterprise neither new nor difficult; and on the other hand, he had a sure entry with work so simple as the editing of “La Voz Pública,” a voice that would be heard only one day of the week; on all the others it would keep silent.

It was assured that the newcomer would waste no time in getting married. His fiancée was Antonia Pacheco, whom he had met and seen quite a lot of in Mexico City the past year, a beautiful and modest young woman, the only daughter of a man who was vulgar but loaded with money.

Luck, therefore, seemed to be smiling on the young man. He had already passed through prosperity’s doors and the world was his.

****

By Khaki Scott

For information on This Week’s Events in Merida
Please check our Weekly Events Article
or our Month-At-A-Glance Calendar

Ongoing Events

Monday (Lunes)

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Conversaciones con Amigos (Conversations with Friends)
Practice Spanish or English with friends. Membership not necessary. The library really needs English-speaking participants, as word is getting out that this is a great place to learn English. It also happens to be a great place to learn Spanish, too, and to make some friends outside of the expat community. Come and participate!
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 #524 x 66 y 68.Vaqueria in Merida, Yucatan
Time: 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Monday
Admission: Small Donation

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Hennessy’s Movie Night
Each week, a new movie. Watch outside with friends while you enjoy dinner or a drink or both.
Location: Hennessy’s Irish Pub / Polo Bar, Paseo Montejo x 61 y 43, Centro Merida
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Jehovah’s Witnesses: English Meetings
Location: Calle 50 #231 x 19 y 21, Col. Roma (near Plaza Las Americas).
Time: 7:00 PM, every Monday

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Vaqueria
Performances by the Ballet Folklorico de Merida, accompanied by the Orchestra Jaranera. This celebration has its roots in the 18th century, when cattle ranching was the main source of wealth on the Yucatan Peninsula. Ranchers held huge fiestas to show off their wealth during branding time. The dances were adapted by the wives of the cowboys and soon developed into the signature dances of Yucatan.
Preview: Monday’s Vaqueria
Location: In front of the Municipal Palace (the building with the clock), Calle 62 x 63
Time: The first note of “Aires Yucatecos” begins at 9:00 PM, every Monday
Admission: Free

 

 Tuesday (Martes)

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Merida English Library House Tours
The MEL House Tours are the original tours, and the only ones in Merida where all the proceeds go to benefit the non-profit library. Meet at the Merida English Library at 9 AM for a three hour tour of finished homes, renovated homes, homes-in-process and private homes. Enjoy the tour multiple times, because every time is different! Check the website to see when the tours start in the fall.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 between 66 and 68
Dates and Time: 9:00 AM, every Tuesday from October through April
Admission: Members and Guests: $150 pesos, Non-members: $200 pesos

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Mercado Consciente (Organic Market)
Location: C.61 x 46 y 48 Fco. de Montejo en TaBoO & Tea.
Time: 9:30 AM to 2:00 PM every Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Musical Memories
This weekly dance has been held every Tuesday night since Valentine’s Day, 1984. Come out and enjoy the Big Band sounds of the 1940′s, performed by members of the wonderful Jaranera Orchestra. Best of all, this is a great place to practice your chachacha and your mambo, or just sit and watch others enjoy dancing under the stars. You can even have dinner at a cocina economica while you watch!
Preview: A Salsa Night in Parque de Santiago 
Location: Parque de Santiago, Calle 72 x 59
Time: 8:30 PM, every Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida French Afternoons at Negrita Cantina
French conversation for all levels, with support by the French Alliance of Merida. This is the place to come and enjoy either learning or practicing new French language skills or, for those for whom French is their native language, to enjoy the familiar sounds of home.
Location: La Negrita Cantina, Calle 62 x 49, Barrio de Santa Ana, Centro
Time: 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM, every Tuesday
Admission: $30 pesos, space limited to 15

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Chelem: Tuesday Farmer’s Market
Hosted by Artistas de la Playa and Masai Maya Bistro. Fruit, vegetables, baked goods, handicrafts, art, children’s activities, entertainment.
Location: at the left of the 1st tope in Chelem
Time: 2:00 PM to 7:00 PM, every Tuesday
Admission: Free but be prepared to shop and eat!

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Wholefood Market
Location: on the highway between Chelem and Churburna, beside Natural Thangs Garden Center on Graciella’s beautiful property. Available every week, food, as well as jewelry, blankets, trinkets, etc.
Time: 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM, every Tuesday
Admission: Free but be prepared to shop and eat!

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Merida Men’s Club
This is a multi-national English-speaking group whose members live in or near Merida, Yucatan. They meet for coffee, breakfast and friendly conversation. Speakers are invited to address the group on topics of interest. No dues. No officers. No bylaws.
Location: Main Restaurant at the Hyatt Hotel, Calle 60 x Av. Colon
Time: 8:00 AM to about 9:30 AM, 1st and 3rd Tuesdays and 5th Tuesday if there is one.
Admission: Donation plus buffet is $130 pesos. Bring a friend!
Donations Support: Chicxulub Food Bank and Kids Breakfast Program of Cholul.
Additional Information: Roger Bowie at 924-6792 or Dan Ninburg at 928-2878.

Yucatan Living Events in Merida AA Steps Meetings in English
Time: 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM, every Tuesday
Location: Calle 53 #524 x 66 y 68, Centro
Admission: Donation
Contact: www.meridaenglishlibrary.com or (999) 924-8401

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Curry Night at Hennessy’s
Home made curry dishes cooked by the man himself, Sean Hennessy. Reservations almost certainly required.
Location: Hennessy’s Restaurant on Paseo de Montejo

Dates and Time: 8:30 PM, every Tuesday
Admission: $250 pesos for all you can eat.

 

Wednesday (Miércoles)

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Al-Anon Meeting in English
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 #524 x 66 y 68
Time: 5:30 to 6:30 PM, every Wednesday
Admission: Donation

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Jehovah’s Witness Bible Study
Location: Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Calle 50 #231 x 19 y 21, Colonia Roma (near Plaza Las Americas)
Time: 7:00 PM, every Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Movie or Documentary
Each week, a new and interesting movie. Check our weekly events listing for the movie this week! Or check their website.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, Centro
Time: 9:00 PM, every Wednesday
Admission: $30 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves)

Yucatan Living Events in Merida To Remember is to Live
This is a dance that begins early and ends at a reasonable hour. Music is provided by the Jaranera Orchestra, with their signature Big Band sound. It was originally intended as an entertainment venue for older dancers, but lots of other folks use it as yet another opportunity to perfect their dance steps.
Location: Parque Zoologico del Centenario (The Zoo), Calle 59 x Avenida Itzaes
Time: 4:00 PM, every Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida AA Discussion Meetings in English
Location: Calle 53 #524 x 66 y 68, Centro
Time: 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM, every Thursday
Admission: Donation
Contact: www.meridaenglishlibrary.com or (999) 924-8401

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Movie at Cairo Cinema Cafe
2 movies are shown. Check our weekly events listing for the titles or check their website.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17 Colonia Itzimná
Time: 7:00 PM and 9:00 PM, every Thursday
Admission: $30 pesos, includes popcorn and $50 pesos for both movies.

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Serenata Yucateca (Yucatecan Serenade)
This is the defining serenade of Merida and has been performed every Thursday night for over 40 years. Parque Santa Lucia, home to the Altar to Trova is the center of Merida’s romantic heart. If you are a visitor, make sure to see this particular serenade. It is well worth becoming a part of your first memory of Merida.
Preview: Trova and Merida with Los Juglares
Location: Parque de Santa Lucia, Calle 60 x 55
Time: 9:00 PM, every Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Movie or Documentary
Each week, a new and interesting movie. Check our weekly events listing for the movie this week! Or check their website
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, Centro
Time: 9:00 PM, every Thursday
Admission: $30 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Events in Merida AA Meeting in English
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 #524 x 66 y 68
Time: 7:00 PM, every Thursday

 

Friday (Viernes)

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Denis Lafoy’s TGIF
This is the party sponsored by Yucatan Trails Travel Agency and held in Hennessy’s Bar on all First Friday nights. It is a time to visit with old friends and make new ones.Botanas (snacks) are provided.
Location: Hennessy’s Restaurant, Paseo Montejo #486 x 41 y 43, across the street from the Anthropology Museum
Time: 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM, first Friday of the month
Admission: Free (cash bar)

Yucatan Living Events in MeridaWeekly Language Exchange
Every Friday in Hotel Campestre there is a language exchange. The comfortable setting is very peaceful, on the terrace, with great coffee. If you want to meet new friends, practice foreign languages, and have great time, please do come and join this group. There is someone new at every meeting, so don’t be afraid to come alone. Find out more at this meet-up group, Merida Language Exchange Meetup.
Location: Hotel Campestre, Calle 1d No. 248 x 36 y Prol. Montejo, Fracc. Campestre, www.meridacampestre.com/
Time: 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM, every Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Movie or Documentary
Each week, a new and interesting movie. Check our weekly events listing for the movie this week! Or check their website.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, Centro
Time: 9:00 PM, every Friday
Admission: $30 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Movie at Cairo Cinema Cafe
2 movies. Check our weekly events listing for the titles or check their website.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17 Colonia Itzimná
Time: 7:00 PM and 9:00 PM, every Friday
Admission: $30 pesos, includes popcorn and $50 pesos for both movies.

Yucatan Living Events in Merida MEL-O-Nights
This is a chance for the locals to meet the ‘extranjeros’ in a casual setting in the gardens at MEL. There is a cash bar and great botanas (snacks). Please join us for this sociable evening… meeting old friends and making new ones! If you want to know more, call the Library at 999-924-8401.
Location: Merida English Library, Calle 53 #524 x 66 y 68
Time: 7:30 PM, every Third Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Merida Jewish Circle Weekly Services
Friday morning shacharit services, some social events. For information and a weekly email with candle lighting times and more, write Alan or Ken at ComunidadJudiadeMerida [at] gmail [dot] com.
Location: To be sent by e-mail
Time: To be sent by e-mail
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado)

Tours of the Cathedral in English

The tour includes the choir loft, the north belltower, parts of the roof and more! This news is very exciting because these spaces were previously off limits. We often Merida Cathedral tours in Englishforget that we live with the second oldest Cathedral in the New World, the Cathedral of San Ildefonso. Merida’s cathedral is built on top of the Mayan city of T’ho. Many of the stones used in the construction of the cathedral and other old structures in Merida were taken from the temples of this ancient city. Some of us pass the Cathedral every day and hardly take notice of it anymore. These tours will be a way for English speakers to learn more about the Cathedral and better appreciate its role in the history of Yucatan.
Time: The tour in English is on Saturdays at 10:00 AM. The tour in Spanish is on Saturdays at 4:00 PM.
Admission: $50 pesos per person with tickets available inside the main doors of the Cathedral.

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Operas at the Movies
Operas are presented on the first Saturday of every month. This has become one of the most well attended events in the City and we hope to see everyone there!
Location: Movie theatre at the Mundo Maya Museum by Siglo XXI
Time: Brief opera talk 11:30 AM, Opera begins 12:00 PM, every Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Movie or Documentary
Each week, a new and interesting movie. Check our weekly events listing for the movie this week! Or check their website.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, Centro
Time: 9:00 PM, every Saturday
Admission: $30 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Events in Merida International Women’s Club Breakfast
The IWC holds a non-host breakfast that is open to both members and to potential members. You can read about the IWC here and check their calendar.
Location: Tecnologica Turistica Total, Calle 57 #492 x 56 y 58 in Merida centro
Time: 9:30 AM to Noon, last Saturday of every month except December, July & August
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Slow Foods Farmer’s Market
Organic produce, organic eggs, organic coffee, miscellaneous organic goods, cut flowers and potted plants, artisanal cheeses, ethnic foods homemade baked goods, homemade pasta, sauces, dips, preserves, organic honey, organic meats and much more! A great place to meet fellow expatriates as well.
Location: Avenida Reforma (Calle 72) x Avenida Colon, García Ginéres
Time: 9:00 AM until 1:00 PM, every Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Mérida Mens Club
No dues and no officers – just great camaraderie, wonderful speakers, and loads of information about subjects of general and local interest. The Merida Men’s Club is a multi-national, English-speaking group that meets for coffee, breakfast and friendly conversation. For more information, contact Dan Ninburg (928-3866) or Roger Bowie (924-6792). You can also contact Dan via e-mail at: bushninburg [at] yahoo [dot] com
Location: Different locations
Time: 9:00 AM to 10:30 AM, last Saturday of every month
Admission: Free (bring a friend)

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Noche Mexicana
Each Saturday night, there is a performance on an outdoor stage at the beginning of Paseo de Montejo, often from a musical or dance group from another part of Mexico. Chairs are set up for the audience, but there is often standing room only. Booths selling food and handicrafts are set up in the park. The purpose of this performance is to bring all of Mexico to Merida and to our tourists from all over the world.
Location: At the beginning of Paseo de Montejo, at the Remate (corner of Calle 47)
Time: 8:00 PM, every Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida En El Corazón de Mérida (In the Heart of Merida)
Live music, including jazz, salsa and trova, held on various stages around the Plaza Grande. Many of the streets leading to the Plaza are closed to all but foot traffic, and the restaurants and bars put their chairs and tables outside in the streets. This is a night designed for that Saturday night date, but they’ve got all of the shops open for business too.
Location: Plaza Grande, Calle 61 at Calle 60
Time: 9:00 PM to 2:00 AM, every Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Movie at Cairo Cinema Cafe
2 movies. Check our weekly events listing for the titles or check their website.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17 Colonia Itzimná
Time: 7:00 PM and 9:00 PM, every Saturday
Admission: $30 pesos, includes popcorn and $50 pesos for both movies.

 

Sunday (Domingo)

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Bici-Ruta
The Bici-Ruta begins early, at 8:00 AM, though we see them setting up as early as 7:00 AM. It ends at 12:30 PM. The route usually begins at Ermita de Santa Isabel, with stops at Monumento a la Patria, Paseo de Montejo x 33 y Ave. Cupules, Paseo de Montejo x 29, Paseo de Montejo x Ave. del deportista, and Paseo de Montejo x 42. Along the way, participants can participate in health education programs, music and dancing, art and sculpture classes, soccer games and more. If anyone wants to pick up a chess game, one can be found on the sidewalk outside the Museum of Anthropology on Paseo de Montejo at 9:00 AM. There is a complete listing of activities (they change weekly) on the Bici-Ruta website.
Location: Begins at Parque de la Ermita, runs through the Plaza Grande and ends at the glorietta on Prolongacion Paseo de Montejo (by Burger King), also in Ciudad Caucel around Animaya/
Time: 8:00 AM to 12:30 PM, every Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Jehovah’s Witnesses: English Meetings
Public meeting
Location: Calle 50 #231 x 19 y 21, Col. Roma (near Plaza Las Americas).
Time: 9:30 PM, every Sunday

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Merida En Domingo
Sunday downtown is a spectacular tradition in Merida. Start at the center of the city, where booths are set up all the Plaza Grande. Inside the plaza, you can find huipiles, guayaberas, honey, dolls, bags, tee-shirts and more. Everything is made for sale by the local people of Yucatan. The outer ring of booths sell food, such as marquesitas, tacos, cochinita, ice cream (try the coconut), fruit, drinks, etc. If the crowd starts to get to you, wander up Calle 60 to Santa Lucia Park, at Calle 55, where you can also find antiques, old books and other curiosities. At that lovely park, there is also live music, lots of dancing, and more great food.
Location: in the Centro Historico: Plaza Grande, Parque Santa Lucia (Cale 60 x 55) and MACAY Museum (Calle 60 x 61 y 63).
Time: 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM, every Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Movie at Cairo Cinema Cafe
2 movies. Check our weekly events listing for the titles or check their website.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17 Colonia Itzimná
Time: 7:00 PM and 9:00 PM, every Sunday
Admission: $30 pesos, includes popcorn and $50 pesos for both movies.

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Sunday Art on Paseo de Montejo
Every Sunday there are artists displaying and selling their fine art along Paseo Montejo. There are usually 20 or more artists showing their paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints and more. This is your chance to meet the artists, see what’s new and maybe pick up something great for those big empty walls in your new renovated home in Merida or that house by the beach.
Location: Paseo de Montejo in front of VIPS (on the southeast corner of Avenida Colon, across from WalMart)
Time: 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM, every Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Events in Merida English Church Services
All denominations welcome.
Location: The church, Presbyterian Iglesia Jesus, is located in Progreso on the corner of Calle 35 and Calle 80. Traveling from Merida to Progreso, cross over the Chixculub Telchac highway (passing Aurrera Bodega supermarket on the right). Take a left onto Calle 35, cross over Calle 80 and the church is on the left side on the corner of Calle 35 and 82.
Time: Service is at 8:30 AM, every Sunday.
For further information: Call or email bilingual Pastor David Correa (969) 935-1678 or email iglesiajesus [at] prodigy [dot] net [dot] mx.

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Cathedral Mass in English
The Mass includes all Protestant denominations and Catholics. Two priests, alternating weekly, are sharing the provision of services. Some of those attending mass in English go to breakfast after the service and everyone is welcome to join in.
Location: In the North facing chapel to the left of the big altar in the main Cathedral on the Plaza Grande.
Time: 9:00 AM, every Sunday

Yucatan Living Events in Merida Merida: Jehovah’s Witnesses English Services
Location: Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Calle 50 #231 x 19 y 21, Colonia Roma (near Plaza Las Americas)
Time: 9:00 AM, every Sunday
Admission: Public is welcome, No collections. See jw.org for more information.

 

 

For information on This Week’s One-Time Events in Merida
please check our Weekly Events Calendar

If you know of a regular ongoing event in Merida and the surrounding area that you think should be included here, please email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com

 

By Working Gringos

Casa Millsaps face to the street in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Entry to Casa Millsaps in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Pool and courtyard at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Bedroom at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Bedroom for two at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Bunkbeds at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Bathroom at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Dining room at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Kitchen at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Sitting area at Casa Millsaps in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Conference room at Casa Millsaps

Terrace at night Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Roof terrace at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casa Millsaps

Casa Millsaps is a 9 bedroom, 10 bathroom vacation rental house in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Located just a few blocks from the hotel zone and Merida’s famous Paseo de Montejo, Casa Millsaps is set up to comfortably accommodate large parties of up to 20 people in the same house. A mixture of small suites with dorm-style beds and private rooms with queen or two twin beds makes Casa Millsaps is a perfect place for international classes, family or class reunions, retreats or any sort of group travel.

 

In addition to the ample sleeping facilities, Casa Millsaps also features a complete kitchen and covered patio dining area, a conference room that seats up to 20 people, a filtered plunge pool, a rooftop seating area and Wi-Fi throughout the house. Within a few blocks, there are hotels, car rental agencies, a wide selection of restaurants, Wal-Mart, banks, shopping and a traditional market at Parque Santa Ana.

 

 

Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

Rates

The rates for Casa Millsaps range depending on the number of people staying and the length of stay. The rates are, for the most part, calculated on a per person basis.
The rates are approximately $30 USD per person per night. We request a minimum of four persons for a three night minimum. For a fully occupied house in all nine bedrooms, rates would be approximately $600 per night. However, slightly lower rates are available for larger groups and longer stays.

 

Children and Pets

There is an unfenced swimming pool at Casa Millsaps. Children must be supervised at all times and the guest assumes all liability and responsibility for children in and around the pool and all areas. Pets are not encouraged, but may be accommodated on a case by case basis.

Deposit

Typically, a 50% payment is expected within 2 weeks of the receipt of your confirmation that Casa Millsaps is available and reserved for your requested dates. If your desired arrival date is less than two weeks from the reservation date, then the full payment would be due at the time of reservation. The remaining fifty percent (50%) balance is due 4 weeks prior to your arrival date. If your desired arrival date is less than 4 weeks from the reservation date, then the full payment would be due at the time of reservation.
In addition to the rental fee, we require a refundable deposit of $250 for lost or damaged items or as an excessive cleaning fee.

 

Cancellation Policy

In the event that guest cancels the reservation for any reason, a $250 cancellation fee will be charged. If the cancellation occurs at least thirty (30) days prior to the check-in date and Casa Millsaps is unable to re-rent the property by the guest’s check-in date, the guest will be liable for fifty percent (50%) of the rental costs. If the cancellation occurs less than thirty (30) days of the check-in date, all monies paid by guest will be forfeited if Casa Millsaps is not re-rented by the check-in date. Casa Millsaps will make all reasonable efforts to re-rent the home by the check-in date. We encourage you to buy travel insurance at the time of booking in the event you must cancel and forfeit funds.

 

Pool at Casa Millsaps Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

 

Payment Options

Casa Millsaps accepts checks or bank wires in US dollars or Mexican Pesos as long as they are deposited one month prior to your arrival date. We can also accept Credit Cards or PayPal. Payment options and instructions will be given upon the acceptance of the reservation dates.

 

Contact

 

For more information, go to our website:

www.casamillsaps.com

 

You can use our reservation request form on the website to let us know about your group and check availability, or you can email us at info [at] casamillsaps [dot] com. We look forward to seeing you at Casa Millsaps!

By Khaki Scott

The Weather Outside is Frightful….

Yes – the temperature went up to 41 C (105.8 F) in Yucatan this week and the first tropical storm rolled off of Africa into the Atlantic. Hurricane season begins June 1 but, by all accounts, it is starting a little early this year. The first tropical storms are heading for South America, but it’s time to get prepared (just in case) and to find an online weather radar that you like. If you don’t have a favorite, try Intellicast Caribbean. If you think you have found a better radar tracker, please put a link in a comment to let others know where to find it. We hope everyone has a safe and hurricane free summer.

New Flights to Cuba

Closer ties have been developing between Yucatan and Cuba for years, especially in the sharing of culture, education and medicine. However, over the more recent months, the speed of economic development in the Caribbean nations has resulted in new ties to business and technology in Cuba and Yucatan. With upward of 4,000 Cubans already commuting between Havana, Cancun and Mexico City on a regular basis, the time has come for Interjet, Aeromex and Cubana to expand their already growing number of tourism flights to and from Havana. This week, with Mexican agencies signing approvals for multifaceted tourism to Cuba, flights increased and prices dropped. The result has been an air fare price war with tourists as the clear, if temporary, winners. If you are looking for a new place to go on vacation, it looks as if Cuba is the favorite for summer 2015.

Louisiana Entrepreneurs in Merida

Not a week goes by that Merida doesn’t become the host city for yet another international convention or two. It is amazing to watch as this city’s resources, including peace and tranquility, call them in from around the world. This time, it is a group of 40 entrepreneurs from Louisiana. They will be in Yucatan and Campeche for two weeks and attend four big events, one of which will be focused on clean energy and another on oceanography. Developing strong ties between these Louisiana entrepreneurs and the science and technology sectors of Yucatan and Campeche will be the main goal of the convention. With South Louisiana as one of the strongholds of energy production for the United States, as well as LSU Baton Rouge being the home of Oceanography & Coastal Sciences, Biological Sciences, and the Coast and Environment, these are important relationships to the next generation of business and energy production worldwide.

Speaking French in Yucatan

Did you know that French is the second favorite language for Yucatecos? This is due to the fact that France has, throughout more than a few decades, provided many scholarships and higher education opportunities for Yucatan’s young scholars, as well as job opportunities for college graduates. The French Alliance of Merida provides French language workshops at every level for students who want to earn certification by the French government in that language. Every year, as Yucatan’s college graduates set off for graduate school and/or jobs in France, we often forget that they have spent years becoming proficient enough in French to survive and thrive in another language. New classes are soon to begin at the French Alliance of Merida and everyone is deeply appreciative of their continued dedication to the nurturing of Yucatan’s students of the French language.

It’s Scout Week in Merida

Don’t ever think that Yucatan is unaware that the children of today will be in charge of the future for this state. Toward ensuring that the future is stable, safe and secure, Yucatan has always included its children, as much as possible, in the political process. This includes invitations to serve “For a Day” in every important position in government, from Governor to fireman, during Scout Week. Of course, this exciting week has its share of fun as well, as kids compete in rowing, canoeing, soccer, and even cooking. From cub scouts on up through the highest levels of Boy Scouts, May 22 through 31 will be the week that kids are in charge, so look for them everywhere and give them all the encouragement you can.

Hats Off To Honey!

Whoever would have believed that, in only fifteen years, Yucatan’s beekeepers would be able to not only band together, but become the exporters of over 2,200,000 tons of honey to Europe each year? Beekeepers struggle with minute changes in weather having the ability to cause major damage to their production. These include too much or too little rain, flowers or few flowers, mold and mildew or too much sun, can the state step in with resources or not, late nortes, hurricanes and tropical storms. The list goes on and on. It takes a brave man to be a full time beekeeper and Yucatan has the honey on its way to Europe to prove the courage of its beekeepers.

Breast Milk Bank

In this era, there is little doubt left as to the benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and baby. There is also little doubt that, for most families, two paychecks are needed to support a modern, safe and secure lifestyle. What are working mothers to do? Temporary places to store breast milk, usually within a few minutes walking distance from their jobs and/or daycare centers, is just the thing to bridge the gap for working, breast feeding mothers and their babies. This week, a breast milk bank that has the capacity to temporarily store the breast milk of 142 mothers opened in the Zamna building of the Yucatan State Ministry of Education. Many thanks to the agencies who supported this facility and congratulations to the mothers and babies who will benefit from it.

Merida’s New Canine Restaurant

This is going to be the hottest reservation in the city (no pun intended) for the next few months. The restaurant’s name is Peek Food Restaurant. Location: Calle 57B #647 x 10 y 12. Phone: +52 999 576 4518. Hours: 6:00 PM to Midnight. Find Peek Food Restaurant on Facebook. The restaurant is the brain child of 20 year old dog trainer Rashid Cortazar Alccer and his sister, Georgina Citlalli. It has three areas: the outside patio is for dogs and their owners, the inside dining room is just for people, and a private room is just for people. The doggie menu is very special and dog-healthy, so not to worry about your dog being fed something that might not be good for him or her. They are open Thursday through Sunday, with space for 50 people and 12 dogs, so do call and make a reservation to treat you and your dog to a night out for dinner.

National Vet Congress & Yucatan Exports Security Dogs

As Merida hosts the 33rd National Congress of the Mexican Association of Small Species Veterinary Medical Specialists, we learn that part of the reason Merida was chosen to host these 800 experts was the dedication of the people of Yucatan to the welfare of their pets. This association works hard to improve national standards of practice. Issues to be addressed include cardiology, neurology, dermatology, orthopedic surgery, ophthalmology, feline leukemia, pre-diabetic cats, constipation, rehabilitation and treatment for poisoning, and the pseudo-veterinary services provided by pet stores. They will also cover a number of reptile issues. This kind of dedication has brought Merida worldwide attention on another front, i.e. that of producing and training security dogs for export to other areas of Mexico, the United States, and Asia. These dogs are born, raised and trained in Yucatan. Then they are loaned for two years to police departments that request dogs proficient in narcotic and explosive detection. Recently, some of these dogs have been trained to protect private individuals. One man can be given credit for the now legendary professionally trained canines of Yucatan. His name is Jose Renan Arjona Villalobos, a policeman for 22 years, who is currently an instructor in the canine unit of the City of Merida, Director of Serpico K-9 Training Center (security training), and Director of Sisk-9 (dog training and comprehensive care). He is also the former commander of the Canine Unit of the Ministry of Public Security. Yucatan has many unsung heroes. Jose Renan Arjona Villalobos is one of them.

Children Get Heart Surgery in Iowa

The Cable Lifeline program, supported by Yucatan’s DIF, supports children and their families while they go to Iowa for heart surgery. They started with 11 children on the list. Four have already had their surgery and arrived back home. The rest will go in July and September. The first four children and their parents were honored with a Welcome Home party in the offices of Yucatan’s DIF. Many thanks to Mercy Hospital, in Iowa, and to the dedicated staff and physicians who have done so much for these children.

By Working Gringos

We recently acquired a key player in the residential, and ocean front property companies in the Yucatan. This group has an enviable record of success in developing consumer markets.

We currently have a large number of listings and are developing new ones daily. We will soon be expanding into the rental and property management area. Our director has many years of commercial and industrial experience, which has already brought exciting opportunities to us in the Yucatan.

We are firm believers in the quote…”If you are not growing…you are dying”!

For this reason we will be hiring a few choice people for the upcoming seasons.

You want from us:

*Honesty
​*Genuine Opportunity
*Training
*Excellent Income Potiental

We Want from You​:

*Coachability
*Integrity
*Accountability

While we invite all to apply, please recognize that we are guests in this great nation…. Nationals will be given preferential status for Language Training, and In Market/Hands On training.

Glen Mac Farlane
Director Sales/Marketing
Yucatan Dream Properties
204 480 6435 Vonage
9992988998 Cell
yucatandreamproperties [at] gmail [dot] com

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting May 25 , 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) May 25, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Tuesday (Martes) May 26, 2015

Yucatan Living Diploma of Photography: El Toloc Collective – May 26 – 30
Historical Archives of Merida: Module 1: Visual Language
Teacher: Patricia Aridjis
Location: Contact for more information
Time: Open Hours: Tuesday – Friday: 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM, Saturday: 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Registration and Information: Cell: 999-335-6916, e-mail: toloc [dot] colectivo [at] gmail [dot] com, Facebook: Tolocolectivo

Yucatan Living Movie: The Element of Crime
(Denmark 1984). Director: Lars von Trier. Starring Michael Elphick, Esmond Knight, MeMe Lai, Jerold Wells, Ahmed El Shenawi and Astrid Henning-Jensen. Fisher, a police inspector, returns to Cairo after investigating a murder in Europe. In a state of confusion, he seeks the help of a psychotherapist in order to use hypnosis to reconstruct a crime from data he has been collecting.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti/Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20, García Gineres.
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Los Galanes
Audiences are enjoying seeing more of this iconic trova trio these days.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Chinese Roulette
(Germany 1976) Both the parents of a young teen who walks with crutches, go on their own secret meeting with lovers, both surprising each other at the family’s county home. The daughter arrives and initiates a guessing game of “Chinese roulette”. In German with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) May 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family suffered a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of Ida’s roots, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Groupo Quo Vadis: Dances of Europe
This group has rapidly become a favorite in Merida. It is under the direction of Pawel Marek Blaszkowski.
Location: Teatro Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Choir of the City of Merida: To You – I Love You So Much
This is a wonderful choir under the direction of a masterful leader.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Joy Division
Joy Division is a 2007 British documentary film on the British post-punk band Joy Division, directed by Grant Gee. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) May 28, 2015

Yucatan Living Progreso: Annual Motorcycle Meeting: Lawless Tribe – May 29 & 30
Look for at least 400 members of the Lawless Tribe, from all across Mexico, to be in Progreso for this event. If you love leather and motorcycles, this is the place for you! There will be loads of activities going on, including motorcycle repair workshops and visits from a number of well known athletes in a variety of sports. From what we can tell see now, this will be a photographer’s dream weekend, so do plan on being there.
Location: Malecon in Progreso
Time: Two days and nights
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Trial
(France, Germany, Italy 1962). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Anthony Perkins, Rommy Schneider, Jeanne Moreau and Orson Welles. An unassuming office worker is arrested and stands trial, but is never told what the charges are. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingMovie: Come Back To Life
(Mexico 2010) The love story between a top model from New York, a Mexican scuba diver and a shark. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Relay Art Installation #12
Manager: Nina Dunkel
Location: ReLe, Calle 65 #349 B x 38 y 40, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Stella Cadente
(Spain 2014) The film narrates the brief reign of Amadeo of Savoy in Spain, who in 1870 tried to tidy up and modernize a country which was ungovernable. The king was misunderstood abroad and quickly took refuge inside his palace. Outside his palace, the country was collapsing, and within it, he plays his court games with love, pleasure, beauty and melancholy. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Tim’s Vermeer
(USA 2013) Inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer, and has some pretty amazing success. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 29, 2015

Yucatan LivingMovie: J.C.Chavez
(2007 Mexico) Directed by Diego Luna. A documentary about the life and career Mexican boxer Julio César Chávez. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: An Immortal Story
(France 1968). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Jeanne Moreau, Roger Coggio, Norman Eshley and Fernando Rey. The Portuguese colony of Macao in the 19th century. Mr. Clay is a very rich merchant and the subject of town gossip. He has spent many years in China and is now quite old. He likes his clerk Levinsky to read the company’s accounts to him at night for relaxation. Tonight Mr. Clay recounts a true story he heard years before about a rich man who paid a poor sailor 5 guineas to father a child with his beautiful young wife. Levinsky says that’s a popular old sailor’s legend and not true. Mr. Clay has no heir for his fortune and no wife either. He resolves to make the story true. Levinsky approaches Virginie, another clerk’s mistress, and strikes a bargain for 300 guineas. Now to find the sailor… In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Choir of the City of Merida: To You – I Love You So Much
This is a wonderful choir under the direction of a masterful leader.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Taxi Driver
(USA 1976) A mentally unstable Vietnam war veteran works as a night-time taxi driver in New York City where the perceived decadence and sleaze feeds his urge for violent action, attempting to save a preadolescent prostitute in the process. Legendary performance by Robert DeNiro and Jody Foster. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Jauja
(Various 2014) A father and daughter journey from Denmark to an unknown desert that exists in a realm beyond the confines of civilization. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 30, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(Spain 2013) An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and gives viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Tour of Independent Music: Los Lásgori y Barzoo Bands
This is part of the Sinestesia Festival that is under the direction of Jairo Couoh Pech. Sinestesia is the experiencing of emotion with two or more senses. This event includes a Bazaar in the courtyard.
Location: Calle 60 x 37 y 39, Centro Merida
Time: 5:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Don Quixote
(France 1992). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Jess Franco, Francisco Reiguera, Akim Tamiroff, Patricia McCormack and Orson Welles. After reading too many novels about knights and heroic stories, Don Quijote and his servant Sancho Panza decide to wander the roads of Spain to protect the weak and to accomplish good deeds. English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Emiliano Buenfil and Tropical ChanCil
This performance is under the direction of Sandra Gayou Soto. Watch for Emiliano Buenfil and Tropical ChanCil to shoot to the top of the international music scene. They are just wonderful!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: The Color of Money
(USA 1986) Fast Eddie Felson teaches a cocky but immensely talented protégé the ropes of pool hustling, which in turn inspires him to make an unlikely comeback. Starring the amazing blue eyes of Paul Newman and a young Tom Cruise. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Entre Sombras
(Mexico 2014) In a final attempt to resolve their marital problems, Eric and Mari make ​​a road trip to the jungles of southeastern Mexico. Just when his luck seems to be changing, she disappears. Confused and devastated, Eric begins the journey back to the capital, encountering on his way an enigmatic character, Narciso, who becomes his traveling companion. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), May 31, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary: Prehistoric Sharks
In the ancient seas, there was a shark ancestor of the great white shark of today. We call it Megalodon. It was as long as a bus and weighed over 20 times what a great white shark weighs today. This documentary introduces this great predator of the seas of antiquity.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Orchestra of Merida: Night of Soloists
Never miss an opportunity to see the Chamber Orchestra of Merida!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Les Carabiniers
(France 1963) Twelve episodic tales in the life of a Parisian woman and her slow descent into prostitution. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) June 01, 2015

No events planned for today as yet. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Yucatan Living Hurricane Season Officially Begins

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Writing and Publishing Workshop – Saturday, June 6
This is a bilingual workshop. Participate in writing exercises. Explore different types of writing and learn about self-publishing.
Location: Biblioteca Publica, Lectura Salon, Calle 55 x 60 y 62, Centro, Merida
Time: 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Admission: Free
More Information: Contact Ria: Ria [dot] stonemail [at] gmail [dot] com

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Double Barrel Yucatones – Sunday, May 31
The fabulous Yucatones, past and present, will be performing at Hemingways. Don’t miss this fun time! Great music, great food, great company. More info here.
Location: Hennessy’s Irish Pub
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: Various
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar – Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Khaki Scott

Navy Day: Dia de la Marina: May 22 – June 1

The growth of Navy Day reminds one of the growth of Progreso itself. Little more than a decade ago, Dia de la Marina consisted of a commemorative mass, the crowning a queen and the laying of a wreath in the Gulf of Mexico to honor all the sailors and fishermen who have died at sea. In 2015, the Progreso Marathon of the Marina , from Merida to Progreso, will begin in the early morning hours of Sunday, May 31. As runners head for Progreso, the 11:00 AM mass at the Yucalpeten pier will begin the day in Progreso. Following the mass, will be the Singa Tournament (Torneo Singa), a rowing contest. Marathon runners will be coming in for most of the day and the sports tournaments that began as early as May 22 will have their concluding matches. Ending the day will be the official ceremony in Progreso’s Parque de la Paz , on the Malecon , and the laying of the wreath at sea. Don’t forget that this is also the final weekend of the national and international motorcycle convention, also to be held in Progreso. For those who still labor under the impression that Progreso lives on as a sleepy-little-fishing-town, well – perhaps not so sleepy after all.

Oil Potential Off the Coast of Yucatan

A new Pemex Exploration and Production study has identified the area from Celestun to las Coloradas as an area that holds both oil and natural gas. Now, it has also identified an offshore area in the center of the Chicxulub Crater between Progreso and Chicxulub as an area of potential oil production. These are not necessarily new findings. What makes them important now is that the rules of the game have changed. Before now, Semarnat and Profepa have kept oil companies away from Yucatan on the grounds of the possibility of environmental damage to the reefs and to densely populated areas. With the new national energy reforms now in place, the way is now clear for Pemex, as well as international companies, to begin new three dimensional geologic and seismic studies, with the understanding that any proposals they make must include the impact of their work on sustainable development and effects on the environment. With the potential for a looming worldwide oil crisis, there may soon come a time when oil production really does come to Yucatan.

Progreso: Unsung Canadian Heroes

Do you know who they are? This week, there was a slideshow of photos, in Progreso Hoy , that showed a group of Canadian volunteers who had simply shown up to remodel the home of a family that had been living in a cardboard house. The Canadians did not speak Spanish and no one in the neighborhood spoke English, so the people never found out who their benefactors were. They think these altruistic angels may have belonged to either a church or to an association because they were dressed in blue and green shirts and shorts, but that is all they know. We would love to know who these folks might be. Leave us a comment if you can identify the group in this Progreso Hoy photo.

Maritime Cargo Management Training in Progreso

Houston Community College, in Texas, will be installing a study center for Americans and Mexicans who want training in the logistics of importing and exporting maritime cargo. Facilities for this new training program will be provided by Puerto de Altura de Progreso and the degree that students will earn will be from the Houston Community College. The academic diploma will be called Specialty Provider of Global Maritime Logistics, and will be offered to students both in Progreso and at Houston Community College. Their curriculum will include sections on maritime operations, port management, suppliers of high technology in transportation, and distribution and administration in warehouses and on docks. This is the type of training that catapults Yucatan far into the 21st century and creates a workforce that is stable enough to continue the rapid climb of Yucatan’s economy and quality of life.

Live in Yucatan? Are You Tsunami Ready?

Are you prepared for a hurricane? Of course you are! Are you prepared for a tsunami? Probably not. Thus far, Yucatan has not addressed the possibility of being hit by a tsunami of any size. However, with the Earth’s environment changing and the increase in the number of earthquakes worldwide, this might be a good time to at least visit the subject. Considering that some tsunamis can range inland for between 15 and 20 kilometers, Yucatan would be at risk because there is no high ground here to stop that kind of wave action. What Yucatan needs is fast highways and a training program for residents so they can get out of harm’s way whenever the occasion arises. The Mexican Association of Emergency Medicine and Disaster suggests that every area of Mexico should be trained and ready for any number of disasters that do not ordinarily happen where they are. It might sound silly for Yucatan to prepare for a phenomenon that seems only to happen in the Pacific, but we never know when or how the environment of the planet will change just enough to put us in harm’s way. Better safe than sorry.

Merida: Slow to No Water Pressure

With temperatures at or above 40 C or 104 F, the demand for water in Merida is sufficient to create a situation in which many areas of the municipality have slow or no water pressure. As usual, fingers are pointed at the swimming pools of north Merida, or CFE’s outages in various parts of the city. In the end, however, what we have is a huge population and a water department that is working constantly to repair and maintain older water pipes as well as put in new ones – and trying to work in extreme heat themselves. We only have a few more weeks of this before temperatures cool off and the demand for water falls back to normal. In the meantime, please be patient and conserve water whenever you can.

Chinese Set to Invest in Merida

It’s official. Merida’s safety, infrastructure and services have combined to ensure that China will make significant investments in this city and state. Their main interest is in solar and wind power, and they are also open to worker exchanges between Merida and Qingdao, in Shandong Province, on the east coast of China. Qingdao and Merida have much in common, with age, colonial history, and love of their own culture as a starting place. The beauty of the two cities is unmistakable and tourism is welcome in both places. Needless to say, their temperatures and rainfall are both a bit lower than what can be found in Merida, but their summer weather would make for a great getaway for anyone in Yucatan. Preview Qingdao


New Daily Flight to Villahermosa

Yes! You can now hop up to Villahermosa, Tabasco, for a day of shopping, a night out on the town, or a special event, any day of the week. The airline is a relative newcomer, but has daily flights to 21 domestic destinations without having to go through Mexico City. This is great news for expats who want to see more of Mexico without having it turn into a huge traveling annoyance. Welcome to Aeromar! We hope they have a long and successful run in Merida. Preview Aeromar

Proactive Arts in Yucatan

Where does Yucatan get its low crime rate? How does Yucatan fight the worldwide problem of gangs and disintegrating social orders? The answer is actually quite simple and one we were all taught as children. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” But what does Yucatan use as prevention? It’s easy. That begins with toddlers and the arts. Yucatan invests in its children from day one. Children who are singing, dancing, acting, painting, graphic arts, and playing music would not only be on their way to degrees, including graduate degrees, in the arts, but it also would not cross their minds to engage in delinquent or criminal behavior. We had to laugh, this week, as we saw Yucatan described in the news as a “hotbed of artists.” We don’t know about that, but we do know there are many art and sports agencies that are dedicated to the young people of Yucatan.

Yucatan Fights Rabies House-to-House

Rabies continues to be a threat in Yucatan. To date, this year, there have been 854 cases of dogs biting humans. Thankfully, there have been no cases of rabies. However, last year, there was a scare when a dog was infected by a wild animal and then bit a child. Earlier this year, the First National Rabies Week was undertaken in Mexico. Now, the Second National Rabies Week is underway, with the goal of vaccinating 450,000 domestic animals in Yucatan. This is a house to house fight, with health workers making certain that every dog and cat in every home is up to date on their rabies vaccinations.

Summer Health Risks in Yucatan

Yucatan has now registered its second case of heat stroke for 2015, and its first case of heat “exhaustion”, though we are not clear on the difference. In the space of just a few weeks, there have also been six cases of influenza, with one case proceeding to an outcome of death. All of these are preventable. Stay in the shade, especially during the heat of the day. Stay well hydrated. Save exercise for early morning. Make hand-washing a ritual and stay out of crowds that could spread germs. As always, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables! Try to cut back on eating street food due to food preparation issues this time of year. These are common sense rules that should keep everyone safe. Add to this the strong admonition to see your doctor at the first sign of not feeling well and you have the recipe for the perfect summer in Yucatan.

Casa Itzimna in Architectural Digest Mexico, May 2015

The Reyes Rios + Larrain Studio of Architecture and Design is located in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. The firm was founded by Architect Salvador Reyes Rios and Josefina Larrain Lagos. In addition to being nationally recognized in the field of colonial restoration and remodeling, the Reyes Rios + Larrain Studio has executed numerous contemporary projects developed as private homes and public buildings. The Studio is also known for their modern and minimalist furniture design, as well as environmentally sustainable landscaping design. Now, their home in Itzimna has been featured in Architectural Digest Mexico. Look for it in the next issue. Congratulations to our friends Salvador and Josefina!

By Working Gringos

Company Name: Floreana
Job Location: Merida, Yucatan
Email: info [at] shopfloreana [dot] com
Job offered: Fashion start-up based in Merida looking for bilingual Spanish/English executive assistant.
20+ hours/week. Flexible scheduling.
Responsibilities include: sourcing fabric, vendors, artisans. Overseeing projects/timeline/production. Fashion/Design/Photoshop/Drawing skills important. Must have valid driver’s license.
Growing company looking for someone to grow with us. Must be good at research, outgoing, friendly. Interest in sustainability and social change a huge plus.
ContactCamilla at info [at] shopfloreana [dot] com with Subject heading: Floreana Assistant

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting May 18, 2014

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) May 18, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Tuesday (Martes) May 19, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) May 20, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: El Cielo Abierto (The Open Sky)
(Mexico 2011) Vigorous documentary on Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero, the voice of the voiceless in El Salvador, the pastor in the midst of one of the bloodiest civil wars. Romero dared to say that the mission of the Church is to identify with the poor. Archbishop Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Dances of Europe: Grupo Quo Vadis
This performance is under the direction of Pawel Marek Blaszkowski.
Location: Church of Monja, Calle 63 x 64
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tour of Independent Music: Los Lásgori y Barzoo Bands
This is part of a Sinestesia Festival that is under the direction of Jairo Couoh Pech. Sinestesia is the experiencing of emotion with two or more senses.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 63 x 64
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Leviathan
(Rusia 2014) Kolya lives in a small village on the Barents Sea, north of Russia. It has a garage next to his house, where he lives with his young wife Lilia and her son Roma, from his previous marriage. The village mayor wants to steal his land, his home and his workshop for their projects. In Russian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) May 21, 2015

Yucatan Living Valladolid: Andre Solo Lecture: Journey to Meet the Gods
André Solo is an American author and adventurer. As a child, he dreamed of traveling across the Americas. Three years ago, he quit his job and set out to do it – entirely by bicycle! So far he has crossed the United States and Mexico, living and writing in cities and villages along the way, and he plans to continue to South America. To Andre this journey is a spiritual quest. It’s a chance to push himself to his limits, learn from the beliefs of the people he meets, and perhaps even come face to face with the divine. Andre will share stories from his travels, talk about the difficult life of the road, and describe how he managed to cross the dangerous narco trafficking region along the US/Mexico border.
Location: The Palapa XOCO LOCO in Casa Hamaca, Valladolid
Time: 7:30 PM
Admission: $50 pesos donation to V.E.L.

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Othello
(Morocco 1952). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Suzanne Cloutier, Michael MacLammoir, Robert Coote and Fay Compton. The General Othello is manipulated into thinking his new wife has been carrying on an affair with one of his officers, when in reality it’s all part of the scheme of a bitter lieutenant. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingMovie: Twenty Feet From Stardom
(USA 2013) This is a tribute to the background singers, who are on stage, but are secondary compared to the famous singers they support. Their voices provide harmony to the best bands in popular music. In English
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Relay Art Installation #11
Manager: Saul Villa (SNCA)
Location: ReLe, Calle 65 #349 B x 38 y 40, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(Spain 2013) An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and gives viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Lisboa Story
(Germany 1994) The director Friedrich Monroe has trouble with finishing a silent b&w movie about Lisbon. He calls his friend, the sound engineer Phillip Winter, for help.. In Englsih with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 22, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Machete Language
(Mexico 2011) Ray and Ramona are a young couple (30′s) who spent many years together. They live in Mexico City. They are hyper aware of chaos and injustice of the social context of which they are part. Each in his own way want to change that reality, fight for a fairer world. His life fluctuates between that world and the world of nighttime partying. She works for an NGO and she is a singer in a punk band. Their relationship is intense, often problematic. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Confidential Report
(France, Spain, Switzerland 1955). Director: Orson Welles. Staring: Orson Welles, Akin Tamiroff, and Michael Redgrave. An American adventurer investigates the past of mysterious tycoon Arkadin… placing himself in grave danger.In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Everything Is Illuminated
(USA 2005) A young Jewish American man endeavors to find the woman who saved his grandfather during World War II in a Ukrainian village, that was ultimately razed by the Nazis, with the help of an eccentric local. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of Ida’s roots, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 23, 2015

Yucatan Living Art Fest at Bistro Cultural in Merida MexicoBistro Cultural Art Fest – May 23
The Bistro Cultural Art Fest returns better than ever. There will be live music performances throughout the evening, a special menu from Chef Yohann, and your favorite artists and craftspeople return along with a select few new and interesting ones. Don’t miss it!
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 43 X 66, Santa Ana, Merida Centro
Time: 4:00 to 10:00 PM
Admission: Free, but bring money!

Yucatan Living Movie: Ilo Ilo
(China 2013) Ilo Ilo chronicles the Lim family as they adjust to their newly arrived Filipina domestic helper, Teresa, (Angeli Bayani) who has come, like many other Filipinas, in search of a better life. In English.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Touch of Evil
(United States 1958). Director: Orson Welles, with music by Henry Mancini. Starring: Janet Leigh, Charlton Heston and Orson Welles. This movie has performances by Marlene Dietrich, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Victor Millan, Dennis Weaver, Ray Collins, Joseph Cotton, Keenan Wynn, and Mercedes McCambridge! A stark, perverse story of murder, kidnapping, and police corruption in a Mexican border town. This movie is worth seeing for the cast alone! English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Live Essence
Everyone should come out for this performance! The group is the same one that performs for Merida’s Love of Baroque on Sundays. This series of concerts gives each member an opportunity to direct a performance. Tonight, the Director will be percussionist Felissa Estrada. In just a few days, Rob Meyers will take his turn. Let everyone else head for the beach, while you stay in the city and enjoy these wonderful concerts!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Raging Bull
(USA 1980) An emotionally self-destructive boxer’s journey through life, as the violence and temper that leads him to the top in the ring, destroys his life outside it. Amazing performance by Robert DeNiro. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Jauja
(Various 2014) A father and daughter journey from Denmark to an unknown desert that exists in a realm beyond the confines of civilization. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), May 24, 2015

Yucatan LivingDocumentary: The Maximum Guide to Ants
This is a look into a world in which absolute obedience to societal rules has ensured the survival of a species.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: For the Love of Baroque
Not to be missed, especially when excitement is running high during this group’s current concert series. The performance should be more memorable than ever!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission:$50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: My Life to Live
(France 1962) Twelve episodic tales in the life of a Parisian woman and her slow descent into prostitution. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) May 25, 2015

No events planned for today as yet. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Progreso: Annual Motorcycle Meeting: Lawless Tribe – May 29 & 30
Look for at least 400 members of the Lawless Tribe, from all across Mexico, to be in Progreso for this event. If you love leather and motorcycles, this is the place for you! There will be loads of activities going on, including motorcycle repair workshops and visits from a number of well known athletes in a variety of sports. From what we can tell see now, this will be a photographer’s dream weekend, so do plan on being there.
Location: Malecon in Progreso
Time: Two days and nights
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Writing and Publishing Workshop Saturday, June 6
This is a bilingual workshop. Participate in writing exercises. Explore differet types of writing. Learn about self-publishing.
Location: Biblioteca Publica, Lectura Salon, Calle 55 x 60 y 62, Centro, Merida
Time: 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Admission: Free
More Information: Contact Ria: Ria [dot] stonemail [at] gmail [dot] com

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
Goossens, Eugene – At the Tarn Op. 15 No. 1
Britten, Benjamine – Simple Symphony for String Quartet
Bacewicz, Grazyna – String Quartet No. 4
8 PM performance.

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Double Barrel Yucatones
The fabulouos Yucatones, past and present, will be performing at Hemingways. Don’t miss this fun time! Great music, great food, great company. More info here.
Location: Hennessy’s Irish Pub
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

My name is Piper Delaney.

I am currently living in Honduras but will be moving to Yucatan area in June.

I am looking for an ESL teaching job.

My email is piperosedelaney [at] yahoo [dot] com and my phone number is 1 (541) 499-8153.

Work Experience:

2009-2013 Steens Mountain Running Camp Burns, Oregon, USA
• Oversaw, organized and inspired a group of high school runners for weekly sessions.
2013 YMCA Medford Medford, Oregon USA
• In charge of a group of children at a day of camp, responsible for their needs, creating activities and general welfare Counselor for a week resident camp
2014 Idiomas-Sin-Fronteras Puerto Varas, Chile
• Taught English to Spanish speaking students from age 7 to 75
• Prepared lesson plans focusing on grammar, listening, speaking and writing skills
2015 Western international School Santa Rosa de Copan, Honduras
• Taught English to first graders
• Prepared lessons for two classes of first grade, teaching the basics of English

By Nadine Calder

Married couple in historic YucatanIn most cases, married life produces conflicting effects on women. Some slim down, others gain weight, this one loses her looks and that one becomes more beautiful, and very few are those who remain the same. The fresh and beautiful Guadalupe, who after a half year of marriage began to lose the color and fullness of her cheeks, did not fare well.

Certainly it is true that the lifestyle of a husband like Pancho Vélez would not augment positive signs of health in his wife, who for as much as she tried to avoid it, couldn’t help but lose sleep waiting up for the night owl.

Her impressions of her new life, into which she had entered with the curiosity of a child, were reason for her not feeling the full weight of pain that her mother’s death must have caused her. And when the rosy clouds that huddle in the honeymoon’s sky began to come undone, the terrible reason that precipitated her marriage had been held back only to awaken in her the need to pay the full tribute of tears that she owed to the memory of the woman who had given her life.

Furthermore, other family questions were attracting her attention and bothering her deeply… those were the differences arising between her husband and her brother Manuel over the lack of a will, and the latter’s displeasure reaching the point that he had completely stopped going to his brother-in-law’s house.

The estate was put up for auction and Manuel kept the plantation, paying the difference at his own expense.

The newlyweds had moved into a decent annex, spruced up with some nice furnishings, not far from the street that was the scene of their first conversations at the window. They acquired it as property with the inheritance, and the eighteen thousand pesos left over from their share of the hereditary package were invested in a trading house that paid them twelve per cent a year, that is one hundred eighty pesos a month. With this, they could have gotten by quite handsomely, small as the family was, if the husband’s personal budget had not had outlays that were like a hole through which the fortune of a Croesus could seep.

Marriage in YucatanLupita had to resign herself to seeing that, little by little, the enchanted castles she had manufactured in her maiden’s fantasy, and that she had hoped to see upright and dazzling when she was married, were crumbling. How many times then had she imagined herself going to gatherings, attending dances, riding in a coach through the avenues dressed elegantly and always accompanied by her adored Pancho Vélez, who would show her off in the best society, like displaying a rich treasure that stirs the envy of others.

But the distinguished playboy was not fulfilling such beautiful dreams, and not because of the prescribed mourning period. In fact, even when this was past, when his wife managed to have him take her to a party, he would leave her alongside a friend, if not a stranger, and return for her later.

And it even happened once at an open-air concert that the music ended and Pancho Vélez didn’t appear. Lupita found herself suffering the mortification of having to be taken home by the kind Chonita and her mechanic husband, while her own was perhaps arguing in a cantina, if not wandering around someplace less licit.

At one in the morning, he came home. His young wife, awake and upset, heard him come in, and while he calmly took off his coat and unknotted his tie, she said to him in an ill-tempered voice:

“You really treated me well. You had a lot of nerve leaving me stranded.”

“Before the concert ended I was desperate walking through the plaza looking for you. But girl, with all those people!”

“And that’s why you didn’t come to see if I was already here?”

“I didn’t think it was necessary. Where were you going to go? I supposed that you were with Chonita, whom I seated you next to and you would have expected to come home with.”

“What fun I would have had following you around waiting. Who knows where you were at that hour?”

“Well, talking with friends.”

“So I believe it; and the friends are those who give you flowers like the one I found yesterday in your pocket.”

“Flowers? Ah yes. You know that I’ve always liked flowers. The day before yesterday I bought them from a boy to give them to you, and you don’t thank me.”

“I thank you very, very much,” grumbled Lupita.

At first, such scenes were more violent and they made her cry.

“Tears?,” he said then. “Well, the sensible thing is to get away from where it’s raining to keep dry. If you keep crying, I’ll leave again.”

Fortunately, maternal care and affection came to make married life’s difficulties more bearable. A little after one year of marriage she had a child to whom they gave the baptismal name of his father.

BagbyThe new being came into the world somewhat weak and sickly, but to Lupita he was the most beautiful child on earth and she dedicated herself to caring for him, spending long hours looking at and caressing him.

When Pancho Vélez first came in to see his heir, he let out a grunt. And he still had not figured out if he liked him or not. But little by little he was beginning to feel affection and even showing great satisfaction at feeding time by cooing to the little guy. He often brought him sweets or toys appropriate to his age.

Because of that, it should not be believed that such domestic digressions were changing his behavior. His late nights were the same, with the difference that Lupita became accustomed to them and no longer offered a single reproach, and only occasionally one concern or another about his health, as Pancho Vélez was day by day becoming yellow and wrinkled, and a suspicious cough was beginning to bother him.

Out with FriendsThe womanizer’s mother had given up any hope that the holy knot could bind her son strongly enough.

What more did Lupita need than to receive without letup the news that her husband had given that woman an expensive dress or the other a very elegant fan, all of them women of questionable virtue?!

How many things had been brought to her attention and how urgently she wanted to do something about them.

The details, which seemed too impossible to talk about, came to her and irritated her and gave rise in her spirit to a dangerous desire.

One night, during theater season, someone told her that her husband was in a restaurant dining in full view of everyone with an attractive chorus girl, and she was tempted to go out in the street and, taking the arm of the first young man she happened on, look for Pancho Vélez and in front of him and the chorus girl, closely embrace the other man, provoke a jealous explosion, and feel the pleasure of revenge.

****

Want to catch up? Go here and start with Chapter One

By Working Gringos

Trofeo de Amistad

A few weeks ago, (April 22 – April 27, 2015) a well-planned tennis match was held between a team from Club Libano here in Merida, Yucatan, and the Kraft Tennis Club of Amelia Island, Florida.
The Yucatan participants at the tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida Yucatan
The instigator of this event was Peter Johnson, a retired State Department FSO (Foreign Service Officer) who is now a resident of Merida. Peter, and his wife Alicia who was born in Cuba, spent many years working in Latin countries, both in Latin America and on the Iberian Peninsula. Peter and his wife are obviously very familiar with the Latin culture and after living and working all over the world, they decided to settle in Merida upon retirement.

One of Peter’s accomplishments before retiring was founding the Kraft Tennis Club on Amelia Island. As a resident of Merida, he also has become a member of Club Libano. It was only a matter of time before he decided to put the two together.

The tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida YucatanClub Libano was represented by Dr. Eduardo Patron, a Merida cardiologist. The Merida club has about eight players in the over-60 category and all of them were enthusiastic about the idea. In addition, these players offered their homes to host the players and their wives from the United States. They also offered to host meals and serve as city guides. In the end, Peter and a representative from each tennis club conceived of a visit for couples from the United States, where a competitive tennis tournament would be combined with parties, get-togethers and a few archaeological day trips.

Since they were the ones traveling, the Kraft group determined the size of the teams. In the end, there were four players on each team, each accompanied by their wives. Club Libano’s team was headed by Dr. Eduardo Patron and Kraft’s team was headed by Phil Scanlan, a retired AT&T executive. As a resident of Merida, Peter played for the Club Libano team.

A Successful Event

The Kraft group arrived on April 22, and Alicia and Peter held a welcoming reception for everyone, complete with a Cuban trio and un monton de mojitos. Dr. Patron and his wife, Gloria, hosted the despedida (farewell) dinner, complete with roving Mexican minstrels on April 27. A good group of local expatriates and Yucatecans showed up in the intervening days for the two tennis matches, choosing their sides with no agenda, but just to enjoy the competition.

At the closing dinner, a Trofeo de Amistad (Friendship Trophy) was given to the Kraft team with an inscription bearing the players’ names and other information. The attractive little trophy included a small statue of Serenade at the tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida Yucatana male tennis player. Everyone was so pleased with the outcome that an an April visit to Amelia Island is in the planning for the Yucatecans in 2016. While the Kraft team won the tournament, the point of the trophy was not to celebrate the winner, but the event itself. In addition to the satisfaction of winning, the Kraft players had some terrific Mayan food at a typical restaurant, a great visit to the luz y sonido display at Chichen Itza and a Sunday trip to the Plaza Grande.

Tennis in Merida

The sport of tennis is itself growing in Merida in recent years, though information about tennis is incredibly difficult to find in Merida. We are sure that, like many things these days, this will be changing.

In and around Merida, there are several public or quasi-public courts. Parque Salvador Alvarado, located on Calle 60 just north of the zona hotelera, has three hard courts which are open to the public. The Kukulcan Sports Complex, in the east of Merida at Avenida 28 at Circuito Colonias, in the section called Morelos Oriente, also has six tennis courts open to the public. There are courts at Parque Aleman, in Fraccionamiento Los Heroes there are 4 courts (cost of $10 peso per hour, maximum 2 hours). There are courts also in Dzitya, and in Francisco de Montejo at Centro Bic. Tennis Court at Reef YucatanVarious hotels have tennis courts as well. The one pictured here is at Reef Yucatan, on the Yucatan Gulf Coast in Telchac Puerto.

The prominent private clubs are Club Campestre with 18 hard and clay courts, Club de Banqueros which has several hard courts, and Club Libano (Centro Libanés) which has five hard courts. The Club de Golf de Yucatan north of Merida has 9 hard courts, 2 of which are covered. Also to the north, the clay courts at the Yucatan Country Club are excellent, but the club seems to put more emphasis on the world of golf. All the clubs have pros who will gladly sign you up for lessons. Antonio at Club Libano, for instance, is a great teacher and player, according to Peter, and manages to speak English pretty well. Peter says he chose Club Libano because the welcome was inviting and warm and continues to be. Peter thinks he is possibly the only non-Mexican who plays tennis at Club Libano. The price of admission varies with each Players at the tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida Yucatanclub and level of membership, but all of them involve an upfront payment and a regular amount each month. A recommendation from an existing member is also necessary.

Every club has its own tournament schedule for men and women. Club Libano is doing their part to promote the sport by encouraging some of the older age groups of men and women to pick up a racquet and start playing. Players play all year round, but tend to play earlier in the day during spring and summer as the days get so hot. From time to time, major tournaments are held in Merida and they are typically held at Club Campestre, which has a much higher capacity and more courts than any of the other clubs.

In 2015, a Davis Cup match between Mexico and Bolivia was held at Club Campestre with good attendance. Davis matches are held throughout the world, as regions work towards winners and playoffs. The match with Bolivia was well attended, the Bolivians played better than anyone expected, and in the end, the Mexican team won.

Retrospect on the Trofeo de Amistad Event

In retrospect, the event with the team from Amelia Island seems to have forged more than a tennis connection. Peter reports that the Mexican participants, none of whom have previously had much contact with Americans, warmed considerably to the Americans who came to visit. More than anything, they were apparently pleased that their American counterparts seemed without airs or arrogance… that they were just regular people. The Players at the tennis Trofeo de Amistad in Merida YucatanAmericans, on the other hand, were equally effusive about the experience, calling it “a wonderful cultural experience for all of us!” They marveled at the hospitality of their new Mexican friends, their delicious food and how frustrating it was to not be able to communicate more easily.

Everyone involved in this unique tennis event is anxious to do it again, and Peter is pretty convinced that the next contingent from the USA will be larger, based on the reports of the first team.

Peter, whose job in the Foreign Service was often to develop and improve relations between the USA and other countries, was pleased that this small event seemed to create a warm and personal bridge between these representatives from the USA and Mexico. For our part, we hope it is just the start of many more to come!

****

More about the Salvador Alvarado Sports Park can be seen here (in Spanish).
The Institute of Sports for the State of Yucatan (IDEY) has a website, but it is not well maintained.
More about the Kukulcan Sports Complex
Club Campestre
Centro Libanés
Yucatan Country Club
Centro Bic in Francisco de Montejo
Club Deportivo de Olivo in Las Americas
and last but not least…
The Mexican Tennis Federation, in case you are interested.

By Working Gringos

I’m an old gringo who is a senior computer systems engineer and have worked for corporate America for 25 plus years. I’ve a ton of experience in this area (see below for some of it. Resume upon request). I’ve not yet retired and would like to help out here in the Merida area. I live in Chelem and would like to meet folks and obtain some odd jobs here and there. I’ve not yet learned Spanish but am trying very hard.

I can help with just about anything from setting up a home system to setting up corporate networks. I’ve been doing this a long time so not much is out of my area of expertise.

If anyone is interested in my assistance, please contact me via email at brian-waldron [at] hotmail [dot] com.

Experience:

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING / GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS
Customer-focused IT Leader with in-depth Systems Engineering expertise who contributes cost effective solutions that move the business forward. Strong technical skills in Windows, Exchange (all versions), Citrix, Rightfax Enterprise Suite within rapidly changing environments. Adept in systems migration and integration initiatives across diverse geographic locations. Special expertise in architecture design and development. Excellent diagnostician with a history of building positive customer relationships.

Core Technical Competencies:
Active Directory
Citrix XenApp 6.0
Windows/Symantec Clustering
Windows (all versions)
SharePoint Portal
MIIS
Exchange (all versions)
Scripting: (vbscript, Powershell, C#)
MS Office Suites
Forefront for Exchange
Documentation
Visual Studios
Rightfax Enterprise Suite
Group Policy
NetApp
Blackberry Enterprise Server
SQL
NetBackup
Office 365
ActiveSync
MOM/NetIQ
ISA
Dell Kace
IIS
Lync 2010 & 2013
WSUS

By Khaki Scott


Deadly Heat Continues

With temperatures still soaring above 40 C (104 F), the weather is beginning to take its toll on the people. This week, a vendor fainted in Progreso. Please take every precaution against the heat. The following recommendations are made by the Mayo Clinic: Drink plenty of water. Wear loose, lightweight clothing. Stay in out of the sun during the heat of the day. Cut back on alcohol consumption. Be careful with medications that might dehydrate you or make you sensitive to heat. Never leave anyone in a parked car. Finally, if you attend any events during the day, make certain that medical assistance is available if necessary. With these precautions, your summer in Yucatan should be free of worry about heat-related illnesses.

Obama Administration Approves Ferry to Cuba

This is wonderful news, but still for a limited number of travelers. It has been 50 years since there was ferry service between the United States and Cuba. Now, the U.S. Treasury and Commerce Department has issued at least four companies licenses to travel between Florida and Cuba. Those companies include: Havana Ferry Partners of Fort Lauderdale, Baja Ferries of Miami, United Caribbean Lines Florida of Greater Orlando and Airline Brokers Co. of Miami and Fort Lauderdale. There may be more licenses approved, but no others have yet been announced. The ferry trips would be cheaper than flying and passengers could bring much more free luggage. But don’t start the party quite yet. Cuba still has to approve the operation and, even when that happens, U.S. tourists are still not allowed to go to Cuba for general tourism. It is important to note that the twelve specific categories of approved travelers to Cuba are still in effect and only Congress can lift the embargo. Havana Ferry Partners plans to begin service within a few weeks at approximately $350 USD round trip and with 200 pounds of free luggage allowed. Baja Ferries USA is planning on making the trip three times a week. United Caribbean Lines Florida plans to leave from at least three Florida ports. There is no word yet on any plans for expansion of service to Yucatan, but that connection has long been considered and will surely be revisited as the new ferries settle into routine routes. Since the Florida to Yucatan ferry had difficulty paying for itself except during October and April Snowbird migrations, visiting Cuba could likely bring in enough additional income from tourists and residents of the Yucatan Peninsula year round. This is especially true of the business and technology professionals in Cuba and Yucatan. Ferry watchers look for these kinds of discussions to begin appearing in the news in the very near future.

Where are You Going on Vacation?

Are you an expat in Yucatan but looking for somewhere to go on vacation? There is a new non-stop flight coming soon from Cancun to Lima, Peru. The Avianca flights begin on July 26 and will run three times a week. This new flight is not a surprise, considering that travel from Lima to Cancun was up 77% in 2014. Avianca also offers seven flights per week between Cancun and El Salvador, as well as 14 flights per week between Cancun and Bogota. From Lima, connections can be made to almost anywhere in South America. So, if you want to see something new, the sky is – literally – wide open for business.

Murders Decline in Mexico

New numbers are in and there is good news to report. For the third straight year in a row, murders are down in Mexico, with the most notable decline in the states along the U.S. border. Five of the six Mexican states that border the United States have a combined drop of 17.7% in the number of homicides in 2014. Much of the drop in murders in Mexico is due to Mexico’s determination to go after the heads of every cartel. They have been supported by the United States with $2.3 billion USD, since 2008, earmarked for police training, aircraft, scanners, x-ray machine and almost 400 dogs that can alert to drugs, weapons and explosives. Initially, when Mexico first went after cartel leaders, there was an explosion of violence, but that soon dissipated and, each year, the murder rate continues to drop. It is a matter of concern that the only murder rate that went up was against journalists. There were seven journalists killed in Mexico in 2013, and that number rose to 17 in 2014. But the good news is that the murder count, from all categories, in the entire country of Mexico, was 15,649, a 13.8% reduction over the year before.

Free Trade Between Norway and Mexico

This feels as if we are waiting for the other shoe to finish dropping. Mexico and Norway are working together on every front. There is even a Norwegian Business Day in Mexico and Mexico has begun a number of ambitious reforms designed to make itself more attractive to the international business and investment community. These reforms are especially important to Norway, as Norwegian companies are leaders in providing environmental solutions for natural resource exploitation, especially offshore, in Mexico. The only thing left is sea trade, and that will come as soon as Mexico fully implements the free trade agreement between Mexico and Norway.

Injured Workers Brought to Hospital in Merida

On May 5, one of the legs of the Troll Solution platform collapsed off the coast of Campeche. Eighteen workers went to the hospital in Campeche, but only four needed to remain hospitalized. Two workers died, three are simply under observation, and four were brought to the Regional High Specialty Hospital in Merida. A total of 101 workers were not injured and all were successfully evacuated. The platform was swaying at the time the leg collapsed and continues to sway. It is owned by Typhoon Offshore. More will be known in the days to come. We are just glad to know that Merida has the hospitals and staff to handle emergencies such as this.

Second Edition of Rally Maya Mexico 2015 Delivers Wheelchairs

Over the past week, Rally Maya Mexico 2015 drove from Merida to Cancun. This is not a car race. It is more of a tour/parade, and all participating cars have to be at least 45 years of age. There are different paths taken throughout Mexico, with each functioning as an altruistic association in their own area. This week, they delivered wheelchairs and hearing aids to disabled children in Progreso. To learn more about this wonderful event, do visit their website: Rally Maya Mexico. We are looking forward to the third edition of this tour in 2016. If you own an elegant old vehicle, look for the opening of registration for Rally Maya Mexico 2016 along about September 2015.

Hotel Boutique Rosas & Xocolate Wins International Award

Congratulations to Rosas & Xocolate Boutique Hotel for winning the international ESR 2015 distinction at the VIII Latin American Meeting of Socially Responsible Companies. The award was presented by Lorena Martinez,of the Federal Prosecutor’s Consumer Office and was received by owner, Carol Kolozs. The event was attended by over 2,500 business executives, leaders of business associations, government officials, leaders of CSOs and members of the media, all on hand to exchange ideas to better refine best practices for social responsibility.

Quintana Roo Plays Hardball with Bullying

This past week, two 13 year olds and a 14 year old attacked another boy outside of a school in Cancun. Someone called the police and all three of the bullies landed in jail. It seems that Quintana Roo has had enough of bullying and discrimination in and around their schools. The State of Quintana Roo formed a commission to come up with ways to fight it and zero tolerance was at the top of the list. While it is all well and good to develop programs to help the bully, the prime motivation must be the protection of their innocent victims. If a bully pushes the issue to the point of leaving jail as the only option, then Quintana Roo has no other choice but to arrest them. This will be seen as a good thing by some and as not necessarily the right way to treat children by others. The fact remains, Quintana Roo had the courage to keep all options open with respect to fighting the scourge of bullying.

Yucatan Influenza Death Free Winter of 2014 – 2015

No one died of influenza in Yucatan this past winter, pointing to a very successful vaccination program. DIF stresses that it is up to the people to get their flu shots and take ordinary precautions against catching the flu virus. These are actually quite simple precautions, such as hand washing, sneezing into the crook of one’s arm, staying out of crowds and away from people who are already ill, plus be sure to eat your fruits and vegetables every day. Yucatan is, after all, a state with a thriving citrus industry and markets everywhere you go, so no excuses! Influenza is a killer and it cannot be stressed enough that one successful winter is not a free pass. Please contact your physician to find out when he or she recommends getting a flu shot – and then make sure you get yours. It is so easy to put off something like this when you feel well. So do call your doctor’s office and follow their lead.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting May 11, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performance: May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17. Remember, the venue has changed from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Monday (Lunes) May 11, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

Tuesday (Martes) May 12, 2015

Yucatan Living Invitation: Dutzi Design, City of Valladolid
Dutzi Design and the City of Valladolid cordially invite you to join them to honor designer Ariane Dutzi, founder of Dutzi Design. This is a great honor… Felicidades, Ariane!
Location: Parque Principal in Valladolid
Time: Inauguration: 6:00 PM, Catwalk: 8:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Soylent Green
(United States 1973). Director: Richard Fleischer. Starring Charlton Heston, Leigh Taylor-Young, Edward G. Robinson, Chuck Connors, Joseph Cotton, Brock Peters and Paula Kelly. Synopsis: In 2022, the population of New York is about 40 million and they are living in miserable conditions. A synthetic food, soylent green, is created to alleviate hunger, but a policeman and a survivor of another era suspect there is something disturbing behind the new food.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20, Garcia Ginerés
Time: 8:00 PM, Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Los Romanticos
This trio is a one of the long-time signature trova trios of Yucatan. They represent the best of traditional trova and always please their audiences.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Carnage
(USA 2011) Two pairs of parents hold a cordial meeting after their sons are involved in a fight, though as their time together progresses, increasingly childish behavior throws the discussion into chaos. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) May 13, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Radio La Colifata
(Spain 2007) LT22 Radio La Colifata is a radio station run entirely by the patients of the J.T. Borda Psychiatric Hospital in Buenos Aires. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living First Festival of Sexual Diversity Yucatan 2015
Different activities until June 10.
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20, Garcia Ginerés
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free: Adults Only

Yucatan Living Movie: El Mudo
(Peru 2013) The story is about a Peruvian government official named Constantino Zega. He doesn’t fit anywhere among the hodge-podge of Peruvian government officials and looks down on his colleagues because he has never succumbed to an act of corruption and, every time he has had the opportunity to do so, he has made an effort to impede it. Over his two decades as a government official he has cultivated purity – the fuel for his soul. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) May 14, 2015

Yucatan Living Merida English Library: Evening of Magic Wine Tasting
Villa Verde, the location for the May event, is a beautifully restored, 250 year old colonial mansion that is now a boutique inn / guest house in the heart of historic Centro. The location boasts remarkably restored historic Spanish architecture with 20 foot ceilings, mosaic pasta tile floors, vigas, mahogany doors, fountains and many other historic features. The wine is being provided by Elliot Diaz of Taninos and the botanas will be prepared by Michael Berton and Robert Klie of Botella Verde.
Location: Calle No. 56 # 468 x53 y 55, Centro Merida
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $250 pesos for members, $300 pesos for non-members. Tickets available at the Merida English Library.

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Lady from Shanghai
(United States 1947). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Rita Hayworth and Everett Sloane. Fascinated by gorgeous Mrs. Bannister, seaman Michael O’Hara joins a bizarre yachting cruise, and ends up mired in a complex murder plot. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: H2O
(Mexico 2012) Mexico City grows unchecked. Before an area surrounded by lakes, now supplying water to this city is a real problem. H2Omx records shortages, waste and serious water pollution problems. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Relay Art Installation #10
Manager: Saul Villa (SNCA)
Location: ReLe Calle 65 #349 B x 38 y 40, Centro
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Armadillo
(Denmark 2010) In February 2009 a group of Danish soldiers accompanied by documentary filmmaker Janus Metz arrived at Armadillo, an army base in the southern Afghan province of Helmand. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Ernest & Célestine
(France 2012) The story of an unlikely friendship between a bear, Ernest, and a young mouse named Celestine. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 15, 2015

Yucatan Living Teacher’s Day: School Holiday

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(Mauritania 2013) The Malian city of Timbuktu has fallen into the hands of religious extremists. Kidane lives quietly in the dunes Satima with his wife, his daughter Toya and Issam, a shepherd boy of 12 years. But city dwellers suffer the regime of terror imposed by the jihadists: banned music, laughing, smoking and even football. Women have become shadows trying to resist with dignity. Each day, some Islamists launch makeshift court judgments as absurd as tragic. In Arabian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Macbeth
(United States 1948). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Jeanette Nolan, Dan O’Herlihy, Roddy McDowall, and Edgar Barrier. In fog-dripping, barren and sometimes macabre settings, 11th-century Scottish nobleman Macbeth is led by an evil prophecy and his ruthless yet desirable wife to the treasonous act that makes him king. But he does not enjoy his newfound, dearly-won kingship. The movie plot is restructured, but all the dialogue is Shakespeare’s. In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Expo Movie Poster V Edition
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Mumia
(USA 2012) The film captures the life and revolutionary militancy political prisoner on death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal. The new documentary by Stephen Vittoria is an inspiring portrait of a man many consider the most famous US political prisoner, a man whose very existence challenges our beliefs about justice and freedom. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 16, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Third Man
(United Kingdom 1949). Director: Carol Reed. Starring: Joseph Cotton, Alida Valli, Trevor Howard and Orson Welles. Pulp novelist Holly Martins travels to shadowy, postwar Vienna, only to find himself investigating the mysterious death of an old friend, black-market opportunist Harry Lime. English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Live Essence
This performance is under the direction of Felissa Estrada.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa
(UK 2012) When famous DJ Alan Partridge’s radio station is taken over by a new media conglomerate, it sets in motion a chain of events which see Alan having to work with the police to defuse a potentially violent siege. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(Spain 2013) An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and gives viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), May 17, 2015

Yucatan LivingDocumentary: Secrets of the Humpback Whale
Watch the secrets of the deep as these beautiful animals migrate and raise their young in groups.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Laura Moguel, Soprano
This performance is under the direction of Felipe de J. Cervera.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission:$50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Symphony of Yucatan Performance
Piano and Romance. Fernando Varcarcel as Guest Director and Dario Antonio Martin García on the piano. The first part is a tribute to the father of romanticism, Beethoven. It includes the Fidelio Overture and Piano Concerto no. 4. Also the young Cuban winner of the international Piano competition “Jose Jacinto Cuevas” will perform Symphony no. 101 by Haydn.
Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance. The regularly scheduled performances for May 15 and 17 will now take place in this combined performance May 17.
Location: The venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero.
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Chamber Sundays: For the Love of Baroque
This is a performance by the International String Quartet of Merida, much loved and admired. If you have a chance to see them, don’t pass it up!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students & Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: A Woman Is a Woman
(France 1961) A French striptease artist is desperate to become a mother. When her reluctant boyfriend suggests his best friend to impregnate her, feelings become complicated when she accepts. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) May 18, 2015

No events planned for today as yet. Check our Calendar for Ongoing Events.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Art Fest at Bistro Cultural in Merida MexicoBistro Cultural Art Fest – May 23
The next Bistro Cultural Art Fest returns better than ever. There will be live music performances throughout the evening, a special menu from Chef Yohann, and your favorite artists and craftspeople return along with a select few new and interesting ones. Don’t miss it!
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 43 X 66, Santa Ana, Merida Centro
Time: 4:00 to 10:00 PM
Admission: Free, but bring money!

Yucatan Living Progreso: Annual Motorcycle Meeting: Lawless Tribe – May 29 & 30
Look for at least 400 members of the Lawless Tribe, from all across Mexico, to be in Progreso for this event. If you love leather and motorcycles, this is the place for you! There will be loads of activities going on, including motorcycle repair workshops and visits from a number of well known athletes in a variety of sports. From what we can tell see now, this will be a photographer’s dream weekend, so do plan on being there.
Location: Malecon in Progreso
Time: Two days and nights
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan Living The International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
Goossens, Eugene – At the Tarn Op. 15 No. 1
Britten, Benjamine – Simple Symphony for String Quartet
Bacewicz, Grazyna – String Quartet No. 4
8 PM performance.

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Double Barrel Yucatones
The fabulouos Yucatones, past and present, will be performing at Hemingways. Don’t miss this fun time! Great music, great food, great company. More info here.
Location: Hennessy’s Irish Pub
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living 8th Annual Whale Shark Festival – July 18-24
A cultural extravaganza that showcases the achievements, traditions and environmental splendor of Isla Mujeres. Last year 5,000 people attended the family-friendly Whale Shark Festival, where guests can swim with whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean and an endangered species. They can also join in traditional dancing, enjoy local food and work by local artisans, visit the turtle farm, snorkel and dive the reefs surrounding the Island and more.
Location: Isla Mujeres
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Check the website here: www.whalesharkfest.com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Name of Company – Loyola Comunidad Eduativa

Job Location – Dzodzil Norte (close to the Gran Plaza and Liverpool)

Name of Contact – Jessica Robertson/ Claudia Alvarez (School´s principal)

Phone Number – 999.941-5454

Email Address – jrobertson [at] serloyola [dot] edu [dot] mx / calvarez [at] serloyola [dot] edu [dot] mx

Job Description – We are currently looking for part-time or full-time elementary school teachers to work with us for the 2015-2016 school year.

Job Requirements

-Native or very fluent English speaker
-Experience teaching the desired age group
-Availability during the entire 2015-2016 school year (from August 2015 – July 2016).
-Desire to work closely with other teachers in a learning community
-Knowledge of socio-constructivist theory

Additional Information – Loyola is a forward-looking private school in Mérida, México founded in socioconstructivist learning theory and the idea that students should be the central players in their education. We seek to form responsible, creative, and reflexive individuals who are empowered to make a difference in their community and are equipped with all of the abilities necessary to do so. Our classes are small (maximum 24) so that teachers can give each student the personal attention and support that they need. In English, our students learn the language skills necessary to express their ideas and communicate with the world. Our English teachers also work to develop projects in collaboration with others to link to other content areas. And, as a team, we’re 100% committed to constantly growing and learning.

Websitewww.serloyola.edu.mx/

By Nadine Calder

Room in Merida Yucatan

Home Life

It seemed impossible that so many people and so much junk could fit into the two holes in the wall where the bachelor’s sister lived with him and her seven children. In one of them, with smoke-darkened ceiling and grime-coated walls, there was a large table wrapped with sheets that was used for ironing, which was the industry with which his sister Teresa helped don Hermenegildo with the household expenses.

On the hooks in the wall could be seen the rolled hammocks, and in two of the corners, at hand height, ropes were extended to show off, like the best coat racks, a jumble of dirty clothes in which it was as likely to see a petticoat as a pair of little boy’s pants, full of tears and patches. On the floor were pots and pans, when they weren’t being used in the kitchen, alongside crates on which were some beat-up trunks; for their part, these held the big baskets for the ironed clothing, and other odds and ends for domestic use appeared elsewhere.

At night, with the table shoved up against the wall, that tiny room was converted into a dormitory for the señora and five of her children, four who slept two by two and one, the youngest, beside her in the hammock which was biggest, or to put it more accurately, least small.

Sleeping in the YucatanThe other room was assigned to don Hermenegildo and his two older nephews, who also slept together; because while sleeping in that house, the fifty-year-old was the only one who comfortably stretched out his shanks without danger of coming up against the obstruction of another body, even though there was little certainty that his legs wouldn’t end up outside the narrow hammock, which had little of itself to offer.

At best, from what could be seen, that room was the place to receive visitors, with five somewhat rickety chairs and a padded rocker which was missing an arm, leaving in its place only the tip of a screw that served to snag any clothing that came into contact with it.

A table that could be used for writing, a trunk less damaged than the others, and an old shelf that had lost the color of its paint fit laboriously into that hovel, theater of don Hermenegildo’s musings and of the vigils that made him suffer his younger nephews’ cries which thus intensified the aches and pains of his lamentable life.

This changed somewhat with the death of doña Prudencia, as it served to interrupt his promising dreams of matrimony’s good fortunes.

Hermenegildo’s Dilemma

The fifty-year-old was wondering if he should observe mourning for the widow’s death, and after much hesitation, he finally decided to place some inconspicuous crepe next to his hatband and to pass the hours in sadness as a sign of his profound pain.

He imagined that he had suffered a loss that wounded him deeply, and it is certain that, had he known of those things, he would have compared his luck to that of Dante upon his loss of Beatrice. However, doña Prudencia’s remains could sleep in peace, sure that they had not, with a spark of love, removed the clerk’s dry heart.

He skipped doña Raimunda’s gathering those first days, but his return was fertile ground for jeremiads on the loss that he had suffered, and to which he referred while greatly arching his eyebrows and giving his eyes an expression that made them seem to contemplate from his gaunt face the stingy tomb that guarded forever the object of his newly truncated illusions.

Aside from his love for the deceased, his past loves, if they could be called that, didn’t occur to doña Raimunda and the lawyer. Don Hermenegildo’s lack of ardor and great reserve weren’t conducive to getting to know him, and the licenciado don Felipe Ramos Alonzo’s spouse only remembered the bachelor’s loves when she had him in front of her to get him to talk and make her laugh for a while. Lupita didn’t have the slightest suspicion that don Hermenegildo’s visits had any but the ordinary objective and so, although he would have liked the whole world to pity him for the great misfortune he had undergone, he frequently sighed without having anyone stopping to think about it.

Making The Best Of Bad Luck

Convinced that the adverse star that pursued him was depriving him of the conjugal state just as he felt inclined to embrace it, he resolved to make his sister Teresa’s family more his own and to see his nephews as compensation for the children that heaven was denying him.

A good invention for the YucatanHe dedicated himself to their care and made the eldest, Lucas, study daily, reviewing his lessons before sending him off to class at a free school. The second was barely seven years old, and don Hermenegildo decided to get him started on the challenges of learning the primary subjects in order to avoid the drawbacks of sending him to school, not the least of which was the necessity of providing him with clothes; at home he could easily go around shabby and dirty, as always, eventually converting to shreds his older brother’s already-unusable rags.

The latter, aside from being an incorrigible prankster, for which he suffered frequent detentions in school and tugs on his ears at home, seemed intelligent and was benefiting from his lessons. His books could have been handed down to his little brother, but when he was finished with them, only the last pages were left and those had come unstitched.

Evil Genius

Ramoncito, don Hermenegildo’s primary-student disciple, wasn’t any more careful. After two weeks he had already defaced nearly half of a paperback copy of the primary book by Mantilla, and everywhere on the pages, despite his teacher and uncle’s warnings and threats, could be seen numerous strokes and extravagant figures done in pencil, a sign of the child’s early love of drawing. The pencil had come from a rascal in the neighborhood, a buddy of his, in exchange for a good amount of tamarind seed, currency used in the games of hoyuelo* and arrimadilla**.

What Ramoncito shone at was drawing people. Any paper he found, and walls alike, served him as canvas for his artistic conceptions. Those soldiers in the making were his delight, and he showed them to his friends with pride.

Soldier stick figuresHe would draw a circle destined to be a head, and inside he would put a pair of points to represent the eyes; from each of the places where the ears should be, he drew a horizontal line in the guise of an arm, which ended in another five, opening like a fan to represent the fingers; downward, in place of the neck, he drew two parallel lines which fancied themselves legs, and there you have a quintessential man.

Later converting this individual into a troop was for Ramoncito a simpler procedure than that employed by the government. He crossed that phenomenal body with a line that stuck out to one side of its head, and its rifle was at the ready; a dozen figures like this and a company was formed.

Don Hermenegildo needed a good dose of patience to see to it that this precocious rival of Apelles could overcome the difficulties of spelling, and he had to think about teaching him the multiplication table. All this in those moments when he found himself free of his commitments as clerk and his customary attendance at his excellent friend señor licenciado don Felipe Ramos Alonzo’s traditional gathering, which he had missed only once in order to visit Lupita.

And so two more years of his life went by, amid the pressures of domestic life, the whining of his little nephews, and the arguments brought on by the older ones. And so he would have continued to live with the same prosaic monotony if life, which has so many ups and downs, didn’t have in each one of them varied and new developments that change the face of things and shoot down man’s hopes and expectations.

****

*”dimple:” A child’s game in which, throwing from a distance, one tries to land coins or pellets in a hole.

**”come close:” A child’s game in which each player tosses a marker (coin, button, etc.) against a wall attempting to have it remain as close as possible to the wall; the one who succeeds in landing closest wins all the markers.

By Working Gringos

Uaymitun Beach House for Rent

Beautiful, stately beach front home in prestigious Uaymitun… the best beach on the Yucatan Gulf Coast! When you stay here, you’ll be 15 minutes to Progreso and 35 minutes to Merida.

The house has a huge master bedroom, plus 2 more bedrooms all en suite on the second floor, as well as an en suite room downstairs for staff member.

There is a gorgeous outdoor patio, a swimming pool with magnificent palms… it is truly a tropical paradise.

Living Room, dining room, kitchen, pantry, washer/dryer, and full time caretaker.

Available June 1 – 30, $2,500.00/US
Not available in July.
Available August 1 – 30, for $5,855.00 US
Available September – November for $2,500/mo. US
Rent for one month, or longer.

Contact Information

Please contact: Paola Ferrer by phone in Merida
999.368.18.18
or email: paoferrer [at] live [dot] com [dot] mx

By Byron D. Augustin

Road Trips Revisited

Road Trip! When I was in college a group of students would gather on Saturdays for activities that, for the most part, were not beneficial to society. On many of these occasions, someone would yell, “Road Trip!” Planning would begin immediately and within an hour the cooler was full of soft drinks (or other beverages), and off we went. It was great entertainment and we visited some interesting places and actually engaged in some accidental learning.

In our Yucatan retirement years, my wife and I have returned to those wonderful experiences of times gone by. The Yucatan Peninsula is covered with roads that beckon the adventurer to explore a world of unexpected discoveries. We have met the perfect couple to share in these experiences. Ron and Dee Poland are a couple of expats from southern Canada. They spend their winters renovating their property, known as Hacienda Santa Inez, near Dzitas. Ron has a built-in GPS system in his brain, making him a handy companion for these trips, and Dee always packs a great cooler full of snacks and soft drinks.

Ron’s sense of humor is drier than the most recent climatic spell that brought no rain and the hottest temperatures on the planet to the Yucatan. So, when he suggested a road trip to the Shrine of Wine, we were all in. I have always had an abiding interest in the roadside monuments and chapels scattered along the Yucatan’s roads. They are wonderful expressions of some individual’s personal commitment to the memory of loved ones or personal expressions of faith, and like haciendas, each one is unique.

Who Built The Wine Bottle Chapel?

The Wine Bottle Chapel in YucatanThe Wine Bottle Chapel turned out to be well worth the road trip. The first visit initiated my interest in discovering how on earth an edifice of this nature could come to fruition. Ron declared that Dee and he knew the people responsible for building the chapel and that they were good friends. So, Ron made an appointment to meet with the builders and we all went back for a second visit, anxious to learn the fascinating story behind this unique shrine.

Victor Tuyub and his wife Diane are currently living in Sudzal, four kilometers away from the chapel on a road with a new asphalt surface. Victor is a local contractor and Diane is an archaeologist by training. After an impressive career in archaeology, Diane began to dabble in land investment and development of properties in the area of Yucatan near Izamal. A few years ago, there was a rash of fires set by an unknown individual that endangered livestock, wild animals, birds and property. Victor and Diane decided to build a chapel in the heart of the area where the fires were occurring. They hoped the chapel would have a positive impact on the perpetrator of the fires and that he would cease to engage in his illegal activity. The plan, by the way, seems to have worked and the fires have stopped.

Let us pause a moment to consider the wonderful Mexicanismo that resulted in this solution.

Why Wine Bottles?

When construction on the chapel started, Diane was the managing partner of the Hacienda San Antonio Chalante Bed and Breakfast, located a short distance from the chapel site. The Bed and Breakfast had a great kitchen, wine bottles in Yucatansuperb meals, and an excellent wine list. Diane could not bring herself to throw the beautiful, wine bottles of many colors away and asked if there was a way to incorporate them into the construction of the chapel. Since Victor is a talented builder, he was sure there was a way to use them and set about drafting a design for the inclusion of the wine bottles into the construction materials.

At one point, there was a brief hesitation in planning while they discussed the inclusion of wine bottles into a building devoted to prayer and religious issues. They came to the conclusion that it was permissible since Jesus turned water into wine at the marriage of Canaan, and wine was essential for the communion sacrament in the doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church. They feel it was a good decision and not a single person has ever suggested that the chapel is in any way sacrilegious. For my money, the beauty of the cross in the chapel will cause any thoughts along those lines to evaporate immediately.

Construction of the Wine Bottle Chapel

Construction of the chapel began in 2001. Initially, Victor and his father, Eliseo Tuyub, did the work. They cleared a space for the chapel near the road and started with the walls. The dimensions of the chapel were approximately 13.5 feet by 13.5 feet. The walls were built using the local construction technique using stone and mortar, known as mamposteria. Limestone rocks present in the area were used to form the walls and the rocks were held in place using a mortar, which consisted of cement, pulvo (dust), cal, and water.

cross at wine bottle chapel in YucatanSpecial care had to be taken to leave space for the massive wine bottle cross, the paloma, or dove of peace over the front door, two windows and the entrance door. The cross is composed almost entirely of green wine bottles. However, there are five blue bottles in the center of the cross. I suspected there was some symbolic meaning to these five blue bottles, so I asked Victor to explain its symbolism and the choice of only five blue bottles. He looked at me like I might be missing a few cells in the cabeza (head) and said, “because that is all there were.”

The chapel was an open sanctuary without a roof until additional building supplies could be acquired. Rafters for the roof were cut from Victor and Diane’s property. The metal covering was a gift from an anonymous donor. The door was salvaged and recycled from a previous construction project.

One major question remained unanswered. What should be done about the dirt floor? After some time passed, Victor suggested that wine bottles be used to create a glass floor. It would require that the bottles be inverted downward with the bottom of the bottle serving as the surface of the floor. Mortar would have to be mixed and each bottle would need to be installed separately. This would require a significant amount of labor and a truckload of bottles.

Los Patas Rajadas

Victor owned and still owns a construction company by the name of Los Patas Rajadas. At the time, the company had seven employees, and after a lengthy discussion the workers agreed to donate their labor las patas rejadas in Yucatanand help install the floor.

At this point, I had to call a time out so that I could determine how Victor decided to use that name for his company. The term Los Patas Rajadas, means “the cracked feet” and has often been used as a derogatory term by some elite members of Yucatecan society to describe the fact that many Maya peasants walk barefooted, causing the bottom of their feet to get callouses and crack.

An incident in a pueblo in the area occurred shortly before Victor selected the name for his company. A local politician spoke at a political rally to endorse his favorite candidate. The largely Maya crowd asked the politician questions that were difficult for him to answer. He became more and more agitated until his frustration caused him to blurt out, “I am not going to continue to listen to a bunch of cracked foot Indians”. The candidate the politician had supported lost the election and Victor found a name for his company, which reminds the local population of the insensitive and unacceptable behavior that sometimes occurs in politics.

Feet of the Maya by Fernando Castro PachecoAs an aside, Fernando Castro Pacheco, Yucatan’s famed muralist and painter, painted an image of two cracked feet walking down a path. This image can be found in Merida’s Palacio Municipal, and is a visual expression of the poverty and hard life experienced by many rural Maya.

Drink More Wine!

As the workers from Los Patas Rajadas continued to work on the floor, guests at Diana’s Hacienda San Antonio Chalante Bed and Breakfast were unable to consume enough wine to meet the needs of the floor crew. So, Victor drove to the Izamal sanitary landfill in search of more bottles. Appropriately, in the Bible, Matthew 7:7 and Luke 11:9 have similar verses which state, “Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and you shall find.” virgen made of wine bottles in YucatanThis was good advice, because as it turns out, Victor found a mound of hundreds of empty bottles in excellent condition that had been recently dumped by a local company. By the time the floor was finished, more than one thousand bottles had been consumed by the little chapel.

La Virgen That Could Not Be Stolen

Diane’s goddaughter wanted to contribute to the project, so she gave Diane a beautiful jute wall hanging of an image of the Virgin of Guadalupe. After a year, a chapel visitor stole the special gift. Everyone involved in the project agreed that there had to be a new image of the Virgin in the chapel, but this time, the image should be an image that could not be stolen.

Los Patas Rajadas again came to the rescue. First a local artist named Pez from Izamal painted an image of the Virgin on the front wall next to the altar. The workers then made the shape of her body with mortar. The mortar used for her dress was dyed red and had pieces of clear glass bottle fragments imbedded in the mortar before it dried. Her cloak consisted of grey mortar with pieces of glass from blue wine bottles, and quetzalcoatl in the wine bottle chapel in Yucatanthe halo surrounding her, utilized green bottle glass. It has been said that as drivers approach the front of the chapel at night, the lights of their vehicle reflect off the Virgin’s glass and it appears as if she moved. Perhaps it is only an optical illusion, but some drivers have been sure it was a miracle.

Quetzalcoatl Joins In

When the Virgin was completed, one of the Maya workers suggested that an image of a Maya god should be displayed on the other side of the altar. Some Maya still incorporate ancient Maya religious beliefs with Catholicism and this image would make the chapel ecumenical.

Enrique May Rejon, an extraordinarily talented designer, painter, and sculptor also from Izamal, was hired to create an image of Quetzalcoatl. The image was made of stucco and meticulously painted with bright colors. The builders expressed their hope that visitors to the chapel will not be offended by the presence of both Christian and Maya religious icons. They feel strongly that in the privacy of the chapel, an individual has the freedom to practice his or her own personal faith.

The floral mosaics on the exterior of the chapel were a labor of love by Leonardo Chi, an employee of Los Patas Rajadas. He requested permission to contribute his talents with the creation of his own floral designs. flower out of wine bottles in YucatanIt is truly amazing what some talented individuals can do with pieces of broken glass.

Chapel Perilous

Recently, when the road was straightened, improved and resurfaced, the chapel was nearly lost. Even though Victor and Diane had been assured that the chapel would be protected, information leaked back to them that this was not true. Anonymous sources warned that the state government and the construction company did not want to build a curve to avoid the chapel. The source went on to tell them that early some morning a bulldozer would appear, and make short work of the structure and then nothing could be done to save the chapel.

The information revealing the impending destruction of the beloved chapel spread like wildfire through the community. Local people expressed outrage and indignation and protested vociferously. Yamil Apud Chavez, a neighbor, traveled to Merida personally and informed the Diario de Yucatan of the potential injustice. The newspaper investigated Altar made from wine bottles in Yucatanand printed an article. This, along with local support, placed heavy pressure on those responsible for the road to preserve the chapel. So now, the road now makes a gentle curve around the Wine Bottle Chapel. Sometimes, the good guys do win!

****

Directions to the Wine Bottle Chapel: Take the autopista from Merida toward Cancun. At kilometer 68, turn at the retorno (return) and proceed west for a short distance before exiting at the sign to Izamal. Drive through Xanaba, and continue to the town square in Sudzal. Pass the brightly painted Palacio Municipal on your left and turn right at the first intersection. Follow that road for approximately four kilometers and the Wine Bottle Chapel will appear on your left. If you are arriving from the direction of Valladolid, exit at the sign to Izamal at kilometer 68 and follow the same directions the rest of the way. Please respect the sanctity of this unique site and leave it as you found it.

By Nadine Calder

Mexico CityLuis Robles had gone to Mexico City. Making good use of connections available through a relative who gave him letters of recommendation, and a letter that he was able to get from his Law professor, he was hoping to obtain a scholarship that would allow him to live comfortably and somehow manage to continue in such a way that the big city would open a path for him, securing a respectable position in line with his aspirations.

After a lot of useless waiting around in the Ministry and continued persistence with influential acquaintances who met with him there, he came out in the end with the longed-for scholarship that ensured his stay in the nation’s capital. Going to class at times, and skipping the rest, Luis didn’t lose his sense of humor with the change of scenery, much less when that change offered a broader field for his inclinations and character.

He increased his connections, began to attend some gatherings of a certain type, donned his top hat, and in order to make himself look as important as possible, was no longer inclined to leave his frock coat unbuttoned.

As he was handsome, the new look and his free and easy air spoke well of him. He was kind to those he dealt with and six months after arriving, he was making his way around the city as if he owned the place.

With some young journalist friends, he had begun to frequent the editorial offices, where he began handling news, verbally at first and then written. He was bitten by the desire to appear in the press and was hoping to be paid later for what he was now providing for free, since his talents were beginning to be appreciated.

It was of this that doña Raimunda and don Hermenegildo were speaking in her home one night. The bachelor was not visiting doña Prudencia because she had fallen ill during the day, and that afternoon a high fever was consuming her to the point of making her delirious. It did not, however, seem to be anything of concern, so as he was not worried, he went to visit his friend doña Raimunda. The latter teased him that it was a matter of planning the wedding that was bothering doña Prudencia.

“Wedding plans, already? I don’t deny that I think I’m making progress. But wedding plans, there are none. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

“But why don’t you speak frankly? I’ve talked with doña Prudencia and she tells me that you don’t show her your intentions with anything more than indirect statements. Why don’t you tell her once and for all that you want to marry her?”

Señora, because I don’t have it in me, because I can’t control myself, because I don’t have the courage. When I want to tell her something, I get strangely agitated. I can’t avoid it. It’s like someone is going to kill me.”

“But those are childish things, don Hermenegildo. Make up your mind.”

“All right. I’m going there soon. I know what I’m talking about. Two nights ago I reminded her that with Lupita’s marriage, she was going to be left alone and that there wouldn’t be a better occasion for her to remarry.”

“And she?”

“She smiled. She’s very nice. Ay! But I wasn’t born for these things, doña Munda. I assure you that if all men were like me, not even half of them would marry.”

“Well, I’ve already talked with you about this and you told me it would be odd for her to propose to you. That means that it’s best left up to you and that you just need to talk with her.”

“Yes. I promise you that I’m going to talk frankly with her. But what will she think of my brevity? The first time that I speak clearly!”

The attention of the two visitors was caught by the arrival at doña Prudencia’s home of a carriage from which stepped the family doctor. A little later they saw that a boy who had come out of the house was running down the street with a bottle, and as he passed by he informed them that he was hurrying to the pharmacy because the señora was not doing well.

Don Hermenegildo went to find out what was happening and returned with the news that the widow was in serious condition.

Ave María!,” exclaimed doña Raimunda. “I’m going over there.”

And after giving some instructions to the domestic help, she went to her friend’s house.

The doctor, after the examination and prescription, explained to the family that the intense nature of the fever was not very reassuring. He recommended that they take great care that she not miss a dose of the medicine, and promising to return soon, he took his leave. Doña Raimunda, who left there very late that night, attended the patient with true affection.

The latter’s condition was worse in the morning. The doctor said it would be wise to prepare for the eventuality of her death, and the difficulty was to find someone to break the news to her. Doña Raimunda resigned herself to the task, making use of cautious understatement, to which the patient responded by designating which priest she wanted.

Another worry, equally serious, assailed the ailing Prudencia in those moments: Lupita. What would become of her daughter, young and without maternal support? She begged them to call Pancho Vélez and she spoke with him in a voice weakened by her illness. He, who deep down was not a bad person and who blamed his habits and disorderly life on nothing more than a flaw in his education, was moved by the dying woman’s words and he of course promised to get married, after which he left the house ready to fix everything.

Once on the street he set himself to thinking about his situation, and it seemed to him he was in a fantastic position. He had decided to get married, because he had to do it some day and because his mother was always preaching to him about marriage’s convenience. But if one night he had set the date for his own marriage, it was so that he would not be left with nothing to say. The truth was that he had never thought seriously about it.

Dead coupleThis time, the situation presented itself as inescapable. The sick woman wanted to see them united before she died. The poor señora! She had been very good to him. And in the end, if he had to get married, today was the same as tomorrow. Why not give the poor woman what she was asking for?

So on the following day, the ceremony was celebrated at home, in front of an altar in the patient’s room and in keeping with her insistence that she wanted to witness it from her bed.

The wedding was sad and hushed. Aside from the wedding party and witnesses, the only others in attendance were doña Raimunda, puffing due to her weight and the heat, don Hermenegildo, looking as if he was about to cry, and their neighbor Chonita, with a strange look in her eyes, probably making notes for her next liaison with her mechanic.

Doña Prudencia was crying, and every once in a while her moans interrupted the solemn words of the ritual recited by the priest. That celebration that is usually cause for a party and rejoicing therefore had the funereal aspect given it by the circumstances. Guadalupe was emotional and Pancho Vélez had a disgruntled look on his face.

The sponsors were the young man’s sister, as his mother excused herself with the rheumatism that tormented her, and Guadalupe’s brother, Manuel, who with his sullen and bad-tempered face and untidy mustache, had the look of a wild beast caught in a trap.

When the celebration was over, the widow called to her daughter, and sweetly drawing her toward her, the two embraced, intermingling their kisses and their sobs. Everyone present at this scene had the discretion to leave the room.

Lupita, who had watched the approach of her marriage and the seriousness of her mother’s condition as if she didn’t understand what either of those events signified, felt her very being diminished during the ceremony. And drawing near to the bed of the dying woman, who between tears snatched the opportunity to lavish her with caresses, more tender and effusive than ever, with the pain of thinking they were the last, her child’s heart, new to strong emotion, seemed to open itself to that first teardrop impregnated with deep sorrow, and a torrent of weeping arose from her young and beautiful face.

DeathChonita, who came to dispense a spoonful of medicine, interrupted the scene. A little while later, the bride conversed with the neighbors in the hallway, seated beside Pancho Vélez, although she constantly went to check on her mother, next to whose bed the surly, but sensible Manuel spent almost the entire day.

The following day, in the afternoon, doña Prudencia died. Numerous friends of the deceased and of Lupita showed up at the house of mourning, to say nothing of some friends of Pancho Vélez, who was now considered one of the bereaved. The neighbors were not to be missed. Chonita was there, doña Raimunda and her husband the señor don Felipe were there, and next to them the dutiful don Hermenegildo.

The prayers, the chocolates and the conversations followed as they do in such situations. Once past the initial impression that death produces, wakes resemble any other gathering place. People talk about everything and they laugh. Few are those who maintain a suitable circumspection, and of those there was naturally our most courteous don Hermenegildo, who was often engrossed in his own thoughts and who only once in a while spoke privately and haltingly with the señor don Felipe, who was at his side. Facing them could be seen the rigid body of the dead woman amid four sconces with their respective fat candles burning melancholicaly.

Doña Raimunda was calculating with her husband the likelihood that Pancho Vélez would inherit the estate, and the time that it would take him to exhaust it in riotous binging, when don Hermenegildo interrupted them, saying darkly:

Don Hermenegildo

“Can you see now, doña Munda, that I’m right in saying that I’m very unlucky?”

“Why do you say that?”

“When I was thinking again of getting married and I was at the point of arranging everything . . .”

Doña Raimunda sprang up, and inasmuch as her volume would permit, she hurriedly got out of there so that she could give way to the laughter that was filling her cheeks and that she held back with a hand over her mouth.

As for the licenciado, half in jest, half seriously, he set about consoling the bachelor.

“Another one will turn up, don Hermenegildo. It’s a big world.”

“I doubt it very much, señor licenciado. Misfortune is my destiny. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

****

Want to catch up? Go here and start with Chapter One

By Khaki Scott


Getting Around the City Changing Soon

The first of the new buses has arrived. The drivers are trained and all that remains is the installing of intelligent traffic lights that will connect with the buses to get riders around the city faster than ever. Funding has been a cooperative effort between the State and Federal Governments and dealers, including a 20% subsidy, in order to speed the process along. This will be a welcome change for the many expats who have chosen to live without vehicles in Merida, and it will be the best news we have had in a long time for the environment. The first two routes to open will be Circuito Poniente and Ruta 52 Norte Santa Gertrudis Copó.

Heat Hits Poultry but Not Pork and Honey

This is not good news. For every week of extreme heat, poultry farmers lose 200,000 chicks (from a total of 1.7 million) and 10,000 cases of eggs (from a total of 175 thousand cases). Chickens and eggs are not under fans because the cost of the electricity would be monumental. Consumers can expect higher prices for chicken and eggs beginning soon. As of now, 90% of all swine are under shade roofs and most are under ceiling fans. Swine producers say they will not suffer significant losses. The honey industry is on its way to a bumper crop this year (12,000 tons, up from 10,000 tons last year). The only thing that could hurt them now is drought or fire and every precaution against those two events is being taken. We don’t hear much from the beef industry and are assuming they are busier than ever now that they are USDA certified.

Addy Velazquez Sosa: Queen of Navy Day 2015

Any time anyone thinks that titles are handed out to just any pretty face in Yucatan, they have another think coming. Addy Velazquez Sosa is only 23 years old, but is already dedicated to working for her father’s company, exporting fish, pulpo and sea cucumber. This young lady is a consummate professional and is fluent in English, French and Mandarin Chinese. Addy Velazquez Sosa is also the first elected Queen of Navy Day. In prior years, this honor was made by appointment. Yucatan Living would like to congratulate Addy Velazquez Sosa, her parents, and siblings. We can only imagine how thrilled her family and her community must be over this happy event and we look forward to meeting her on Navy Day.

First International Festival: The World in a Mayan Village

Traditional music and dance from ten visiting nations were presented in Telchac Puerto last week. The participating countries included Canada, Malaysia, Lebanon, Spain, Ecuador, Ireland, Cuba, the Republic of Korea, Colombia and Mexico. The purpose of this festival is to bring cultures together to showcase their similarities, as well as their differences. This is to be an annual festival and next year, should be a wonderful tourism opportunity as they will have more time to plan, and visitors can structure a visit around this marvelous event. We suspect that indigenous cultures from around the world will find that they have many more things in common than they have differences.

Merida Inaugurates First Dog Park

The new dog park is called Peek Park, and it sports areas for specialized pet games, drinking fountains, wading pools, veterinary care, and even child care. The park is located in Unidad Territorial 5 del Parque Lineal and covers approximately 608 square meters, divided into sections for small and large dogs. Visitors can also take advantage of such activities as Zumba, yoga and outdoor movies. There is a small admission fee to get into the park. A decent dog park in Merida has been a long time coming and congratulations are due all around for the completion of this project.

Annual Children’s Day in Mexico: April 30

April 30 was Mexico’s Children’s Day and most of the news that week always focuses on what’s new with kids. They are, after all, the generation that will be in power when we are old and gray, so we have a stake in who they are and who they will become. We are happy to report that much has improved in the lives of Yucatan’s children over the past few years and the stories below showcase just a few of those improvements.

Maya Genome: Heredity and Disease

The National Institute of Genomic Medicine of Mexico will now be working with specialists in chemistry, medicine, science and psychology to study the Mayan genome and to define the reason some communities in Yucatan are more susceptible to obesity and diabetes. These communities have had years of nutritional education and still their rate of obesity, diabetes, and coronary disease continue to climb. Is there a psychological or cultural issue here? Is the problem purely genetic? With all that is known about the Mayan genome today, it is time to track these diseases to their roots. If this can be accomplished in the Maya, then the findings can be extrapolated to populations around the world. That sort of miracle is a long way off, but maybe it will be the Maya who provide the original model for defeating obesity, diabetes and coronary disease.

Children: Traditional Games Survive and Thrive in Yucatan

We have all heard the stories of our grandparents’ childhood toys, along with stories of their having made many of those toys themselves. Then, most of our parents moved to cities and we grew up with store-bought toys that had nothing to do with who we were or where we came from. Today, we are happy to report that such is not the case with the childhood toys of the Maya. Parents, evidently without being prompted to do so and no matter their level of urbanization, continued to purchase traditional toys for their babies and teach older children to create and build their own toys. The time the children spend in crafting their own toys is time during which culture itself is strengthened. “Studies show” (everyone loves that term when it brings good news!)… studies show that it will be many more generations, if ever, before there will be a decline in the use and construction of traditional Mayan games for children. In the meantime, technology has decided that it’s easier to join the Maya than to fight them. Today, new electronic games played on cell phones, using Mayan language and traditional graphics, are being taken to outlying towns and villages. It looks to us as if the Maya of tomorrow are going to be in quite a good position when it comes to living with one foot in both cultures.

Chickenpox Still on the Rise in Yucatan

From the beginning of January to the beginning of April, there has been a 121% increase in cases of chickenpox over the same time last year. This is not usually a life-threatening disease for small children, but both chickenpox and its secondary manifestation, shingles, can be life-threatening to older adults. To help stop this disease, all children in all daycare centers must now have an up-to-date immunization record. If they do not, then free immunizations are given immediately.

Number of Births on the Rise

According to the Civil Registry of Yucatan, in 2009, there were 36,134 babies born in Yucatan state. With a steady increase each year, the Civil Registry of Yucatan reports that in 2014, there were 37,966 births in the state of Yucatan. Unfortunately, 25% of these births were to teenage mothers. One hospital administrator believes it is the culture of the internet that is encouraging sexual activity at increasingly earlier ages. Teen mothers are a worldwide issue and Yucatan’s DIF works hard to provide as many services as possible to these young mothers, their babies, and their families.

The Name Game

In 2013, Yucatan enacted a law that says parents have the right to name their child with the mother’s surname first and the father’s surname second. If they choose that option, the rest of their children will also have that inverted name. If they do not choose that option, the default option is the old way of naming, with the father’s surname first and the mother’s second. It looks as if the people only wanted that option, and were not necessarily intending to use it. Thus far, only 15 babies in Yucatan have been named with the inverted naming pattern. We have to admit that we are a little relieved that this is not a popular practice. With Spanish as our second language, any little stable crutch we can hold onto to understand the culture around us is a plus for us!

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting May 04, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performances:
May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17
Remember, the venue has changed from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – April 24 to May 4
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddhist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion. People of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Daily during Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Oaxaca in Merida: Until May 4
For the next two weeks or so, come visit Oaxaca at Parque de la Paz. Great food, shopping and dance demonstrations!
Location: Parque de la Paz, Avenida Itzaes at Calle 59
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) May 04, 2015

Yucatan Living No events planned for today

Tuesday (Martes) May 05, 2015

Yucatan Living National Holiday: 5 de Mayo

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
This is the final performance for this traveling event.
Location: Parque de la Colonia Emiliano Zapata Oriente, Calle 22 entre 37 y 39.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Grand Prize of Classical Dance
This event is under the direction of Rosa Elena Camacho de Farah. This will be a gala function to present prizes for outstanding achievements.
Location: Centro de Estudios de Ballet (CEBAC)
More Information: Cell: 999-121-4782

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova
Always a great Trova Trio performing… check it out!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Vertigo
(USA 1958) A retired San Francisco detective suffering from acrophobia investigates the strange activities of an old friend’s wife, all the while becoming dangerously obsessed with her. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) May 06, 2015

Yucatan LivingMovie: Pina
(2011 Germany) Pina is a 2011 German 3D documentary film about the contemporary dance choreographer Pina Bausch. It was directed by Wim Wenders. The film premiered Out of Competition at the 61st Berlin International Film Festival. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Hasta el ultimo trago… corazon! (‘Till the Last Drink… my Love)
This movie was made in Mexico in 2005. Directed by Beto Gomez and starring Lila Downs, it is a documentary about Mexican music and the women who have contributed to its development. Yes, it’s in Spanish but the language of music is universal! In Spanish with English subtitles. And a great chance to see Lila Downs!
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 30, 2015

Yucatan Living 110 Years of Korean Immigration in Yucatan
This is a very special program to honor one of the integral ethnicities that form the culture of Yucatan in the past, present and future.
Location: Museum of the City of Merida, Calle 65 x 56
Time: 11:00 AM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Magnificent Ambersons
(United States 1942). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Orson Welles, Dolores Costello and Agnes Moorehead. Welles was the narrator of this movie. Synopsis: The spoiled young heir to the decaying Amberson fortune comes between his widowed mother and the man she has always loved. In English with Spanish subtitles… a great way to learn Spanish!!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living .56% What Happened to Mexico?
(Mexico) This is the story of the battle for power in Mexico; the story of a man, known as AMLO, who was once the mayor of Mexico City. He ran for President, lost, and challenged his country’s institutions by proclaiming himself legitimate president after losing the 2006. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Virgin Suicides
(USA 1999) A group of male friends become obsessed with five mysterious sisters who are sheltered by their strict, religious parents. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 08, 2015

Yucatan Living Valladolid: English Teachers’ Workshop
The Valladolid English Library is pleased to be the host location for the first English Teachers’ Workshop of Mextesol, La Asociacion Mexicana de Maestros de Ingles, A.C.
Location: Valladolid English Library
Time: 9:30 AM Thursday
Admission: $25 pesos. All teachers of English are invited and encouraged to attend.

Yucatan Living Movie: Gerhard Richter – Painting
(Germany 2011) A documentary on the German artist that includes glimpses at his studio, which has not been seen in decades. In German with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Journey into Fear
(United States 1943). Director: Norman Foster. Starring: Orson Welles, Dolores del Rio and Joseph Cotton. A Navy engineer, returning to the U.S. with his wife from a conference, finds himself pursued by Nazi agents, who are out to kill him. In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: El Mudo
(Peru 2013) The story is about a Peruvian government official named Constantino Zega. He doesnt fit anywhere among the hodge-podge of Peruvian government officials and looks down on his colleagues because he has never succumbed to an act of corruption and, every time he has had the opportunity to do so, he has made an effort to impede it. Over his two decades as a government official he has cultivated purity – the fuel for his soul. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 09, 2015

Yucatan Living Bird Watching Tour
This tour will participate in the Global Big Day, an initiative of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, which aims to record the largest possible number of birds in a day and thus contribute to their knowledge and conservation. All birdwatchers, experienced and non-experienced, are invited to participate in this important, worldwide event.
Location: Leaves from: Gran Plaza, Merida (in front of Samborns). Destination: Sierra Papacal
Time: 5:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Admission: $200 pesos
More information: On their website. www.ebird.org/globalbigday or call: (999) 988-4436 ext 113, or e-mail infotoh [at] pronatura-ppy [dot] org [dot] mx.

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Surprise Screening
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Stranger
(United States 1946). Director: Orson Welles. Starring Edward G. Robinson, Loretta Young and Orson Welles. An investigator from the War Crimes Commission travels to Connecticut to find an infamous Nazi. With Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Music: Emiliano Buenfil and La ChanCil Tropical
Do not miss any performance by this group. They have an amazing range of music and are one of the most exciting groups to come along in a long time.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and Inapam: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Grazing the Sky
(Spain 2013) An intimate look at the lives of modern circus performers in and out of Cirque Du Soleil. The film follows the stories of several different performers and gives viewers an unprecedented look into their lives and art. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), May 10, 2015

Yucatan Living Mexican Mother’s Day

Yucatan Living Documentary: Wild Panama
Discover the rain forest on a wild Panamanian island. There are precious few unspoiled areas like this left in the world, so this documentary is more valuable to us with each passing year.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Laura Moguel, Soprano
This performance is under the direction of Felipe de J. Cervera.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission:$50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Le Petit Soldat
(France 1963) During the Algerian war for independence from France, a young Frenchman living in Geneva who belongs to a right-wing terrorist group and a young woman who belongs to a left-wing terrorist. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 5:00 and 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: TBD

 

Monday (Lunes) May 11, 2015

Nothing planned as yet.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performance May 17
Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
The regularly scheduled performances for May 15 and 17 will now take place in a combined performance May 17.
Location: The venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero.
Admission: People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Art Fest at Bistro Cultural in Merida Mexico

Bistro Cultural Art Fest – May 23
The next Bistro Cultural Art Fest returns better than ever. There will be live music performances throughout the evening, a special menu from Chef Yohann, and your favorite artists and craftspeople return along with a select few new and interesting ones. Don’t miss it!
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 43 X 66, Santa Ana, Merida Centro
Time: 4:00 to 10:00 PM
Admission: Free, but bring money!

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
Goossens, Eugene – At the Tarn Op. 15 No. 1
Britten, Benjamine – Simple Symphony for String Quartet
Bacewicz, Grazyna – String Quartet No. 4
8 PM performance.

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos
Facade of Hacienda Petac
Outside at Hacienda Petac in Yucatan
Meals at Hacienda Petac
The master bedroom at Hacienda Petac
One of the five bedrooms at Hacienda Petac
One of the five bedrooms at Hacienda Petac
The pool at Hacienda Petac
The Casa Principal of Hacienda Petac
Petac's magnificent gardens

The Ultimate Hacienda Vacation Rental

Hacienda Petac

 

For the ultimate luxury hacienda experience, nothing compares to Hacienda Petac.

Nestled in the Mayan countryside near the colonial city of Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, this award-winning estate offers an extraordinary combination of luxury, service and total privacy within the walls of a beautiful 18th century hacienda.

Experience the graceful life of centuries past and, as the hacienda’s sole guests, savor the artistry of personal care.

Explore the Mundo Maya, or simply relax as on-site amenities bring the cultural highlights of the Yucatan to your door. An attentive staff, exotic natural surroundings and exquisite details make Hacienda Petac the perfect setting for a unique and memorable holiday.

Hacienda Petac is perfect for corporate retreats, family vacations or special-interest outings that are seeking a spacious, private and luxurious setting.

 

Fascinating Surroundings

Surrounding Hacienda Petac are some of the most interesting and fascinating activities imaginable. One day you might be diving into a crystal-clear cenote, a fresh-water practically-bottomless pool inside a cave. An hour later, you could be climbing to the top of centuries-old stone structures, overlooking the vast tropical-desert countryside of the Yucatan Peninsula. The next day, you could be wandering the cobbled streets of the colonial town of Izamal, designated one of the Mexico’s Pueblos Magicos, a magical step back in time when the Spain conquered Mexico and brought their architecture, religion and culture to this foreign land. Today, you can witness the fascinating mixture of cultures that is the modern day Yucatan.

The countryside around Hacienda Petac

Prices

The following 7-night rates apply year-round. For shorter stays or smaller parties, please contact us.

1-5 people – $8400 USD

6-10 people – $10,500 USD

Weekly rental rate includes…

  • Rental of the hacienda with all the facilities, and a full-service team of manager/hostess, cooks, maids and gardeners.
  • 17% Mexican government tax
  • All meals, snacks and non-alcoholic beverages
  • Daily laundry service
  • Roundtrip airport transfer from Merida (surcharge for more than one arrival)
  • Guided bird-watching walk of the hacienda grounds
  • One lecture or meeting with an expert on Mayan culture

For more information, please see the Rates page on our website:

www.HaciendaPetac.com

 

More Info on the Website

Hacienda Petac has a very comprehensive website with information about exploring both the hacienda and the Mayan, Colonial and modern Yucatecan worlds that surround it. There are menus of the meals that are served at the hacienda, maps and directions, complete rate information and of course, extensive photo galleries.

Please see our website:

www.HaciendaPetac.com

The gameroom at Hacienda Petac

Contact Us

For information about renting this hacienda, please contact us

Call
In the US 1-800-225-4255
In Mexico +52-999-911-2601 (Spanish)
In the United Kingdom 079560978469
Fax +52-999-911-2600
Or email

info [at] haciendapetac [dot] com

 

By Working Gringos

We are in need of a short term nanny.

Name of Company: Nanny for family with one 20 month old boy
Job Location: Merida, Mexico
Name of Contact: Emily
Phone Number: n/a
Email Address: emily [dot] dutterer [at] gmail [dot] com
Job Description: Full time nanny (Monday-Friday) for 20 month old boy. Position is only for the month of June 2015.
Job Requirements: Prior experience as a nanny/babysitter for children under 2 years old.

By Working Gringos

After several months, don Hermenegildo hadn’t made much progress in his plan to rescue doña Prudencia from widowhood and to escape his own long and regrettable celibacy.

A few times when visiting with others at doña Raimunda’s house, the widow received from the good gentleman one or two timid compliments, which at first astonished her, given his natural Paseo de Montejo in Merida Yucatangravity and restraint. Don Hermenegildo, for his part, broke out in a sweat with each one of these little raptures, but he never managed to present the widow with a formal declaration due to the sensitivity of his nerves, those damned nerves that always abandoned him when he tried to take a step toward putting an end to his long bachelorhood.

It didn’t take long for doña Prudencia to figure out the object behind all her suitor’s honeyed phrases. At first she thought it outrageous to get married again, but then she began to think it wouldn’t be such a ridiculous thing, inasmuch as she wasn’t an old woman nor was don Hermenegildo a scarecrow.

Given the good position in which she found herself upon the death of her husband, she calmly dedicated herself to the care of her children, without ever thinking that they would walk her once more to the altar. But the clerk’s timid advances had made her realize that the youthful fire in her heart was not completely extinguished.

Nothing could be resolved, however, because the dusty hero did not use clear and concrete language. Doña Prudencia was longing to hear the words she saw fighting to escape, but no one would be able to guess what was going on in her heart, and in that of her modest suitor, unless doña Raimunda, who was in on the secret, nudged him so that what had so many times choked him would finally emerge.

Guadalupe suspected nothing. She was sufficiently preoccupied with Pancho Vélez, who was still visiting her every night. She had stood out at various parlor dances, showing off her elegant beauty and accompanied by the well-known playboy who, it was said, had decidedly chosen her to put an end to his dissolute and crazy life.

Park in Merida YucatanThe young man’s mother, nearly distraught on account of his recklessness, had with good grace consented to the marriage in hopes of seeing it subdue her son, whose lack of restraint was damaging his health, predisposing him to tuberculosis. And she thought that married, he might fall heir to some benefits that could save him from misery, as there was not much to hope for, given his attitude toward work.

After nearly a year of visiting the house, Pancho Vélez still had not set the date for the wedding. Lupita’s brother, who knew his future brother-in-law’s history and did not seem to sympathize much with him, touched on the point one day.

“And when has he said that they’ll get married?”, he asked his mother.

“I haven’t asked him about it.”

“Well, you have to tell him to set a date, because already the engagement is becoming interminable. Is it that he wants to make fun of my sister like he has of so many others?”

The seriousness of the observation wasn’t lost on his mother, but she was incapable of carrying out any such mission that could hurt the sensitivity of that distinguished young man.

Nevertheless, she asked Guadalupe if her intended had indicated to her when the wedding might be, but she was just as ignorant of that as her mother. Don Hermenegildo came up with a solution to the difficulty when, approaching Pancho Vélez during one of his visits, he asked:

“And when are we going to drink the chocolate, Panchito?”

“Whenever you like, don Hermenegildo. We can have some today if you want”, he replied lightheartedly.

Saint Francis Borgia in Merida Yucatan“Many thanks. But I am referring to the famous wedding chocolate. I promise myself to drink two that day: one to Lupita’s health and the other to yours. When will it be?”

“Within three or four months… my saint’s day.”

“Saint Francis Borgia, isn’t that right?”

“Yes, sir.”

“Good idea. That way the celebration will serve a double purpose. I look forward to my invitation. Lupita is well aware that I want to see her happy, no less than you, who are the spitting image of your father. Such a fine man, so gentlemanly, so considerate toward me. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”

This brief dialogue produced two impressions on doña Prudencia: the satisfaction of knowing that shortly the young girl would be well situated, and the sadness of realizing that that daughter, from whom she had never been separated, was going to form a family apart, in another house different from her own.

The nobility of the maternal sentiment manifested itself with all its power, and moved, she was at the point of crying. In order to distract her thoughts she returned to talking with don Hermenegildo, who was formulating in his mind a statement clear enough to lead him toward his own loving purpose.

****

Want to catch up? Go here and start with Chapter One

By WD Barr

New Leones Outfielder

Corey Wimberly has traveled a long and winding path from his boyhood days in Florida to now roaming the outfield for the Leones de Yucatan in Merida.

Corey Wimberly of the Leones de YucatanBorn in Jacksonville, Florida in 1983, the now 5’8″ 170-pound Wimberly attended Ribault High School from 1999 through 2002 and became one of three players from that school to have been drafted by the Major Leagues. Upon completion of his playing days at Ribault, Wimberly was signed to play the infield and outfield for the Alcorn State Braves in Lorman, Mississippi.

Corey played for two seasons (2004-05) at Alcorn. Always known for his speed on the base paths, his statistics while there are most impressive. In 2004 he hit .420 with 8 doubles, 4 triples and 40 stolen bases. 2005 was an even better year for Corey. He raised his batting average to .462, stroked 10 doubles with 3 triples and stole 42 bases. The Colorado Rockies took note and drafted Wimberly in the 6th round of the draft in 2005.

Minor League Career

The Rockies immediately sent Wimberly to the Casper Rockies of the Pioneer League, a Rookie League. In Casper, Corey hit .381 with 10 doubles and 36 stolen bases in 67 games.

Wimberly played in the Rockies organization from 2005-09 before being let go and signed by the Oakland Athletics. In 2010, with the AAA Sacramento River Cats of the Pacific Coast League, he hit .284 with 14 doubles, 7 triples and 3 home runs while driving in 57 in 135 games. Wimberly had several more stints at the AAA level, Indianapolis of the International League (Pirates), the Buffalo Bisons of the International League (Mets) and the Gwinnett Braves of the International League (Braves). In all, Corey has played for 7 Major League organizations in his career.

Mexican and Venezuelan Leagues

As a newcomer to the Leones, Wimberly is still no stranger to Latin America. Wimberly began his international playing career for the Yaquis de Obregon of the Liga Mexicana del Corey Wimberly of the Leones de YucatanPacifico in 2009. His debut was pretty inauspicious as he appeared in just 7 games for the Yaquis and hit just .240 with 2 stolen bases. In 2010 he played for the Tomateros de Culiacan where he hit .266 with 5 doubles, a home run and 4 stolen bases in 24 games.

In 2011, Wimberly played for the Leones del Caracas of the Venezuelan Winter League where he hit .231 with 6 doubles and 8 stolen bases. Corey did not play international ball again until he signed with the Yaquis for the 2014 winter season. That year, he hit .289 with 8 doubles and 17 stolen bases.

2015 will be his first experience in the Liga Mexicana de Beisbol having signed to play for the Leones de Yucatan.

In 11 years in the minor leagues, including the 2015 season with the Leones, Corey has played in 840 games and compiled a .290 batting average with 902 hits, 111 doubles, 30 triples, 12 home runs and 258 RBIs. Wimberly has stolen 318 bases while being caught stealing 100 times.

Interesting factoid about Corey Wimberly

While a member of the AAA Indianapolis Indians of the International League in 2011, Corey was called on to pitch one time. He gave up 3 hits and an earned run in one inning on the mound and was not involved in the decision.

****

Mexican Baseball Standings as of April 26, 2015

Norte Division

Team Record|WP|GB

Rieleros de Aguascalientes 14-6|.700|-
Acereros del Norte 12-8|.600|2.0
Diablos Rojos del Mexico 12-8|.600|2.0
Toros de Tijuana 12-8|.600|2.0
Vaqueros de la Laguna 12-8|.600|2.0
Saraperos de Saltillo 7-13|.350|7.0
Broncos de Tamaulipas 6-14|.300|8.0
Sultanes de Monterrey 6-14|.300|8.0

Sur Division

Team Record|WP|GB

Tigres de Quintana Roo 13-7|.650|-
Delfines de Ciudad del Carmen 12-8|.600|1.0
Leones de Yucatan 11-9|.550|2.0
Olmecas de Tabasco 11-9|.550|2.0
Pericos de Puebla 10-10|.500|3.0
Piratas de Campeche 8-12|.400|5.0
Guerreros de Oaxaca 7-13|.350|6.0
Rojos del Aguilas de Veracruz 7-13|.350|6.0

Statistical Leaders Through 20 Games

BATTING

Batting Average
Justin Greene (SAL) .468
Jesus Castillo (AGS) .415
Max Ramirez (MTY) .397

Hits
Jesus Castillo (AGS) 34
Olmo Rosario (MVA) 32
Jose Amador (MVA) 31

Doubles
Mike Jacobs (OAX) 9
Danny Richar (AGS) 9
Randy Ruiz (TAM) 9

Home Runs
Saul Soto (AGS) 8
Jorge Cantu (TIG) 7
CJ Retherford (TIJ) 7
Jose Ruiz (MVA) 7

RBIs
Saul Soto (AGS) 28
Jose Ruiz (MVA) 23
Manny Rodriguez (SAL) 22

PITCHING (minimum 20 innings pitched)

Record
Pablo Ortega (TIG) 4
11 tied with 3

ERA
Josh Lowey (MVA) 1.78
Pablo Ortega (TIG) 1.80
Jose Contreras (TIJ) 1.88

Walks
Omar Espinoza (TAM) 13
Ramon Ramirez (AGS) 13
Orlando Lara (AGS) 12

Strikeouts
Irving Jimenez (TAB) 31
Jose Oyervidez (MVA) 30
Cesar Valdez (TAB) 28

WHIP
Jose Oyervidez (MVA) 0.77
Jose Contreras (TIJ) 0.92
Jarrett Grube (TIG) 0.95

**

For those of you who, like us, forgot or maybe never knew these things:
WP: Win Percentage
GB: Games Behind
ERA: Earned Run Average
WHIP: Walks+Hits/Innings Pitched
RBIs: Runs Batted In

By Khaki Scott

Hottest Place on Earth

As temperatures hover between 40 C and 42 C (104 F and 107.6 F), for at least a week, the Yucatan Peninsula has been named as the hottest place on the planet. The coolest parts of the day bring temperatures of 20 C to 24 C (68 F to 75.2 F). Yikes!!

Hurricane Predictions for 2015

For the past several years, the University of Colorado’s experts in atmospheric sciences have distinguished themselves in the area of accuracy when predicting hurricanes. Hurricane season begins on June 1, but early predictions are already out. To its credit, the scientists at the University of Colorado caution that predicting this far ahead has its problems, but they believe, at this point, that 2015 will be the calmest year since 1994. As of now, they expect seven named tropical storms, with three hurricanes, at least one of which will be a Category 5. Although this is good news, we must caution everyone that it only takes one hurricane to cause widespread damage. This means that now is the time to prepare for a hurricane so that everyone can enjoy a safe and relaxing summer no matter what weather comes our way.

Brush and Forest Fires Rage On

The combination of extremely high temperatures and high winds creates an environment in which brush and forest fires flourish. The fire season begins, in Yucatan, about mid-February. Currently, we have had more fires this season than last, but they have actually consumed a smaller area because the skills of our firefighters increase every year. Firefighters are asking that people be very careful with sources of fire. Obviously, this includes not throwing lit cigarettes of vehicles. But it also includes not throwing out anything that is in the least way shiny. Bits of cellophane and aluminum foil, found mostly in packaging, serve as a magnifying glass for sun rays and fires begun this way can be well underway before they are even noticed. Please do your part by not creating an environment in which fires can begin.

Merida: Water Use Up 40%

JAPAY is reporting that the demand for water is up 40% and will likely remain high as long as temperatures are near or over 100 F. They also report that the biggest contributors to this increase in demand is coming from the north side of Merida, where filling and maintaining swimming pools, and showering more than once a day are common in this kind of weather. Even though JAPAY spent the entire winter repairing and maintaining the water lines, this is still not enough to prevent citywide drops in water pressure due to demand. Please try not to use more water than is necessary. Water is a precious resource that is going to be an increasingly important topic far sooner than anyone would have thought. As an added note, for those who live with flooded streets during the rainy season, the city is taking advantage of this time of year to clean and repair storm drains.

Rate of Conjunctivitis Up 113%

Conjunctivitis (pinkeye) is caused by viruses, bacteria, irritants, or allergies. With high temperatures, people tend to sweat and wipe their eyes with their hands. This, combined with thousands of children out of school and running around during summer vacation is setting up a perfect storm situation in which the spread of conjunctivitis can become a serious health issue. The consistent use of antiviral and antibacterial sanitizers and wipes is recommended, but the best thing to do to prevent the spread of this eye disease is to wash your hands often with soap and water, then keep your hands away from your eyes.

Summer Vacation 2015: July 18 through August 24

Students throughout the State of Yucatan will be taking national evaluation tests during the week of July 13 – 16, with Friday, July 17 designated as Prom Night. Summer vacation begins on Saturday, July 18. Although no 2015 – 2016 calendar has yet been published, newspapers are reporting that the new school year will begin on Monday, August 24. That means that, for five weeks in a row, children will be playing in all of the parks and there will even be informal soccer games, at all times of the day and night, in many of the streets throughout the state. Please drive carefully and practice patience.

Sports: National Day of the Marina (Navy Day) Sunday, May 31, 2015

Calls for teams are going out now from Progreso. There will be tournaments in beach volleyball and soccer, as well as basketball and softball. These tournaments will include both women’s and boys’ divisions. If you know of a local team that might like to play, have them contact the Director of Sports in the Municipality of Progreso. Entries are open until May 20, at the Victor Cervera Pacheco Sports Complex.

Closed For Summer: Muelle Market – Bazar del Muelle

The Muelle Market is affiliated with the Chicxulub Food Bank. The market helps raise money to support the many programs of the food bank. This year, between December and March, the Muelle Market donated $6,826 pesos to the Chicxulub Food Bank, $6,000 of which paid for the busses for three field trips to the Science Park for food bank kids. The remainder went to children’s programs and food pantries. The Muelle Market will reopen in December. Look for great vendors to make the Muelle Market 2016 better than ever.

Merida: A Neighborhood of Senior Citizens

As we look into the future of every nation, time and attrition are working hard to sort and sift populations everywhere into groups with similar characteristics. Such is the case in one, if not more, of the neighborhoods of Merida. Over time, San Damian has become a neighborhood of senior citizens. Some are in need because of loss of family relationships. Some are in need of medical services. The fact remains, however, that the citizens of Colonia San Damian are part of the future of the world. They are quietly aging in place and only time will tell how well. To Merida’s credit, local politicians and DIF are doing their best to meet the needs of this population, but this is a worldwide trend that it would do all of us well to watch.

Two Crimes with Guns This Week

All of Yucatan is proud of this state’s position as the state with the lowest crime rate in all of Mexico. However, that does not mean that any of us should assume that there is never any crime at all in Yucatan. This past week, a group of armed individuals boarded a bus on its way from Cancun to Merida. Just prior to crossing into Yucatan, they stopped the bus and robbed the passengers. Only one shot was fired, into the roof of the bus. No one was injured, but the fact remains, a bus was robbed at gunpoint. One of the criminals was captured immediately, but the others are still on the run. Then, an auto service shop at Bodega Aurrera in Motul was robbed by five men with guns. No shots were fired, but three employees were injured. When they could not get the safe open, the criminals fled with only the money in the cash registers. These criminals have not yet been captured.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting April 27, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performances:
April 24 & 26, combined performance on April 26
May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17
In all cases, the venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – April 24 to May 4
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddhist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion. People of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Daily during Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Oaxaca in Merida: Until May 4
For the next two weeks or so, come visit Oaxaca at Parque de la Paz. Great food, shopping and dance demonstrations!
Location: Parque de la Paz, Avenida Itzaes at Calle 59
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) April 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today at Ejercito Nacional. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Tuesday (Martes) April 28, 2015

Yucatan Living Photography Workshop (3 nights)
Instructor: Maestra Sagrario Bargas Caporali
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20
Time: 6:00 to 9:00 PM Tuesday
More Information: (999) 112-1954 (space limited)

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Inspiración
This trio is fast becoming one of Merida’s favorites. We don’t see nearly enough of them.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant
(Germany 1972) Petra von Kant is a successful fashion designer — arrogant, caustic, and self-satisfied. She mistreats Marlene (her secretary, maid, and co-designer). Enter Karin, a 23-year-old beauty who wants to be a model. Petra falls in love with Karin and invites her to move in. The rest of the film deals with the emotions of this affair and its aftermath. Fassbinder tells his story in a series of 5 or 6 long scenes with extended uses of a single camera shot and deep focus. In German with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 29, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: La Vida Loca
(Mexico 2008) This documentary offers a glimpse into the life of gang members in Central America. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today at Francisco I Madero. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Wednesday
Time: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 30, 2015

Yucatan Living Children’s Day
Today the whole country celebrates the children of Mexico.

Yucatan Living Opening of Dog Park
Location: Paseo Verde, in Juan Pablo II
Time: 5:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Kid
((United States 1921). Director: Charles Chaplin. Starring: Charles Chaplin, Edna Purviance and Jackie Coogan. The Tramp cares for an abandoned child, but events put that relationship in jeopardy. In English (it’s a silent movie, but whatever…) with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 5:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: The Stone Boy
(Mexico 2015) Arina and her cousins, Tito, Tato and Tete, live in a colorful tropical valley called Tamaulipeca Huasteca. One day, the fair comes to town. Marina and her cousins made a fantastic trip to the Far Senses country where its inhabitants, Ears, Hands, Eyes, Mouths and Noses, help a child of stone regain human form. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Concert: Chamber Orchestra of Merida
This performance is in honor of Children’s Day and is named “From Aluxes and Other Dreams of the Mayab.” Special Guests include the members of the Choral Workshop of the Wallis Cultural Center and the Coro Domingo Ma. Ricalde de Hoctún Centro Cultural Independiente. These are both brilliant choirs and the Chamber Orchestra of Merida is a treasure in and of itself.
Location: Parque de Santa Lucia, Calle 60 x 55
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingThe World in a Maya Village – April 30 to May 5
Much-accomplished Maestro José Luis Chan Sabido will direct this festival of dance and culture that will use traditional Maya dance and music to introduce attendees to the culture, traditions, language, cuisine and customs of the Maya.
Location: Telchac Puerto
Time: No times announced yet, details to follow.

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today at Chenkú. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living TUI NA Massage Therapy
Tui Na is a therapeutic form of massage and has been used in China for more than 2,000 years. It is an external form of massage and is used for giving special treatments to people of all ages. This Chinese therapy use different techniques along the energy´s channels of the body to establish harmonious flow of Qi throughout the body and bringing it back to balance. Tui Na massage therapy is now becoming a more common therapy method due to its focus on specific problems rather than providing a general treatment. The lecture will be given by Katia Sandoval, who has lived in Valladolid for 7 years. She has a Masters Degree in Tropical Natural Resources Management and has studied Acupuncture in Nei Jing Acupuncture School in Cancun and Puebla. She also has a background in Tui Na Massage Therapy at Nei Jing School in Cancun, México City and Puebla.
Location: The Palapa XOCO LOCO in Casa Hamaca
Time: 7:30 PM Thursday
Admission: Donation of $50 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Mommy
(Canada 2014) A widowed single mother, raising her violent son alone, finds new hope when a mysterious neighbor inserts herself into their household. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Way Way Back
(USA 2013) Shy 14-year-old Duncan goes on summer vacation with his mother, her overbearing boyfriend, and her boyfriend’s daughter. Having a rough time fitting in, Duncan finds an unexpected friend in Owen, manager of the Water Wizz water park. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) May 01, 2015

Yucatan Living Official Holiday: Labor Day
While Americans celebrate Labor Day in a different way, around the world, May 1 is a day to celebrate everyone who works. Enjoy the day off!

Yucatan Living Grand Prize of Classical Dance
This event is under the direction of Rosa Elena Camacho de Farah.
May 1 – 4: Master Classes
May 5: Gala function
Location: Centro de Estudios de Ballet (CEBAC)
More Information: Cell: 999-121-4782

Yucatan Living Movie: Good Night Nobody
( Switzerland 2010) The mysterious world of the sleepless. Four insomniacs from around the world invite us to spend a night with them. While the rest of the world sleeps, they’re awake. In Japanese with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today in Merida at San Sebastian. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living First Friday International Cocktail Party
Special 2×1 drink prices, free botanas, reduced parking. Get connected. Join old friends and make new ones at Merida´s biggest monthly gathering of ex-pats and Meridanos.
Location:La Hach Bar, Fiesta Americana Hotel, Avenida Colon and Paseo de Montejo
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Orson Welles Interview in Paris
(United States 1960). Director: Allan King. Starring: Bernard Braden and Orson Welles. This interview captures Orson Welles reflecting on Citizen Cane and expounding on directing, acting, and his wish to leave a valuable legacy of work. Not something you can easily dial up on Netflix. In English, with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Too Much Johnson
(United States 1938). Director: Orson Welles. Starring: Joseph Cotton and Virginia Nicholson. This is a Keystone Kops style short. A woman has two lovers and the chase is on when one finds out about the other.
Location: Videosala del Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) May 02, 2015

Yucatan Living Opera Yucatan: La Rondine
This is a romantic opera in three acts with an Italian libretto by Giuseppe Adami, based on a libretto by Maria Willner and Heinz Reichert. It was first performed in Montecarlo in 1917.
Location: Sala Mayamax in the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Opera Talk: 11:30 AM, Video performance begins: 12:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Yucatan Living Movie: A Band Called Death
(USA 2012) A documentary on the 1970s punk trio Death, and their new-found popularity decades after they disbanded. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Mini Marathon, Happy Children’s Day
My Neighbor Totoro and The Princess Bride. In Spanish.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 5:00 and 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today in Merida at Chembech. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(Mauritania 2013) The Malian city of Timbuktu has fallen into the hands of religious extremists. Kidane lives quietly in the dunes Satima with his wife, his daughter Toya and Issam, a shepherd boy of 12 years. But city dwellers suffer the regime of terror imposed by the jihadists: banned music, laughing, smoking and even football. Women have become shadows trying to resist with dignity. Each day, some Islamists launch makeshift court judgments as absurd as tragic. In Arabian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Tribute to Bon Jovi
This is a performance by Gabriel Marian, former vocalist for Rata Blanca.
Location: McCarthy’s Irish Pub Merida Montejo
Time: 10:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Call 316-2222 for complete information and reservations.

Sunday (Domingo), May 03, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Laura Moguel, Soprano
This performance is under the direction of Felipe de J. Cervera.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission:$50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
Today in Merida at Inalambrico. Click here for the Google Map of the location.
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) May 04, 2015

Nothing planned as yet.

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performance May 17
Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
The regularly scheduled performances for May 15 and 17 will now take place in a combined performance May 17.
Location: The venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero.
Admission: People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Art Fest at Bistro Cultural in Merida Mexico

Bistro Cultural Art Fest – May 23
The next Bistro Cultural Art Fest returns better than ever. There will be live music performances throughout the evening, a special menu from Chef Yohann, and your favorite artists and craftspeople return along with a select few new and interesting ones. Don’t miss it!
Location: Bistro Cultural, Calle 43 X 66, Santa Ana, Merida Centro
Time: 4:00 to 10:00 PM
Admission: Free, but bring money!

Yucatan Living Cirque du Soleil Mexico – June 25
Location: The Great Tent of Cirque du Soleil will be set up in the parking lot of the Coliseo Yucatan.
Time: More information as it becomes available
Tickets: Presale tickets are being sold via Santander Mexico, but we have also seen them advertised on TicketMaster.

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Byron Augustin and wife in Valladolid YucatanYL: When did you move to the Yucatan and from where did you move?
Byron: My wife Rebecca and I bought our house in Valladolid in 2008. However, the house needed substantial renovations. Rebecca retired from her elementary teaching position, came to Valladolid, rented a small apartment, and essentially became a construction supervisor. She knew very little Spanish, but soon picked up construction Spanish and learned to swear in Mayan. By 2010, the house was progressing nicely and was suitable to live in. I resigned my position as a Professor in the Department of Geography at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, and arrived on the scene in October of 2010.

YL: Why did you move?
Byron: We moved to Valladolid because it was my “dream retirement” location. I brought a group of students to Valladolid on a Study Abroad Program in 1978 and fell in love with the city. Over the years I returned with more study abroad students approximately every two years. Our groups usually had 30 to 35 students and it was exciting for me to show them the place I talked about frequently in my classes. Many of those students now return to Valladolid to show their children where they cultivated their interest in Mexico.

YL: Why did you choose the city you now live in over other places in the world?
Byron: During my teaching career, I visited 55 countries on five different continents, so I was certainly aware of other choices. When my students asked me which country of the 55 that I had visited was my favorite, I never hesitated. I always said, Mexico! Most of my university students from Texas said that they knew Mexico from their visits to border towns like Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, Ciudad Acuña, and Ciudad Juarez, and did not understand why Mexico ranked number one on my list. I always told them that they did not know Mexico, if their experiences had been limited to the border towns. I moved to Mexico and specifically Valladolid because of the Maya culture that still prevails, the rich Spanish colonial history, the food, the music, and above all, the people.

YL: Did you buy a house right away or rent first? Do you think you made the right decision?
Byron: My wife made the decision on which house to buy. Our very dear friend, Mario Escalante at the Hotel El Meson del Marques, called us and told us that there was a house on the market in a nice neighborhood. Rebecca flew down, checked it out and bought it. I never saw the house until a few months later. She is far more creative than I am and I trusted her judgment regarding the potential this house possessed. We both think that individuals contemplating taking up residence in Valladolid would be well advised if they rented initially, to make sure they were comfortable with the culture. Rental rates are fair, and it would provide them with adequate time to search for their own dream home.

YL: Are you doing now what you intended to do when you moved here? If not, why not?
Byron:I believe we are doing much of what we intended to do regarding our decision to move to Mexico. We make frequent trips to Isla Mujeres to fish with our long-term captain. He is very knowledgeable regarding where the fish are located and we have never been “skunked” on one of his trips. Both Rebecca and I are very competitive and always challenge each other for the first Byron Augustin in Valladolid Yucatanfish, the most fish, and the biggest fish. I hate to admit it, but she usually wins. We also like to go to the Maya Riviera to relax, and we take two or three-day road trips to Maya sites we have not visited.

YL: What are the most interesting things about living here for you?
Byron: For me the most interesting aspect of living here is to observe the confluence of two entirely different cultures, Maya and Spanish. As a university professor for 42 years, I engaged in a fair amount of research and writing. Valladolid and the surrounding area is a treasure trove of potential research activities. I do not believe that I planned on continuing to conduct research, but the opportunities were so numerous, I could not help myself. It was a real treat to connect with Ellen Fields at Yucatan Living and submit articles and photos for her to work on with her editing magic.

YL: What do you absolutely love about living here?
Byron: The climate is a big factor. I hate cold weather with a passion and from late October to the end of March, this location is a climatic paradise to me. Mild daytime temperatures cool evenings for great sleeping, and lots of sunshine. Summers are pretty hot and humid, but I have always adjusted better to heat and humidity than to frigid temperatures with ice and snow.

YL: What do you miss from your “former life”?
Byron: I think what I miss most about my former life is punctuality. My German heritage has instilled in me a strong responsibility to honor the time of an appointment. In the German community where I grew up, they joked, “that if a German knew what the precise time of his death was, he would arrive ten minutes early, rather than be late. I am aware that this is a cultural characteristic, but I doubt that I will ever really adjust to the lack of punctuality.

YL: What don’t you miss from your “former life”?
Byron: Of all the things that I do not miss about my former life, the item at the top of the list is high property taxes. Our property taxes in Texas were atrocious, but our property taxes in Valladolid are more than fair.

YL: What is your favorite local food?
Byron: Asking what my favorite food is, is like asking an alcoholic what his favorite booze is. The variety of good food here is exceptional, as my girth will document. The fresh fruit and vegetables available at our large central market are superb and a selection of choices is available throughout the year. Right now I am foundering on mangoes. As far as specific dishes, I love Yucatecan pork, especially cochinita pibil and poc chuc.

YL: What is your favorite time of year here and why?
Byron: My favorite time of the year in Valladolid is late fall and winter. During this time of the year, the vertical rays of the sun are less intense and temperatures drop. More importantly, it is the dry season and the relative humidity declines substantially. Also, there are lots of festivals and cultural opportunities to take advantage of in this season.

YL: Where do you take guests who visit you here to show them something really special?
Byron: We kind of have a routine we follow, especially with first time visitors. Ek Balam and Chichen Itza are our choices for local Maya ruins. Our preference is Ek Balam because it is more intimate, has fewer tourists crowding onto the site, and allows visitors to climb to the top of the Acropolis pyramid (96 feet tall) for a spectacular view of the site and the countryside. A really fun adventure is a visit to the Mayapan Distillery for a tour and tasting of Valladolid’s very own agave azul product. It has a unique tequila flavor, but cannot be called tequila because of Mexican law, so it was named Mayapan. The San Roque Museum is well worth a visit and contains a nice mixture of Maya and colonial period items on display. It is located next to the Heroes Park, where three heroes of the 1910 Mexican Revolution are interred. They were blindfolded and shot by a firing squad of federal soldiers a few feet from where their permanent resting places are located.

YL: The last time you went out to dinner, where did you go and why?
Byron: We have some excellent restaurants in Valladolid. I do not remember exactly which one we dined in last, but we have some favorites that we regularly patronize. It is hard to top the regional Yucatecan menu items at the restaurant in the lovely central garden of the Hotel El Meson del Marques. Breakfast is a delightful experience at Xoco Loco in the palapa at Casa Hamaca. The best pizza in our opinion can be found at Casa Italia, and the lasagna is to die for at Restaurante San Juan. For pure elegance and exquisite cuisine it is hard to top the coconut shrimp served on a slice of grilled pineapple with either a mango or tamarind sauce at Taberna de Los Frailes.

YL: How is the city where you live different for residents than it is for tourists?
Byron: I believe it is different for residents because we have become familiar with the pulse and flow of activity in the city. We know where interesting shops and restaurants are located and we have found excellent health care doctors and expert dental services. Most of us, especially those who are residentes permanantes, are proud to claim that we are Vallisoletanos.

YL: Do you have friends from the local community or do you pretty much hang with the expat crowd?
Byron: We have made many friends and acquaintances in the local community including the city’s last three mayors. The friendship extends across the Maya/Spanish heritage communities. We have been testigoes for Maya and Spanish ancestry weddings, attended several quinceañeras, baptisms, and a Maya Hetz mek ceremony. We hang out with the expat crowd at meetings, dinners, and lectures at the Valladolid English Library (VEL) on the grounds of Casa Hamaca, whose gregarious owner, Denis Larsen always makes everyone feel welcome.

YL: If you are working or own a business, what is it like owning and running a business here or working here? How is it different from doing the same thing in your country of origin?
Byron: I spend a significant amount of time doing research, photography, and writing. In the states I received payments for book contracts, royalties, articles and photos. Fortunately, we do not have to make a living here because of retirement investments my wife and I made when we had full-time jobs in the states.

YL: Are your work habits different here?
Byron: My work habits are different here. I am more laid back and things that need to be done get placed on the back burner more frequently. This is especially true when my wife goes to the States without me. Not too much gets done until she is two or three days from the date of her return. Then, I have to regain my old work ethic and hustle to make it look like I was Mr. Homemaker for three or four weeks. When friends ask me what I do with my time during retirement, I tell them, “I really do not know what I do, but it takes me all day to do it.”

YL: Did you speak Spanish when you moved here? Where did you learn Spanish (if you did)? Is the language barrier a problem for you in your daily life?
Byron: I did not speak Spanish very well when I moved here. I did study some Spanish for a few weeks in San Miguel de Allende. I hate conjugating verbs, especially the irregular verbs. However, I think I can communicate in an acceptable fashion if pressed. With Spanish, I have found that a few drinks improve my Spanish more than studying the language.

YL: What interesting Spanish word or saying have you learned lately? What does it mean and how did you learn it?
Byron: I think one of the more recent concepts I have learned in Spanish is, “lo siento,” or I am sorry. I still do not know how to say that in English.

YL: Are you a Mexican citizen? Do you plan to become one?
Byron: Several of the expats we know in the community are gaining Mexican citizenship or planning to do so. We have so many rights and privileges as residentes permanantes, that I do not feel citizenship is necessary. Besides, at my age, I do not wish to study and take any more exams.

YL: Have you traveled much within Mexico? If so, where and what has been your favorite location to visit? What did you see there that you liked so much?
Byron: Latin American geography was my regional specialty when I was a university professor, so I travelled extensively in Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Basin. However, Mexico always held the greatest interest for me. So far, I have visited 27 of Mexico’s 31 states and the Federal District. There are so many places that hold special memories but one of the most dramatic occurred near Saltillo. On a whim, we turned off the main highway, drove a few miles and then entered a tunnel one and one-half miles long. When we emerged from the tunnel, an absolutely spectacular panorama unfolded before us. It was the old silver mining town of Real de Catorce. We spent a day and a half soaking up the ambiance of this truly unique place, including a church, which was a popular pilgrimage site for Catholics.

YL: How are you treated by Mexicans? Do you feel resented or welcome?
Byron: We have been especially well treated by Mexicans. They show us respect, integrate us into their family’s social activities and always make us feel welcome. A perfect example occurred this past Friday. During the 1980s, I always took my study abroad students to Hacienda Holoctun, just outside of Merida, to visit an operating henequen mill. The mill supervisor and his brother ran the operation and lived in the old Casa Principal. Eduardo, the main supervisor always had his wife make fresh tortillas for the students over an open fire. The students were fascinated while watching the masa turn into a hand-made tortilla. The mill closed more than 25 years ago and the machinery collapsed along with the building, which housed it. I was curious as to what had happened, so my two Canadian friends and I pulled into Holoctun. After checking out the total destruction of the mill we went to the Casa Principal and knocked on the door. Eduardo’s wife came to the door with a smile a mile wide. The sight of her after all of those years melted my heart and long hugs with her and her adult daughter brought back so many warm memories. We talked for thirty minutes and she made me promise to bring Rebecca to see her on our next trip to Merida. The Mexican people have always made us feel welcome.

YL: How do you feel about the economic prospects of Mexico? Of the Yucatan?
Byron: I worry about the economic prospects of both Mexico and the United States. Government officials in both countries have placed their economies at risk because of large debt accumulation. The United States is even worse than Mexico, and if the United States falls into economic decline it will drag Mexico down with it, in my opinion. I do feel more optimistic about the economic future of the Yucatan. As long as airfares from flights originating in the United States or Western Europe remain affordable, the economic development of tourism should continue to grow.

YL: What are some changes you are hoping for in the city in which you live? Do you see any progress towards these changes?
Byron: Name a city where street repair is not a problem and I would guess you live in Shangri-La. We have that problem, but the city government is close to completing a major street project on Calle 40, which enters the center of the city from the south. I would love to see the city pass noise restrictions on motorcycles and scooters. Many of these numerous machines assault the sense of hearing beyond belief and it is a major nuisance.

YL: What are your plans for the future here?
Byron: In the future, I will most likely continue to be actively engaged in research, writing and photography. In June, I will assist a young professor of Global Studies and Cultural geography from Middle Tennessee State University with a group of study abroad students, including providing some class lectures on Cuba and the differences between Maya and Inca cultures. My wife and I hope to continue to explore the Yucatan Peninsula, do some fishing and enjoy the aspects of Valladolid that make it so special.

YL: What is the one most important piece of advice you would give someone buying property and/or planning a move to the Yucatan?
Byron: I would advise potential candidates that might move to the Yucatan to come and live here in rental property for six months to a year, in order to make sure it is the “right place” for them. If they decide to buy, hire a construction engineer to examine the property before the purchase is completed.

YL: If you could say something to all the people of Mexico, what would you say?
Byron: If I could say something to all of the people of Mexico, it would be, “Thank you for making me feel like a special guest in your beautiful country.”

****
Byron Augustin is a regular contributor to Yucatan Living. You can read many of his articles in our Valladolid Living section.

By Working Gringos

Don Hermenegildo had had to work at slipping away from Luis Robles every time he ran into him, in order to avoid the ubiquitous question about what had come of his request. The bachelor had yet to encounter the señora under favorable conditions, at times because she had visitors, at times for some other reason.

And he was not sure of the motive behind the young man’s strange wish.

“It’s impossible,” he thought, “that Luis can’t understand that everything will come about without doña Prudencia agreeing to his visiting the house to woo her daughter. Why then his impertinent insistence that I provide the recommendation as soon as possible?”

It was undoubtedly just one of that scatterbrain Luis’s crazy urges. On the chance that he could escape a negative situation that was neither improving nor worsening for him, he wanted to test the remote possibility that the señora would accede to his wishes. That’s just the way he was; nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Luis had attended many banquets and other parties without anyone having invited him, and he had thoroughly enjoyed himself.

“You’re very happy-go-lucky,” someone once said to him.
“What? Am I going to let the scruples of a nun keep me from doing what I want? I’m sure that if some people don’t invite me, it’s because they don’t see me in time. I never go into a place if I know I won’t be well-received. And don’t think they’re not still thanking me for that. I’ve arrived at parties that had the atmosphere of a wake, and it took me a while to turn everything around. In those cases I’m more useful than the musicians. One of these days I’m going to publish my rates and start charging people like them a fee.”

Don Hermenegildo resolved to take the bull by the horns. Issuing a thousand provisos and assurances that he knew Lupita’s many merits, and that he spoke only to satisfy an obligation, he presented Luis’s proposition to doña Prudencia. She, without hiding behind rhetorical flowers or walking amid their greenery, said…

“But what can that fool be thinking? Can he suppose that I’ve gone crazy, or that I don’t know what he’s up to? You tell me.”
“No, señora, no. I’ll tell him whatever you want me to, don’t get excited. I’m doing no more than fulfilling a commission. I am neither here nor there. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about.”
“Fine. You can tell him that my daughter is still very young for those things. And even if she were older, not in his dreams.”

The poor fellow grabbed hold of the first part of this response which he would amplify in the most golden of terms, neatly keeping the remainder to himself. And that is just what he did with the result that Luis, as if the response were completely natural, didn’t get upset, quieting don Hermenegildo’s fears that it would precipitate a huge outburst.

Meanwhile, in his own interest, the latter had not failed to move forward, dropping in with more frequency for visits to the widow’s house even to the point, overcome by trembling, of daring to predict to her that some day when least expected, a suitor would present himself and she would get married.

Doña Prudencia took delight in the crazy idea, and laughing detracted from her appearance, aged her, as she said how stupid was the man who would pay attention to her when there were so many women in the world.

“Well, don’t you believe it; don’t believe it. The day you least expect it . . . believe me, I know what I’m talking about.

And they went on speaking of other matters.

Smiling to herself, Doña Raimunda had observed that at her gatherings, don Hermenegildo was noticeably more solicitous and courteous with doña Prudencia, and taking satisfaction in that as an accomplishment of her own, she discretely made a point of continuing her attempt to fan sympathetic flames in the idle heart of the widow and in the almost cataleptic one of the bachelor.

Meanwhile, Lupita went on being touched by the dew of new days that were developing her beautiful body and boldly accentuating her figure. Increasingly more splendrous and acclaimed, her beauty was attracting admirers and feminine envy, and even the charmed Pancho Vélez was making his rounds in the street either in a two-wheeled Tilbury or simply astride a beautiful, prancing dark bay. He then persistently watched Lupita from afar and would greet her with an elegant tipping of his hat when coming face to face with her.

Exhausting the rich vocabulary he reserved for these matters, Luis Robles was seeing red, fearing the consequences of a rivalry with someone so much in favor with the fair sex. As for Fermín Dorantes, he suffered the most discouragement, seeing that his girlfriend’s character was unaffected by his fierce loyalty and considering her behavior with Luis Robles to be a good example of that fact.

The poor Fermín loved her deeply and if at times he considered forgetting about her in face of his shortcomings, he continued showing up on the street in hopes that his thinking would little by little work its way into her frivolous nature.

So much sensible advice, so many affectionate scoldings! Lupita seemed to prefer him and she continued to come out to the shutters to talk with him. But she tolerated Luis Robles more than he would have liked. When the latter approached to talk with her, she no longer always went inside, and despite Fermín’s efforts, at the informal dances she danced various numbers with Luis.

“If you like Luis Robles better, just tell me once and I won’t come back,” he sadly told her one night.
“But, hombre, because I dance one or another of the numbers with him?”
“Yes! And because you laugh at the dumb jokes he tells you and that’s what he wants. And because I’ve asked you not to do it, just like that.”
“Do you think Luis Robles is going to eat me? I don’t know what crazy ideas you have. What does it matter to you that he talks to me and dances with me if I only love you?”
“If you loved me, you would do what I have begged of you so many times.”
“It’s that I think you’re mistaken.”
“Fine, now you know… either Luis Robles or me.”
“You, hombre, you. Don’t be foolish.”

After a few days, the reasons for complaint presented themselves anew and the previous dialogue was repeated with slight variations.

“You are incorrigible. You seem more childish every day,” said Dorantes.

And so things continued until a third party appeared to resolve the lovers’ conflict.

Little by little Pancho Vélez’s visits to the street were becoming more frequent, and Lupita always responded to his greetings with obvious appreciation, showing as much interest as she did for either one of her old boyfriends. One day, as night approached, after Vélez passed by a few times on horseback, he approached the window where the young woman was seated, and making the animal place its front hooves on the sidewalk, he struck up a half-hour conversation with her in full view of Robles, who was already on the corner, and of Dorantes who arrived later. Doña Prudencia, who made a brief showing, greeted Pancho Vélez attentively, a pleasant third in the conversation.

This scene, often repeated, resulted in the other two men going elsewhere, not wanting to continue in their slighted roles: Fermín Dorantes, truly dejected to have lost his hope for a love that had dominated his being, and Luis Robles, swearing that he was now convinced that Lupita was most pleased by men who always rode horseback.

“I’m going to ask for an old nag they use to haul water on my father’s property to see if I can dethrone Pancho Vélez.”

****
Want to catch up? Go here and start with Chapter One…

By Working Gringos
Dental Implants Merida Yucatan

Implantology in Merida

A dental implant is a surgical process that connects a person’s jawbone to a dental prosthesis, such as a crown, denture or bridge, anchoring it in such a way that it is as secure (or maybe more so…) than the original tooth. According to a Wikipedia article, the science of implantology is based on “a biologic process called osseointegration where materials, such as titanium, form an intimate bond to bone”. Though there are some minor risks associated with a dental implant, “…in the presence of healthy tissues, a well integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have long term success rates of 93 to 98 percent for the fixture and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth.” (Wikipedia)

Throughout Merida, more and more dentists are learning the techniques of implantology, as the demand for implants grows. Dr. Ricardo Peniche, a practicing implantologist in Merida, is one of Latin America’s experts in the newest technique of implantology, called All on Four, and he is one of a very select group that is teaching the other dentists in Merida and across Mexico.

Dr. Ricardo Peniche

Dr. Ricardo Peniche, an English-speaking dentist here in Merida, received his degree in Dental Surgery from the well-respected dental school at UADY here in Merida. He then went on to get his Masters dr-ricardo-peniche-implants Merida Yucatandegree in Oral Rehabilitation from the Universidad Finis Terrae in Santiago, Chile, with a specialty in Oral Implants. He has also earned a Testimony of Outstanding Performance from the Centro Nacional de Evaluación (CENEVAL) in Mexico, as well as a Professional Certification from the Asociación Dental Mexicana, to which he has belonged since 2008.

He is the Coordinator of the Diploma that is given in Oral Implantology at Anahuac-Mayab University, and he is also a Professor in the Department of Implantology Dental Surgery and in the Department of Implantology Oral Rehabilitation Specialty at the same university. Dr. Peniche was a lecturer at the International Dental Federation Mexico Conference in 2011, and has been a lecturer in conferences of various associations such as the Dental Association Yucatan, Campeche Dental Association, the College of Dental Surgeons of Quintana Roo, the Mexican Federation of Oral Implantology, and the Mexican Association of Periodontology. Dr. Peniche is also a teacher of various courses organized by Nobel Biocare and Biomet 3i in Yucatán, Campeche, Quintana Roo, Mexico, Mexicali, Guanajuato, Chiapas, Nuevo Leon, Sonora, Aguascalientes, Morelia, Colombia and Chile and he has been invited to speak at various conferences on implantology inside and outside of Mexico.

Dr. Peniche has also written papers on the Surgical-Prosthetic Considerations for Immediate Occlusal Loading Procedure, the Ultrastructural Evaluation of Composite-composite Interface on Incremental Technique, and Implants in Patients with Systemic Diseases.

If you are looking for the expert in implants in Yucatan, you are looking for Dr. Ricardo Peniche.

All-On-4 Implants

There is now a most exciting technology that is being advertised and offered around the world by cutting edge dentists… it is called All On Four. All-On-4 is a surgical and prosthetic medical procedure that was created and systemitized in the 1990′s, and which now is available in most places around the world.

This technology is designed for people who previously would need a complete or near-complete replacement of their dental arch. In the past, these people would be fitted for dentures… removable teeth ALLonfour technology from Dr. Peniche in Merida Yucatan Mexicothat must be specially cared for. Now, with All-On-4, these people can be given a fixed prosthesis with 12 to 14 teeth (the entire lower or upper arch), which is placed immediately on the day of surgery. For patients with significant tooth decay or bone loss in the jaw which prevents normal implants, this technology is a wonderful solution.

The procedure of All-On-4 is patented by the company Nobel Biocare, whose products are used in the process. For the entire jaw, only four implants into the bone are used, securing the entire set of teeth. The entire surgery is first done virtually, on a computer using special 3D software. After taking a complete digital Xray of the patient’s jaw, Dr. Peniche works in the software to design the best application of the implants and determines their exact placement. Any mistakes or experiments are made on the computer until the perfect solution is achieved. Then the design is codified and the implants are designed. When the time comes to place the implants in the mouth of the patient, the process is easier and faster, resulting in less pain and fewer problems.

In Merida, and in Yucatan, the expert in All-On-4 implants is Dr. Ricardo Peniche.

Other Implants

Of course, Dr. Peniche also provides other dental implant technology to his patients. Overdentures are dental implants that are supported by teeth but can be removed for cleaning in a similar way to your Dental implant bridge from Dr. Ricardo Peniche in Merida Yucatancurrent denture. Unlike a conventional denture, overdentures are supported by implants, so there is no need for adhesives and the discomfort associated with movement of the prosthesis when it is removed.

Like the natural root of the tooth, a single dental implant provides the ideal foundation for a new all-ceramic dental crown. A ceramic crown on a dental implant looks and functions like the missing tooth, and is often the solution needed when only one tooth is damaged.

The loss of several teeth may reduce bone, change the structure of your mouth and age your appearance. A simple solution to stop this process is a dental implant bridge. When several teeth are missing or must be removed, often Dr. Peniche can place only two implants, topped by a bridge, which is sufficient to replace three or four teeth.

 

 

Hours and Contact Information

Dr. Peniche’s offices are located in the CMA Hospital, just one block east of Paseo de Montejo and one block south of WalMart on Paseo de Montejo. This location is walking distance to the Hotel Zone in Merida, and very close to the historic center of Merida.

Hours: Monday through Friday, from 9 AM to 1 PM and 4 PM to 8 PM. Saturdays, 9 AM to 1 PM.
Address: Centro Médico de las Américas, Calle 54 # 365, interior 314.
Office Phone: (999) 926-4434. Dr. Peniche speaks perfect English.
Email: info [at] dentalimplantyucatan [dot] com
Website: www.dentalimplantyucatan.com

 

 

 

 

This is a paid advertisement.

By Khaki Scott


Mexico in Top 10 Most Visited Countries

Mexico has returned to the list of Top Ten Countries Most Visited by Foreigners. It actually climbed from 15th place to 10th place in one year! Mexico is the most visited nation by foreign tourists in Latin America, and the second most visited nation by foreign tourists from North America. The Top 10 Countries Most Visited by Foreigners in 2014 were: France, the USA, Spain, China, Italy, Turkey, Germany, the UK, Russia and Mexico, in that order. Viva Mexico!

Merida’s Airport Busier than Ever!

At 980 passengers an hour over the past three weeks, it looks as if the Merida International Airport has hit the big-time and will soon need to be expanded. A good deal of this traffic might be generated by the new Merida-Milan connection because people can grab that flight out of Merida and, when they get to Milan, can then get a quick flight to any European destination. The percentage of traffic increase at Merida’s International Airport is three times the global average and, over the Easter weekend, more than 100,000 passengers passed through, with many stopping to enjoy the wonders of Yucatan. Airport management is keeping up, but we wouldn’t be surprised to see expansion in the near future. In the meantime, the Merida airport rarely seems crowded to us and is a pleasure to pass through, especially when you push that button and get a green light!

Merida: When the Wind Chill Goes Up!

Late April and all of May are the hottest months in the year in Yucatan. For several days in a row, Merida reported a temperature of 104 F with a wind chill of 113 F. What the heck does THAT mean?? Merida is a city of well over a million people, with houses built of concrete, connected by hard surfaced streets and roads. As in any city of its size, there are not enough trees, nor are there enough water features. Although the coast is only a few short miles from the city, breezes are blocked by buildings and the people inside must endure the heat or find a way around it. If anything underscores the need to escape to the beach (even for a few hours), this is it. As of this writing, it is only 93 F in Progreso, with no daytime temperature in the next week expected to rise above 97 F, and always with a breeze. Since many of Yucatan’s Snowbirds are landing in snow at home, we are left to wonder if they are just a little glad to see it?

Junior World Champion Weightlifter from Progreso

April 7 – 12 saw the 2015 competition for the Junior World Champion Weightlifter held in Lima, Peru. When it was over, Mexico came home with three gold medals and one bronze. All three gold medals were won by Josue Said Medina Andueza, in the Under Age 17 category. Josue won gold medals for both events in which he was entered. He lifted 150 kg. and 188 kg. Then, he won his third gold for his overall combined score. Needless to say, his parents and grandparents are bursting with pride, as is all of Progreso, Yucatan and Mexico.

Yucatan’s World Class Fencer Returns from European Tour

Abigail Valdez Andrade is a young lady on her way to the top of her sport. She just participated in her first World Cup. Thus far, she is ranked in 44th place as an individual fencer in the world, 15th in mixed teams, and 6th in teams. She has been on tour for the World Championship in Spain and Uzbekistan. In the coming weeks, Abigail will travel to Guanajuato to attend Mexico’s National Olympiad. Yucatan produces some of the best young athletes in the world and we are as proud of them as we know their families and coaches must be.

Progreso Hosted Semi-Final Fashion Show of Miss Earth 2015

The six semi-finalists in Yucatan’s Miss Earth 2015 competition were first presented in a ceremony at Rosas and Xocolate Hotel in Merida on March 19. Since then, they have had a number of public activities, including the planting of trees in Progreso and Cholul. Then, on Saturday, April 11, at 8:00 PM, the young semi-finalists participated in a fashion show in Progreso in which all of their clothes were made from recycled materials. The girls were absolutely beautiful in gowns and swimsuits made out of everything from grocery bags to bubble wrap. See those amazing outfits on Progreso Hoy. Special guest for the event was Yucatan designer Enrique Polanco. The theme of the entire evening was centered on caring for the environment. The Grand Finale to crown Yucatan’s Miss Earth 2015 will take place in Merida on April 25. The winner will represent Yucatan in the Mexican National Miss Earth 2015 contest on August 29 of this year. To keep up with these lovely young ladies and their events, simply look for Miss-Earth-Yucatan on Facebook.

64th FLAM Convention Held in Merida

This past week saw Merida hosting the 64th Assembly of the Latin American Federation of Justices (FLAM). One hundred ten justices from twenty nations attended the event, which was designed to help Latin American nations strengthen judicial independence. One of the deciding factors in choosing Merida to host this event was Yucatan’s dedication to and success in reforming its own judicial system, and its determination to strengthen respect for human rights. Since the manner in which justice is administered has a direct bearing on the economic and social growth of nations, Merida was the logical location in which to hold this meeting. This is yet another area where those who live in Yucatan can be proud of their culture and can really understand that the world is watching.

Immigrant Diet, Public Health, and Culture in Mexico

This past week, there was a case, in Tijuana, in which Mexican authorities, following an anonymous tip, found dog meat cooking in a Chinese restaurant. Since nothing like this has happened in Yucatan, now may be a good time for each of us to think about how we feel about the dietary habits of other cultures. According to the State Ministry of Health, dog meat would be ok to eat if it is properly raised, processed, and prepared. However, the random use of street dogs for this purpose could pose a significant public health problem and would never be approved. With the population of the world increasing and the migration rate also increasing every year, we need to take stock of what our attitudes will be when migrants to Yucatan come and want to continue the diets they had in their home countries. Do we forbid them? Help them? Change them? As deeply as Yucatan loves and respects its pets, we suspect (let’s be honest… we HOPE) that eating dog meat will not be on any menu here in the near future.

Mythical “Sacbe” Now on GPS

The Sacbe (White Road) that connects a number of Mayan settlements to Uxmal was built over 1,000 years ago and is still in good shape today. The connected communities include Nohpat, Che’etulix and Kabah. This is a road that is five to six meters wide, which once facilitated the movement of social, political and military groups, and which ensured Uxmal’s hold on her designation as the capital of the region. One of the more interesting facts concerning the materials used to build this road is the size and shape of the stones. The stones lining the edges of the road are all 30 to 60 centimeters in diameter and well aligned. The stones in the road itself are all 20 to 30 centimeters in diameter. There are a number of lookout points built from round stones that are three or four meters in diameter and between 1.5 and 2 meters tall. Now that restoration is complete and the coordinates of the road have been registered with GPS, we can look forward to any number of cultural events to take place on the mythical-no-more sacbe.


Mexican Postal Service: Business is Booming

With the introduction of the Internet and e-mail, it was expected that the Postal Service in Mexico would soon breathe its last. Such has certainly not been the case! Instead, Internet shopping has created a boom in package deliveries for the Mexican Postal Service. Two years ago, there were a dozen post office branches in Merida. Today, there are fifteen post office branches in the city alone, plus a brand new host of delivery trucks. It is wonderful to hear that many of the packages come from other parts of Mexico and from around the world. Many thanks to the Mexican Postal Service in Yucatan for their service, and our congratulations on a job well done.

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting April 20, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performances:
April 24 & 26, combined performance on April 26
May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17
In all cases, the venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – April 24 to May 4
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddhist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion. People of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Daily during Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Oaxaca in Merida
For the next two weeks or so, come visit Oaxaca at Parque de la Paz. Great food, shopping and dance demonstrations!
Location: Parque de la Paz, Avenida Itzaes at Calle 59
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
We have not found out how long this art exhibit will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) April 20, 2015

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood? (Thank you, Debi!!)
Location: Colonia Zazil-Ha (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission:Free

Tuesday (Martes) April 21, 2015

Yucatan Living Chelem Christmas Toy Drive
April Bingo/Raffle Extravaganza. Just one of the Prizes is an original Paul Lawrence Oil Painting. The fun and funky Nacional Beach Club and Bungalows in Mahahual has donated a three night stay and Lolo Lorena Bed and Breakfast in Isla Mujeres has donated a one night stay. For a $100 peso donation, they will throw 5 tickets in the drawing for you. You do not have to be present to participate in the drawing. You can let them know where to meet you and they can get your tickets to you, or you can donate through PayPal on their donation page.
Location: LaBarca/Dunas Hotel and Restaurant, Chelem
Time: 6:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: There are several categories of bingo cards, so come on out and bring plenty of pesos.

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Parque San Antonio Xluch (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Tuesday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Yellow Submarine
(United Kingdom / United States 1968). Director: George Dunning. Starring: Paul Angelis, Geoffrey Hughes, John Clive, Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and John Lennon. This is the iconic movie of the 60’s, in which the Beatles must save the country from the Blue Meanies of Pepperland, evil beings who have banned music and enslaved the inhabitants of this strange place. (Go ahead – admit it – you know the words to that song, but when is the last time you saw the movie? It’s still great!)
Location: Centro Cultural Jose Marti / Parque de Las Americas, Av. Colon x Calle 20
Time: 8:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Trio Café Canela
The Cinnamon Coffee Trio! This is a new trio to us, but you know they have to be good to make it to Tuesday of Trova. We can’t wait to hear them!
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Birth
(USA 2004) A young boy attempts to convince a woman that he is her dead husband reborn. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 22, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Food Inc.
(2008) An unflattering look inside America’s corporate controlled food industry. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Fraccionamiento Mulsay (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Wednesday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Choir of the City of Merida: Game and Song
This is a wonderful choir of young people. The title implies that a great time will be had by all.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Mumia
(USA 2012) The film captures the life and revolutionary militancy political prisoner on death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal. The new documentary by Stephen Vittoria is an inspiring portrait of a man many consider the most famous US political prisoner, a man whose very existence challenges our beliefs about justice and freedom. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 23, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: Oliver
(United States 1968). Directed by Carol Reed. Starring: Mark Lester, Ron Moody, Shani Wallis and Oliver Reed. Musical adaptation about an orphan who runs away from an orphanage and hooks up with a group of boys trained to be pickpockets by an elderly mentor. Excuse me, sir…
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 5:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Rupestre
(Mexico 2014) The director of this film, Alberto Zúñiga, accepts the invitation of cultural promoter Jorge Pantoja, founder of Tianguis Popular, to document the history, life and motivations of a group of rockers that transformed the history of urban music of Mexico. Over 40 respondents give their testimony about the origin, importance and validity of this unique cultural movement. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Parque Salvador Alvarado West (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Red Cross Benefit: Chip and His Dog
Vocel en Escena will present the children’s opera “Chip and His Dog.” All proceeds will go to support the Red Cross.
Location: Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33 #174 x 112 y 114.
Time: 7:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Adults: $100 pesos, Children: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $80 pesos
Tickets on Sale Now at the following locations: (1) Progreso’s Red Cross, Calle 35 x 72 y 74, (2) Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33, #174 x 112 y 114 in Progreso, and DigiPrint Progreso, Calle 29 # 152-A x 89 y 82.

Yucatan Living Music: For the Love of Baroque Music
This is a performance by the same group that brings us Chamber Sundays, under the direction of Rob Myers.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Concert: Live Essence
This performance of street music is under the direction of Felissa Estrada.
Location: Teatro Felipe Carrillo, Calle 60 x 57
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Hearthbeats
(Canada 2010) The story of three close friends who are involved in a love-triangle. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) April 24, 2015

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – Starts Today
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddhist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion. People of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: Daily during Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Bird Photography Workshop
This workshop is limited to 12 participants. Participants must have their own photographic equipment, including zoom lenses.
Location: Offices of Pronatura Peninsula de Yucatan (Calle 32 #260 x 47 y 47-A, Col. Pinzon II, Merida.
Time: Friday, 24th: 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Saturday, 25th: 7:00 AM to 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Sunday, 26th: 7:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Fee: $1,500 pesos . Must register by April 21.
More information and Registration: (999) 988-4436 ext 113

Yucatan Living Movie: Luminito
(Cuba 2013) The legendary photographer Roberto Fernández “Luminito” presents a sample of his career in Cuban cinema. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: San Jose Tecoh (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Red Cross Benefit: Chip and His Dog
Vocel en Escena will present the children’s opera “Chip and His Dog.” All proceeds will go to support the Red Cross.
Location: Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33 #174 x 112 y 114.
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Adults: $100 pesos, Children: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $80 pesos
Tickets on Sale Now at the following locations: (1) Progreso’s Red Cross, Calle 35 x 72 y 74, (2) Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33, #174 x 112 y 114 in Progreso, and DigiPrint Progreso, Calle 29 # 152-A x 89 y 82.
INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Art Opening at SoHo
Mexican sisters Hortencia and Laura Bueno present their works, New Horizons.
Location: SoHo Gallery, Calle 60 x Calle 43, centro of Merida
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(Mauritania 2013) The Malian city of Timbuktu has fallen into the hands of religious extremists. Kidane lives quietly in the dunes Satima with his wife, his daughter Toya and Issam, a shepherd boy of 12 years. But city dwellers suffer the regime of terror imposed by the jihadists: banned music, laughing, smoking and even football. Women have become shadows trying to resist with dignity. Each day, some Islamists launch makeshift court judgments as absurd as tragic. In Arabian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Stranger than Fiction
(USA 2006) An IRS auditor suddenly finds himself the subject of narration only he can hear: narration that begins to affect his entire life, from his work, to his love-interest, to his death. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) April 25, 2015

Yucatan Living Weekly Meetup: Sabados de Gay Coffee – Every Saturday
This is a recurring, gay friendly event, hosted by Cindy Santos R, who is looking forward to creating a network of LGBT and others who are LGBT friendly. The objectives are to be in touch, get together, and make new friends. Visit their website at Merida LGBT Professionals Meetup.
Location: Gloria Jean’s Coffee, Av. Andres Garcia Lavin #303 x Calle 37 y Calle 37-A, Local 7, San Ramon Norte, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 5:30 PM every Saturday
Admission: Free but purchase your own coffee and food

Yucatan Living Movie: The Stone Boy
(Mexico 2015) Arina and her cousins, Tito, Tato and Tete, live in a colorful tropical valley called Tamaulipeca Huasteca. One day, the fair comes to town. Marina and her cousins made a fantastic trip to the Far Senses country where its inhabitants, Ears, Hands, Eyes, Mouths and Noses, help a child of stone regain human form. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Emiliano Zapata Sur I (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Saturday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Concert: Emiliao Buenfil and La ChanCil Tropical
This you have got to see. The performance is under the direction of Sandra Gayou Soto. Those of you who have a little country (or Cajun) in your soul and miss a bit of toe tapping accordion music – here is Yucatan’s answer to everything you need. …and if you don’t believe that, just take a look at this preview. We dare you not to be dancing in your seats.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos.

Yucatan Living Movie: 24 Hour Marathon
16 different movies playing all night on Saturday and all day on Sunday.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: TBD

Yucatan Living Movie: Güeros
(Mexico 2013) Güeros tells the encounter between Shadow and his younger brother, Thomas, who visited him in Mexico City after some unfortunate events in his mother’s house. The arrival of the young Thomas brings power to the monotonous life of Shadow and his friend Santos, which seems to have lost something after the strike of the UNAM. Together, they embark on a journey to find a legendary musician who listened to children, whose whereabouts were unknown for a long time. This search, crossing the invisible boundaries of the City of Mexico, will teach them that they can not run away from themselves. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), April 26, 2015

Yucatan Living Documentary: Wild Packs
Opportunistic and adaptable, wild dogs show their prowess as hunters and the powerful ties that bind every member of the pack together for life.
Location: Museum of Natural History, Calle 59 Next to the Zoo
Time: 12:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Roble Agricola (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Sunday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Charles Chaplin Movie
No information is given as to what this movie will be, but all of the Charles Chaplin movies are classics now, and well worth attending.
Location: Centro de Artes Visuales, Calle 60 x 47
Time: 7:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Chamber Sundays: For the Love of Baroque
This performance is under the direction of Robert Myers.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

 

Monday (Lunes) April 27, 2015

Yucatan Living Trova in Your Neighborhood
The city of Merida is producing Trova musical events in neighborhoods around the city to bring more of this traditional Yucatecan music to the public. When will they be in your neighborhood?
Location: Ejército Nacional (Google Map here)
Time: 7:00 PM Monday
Admission:Free

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan LivingThe World in a Maya Village – April 30 to May 5
Much-accomplished Maestro. José Luis Chan Sabido will direct this festival of dance and culture that will use traditional Maya dance and music to introduce attendees to the culture, traditions, language, cuisine and customs of the Maya.
Location: Telchac Puerto
Time: No times announced yet, details to follow.

Yucatan Living TUI NA Massage Therapy – April 30
Tui Na is a therapeutic form of massage and has been used in China for more than 2,000 years. It is an external form of massage and is used for giving special treatments to people of all ages. This Chinese therapy use different techniques along the energy´s channels of the body to establish harmonious flow of Qi throughout the body and bringing it back to balance. Tui Na massage therapy is now becoming a more common therapy method due to its focus on specific problems rather than providing a general treatment. The lecture will be given by Katia Sandoval, who has lived in Valladolid for 7 years. She has a Masters Degree in Tropical Natural Resources Management and has studied Acupuncture in Nei Jing Acupuncture School in Cancun and Puebla. She also has a background in Tui Na Massage Therapy at Nei Jing School in Cancun, México City and Puebla.
Location: The Palapa XOCO LOCO in Casa Hamaca
Time: 7:30 PM

Yucatan Living Opera Yucatan, A.C. – May 02
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies beginning May 2.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Looking for: Full-time energetic inside Sales Representatives for immediate hire in Merida.

Requirements:

Native English speaker.
Sales experience.
Energetic / Positive attitude.
Self-motivated.
Outbound call center experience is a plus

This position pays a base salary and includes a high commission plan.

Contact:Josh Padilla at ja [at] dunhillworldwide [dot] com

By Working Gringos

Editor’s Note: This article was first published in December 2008, and updated again in August of 2011 and March of 2013. It has been two years since our last update, so its time to do it again. What follows is the original article with added comments and updated prices. For comparison, we have included the the 2008, 2011 and 2013 prices in parentheses wherever possible, so we can all watch the trends.

In editing the article and putting in the new prices, we found a lot of interesting changes. The prices of tomatoes, water and martinis have not changed, but the price of gas and electricity sure has. Some price changes are hard to quantify… the price of real estate is all over the map, and while prices are not rising as much as they were a few years ago, they haven’t exactly fallen either. We hope you enjoy the update and we look forward to your comments!

What Does It Cost to Live in Merida Mexico?

One of the most common questions we have been asked by readers of Yucatan Living is also one we often hesitate to answer: What’s the cost of living in Yucatan? Our standard (and rather evasive) answer has been: “Well… it depends”. We are particularly surprised by those who ask us, “Can a person live on $4,000 dollars a month down there? Or $2,000 dollars?” Because the answer to that, of course, is “Yes! There are thousands, maybe millions, of Mexicans living here on much less.”

Unlike the United States and other developed counties where money talks and the consumer is king, Mexico and the Yucatan in particular, do not have homogenous economies. In so-called “developed” countries, most people have a wage-earning job, drive a car, shop at the mall, save with an IRA, use a credit card, pay income taxes and share a common – if not equal – economic reality.

But the long and very special history of Mexico has produced a different economy here. Either through imposition or experimentation, Mexicans have incorporated, and to a varying extent maintained, economic systems inherited from Native America, Colonial Spain, the Napoleonic Empire, the Catholic Church, Capitalism, Socialism and Communism, just to mention the heavy hitters. There are whole communities in Mexico that still live off the land, like our great, great grandparents who settled the “wild west”. At the other extreme, the man who consistently competes with Bill Gates to be the richest in the world (Carlos Slim) makes his home in Mexico. And almost every other conceivable economic arrangement and social class is also found here.

You Paid Too Much

While the trend is that more and more Yucatecos are joining what we call the “money economy”, most campesinos still prefer to bargain and barter, avoid banks and loans, and minimize formal payrolls and income taxes. While those in Gringolandia tend to pay top dollar, Yucatecos boast of finding el precio mas barato (the lowest price) for their last purchase.

When we first moved here, a gringa friend of ours had composed a little ditty entitled “You Paid Too Much!”. We don’t remember the lyrics or the tune, but we remember and appreciate the sentiment: no matter what you tell someone you paid for something here, the reaction is almost universal… you paid too much! At first it was unnerving, causing us to walk around feeling like we had been duped at every turn. This is an easy feeling to adopt when you are an expatriate. Sometimes it can feel like there’s a big dollar sign (or pesos sign… coincidentally, they are the same!) printed on your forehead, and you are the only one who cannot see it. Gradually, we have gotten used to this feeling and recognize it as the symptom of a mindset that is always looking for a bargain.

Lifestyle in the Yucatan… It Depends

These and other significant economic and cultural differences mean that the cost of living in Yucatan (and much of Mexico) depends more on your lifestyle and personal financial decisions than they probably do in your own pollo pricescountry. There are simply more options here. Many commodities can be found at very different prices depending on location, context, and quality. The Mexican economy is like eBay, a swap meet and a garage sale wrapped in a department store in a mall at Disneyland (we refer to Cancun). For example, you can watch the same Hollywood blockbuster in an art-deco theater in Santiago for about $2.50 USD that would cost you $8.50 USD lying in a barcalounger in a modern cineplex in northern Merida. Or you can go to a government-sponsored film festival at the Olimpo or Teatro Merida and pay nothing to see an art film. Or you can buy that film for $25 pesos (about $1.60 USD in 2015) from the guy who comes by your table selling piratas (pirated DVD’s) and watch it at home. You see? It depends…

When in Rome… Uh, Merida!

One important way to reduce costs is through immersion and assimilation. The more Yucateco you become, the less you’ll find yourself paying (and willing to pay) too much. It is obvious to most of us who live here that speaking Spanish and adapting to local traditions will almost always guarantee finding a lower price or a lower-priced alternative. What is not immediately obvious is how thrift becomes a way of life when it is supported by the culture that surrounds you. You can drive across town to Home Depot for that machete (yes, you might like to have one here), or you can walk to the corner hardware store and buy one for less. The choice is yours. But you are bound to feel more comfortable at the corner store if you speak a little Spanish and are willing to become a part of your neighborhood.

About the Mexican Peso

With only a few exceptions (real estate and lodging come to mind), you’ll be paying for everything in pesos. After the horrific peso devaluation of 1994, there have been important changes in Mexican finance, which includes a virtual peso “peg” to the U.S. dollar. For about six years after 2000, the Mexican peso tracked the value of the dollar at an exchange rate of 11 pesos to one U.S. dollar, plus or minus half a peso. In mid 2011, when this article was previously updated, the exchange rate of the peso was about 12.3pesos to the U.S. dollar. For comparison purposes and quick calculations, we will use the 12 to 1 ratio in this article, though in the last year, the peso has been as high as 14.3 (May 2012), was 12.3 the last time we updated this article (Mar 2013) and is about 14.9 for this update (April 2015).

Unlike Europeans and Latin Americans, who are conditioned to think in multiple currencies, most norteamericanos have a difficult time understanding the value of anything not quoted in dollars. But it’s not that difficult. We just divide the price in pesos by 10, and then give yourself a 30 percent discount. For example, something that costs $100 pesos costs $10 dollars minus 30%, or about $7.00 USD, mas o menos.

As a service to you, our reader, the rest of this article quotes most of the prices in pesos, so you can practice doing the math…

Housing

One of the more fundamental expenses is housing, and prices in Yucatan are particularly difficult to generalize. The cost of housing keeps increasing just like everywhere else in the world, but from such a low value that there are still many locations that are affordable by North American or European standards. And the rise in prices was not caused by an over-abundance of loans, as most Mexicans own their homes outright. Mortgages are only now becoming available to the growing middle class, and are still practically impossible to get if you are a foreigner.

A renovated colonial house in the centro historico of Merida that cost $150,000 dollars five years ago may now sell for as much as $350,000. Unrestored properties can still be found for well under $100,000 dollars, but a good one is rarely under $35,000 to $40,000 USD. Compared with prices ten to fifteen years ago, this is quite an increase. The center of Merida, along with the beach areas along the Gulf Coast, have appreciated the most, as these are the most attractive locations for expatriates and retirees. There are places in Merida that are exclusive and expensive, such as La Ceiba (the gated community north of Merida on the way to Progreso), and prices there have been fairly stable. And there are numerous other safe and attractive neighborhoods in Merida that are just getting on the expat radar, such as Colonia Mexico or Chuburná, as well as smaller towns around Yucatan State, such as Cholul, Motul, Izamal and Valladolid, where lower priced homes are still available. se vende houses in Yucatan

Fortunately for the real estate shopper, there are numerous agencies in Merida and the Yucatan with comprehensive websites where you can gain a broad view of the market. Just Google “Yucatan real estate” or “real estate in Merida Mexico” (when you have a lot of time). And don’t forget that all prices are negotiable.

Of course, another option is to rent, at least until you have some “on the ground” experience with life in the Yucatan, and have shopped the real estate market to your heart’s content. Many foreigners do rent before they buy, but the variety of rental properties makes determining a price range almost as difficult to generalize as real estate for sale. We have rented modest houses in the centro historico for as little as $200 USD per month and as much as $500 USD. These were rented from locals by locals. Now, a typical two-bedroom rental downtown with the type of amenities that most expatriates are looking for and in the most desirable areas might go for $600 to $1200 USD per month or higher. A vacation rental home in Merida or on the beach, rented by the day or week, costs a lot more. Click on the Vacation Rental topic on the right side of this page to see some of the local offerings. Or as with real estate purchasing, just type in “vacation rental merida yucatan” into Google and compare prices on VRBO.com or Airbnb.com. While we don’t have an exact measure to report, it is our intuition that these prices have stayed pretty stable. Certainly demand has been steadily rising, but supply of these homes has as well, so prices do not seem to have changed too much in the last two years. If anything, they have maybe gone down a bit as competition has been increasing.

If you’re not a local, you’ll be competing with tourists, foreign professionals and student travelers when you rent. Depending on the condition of the property and its location, you will likely pay more than you might have five years ago. This is especially true of restored colonial vacation rental houses. Unfortunately, these are the most frequently advertised on the Internet. The most affordable properties are still advertised by their owners by painting En Renta on the façade or by advertising in Spanish in the Diario de Yucatan, Merida’s leading newspaper. Finding a suitable and affordable rental property therefore usually requires a visit to the area, a leisurely tour up and down the streets of the neighborhood in question, and lengthy communication in Spanish with the owner. For the cost-conscious shopper, we recommend staying in one of the low-price hostels or hotels while shopping rental properties like a local.

Income and Value Added Tax

Very few people in Mexico pay income tax. Well, technically, nobody pays income tax. If you are employed at a company that pays salaries and reports earnings, the company withholds and pays your personal income tax for you. But the number of wage-earning jobs subject to income tax in Mexico is relatively few compared to the United States or Canada.

Many Mexican workers earn their income, in whole or in part, abajo de agua (literally “under water”, but it means ‘under the table’). These workers include private farmers, artisans, independent contractors and construction workers, small restaurants and other sole proprietors of small businesses. This practice is not illegal, although poco a poco, the Mexican government is trying to bring everyone into the fold (ABOVE the table). In the past, you could choose to participate in a “gray” economy, without reporting any profit or loss to the government, or you could participate in the formal economy through serialized invoices called facturas, and report both profits and losses. Many businesses operated in both economies, depending on the client. In the last year or two, the government has begun to require facturas for almost every business transaction and the “gray” economy has theoretically been shrinking.

To compensate for a lack of tax revenue from income, the Mexican Government imposes a rather steep national sales tax, or Value Added Tax, called Impuesto Valores Agregado in Spanish, which is abbreviated to IVA and pronounced ee-VAH (or ee-BAH by many). You are expected to pay IVA for everything you purchase except medicines, unprepared foods, water and other basic necessities of life.

However, there are many cases, depending on your lifestyle choices, where IVA is not added to the price of your purchase (referred to as mas IVA, or plus tax). For example, you can eat fast food, where IVA is added, or you can eat at a private cocina economica, where it is not. You can contract with a professional cleaning service for your housekeeping needs and pay IVA, or you can hire a freelance housekeeper. You can buy a machete (you really should get one…) at Home Depot mas IVA, or you can buy it at the mercado, sin IVA. The choice, once again, is yours: WalMart or Chetumalito (a section of the mercado)? Bit by bit, that 15% savings adds up.

Property Taxes

Your property’s value is determined by a state government agency called Catastral or Catastro (strangely, the same agency, two different names, both correct), and is based on the historic value of the property more than the (usually understated) last sale price. Every year, starting in January, you will receive a bill for property taxes, called a predial (pray-DEE-al). In most cases, you will be stunned to learn that this is profoundly less than you paid in your own country. For example, the former Yucatan Living offices, which was a two-bedroom, restored colonial in the centro, had a market value of over a million pesos. It had been appraised by Catastral at $212,000 pesos. We were billed $110 pesos for predial in 2008. And if we paid before March, there was a discount! Predial prices have not changed much in the last few years, but if you renovate your house, your predial will be raised to reflect the new appraised value. Working Gringos lovely home in San Sebastian, which sold for over $300,000 USD in 2012, paid a predial of approximately $300 USD in 2011, just to give you an idea.

Honestly, the property taxes are so low that we compensate by giving back to the city whenever we can. Anyone who asks us for a donation or wants to sell us flowers on the street will get a few pesos from us… it’s our way of contributing to the life around us here. We figure it’s the least we can do. After all, there’s that “$” on our forehead.

Fidecomiso

As anyone who has shopped for real estate in Merida or along the coast has learned, we are in the so-called “restricted zone”. This means that as foreigners we cannot own property directly in this zone, but must purchase it through a bank trust called a fidecomiso (FEE-day-co-MEE-so). These trusts charge a hefty annual maintenance charge. Just when you thought you were escaping the costs of property ownership: bang, the fideicomiso bill arrives!

Still, adding together the $4,500 to $7,500 peso charge for our bank trust along with the cost of the predial, the net expense is still a tenth of what we paid in property taxes back in California, so we try not to complain. But those annual fideicomiso charges are one motivation for becoming Mexican citizens, which would allow us to own the property outright. Also, there is a serious effort afoot within the Mexican government to make foreign investment in Mexico even easier by getting rid of the fideicomiso requirement. It has not passed and been put into law yet, but we are all watching and waiting.

Everything Else

After housing, most foreigners expect to pay for basic modern conveniences like water, garbage, gas, electricity, telephone, cable and internet. The per-unit cost of your monthly utility bills are not negotiable, but the total cost is directly affected by lifestyle choices.

Water

The water supply is delivered by a company called JAPAY (HOP-eye). There really is no shortage of water in Merida, nor in most of Yucatan, so prices are low compared to the rest of North America. The least you will pay in the centro historico is $58.5 pesos per cubic meter for up to three cubic meters of water (up from $50 pesos in 2008). One cubic meter is 164 gallons. An average toilet flush is about 2.5 gallons. A five-minute shower is roughly 13 gallons. A load of laundry in a modern washing machine runs between 30 and 40 gallons. The more water you use, the higher the price per cubic meter, as the table below illustrates. In updating the prices from 2008, we noticed that most prices had been raised 6 to 10 pesos, but in this last update after a year and a half, there were almost no changes. In updating now in 2015, there have been no changes in the following table.

Water Consumed (M3)

Pesos per M3

4 – 10

$62.00

11 – 15

$69.00

16 – 20

$72.00

21 – 40

$4.5 per M3

41 – 60

$4.8 per M3

61 – 80

$5.5 per M3

You will notice in the table that if you consume less than 20 M3′s per month, you are billed a flat rate. Above 20 M3′s, you are billed per M3. So a consumption of 25 M3′s will run you about $112.50 pesos. To add to this complex billing structure, prices also vary depending on location. In the southern (less affluent) areas of Merida, prices per cubic meter start at $47 pesos (up from $40 in 2008), while in the northern (affluent) areas, they start at $61 pesos (up from $52 in 2008). There is also a higher rate for business locations, which in 2013 is $171.50 pesos per M3. Consumers are billed every other month and in our aforementioned large home, we pay on average about $170 pesos per bill. Yes, we take showers AND we use a washing machine.

Many Yucatecos who own swimming pools choose to drill their own well to fill them, as well as to irrigate their gardens. This probably made more sense back in the day when water was pumped using windmills, but not as much (as we will see) now that the pumps are run by expensive electricity.  It may again make more sense if you install wind or solar energy generators, as we know some friends have done at their haciendas. For more information about water prices, you can check JAPAY’s website. You will note that the last price update was January 2009. Since water is a basic human need, prices for water tend to stay fairly stable in the Yucatan.

Garbage

We are familiar with two garbage collection companies in Merida: Servilimpia and Pamplona. They have different collection days depending on your location. For instance, Servilimpia works Colonia San Sebastian on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. In the tourist areas of the centro historico, they collect whether you pay or not. Sometimes, they forget to stop by for some reason, but in general the service works.

Prices for garbage removal used to be $17 pesos a month across the board in the centro and everywhere else. If you pay for a whole year in advance, they will even give you a discount. Prices are eminently reasonable:

  • Zona Residencial Alta – $53.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Residencial Media – $46.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Media Alta – $33.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Media Media – $28.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Media Baja – $23.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Popular Alta – $20.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Popular Media – $17.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Popular Baja – $14.00 pesos per month
  • Fraccionamiento Popular Alta – $20.00 pesos per month
  • Fraccionamiento Popular Media – $17.00 pesos per month
  • Zona Marginada – $0.00 pesos per month

Have something big or unwieldy you want to throw away? Put it outside. If it is at all valuable or reusable, chances are a neighbor or passerby will pick it up before the garbage truck even gets there. If your garbage requires more effort or ingenuity on the part of the garbage company to haul it away, you might find them banging on your door, even in the middle of the night. Tip them $10 or $20 pesos and they will be happy. If not, they’ll tell you how much they want to take away your couch or old refrigerator, and there is no reason not to pay them.

In addition, you will occasionally see a group of men (and sometimes women) in orange vests, sporting brooms and rolling trashcans, making their way along the streets of Merida to pick up after those who toss candy wrappers and plastic bottles from their cars or from the buses (which at times, seems to be almost everyone…). We would be knee-deep in modern, brand-name detritus if not for them. The discussion about stopping those people from tossing the candy wrappers in the first place is for another article, one we will probably never have the insight to write.

Electricity

La Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) is the national electric company that supplies power to all of Mexico. Although they are a “World Class Company”, (as the slogan on their trucks continues to remind us), they do not pretend to be affordable. Without a doubt, electricity is the most expensive utility in Yucatan. 

We in Yucatan benefit from the previously-mentioned socialist influences within the Mexican economic system by living in a region classified as 1C. This means that because we have an average summer temperature of 30 degrees Celcius (86 degrees Fahrenheit), our electric bills are subsidized during the summer months of May through October. (Or, if you are a die-hard capitalist, you could say we are gouged the rest of the year.)

For a private residence in Merida, the summertime electricity rates are:

up to 300KW/H in 2013

Basic: $0.711 pesos (up from $0.567 in 2008, $0.643 in 2011, $0.693 in 2013) up to 150 Kilowatt Hours (KW/Hr)
Intermediate: $0.839 (up from $0.668 in 2008, $0.742 in 2011, $0.808 in 2013)) for the next 150 KW/Hr (this limit used to be 600 KW)
High Intermediate: $1.071 (up from $1.040 in 2013) from 300 to 450 KW/Hr
Surplus (excedente in Spanish): $2.859 (up from $2.772 in 2013) per KW/Hr over 450 KW/Hr

During the rest of the year, the rates are:

Basic: $0.809 pesos (up from 0.661 after 150 KW/Hr in 2008, $0.733 in 2011 and $0.789 pesos in 2013) up to 75 KW/Hr
Intermediate: $0.978 pesos (up from $0.780 up to 600 KW/Hr in 2008 and $1.229 up to 150 KW/Hr in 2011, $0.960 in 2013) up to 100 KW/Hr
High: $2.859 pesos (up from $2.350 after 600 KW/Hr in 2008, and $2.593 after 150 KW/Hr in 2011, $2,808 in 2013) after 175 KW/Hr

For those who are not familiar with the term “KW/Hr”, it means kilowatt-hour, which is a thousand watts of electricity consumed in an hour. If you burn ten, 100-watt light bulbs for an hour, they consume one KW/Hr of electricity. Naturally, here in Yucatan, low-cost fluorescent bulbs (11 to 17 watts) have been widely adopted, not just to conserve electricity, but also because they survive power fluctuations caused by our lovely afternoon electrical storms better than standard incandescent bulbs.

A new rule says that if you consume more than 850 KW/Hr per month, you are now Tarifa DAC (de Alto Consumo) and you must pay a fixed price of $80.63 pesos per month, and $3.484 pesos per KW/Hr.

How much electricity does your lifestyle consume? If you plan to live like most campesinos outside Merida, you do not own a refrigerator. If you want a cold drink or fresh eggs, you walk to the corner store, which serves as the community refrigerator. You don’t own a washing machine either, preferring to wash your clothes by hand. You might own an electrical fan, but you certainly don’t own an air conditioner. You hang your hammock in a shady spot and let the breezes cool you off. Probably the only electrical appliances you own are a (rather loud) radio and a television, along with a few light bulbs (and maybe a string or two of Christmas lights, (para La Virgen).

With the exception of a few ceiling fans, a small refrigerator and perhaps a washing machine, many working class Yucatecos living in Merida don’t consume much more than their campesino cousins, although a growing number own a DVD player and a battery charger for their cell phone.

We observe that the Yucatan middle-class owns an assortment of electrical appliances similar to most middle-class expatriates, but they do not have as many and they are not used as often. You won’t find a garbage disposal or dishwasher in most Yucatan kitchens, including ours. But the obvious socio-economic dividing line is air conditioning. The modern miracle that made Las Vegas possible and lures thousands of campesinos and working class Yucatecos to the malls every summer is what takes the biggest bite out of anyone’s electric bill. Lest we start feeling at all high and mighty, this modern miracle is also probably what makes Merida even liveable for most expatriates coming from the Great White North.

At the Yucatan Living offices, we would often run two “mini-split” air conditioners throughout the business day. (Only for the comfort of our clients and our computers, you understand.) It was not unusual for our bills to run $6,000 to $8,000 pesos per month. In our home, we only had air conditioners in the bedrooms – a common practice among homeowners who chill electrically – and we avoided using them whenever possible. Consume more than 850 KW/Hr on a regular basis, and you will be rated DAC (De Alto Consumo) (High Consumption) and the rate becomes a fixed price of $80.63 pesos per month, and $3.484 pesos per KW/Hr ($3.281 per KW with a set charge of $74.69 each month in 2013). And no discount during summer months! You guessed it… we were rated de alto consumo. For the luxury of a large renovated house and an air conditioned office, we ended up paying top dollar. And once rated DAC, you can pretty much resign yourself to always being rated that way unless you substantially change your ways. We have learned to cool off with the swimming pool or a cold shower before we resort to air conditioning, but never did get out of the DAC category.

The CFE bill is delivered every other month, so expect to see double when it arrives.

Propane Gas and Carbon

There are no natural gas mains running under the calles of Merida. Every home and office has some sort of propane tank on its roof or in a closet. The gas is delivered from a truck operated by one of several independent companies with names like Z-Gas, Delta Gas and Gas Peninsular. The price of propane has nearly doubled since we moved here in early 2002. That’s the bad news. The good news is that it’s still one of the least expensive utilities and one of the most efficient energy sources.

A typical three-bedroom colonial home has a 300-liter stationary tank on the roof. At a price of $8.14 pesos per liter (up from $5.48 pesos per liter in 2008, $5.94 in 2011 and $6.65 in 2013), it costs more than $2000 pesos to fill it. The gas heats the calentadores (water heaters), secadora (clothes dryer) and is used for cooking, although we often use the campesino method where cooking is done on open wood fires or with charcoal (…in other words, we use a barbeque with carbon (pronounced car-BONE)). A tank lasts us five or six months, so we figure we pay an average of about $400 pesos a month for gas. The government now supplies a handy dandy gas calculator for your convenience.

To save both gas and electricity, we try to hang our clothes out to dry as much as possible, and only use the clothes dryer for rainy days and during the rainy season. We also disable our water heaters during the summer months or if we are gone from the house for more than a week or so. By the way, just like everything else here, if you use carbon for your barbecue, you can buy it in two ways. You can get the branded briquettes you are familiar with at Costco or WalMart, or you can buy a small bag or two at your corner store. That carbon is made locally in the countryside, and costs $8 to $15pesos per bag. It also helps support the people who make it, which is a good feeling.

Transportation

Anyone who reads the financial press or studies Mexican history knows the entire oil industry is consolidated into a state-run institution called Pemex. The Mexican government nationalized the oil industry after the Revolution and sets the prices for gasoline at legislated intervals. Despite protestations and seductions from free-market advocates in Gringolandia, this native bit of socialism has been working out rather well for “We The Consumer”. In addition, we are pretty sure we save a lot of precious hours of our life not worrying about which gas station has the lowest prices, as the prices are all the same at every Pemex station.

There are two grades of unleaded gasoline at the pump. Regular is called Magna and premium is called, well, Premium. A liter of Magna currently costs $13.70 pesos per liter (it was $7.05 pesos per liter in 2008, $9.32 in 2011, $11.14 in 2013). Premium costs $14.73 pesos per liter now (in 2008, $8.77 pesos per liter, $10.32 in 2011, $11.70 in 2013). To convert to dollars per gallon, here’s the math:

(Pesos-per-liter times 3.7854) divided by pesos per dollar

Using an exchange rate of 14.9 pesos per dollar, the cost of unleaded regular gasoline is (drum roll, please) $3.49 USD per gallon. It was $2.93 USD per gallon when we updated this article in 2011, and $3.50 in 2013. taxi ride in Merida

If that sounds like great news, then you probably spend a lot of time in your car. However, you don’t have to drive very much in Merida. Many who live in the centro find themselves walking more, and if you need to make a quick trip to the mall or the mercado, you can always find a taxi, combi or a bus to take you there. A bus ride to anywhere costs $7 pesos (up from $5 pesos in 2008, no change from 2011 and $6 in 2013). (Find out everything you need to know about taking the bus in our article about Taking The Bus in Merida). A typical taxi ride costs about $30-35 pesos (up from $25-30 in 2008 and no change since 2011). And in many cases, what you need – groceries, prescription drugs, dry cleaning – can even be delivered to your home at no additional cost.

Auto Insurance

It is your civil responsibility in Mexico to carry auto insurance. A policy to cover everything your vehicle does to others, but without coverage to yourself, will cost you about $2,000 pesos a year. The cost of total coverage depends on the kind of vehicle you have. For our ten year old SUV, the cost for car insurance was about $7,000 pesos last time we updated this article in 2011, which is about $585 USD a year. Prices for auto insurance have not substantially changed since then.

Telephone

Like everywhere else in the world, your telephone options are mind-boggling. And even though Telmex (and its little cellular brother Telcel)  is still the monopoly of old (oops! did we say ‘monopoly’? Carlos Slim would not be happy with us…), it has been increasingly forced to compete with other companies, if not in price, at least in features. You may want to compare offerings from Axtel, Telefonica, Movistar, IUSACELL, and others (not to mention VoIP options) before making any decisions, but you could find yourself spending a significant part of your life shopping telephone service. We aren’t going to go into all the possibilities here, understandably. But we’ll give you an idea of what costs are from the leading provider.

If your new or restored home has never enjoyed telephone service, you’ll need to order a new line from Telmex. This process has been known to take weeks and costs about $2,000 pesos for the installation. After that, basic service is $389 pesos a month (it was $200 pesos in 2013), which now includes 200 cel phone calls (a new feature in 2015), 100 local calls (it used to ONLY include 100 local calls), and unlimited national and international calls (never included before). Additional calls are still $1.50 pesos flat rate as they were in 2013 (They used to be $4.50 pesos flat rate… a price that has gone DOWN since 2008!).

If you want to upgrade your Telmex service, there are several options. In 2011, for $400 pesos a month (it was $600 pesos per month in 2008), you could order “Telmex 1000” service, which included 100 local calls, 100 minutes of long distance within Mexico and a 1 MB broadband Internet connection with wireless router. For twice the bandwidth and unlimited long distance calls within Mexico, you could order “Telmex Without Limits”, which costs around $990 pesos (it used to be $1,100 pesos in 2008) per month. In 2013, that same package was called Paquete Conectes (which translates to ‘connecting packets’, an awfully technical telephone term…) and cost $389 pesos per month. The package included 100 minutes of calls to cellular phone numbers, 100 local phone calls, 100 national minutes (within Mexico) and internet (called Infinitum) at 3 MBPS. in 2013, “Telmex Without Limits” (Sin Limite) cost $999 pesos per month and included unlimited local, national and international calls, 100 minutes of calls to cellular phone numbers and an internet connection at 10 MBPS. Now, in 2015, for $599 pesos per month, you can get unlimited cell calls, local calls, national and international calls AND internet.

Television

Most Yucatecos of every economic persuasion own a television. What’s more, you can watch television while waiting in line at the bank, having your hair done, strolling down the aisle of your supermarket, riding in a taxi, or having your teeth cleaned. At many drinking establishments, you’ll be greeted by at least half a dozen flat-panel televisions encircling the bar overhead. Yucatecos love television.

There are several local broadcast channels you can watch for free, but most people purchase a cable or satellite service. The cable provider in Merida is CableMAS. They offer various packages of different local, national, sports, movie and pay-per-view channels. They also offer Internet services. Basic service with 40 (up from 26 in 2013) channels and a 6 MB Internet connection (in 2008, it was a 256 Kb Internet connection, in 2011 it was a 1 MB connection, in 2013 it was a 3 MB connection) costs $360 pesos per month (up from $350 pesos per month in 2008 and in 2011, down from $390 in 2013). You can also now, in 2015, get a package of 40 channels with 10 MB service for $480 pesos a month, of unlimited internet with 20 GB, national and international phone calls and cable TV including HBO for a mere $999 pesos per month. But check around with your neighbors… there isn’t a joke about CableMENOS for nothing.

In 2008, the only real option for satellite service was from SKY, (famously pronounced, esk-EYE here) a part of Rupert Murdoch’s global news and entertainment empire. A few years back, they purchased Hughes DirectTV, eliminating the competition at the time. In 2011, a standard SKY package cost $250 pesos per month (down from $400 pesos per month in 2008), but included more channels than the basic cable package. For about $650 pesos (this price did not change from 2008 to 2011), you could have nearly all available channels, including familiar movie channels like HBO, Cinemax and Showtime, along with news from Fox, CNN, BBC and Bloomberg. Other English language channels include Discovery, TLC, National Geographic, Warner and E! In 2013, SKY’s basic package costs $169 pesos per month and could go all the way up to $743 pesos per month for all the additional add-on channels.

In 2013, Dish TV was offered through your Telmex account. For a cost of $164 pesos per month for one TV (it was $150 pesos per month in 2011, and the same $164 in 2013) you can have access to more than 40 channels. That price goes up to $274 pesos per month for up to 3 TV’s. For an ‘all access’ package, you will pay about $469 pesos per month (it was $400 pesos per month back in 2011, $429 in 2013), and enjoy more than 79 channels (60 channels in 2011). The Dish TV packages also provide the convenience of being able to pay in your Telmex bill. Talk about a monopoly! (oops, did we say that again?).

The Cost of Health Care

Like everything else in Mexico, there are multiple socio-economic levels of health care, ranging from free to affordable. If you opt for free or co-paid government-sponsored services, you may have to wait longer and the conditions will be less agreeable. If you choose a private hospital, you will pay more but will be treated to world-class facilities.

There are also several, affordable health insurance options that will take the sting out of any expensive procedures or chronic conditions. For example, our health insurance is multinational, which means it covers costs anywhere in the world. Being rather young and healthy, and because routine health care in Mexico won’t bust our budget, we chose a high deductible plan ($5,000 dollars) that cost about $1,500 USD per person annually in 2013 (in 2008, it cost $1,200 USD per person annually and in 2011 it cost $1,400 USD). Emergency services are not subject to the deductible, and we have been reimbursed for emergency room visits here in Merida. If you want to live like a local, you can sign up for health insurance through IMSS, the Mexican health care system. There are age and other restrictions, but if you qualify, that insurance will run you about $300 USD per year.

For prices in 2015, I asked an insurance agent (John McGee at expatglobalmedical.com) who specializes in expatriate insurance to give me prices for a healthy male, age 60, with no pre-existing conditions. He gave me two sets of prices. The Care Choice works if you plan to spend all your time in Mexico. The Select Choice would be more appropriate if you plan to travel back to the USA, Canada, Europe or Asia.

For deductibles of $250 USD per year, the Care Choice insurance costs $1175 USD per year, or $2315 USD per year to add coverage in the USA. The Select Choice insurance costs $1935 USD per year or $3835 USD per year for USA coverage. With a $5000 USD per year deductible, those costs go to $707 USD per year, $1379 USD with USA coverage, and for the Select option, $1156 USD per year or $2276 per year with USA coverage.

We have written several articles about our medical experiences in Yucatan, as have others (take a look in our Health Section), and there are plenty of sources of information on the internet about this subject, so we won’t elaborate here. In short, there is very good healthcare available in Mexico and it is surprisingly inexpensive compared to Gringolandia. In addition to great prices, we have found that there are none more patient or gentle than Mexican healthcare workers. Many medications can be purchased without a prescription (although that is no longer true of antibiotics or some other commonly-abused drugs such as pain killers). We recently surveyed the prices of some basic dental and medical services, and here is what we found:

Dentistry (prices taken from www.yucatandental.com)
Cleaning: $35 USD (Has stayed about the same since 2008. Often/usually quoted as $400 – 500 pesos)
Dental implant: $1750 USD ($13,000 pesos in 2011. $1750 USD in 2013)
Porcelain crown: $300-400 USD (was $2,000 pesos in 2008, $260-350 USD in 2011, $280-$360 in 2013)
Root Canal: $200-290 USD (Was $1,200-1,700 pesos in 2008, $180-260 USD in 2011, $200-290 USD in 2013)

Ophthalmology
Cataract Surgery: $15,000-17,000 pesos per eye.
Reflective Surgery (Eximer Laser): $15,000-17,000 pesos per eye

One Hour Doctor Visit : $400-600 pesos per visit, same as 2008, 2011 and 2013

Blood Tests (in 2011 and 2013, prices taken from Biomedicos. In 2015, prices from Megalab)
Hematology: $142 pesos (was $100 pesos in 2008, $132 in 2011, $142 in 2013)
Cholesterol: $95 pesos (was $70 pesos in 2008, $82 in 2011, $105 in 2013)
Glucose: $95 pesos (was $50 pesos in 2008, $82 in 2011, $95 in 2013)
Uric acid: $95 pesos (was $60 pesos in 2008, $82 in 2011, $105 in 2013)
Hepatic test: $553 pesos (Was $350 pesos in 2008, $396 in 2011, $533 in 2013)
Triglyceride: $95 pesos (was $70 pesos in 2008, $88 in 2011, $108 in 2013)
Urea: $95 pesos (was $60 pesos in 2008, $82 in 2011, $103 in 2013)
Urine Test: $85 pesos (was $80 pesos in 2008, $78 in 2011, $110 in 2013)
Glucose, cholesterol and uric acid tests together: $285 pesos in 2015, with the in-home visit costing an additional $70 pesos ($421 pesos in 2011, $415 in 2013. In 2011, they charged an additional $65 pesos if they came to your home, and in 2013 they charged $84 pesos for a home visit, depending on the location. (In 2008, a complete blood test taken at your home, including reports was $750 pesos)

Medicines
Advil (12): $40 pesos discounted to $28 (was $20 pesos in 2008, $32 in 2011, $45 in 2013)
Aspirin 500 MG (40): $31 pesos discounted to $22 (was $20 pesos in 2008, $24 in 2011, $28 in 2013)
Insulin (10ml): $600 pesos now, and in 2008 and 2011 (depending on the brand)
Pedialite (500ml): $30 pesos discounted to $20 ($25 pesos in 2011, $30 in 2013)
Prozac (28): $1266 pesos discounted to $937 ($700 pesos in 2011, $772 in 2013)
Tabcin (Cold medication, caps) (12): $53 pesos discounted to $36 (was $20 pesos in 2008, $37 in 2011, $42 in 2013)
Tafil (Xanax) (90, .5 MG): $1020 pesos discounted to $815 ($750 pesosin 2011, $686 in 2013)
Viagra (1, 100 MG): $324 pesos discounted to $207 (was $150 pesos in 2008, $170 in 2011 and 2013. Also, there are now generic options, starting at $80 pesos per pill in 2011, now $60 pesos in 2013).
The discounted prices are the final prices we were able to obtain at a pharmacy in a small town (Maxcanu) outside of Merida. There are many pharmacies in Merida that also discount medications.

Groceries

Food is where the choice of lifestyle really kicks in. But again, the range is broad, and you can eat well for very little if you choose to eat local cuisine.  As our article on grocery shopping explains, there are a variety of places to shop for groceries, and as any walk or drive through the city will show you, an almost infinite number of places to eat. You can check out the Yucatan Restaurants section of this website for a never-complete-but-always-trying list of restaurants in and around Merida and the Yucatan Peninsula, with approximate price levels when we know them, as well as hours, addresses, directions and reviews. tomatoes in the mercado in Merida

So, let’s talk about groceries. A recent trip to various grocery stores resulted in this informal price survey, with 2008 and 2011 prices in parentheses:

Coke 500 ml: $9 pesos ($ .60 USD in 2008, $6.5 pesos in 2011, $7 pesos in 2013)
Loaf of 540 grs. multigrain bread: $28 pesos ($20 pesos in 2008, $24 pesos in 2011, no change from 2013)
Box of whole milk: $16 pesos ($13.50 pesos in 2008, $15 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Box of 510 grs. Special K Cereal: $38 pesos ($37.40 pesos in 2008, $42 pesos in 2011, no change since 2013)
Tomatoes per pound: $12 pesos ($12 pesos in 2008 and 2011 and 2013)
Haas avocados per kg: $20 pesos ($12 pesos in 2008 and 2011 and 2013)
Papaya per kg: $15 pesos ($ 5.5 pesos in 2008, $10 pesos in 2011, $12 in 2013)
Bananas per kg: $9 pesos ($4.9 pesos in 2008, $9 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Granny Smith Apples per kg: $35-40 pesos ($18 pesos in 2008, $28 pesos in 2011, no change since 2013)
Mexican limones per kg: $5-10 pesos ($5-10 pesos when we added these to the list in 2011 and in 2013)
Philadelphia cream cheese:  $22.50 pesos ($22.58 pesos in 2008, $22.50 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Bag of 3 kg (6.6 lb) cat chow: $125 pesos ($86 pesos in 2008, $92 pesos in 2011, $108 in 2013)
Can of Purina cat chow:  $12 pesos ($8pesos in 2008 and 2011, $10 in 2013)
Bag of 4 kg (8.8 lb) Purina Dog Chow:  $150 pesos ($99 in 2008, $110 in 2011, $129 in 2013)
Arm and Hammer (1.36 Gal.) Laundry Soap: $99 pesos ($84.50 in 2008, $100 in 2011, $93 in 2013)
Generic (1 kg) (2.20 lb) Laundry Soap: $19 pesos ($15 pesos in 2008, $19 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Instant (100grs.) Nescafe:  $35 pesos ($30 in 2008, $42 in 2011, $32 in 2013)
Pound of sugar:  $10pesos ($5 pesos in 2008, $8 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Absolut Vodka (750 ml):  $218 pesos ($195 pesos in 2008 and 2011, $218 in 2013)
Whole Chicken (3.50 lb): $60 pesos ($ 42.80 pesos in 2008, $55 pesos in 2011, $60 in 2013)
A bag of charcoal (large): $35 pesos ($32.02 pesos in 2008, $35 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Pack of Marlboro’s at OXXO or similar: $47 pesos ($25 pesos) in 2008, $38 pesos in 2011, $42 in 2013)

Carton of Marlboro’s at Costco: $400 pesos ($261 pesos in 2008, $350 pesos in 2011, $400 in 2013)

Prices Vary by Season and Store

Now, keep in mind that some of these products come from the United States, so the prices are probably higher here. A note about tomatoes, which are NOT from the United States. Tomatoes are cheaper in the local markets, and the cost varies by the season. Tomatoes can go as low as $8 pesos per kilo, or as high as $30 pesos per kilo, depending on the season. Coffee is grown in Mexico, so as long as you don’t insist on an American brand, you can find it cheaper. And it will be even cheaper (and probably better) if you have time to go to one of the coffee shops downtown and have it ground right there for you. Chickens are locally raised, as are pigs and turkeys. But beef can be more expensive, especially if you go for the Argentinian beef that is not raised in the Yucatan. Prices of anything grown or raised locally will be even lower if you go to the local mercados, and even lower at the central mercado.

The cost of meat depends on where you buy it and, of course, the cut you buy. Pork can range from $60 to $100 and beef from $70 to $150 pesos per kilo. Arracheras (Beef cut prepared for the dish arrachera) costs about $150 pesos per kilo. Chicken can be found from $30 to $38 pesos per kilo, shrimp for about $150 pesos per kilo, fish $80 to 120 pesos per kilo, of course depending on the kind of fish and the season. Pulpo (octopus) is about $70 to $80 pesos per kilo. Special beef and pork cuts depend a lot on the place you buy. At Sam’s Club, beef costs between $150 to $300 pesos per kilo, but can be found for less in local markets.

Of course, the savings in price has to be weighed against the time and money it costs to run to all those different places to get everything you need. It definitely is cheaper to eat local foods from local stores and menu at xcanatunshop in local markets.

Dining Out

You’ll find everything from taco stands to fast food outlets to gourmet restaurants in Merida. If you live in a major urban area in the States or in Canada, you’ll probably find fewer foreign food choices here, such as Thai or Indian restaurants. A new exotic restaurant (anything from Asia, basically) is always cause for celebration among Merida expatriates. Often those restaurants do not last long, and at this writing in 2015, they are still hard to find, but not impossible anymore. Now you can get good Korean or Thai food if you know where to go and when.

A meal at Burger King costs about $55 pesos, more than the kids working there make in a day (but that’s another story). A taco at the Wayan’e taco stand costs $9 pesos now in 2015 (it used to be $7) and a drink still costs $10 pesos, and we’ve never met someone who didn’t rave about the food. A hamburger at Hennessys Irish Pub in Merida costs $95 pesos, and meals at any upscale restaurant can run from $120 pesos up to and over $300 pesos. A martini runs from $70 pesos up to about $120 pesos, depending on the restaurant, and that price has not changed in three years.

Again, you can spend as much or as little as you want. You decide.

Maintenance

Nearly every expat we know here has someone cleaning their house. We do too. This is an affordable service in Yucatan, and with all these tile floors, practically a necessary one. Housekeepers are paid anywhere from $125 pesos per day to $250 pesos per day, and a lunchtime meal should be included. Laundry is often not included, and some people hire specialists just to do their laundry. Those specialists charge about $150 pesos per day for cleaning and ironing. Launlaundry in Meridadry services abound, as do dry cleaners. Yucatecans are known for dressing in white and always being clean, so there is no shortage of services towards that end.

Gardening is another service that is easy to come by. Gardeners are usually paid about the same as housekeepers. Our gardener costs about $50 pesos per hour and comes once a week. There are viveros (nurseries) here that will deliver and install plants, and there are landscape consultants who will design and install a garden. They will cost a lot more than our gardener, but still probably less than in the USA or Canada.

Plumbing and electrical maintenance is also a rather constant expense. Not regularly, like a gardener, but in a tropical environment with a lot of rain, lightening and humidity, stuff happens. Whether you need a shower head replaced or a hose bib somewhere where you did not have it before, or a new tinaco on the roof or a whole new kitchen, plumbing services will run you about $50-75 pesos an hour. Electrical is sometimes done by the same people, but more and more we are finding specialists who just do electrical work. And usually, they don’t charge by the hour, but by the job. You describe the problem and they quote a price that doesn’t include materials. You pay for materials up front, which they will purchase and return with your receipt. The obra de mano (the work that they do) is paid for when the job is done.

Painters are another type of worker you might end up seeing every couple of years. Our painter charges us $24 pesos per square meter, plus materials.

A typical expatriate-targeted handyman service still costs about $150 – $175pesos an hour plus supplies. You can hire them to do anything from ironwork to painting to plumbing and electrical repair. You can usually find a local guy in your neighborhood with the same sort of offering for less (maybe $50 pesos per hour or $150 pesos per day), but he typically will have less knowledge about the type of quality you are expecting.

Tipping

La propina is a very important part of the Mexican economy, and it behooves one to carry a pocketful of coins wherever you go. We keep a stash in the car at all times. If you drive and consequently find yourself parking somewhere, you are bound to run across a little (usually old, sometimes handicapped) man with a red cloth who will guide you into your parking space as if you were a returning 747 at a major airport. He will expect a tip when you get out or when you return. After grocery shopping (where it is customary to tip the person who bags your groceries between $5 and 10 pesos), you can expect those same guys in the parking lot to help you with your groceries (especially if you are a woman) and they should also be tipped about the same. Waiters, of course, should be tipped (the normal 15-20%, depending on the level of service). People who make home deliveries should be tipped. Anyone who helps you through your day should be tipped. 5 pesos here, 10 pesos  there. It adds up, but not to very much. It helps grease the economic skids, and it is an important part of some workers’ income. So when in doubt, tip! And tip generously, but not OVER-generously. Our prices above for tips are on the high side, but give you a general idea. Don’t forget, as a foreigner, you generally have a $ on your forehead and are expected to tip. Not tipping makes us all look bad.

A Random Price List

Here’s a smattering of prices for other things you might find yourself buying on a semi-regular basis. Feel free to add to this list in the Comments section!

Purified water 4.4 Gal: $23 pesos ($20 pesos in 2008, $22 pesos in 2011 and 2013)
Spanish lesson: $250 pesos per private class, in 2008, 2011, 2013 and now.
Movie theater ticket: Regular tickets at Cinepolis are $65 pesos now in 2015 (up from $60 in 2013). Some complexes offer senior discounts, and the prices are different in each cinema complex. Prices range from $50 pesos to $70 pesos, with VIP tickets ranging from $80 to $100 pesos, and 3D movies from $70 to $100 pesos. Of course, the most expensive ticket is the VIP 3D movie, ranging from $70 to $130 pesos. In some movie theaters there is a discount for seniors at $46 pesos. These prices are pretty much the same since 2008.
Santiago’s movie theatre ticket: $35 pesos ($25 pesos in 2011, $30 in 2013) (this is the cheapest movie ticket in Merida for a first run movie and has been in 2008, 2011 and 2013.
1 liter bottle of fresh-squeezed orange juice: $15 pesos ($12 pesos in 2008, $20 pesos in 2011)
… depends more on the season than the year.

Official Disclaimers

Yes, we know. Somewhere in this article, we paid too much for something. Elsewhere, maybe we misquoted the price we most recently paid. We do not have a full-time accountant or economist on the payroll, but we do what we can. This article is not intended to be an exact accounting of our expenses here or a promise about what your expenses will be. It is intended to communicate the idea that living a thrifty lifestyle is more easily achieved in Yucatan than in many parts of the so-called developed world (looking at you, California!). But your mileage may vary. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. And in the end, the savings you take is equal to the effort you make.

As always, and especially on this article, we and all the other readers welcome your comments. This has always been a very popular article and there are a lot of comments. Read them for more information, and then add yours! What do YOU want to know the cost of?

By Nadine Calder

A man and his hat in Mexico

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Seven

Don Hermenegildo gave his hat a final brushing, placed it on his head, and taking up his walking stick, said good-bye to his sister.

Deep in thought and brooding, he set out on the delicate and serious task to which he had agreed, determining the best ways to handle it so as not to leave the impetuous young man unhappy and not to displease doña Prudencia, something that would have caused him one of the greatest anxieties of his life.

When he arrived at the widow’s house, she was leaving with Guadalupe for the dance.

“Hello!, he exclaimed upon seeing them. You going out? And someplace nice?”
“To a little dance that’s going to be at the Ortegas’ house. Did you come to visit us?”
“Yes, but I’ll come another time, and I can accompany you now if you’ll allow me that favor.”
“With much pleasure.”

And they set out together with don Hermenegildo walking alongside the señora.

“And will you dance, doña Prudencia?”
“I, yes; there’s no fool like an old fool.”
“Old! Señora . . . If you haven’t married again it’s because you don’t want to.”

Don Hermenegildo had not forgotten doña Raimunda’s advice and he felt himself getting flustered alongside the woman who seemed to him the most suitable to bring him out of his aching celibacy, going beyond his limits to the point of indirectly insinuating the idea of a new marriage. It seemed to him he had said too much, but enlivened by his companion’s eloquent silence, he continued:

“Well, of course, you could get married again. It seems impossible that you should have a thirteen-year-old daughter.”
“Fourteen, don Hermenegildo.”
“Fourteen? It’s that she’s very beautiful, but it’s hard to believe she’s that age upon seeing her mother. You are still very young.”

At this, doña Raimunda came out of her house and joined the group, interrupting don Hermenegildo’s burgeoning momentum.

A dancing shoe in YucatanWith nothing worth noting, they continued on their way to the dance, and there their companion stepped aside, as he had not been invited, when Perico Ortega, who had seen him, insisted on introducing him.

Off to one side, there were four rocking chairs for the mamás, two occupied by the señora of the house and Chonita’s mother. Doña Raimunda and doña Prudencia seated themselves in the others and don Hermenegildo took a chair nearby after politely saying hello.

Upon her arrival, Guadalupe was surrounded by her companions. Those of the opposite sex were approaching, first Pancho Vélez and then the others, grouped together, asking her for different dances and placing her in the difficult situation of responding to all their demands, then holding in her memory that sea of commitments to which she was unaccustomed.

This new development held great importance for her, as it seemed to promise a series of triumphs in life, based on the happy outcome of one small entrance into the world. And it did not escape her that Pancho Vélez had been the first to approach her in a way that was obvious to everyone. It was known that this young man was from one of the leading families, despite the modest position of his cousins, the Ortegas, even though the cousin relationship was unclear to everyone except the girls’ mother, who would explain it to anyone who wanted to disentangle the genealogical skein she put before them.

In a corner was set up the music, composed of a piano and a violin. In the hall next to the parlor several older men were chatting. And outside on the street, the curious craned their necks to peep through the sole window’s shutters. The door had been closed since the last guests entered.

Among those on the street was Fermín Dorantes, snorting because inside he could see Luis Robles, whose strategic moves he had observed. He watched Luis approach the girl along with the others and then be the last to leave her, and he figured it was certain that his impertinent rival would dance with her and not pass up the opportunity to talk with her to his heart’s content.

Indeed, Luis Robles had achieved the promise of nothing less than the first dance, which is typically the cuarta and the polka. For this reason, Lupita resisted somewhat, because she had never danced. But in the end she agreed, counting on her partner’s expertise and the fact that she had practiced alone in her room, humming in the absence of other music.

Couple dancing in YucatanEverything went perfectly in the beginning. Luis Robles, the first dance; Pancho Vélez, the second and the lanceros. But after that, Lupita could not remember how she had distributed the rest. As long as the young men opportunely presented themselves to jog her memory and there was no one to dispute their claims, she didn’t come up against any difficulty. But it so happened that Perico Ortega, mistakenly or maliciously, let her know that the fourth dance, coming up next, was promised to him. The girl agreed, but as the young man of the house stepped away, Luis Robles approached, saying:

“I’ve just told the musicians they shouldn’t end this next dance they’re going to play until dawn.”
“Why?”
“Because this, the first, and the polka will be the most enjoyable that I’ve danced in my life.”
‘So who do you have it with?,” she asked with alarm, suspecting what was the matter.
“What do you mean, who with?”

And so followed the clarification and Lupita’s dismay. Luis Robles was adamant, but he finally had to give in, assuming a gracious persona and the girl’s promise to dance the following one with him. He walked away to see who had agreed to be his other partner for the fifth dance and to arrange a partner for the fourth. This was Belita Ortega, captured at the far end of the room by Pancho Vélez, who had stealthily passed the lulls between dances talking with her.

Everyone said that Belita Ortega was Vélez’s girlfriend, and she, like the other members of her family, assumed that the fair and natural outcome of their encounters would be a wedding. But for anyone not wearing a blindfold that prevented them from assessing the circumstances, the heartthrob had not even in jest given a thought to descending from the heights of his position to introduce the appetizing Vélez branch into the modest Ortega family tree.

Guadalupe knew all this and more, and she did not fail to consider the probabilities and the pleasure she would take in displacing her friend.

Dancing in YucatanPancho Vélez, playboy that he was, was regarded as an excellent catch in the common sense of the word because his family was one of distinction and considered rich, although in reality they were not much so, as they endured serious hardships to maintain old decorum and not be diminished among their relatives.

But let us return to the dance, where the beginning of the fifth dance is sounding, and the gathering is putting itself into motion.

Two people plant themselves in front of Guadalupe: Luis Robles and Francisco Vélez.

“At the beginning you gave me the fifth.”
“Remember; you gave it to me.”
“And what am I to do?” awkwardly exclaimed the young woman.
“Well, dance it with me because you gave it to me,” observed Pancho Vélez.

And taking drastic action he took his disputed partner by the hand and began dancing.

“Don’t be rude”, Luis Robles accused him in exasperation, and let her decide.

But Vélez either did not hear him or pretended not to notice, because he continued swaying and turning in step with the music. The young woman’s heart was in her mouth. She could not figure out how to appease Luis Robles.

Preoccupied with this, she did not even see the forgotten Fermín Dorantes’s upset face at the shutter, although she had seen it earlier without reacting in the least. And she was drawn out of deliberating about her thankless straits only by the voice of Vélez, who began paying her compliments to which she responded with the traditional “You are very kind…” (Muy amablé…)

As the dance ended, Pancho Vélez felt a sharp tug on his coat tails at the same time that a voice said, with a commanding and arrogant tone, “Come over here!” He immediately went out into the hallway with Luis Robles, who had tugged at him, and they got into a dispute exchanging acrid and provocative words.

The fuming Luis wanted them to go from there to the street, but due to the others’ voices of reason, they left the matter for later.

News of the incident circulated within moments, and Luis Robles, figuring that his cause would be the worst bet, especially in that tribunal of cousins, took the option of leaving as the most prudent.

The dance ended a little later, as much because of the incident as the fact that it was already ten-thirty at night. Lupita was the first to leave, accompanied by her mother, by doña Raimunda, and by don Hermenegildo. The latter, as soon as he walked the women home, returned to the dance, trusting that his words of wisdom would pacify the irritable young men.

Pancho Vélez was not allowed to leave because the Ortegas, especially Belita, feared a disaster. But in the end he left with don Hermenegildo in the direction of the corner where Luis Robles was waiting surrounded by the others.

“Now I want to see, right now,” the latter exclaimed, “if you dare to repeat here what you just said.”
“Do you think I’m scared to death? Not of you or your father or all your family,” answered Vélez.

A duel over a woman in MeridaJust then a furious wallop knocked him backwards. But recovering immediately, he went at the other delivering a punch to the face. Robles, blind with rage, gave him such a kick that don Hermenegildo, waving his hands like an olive branch, intervened shouting, “Calm down, gentlemen, calm down!” But the contenders did not hear him and amidst the clamor of battle, he mistakenly received a slap on the head that sent his hat rolling in the dust.

Both contenders had moved in close and were exchanging blows to the head and face until they fell down in a tangle. As he got back up, Pancho Vélez took out a revolver and prepared to shoot, but two of the spectators grabbed him from behind to make him drop it while others, with the help of don Hermenegildo, contained Luis Robles, who had armed himself with brass knuckles. The others disappeared as if by magic, questioning their safety given the new turn of events.

This was brought to an end with the friends’ intervention and each one went off in his own direction: Luis Robles with a bump on his left cheekbone, Pancho Vélez with an injured hand, and don Hermenegildo cleaning his hat with his handkerchief.

Lupita had trouble sleeping that night. What might be happening? She would have given anything to know. Luis Robles is crazy and Pancho Vélez is no coward. They could be tearing each other to pieces and all for her, for her alone.

****
Want to catch up? Read here…
Chapter One and the Intro
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapter Five
Chapter Six

By WD Barr

Jerry Royster, Baseball PlayerEditor’s Note: As part of a series of posts about the 2015 Liga Mexicana de Beisbol, here is our look at the first of the managers of the 16 baseball teams. Following that, the standings of the Mexican baseball teams as of the beginning of this week.

Jerry Royster of the Tigres de Quintana Roo

Jerry Royster was born in Sacramento, CA in 1952. He was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1970 and started his first major league game in August of 1973, playing third base. He had a career that spanned 15 years in which he played for five different big league teams. Jerry compiled a .249 batting average while hitting 40 home, driving in 352 and stealing 189 bases. During his career, he also played for the Chicago White Sox, the San Diego Padres and the New York Yankees. He ended his playing career playing third base with the Atlanta Braves in 1988. In 1976, he was named to the 1976 Topps All-Star Rookie Roster.

His coaching career began in 1993 as a third base coach for the Colorado Rockies, a gig that only lasted one year. Jerry was out of baseball until 2000 when, as a bench coach for Davey Lopes of the Milwaukee Brewers, he was named interim manager after Lopes got off to a disastrous start. Although the interim tag was removed 2 weeks later, Royster was fired at the end of the year following a 53-94 record.

Before being named manager of the Dodgers Triple A affiliate, the Las Vegas 51′s, in 2005, Royster had been the Dodgers infield coordinator for the 2003 and 2004 seasons.

Jerry Royster Manager in South KoreaIn 2007, Royster was signed as manager of the Lotte Giants of the South Korean Baseball League in Busan, South Korea. He became the first non-Korean to manage in the league and he managed the Giants until 2010.

The Tigres de Quintana Roo hired Royster as their manager in 2014 where he led the team to a 65-48 record and 1st place in the Sur Division of the Liga Mexicana de Beisbol. The Tigres lost to the Pericos de Puebla in the semi-final round of the divisional playoffs last year, so you can bet he is hoping to bring back his winning team in 2015.

****

Mexican Baseball Standings as of April 14 2015

Norte Division

TEAM Won/Loss|WP|GB

Toros de Tijuana 7-1| .873
Acereros del Norte 5-2 |.714|1.5
Diablos Rojos de Mexico 4-4 |.500|3.0
Rieleros de Aguascalientes 4-4 | .500|3.0
Vaqueros de la Laguna 4-4 |.500|3.0
Sultanes de Monterrey 3-5 |.375|4.0
Saraperos de Saltillo 2-5 |.286|4.5
Broncos de Reynosa 2-6 |.250|5.0

Sur Division

TEAM Won/Loss|WP|GB

Leones de Yucatan 5-3|.625
Olmecas de Tabasco 5-3|.625
Pericos de Puebla 5-3|.625
Tigres de Quintana Roo 5-3| .625
Delfines de Ciudad del Carmen 4-4|.500| 1.0
Rojos del Aguila de Veracruz 4-4|.500|1.0
Piratas de Campeche 3-5|.375|2.0
Guerreros de Oaxaca 1-7|.125|4-0

BATTING LEADERS THROUGH APRIL 12, 2015

Batting Average:
Max Ramirez (MON) .538
Ivan Terrazas (MEX) .519
Jesus Castillo (AGS) .483

Hits:
Max Ramirez (MON) 14
Ivan Terrazas (MEX) 14
Jesus Castillo (AGS) 14
Saul Soto (AGS) 14

Doubles:
Danny Richar (AGS) 6
Francisco Mendez (LAG) 5
Ruben Rivera (MEX) 5
Randy Ruiz (REY) 5

Triples:
Alejandro Gonzalez (OAX) 2
13 tied with 1

Home Runs:
CJ Retherford (TIJ) 4
Saul Soto (AGS) 4
6 tied with 3

RBIs:
Saul Soto (AGS) 16
CJ Retherford (TIJ) 12
Cristhian Presichi (MVA) 11
Jose Ruiz (MVA) 11

PITCHING LEADERS

Wins:
7 tied with 2

ERA: (10+ innings)
Cesar Valdez (TAB) 0.69
Jose Oyervidez (MVZ) 0.82
Jarrett Grube (TIG) 1.50
Jon Leicester (YUC) 1.50

WHIP: (10+ innings)
Jose Oyervidez (MVA) 0.36
Jo-Jo Reyes (CAM) 0.62
Tomas Solis (VER) 0.77

***
For those of you who, like us, forgot or never knew these things:

WP: Win Percentage
GB: Games Behind
ERA: Earned Run Average
WHIP: Walks+Hits/Innings Pitched
RBIs: Runs Batted In

By Working Gringos

YL: When did you move to the Yucatan and from where did you move?

Denis: I started visiting the Yucatan about 18 years ago, traveling with a volunteer group named Mano Amiga (www.manoamiga.net). My very first meal in the Yucatan was in Valladolid while crossing the Yucatan Peninsula to the small fishing village of Chuburna Puerto. I thought Valladolid was a quaint, sleepy village and the thought never crossed my mind of ever living here. However, during my first visit to the Yucatan, I fell in love with the people, the climate, the food… everything. The volunteer work I was doing consisted of helping high school students from the USA build concrete roofs for owner-occupied homes… sort of like Habitat for Humanity… but faster. In a good day, the groups of high school kids could complete four concrete roofs that would last for generations. I had been living in northern New Jersey for almost 20 years at the time.

YL: Why did you move?
 
Denis: I came one week the first year as a volunteer and two weeks the second year. The third year, I joined the board of directors of Mano Amiga and was visiting the Yucatan up to six times a year. At some point I realized I was giving a lot of money to Continental Airlines and started renting in Isla Mujeres.
 
YL: Why did you choose the city you now live in over other places in the world?

Denis: In 2005, I took a two week driving trip to the five Mayan states with an extended Mayan family… some from Temozon, north of Valladolid, and some from Chilon, Chiapas. In a number of the places we stayed, we had a meal in the courtyard. I loved the idea of having my morning coffee in a courtyard garden with the birds and the butterflies. So when we returned to Isla Mujeres from the trip, I made a list of five cities that I had visited as a tourist that met my criteria of being a Mayan city overlaid with a Spanish colonial city. The cities were Valladolid, Izamal, Merida, Campeche and San Cristobal de las Casas. My plan was to see them all again looking at them as a place to live rather than as a place to visit.

Since Valladolid was the closest to Isla Mujeres, it was at the top of my list. The third time I was in Valladolid looking at property, I came across the house I finally purchased. It was very run down but had good bones and I knew I could work with it. The house was on almost 1/2 acre (34m x 68m) of land in a cul de sac on a small park about 4 blocks from the main square.

Denis Larsen of Valladolid, YucatanAs I look back now on my original list, I know I have made the right choice. Izamal is too small; Merida, too big; Campeche, too remote; and San Cristobal, too cold. Valladolid is just the right size for me! Every time I go to the market, or the main square or the supermarket, I run into people I know. And these are local people, not expats. I feel like I belong and am accepted. As a small example, on Good Friday, I was standing in a huge line at the market to purchase fish. The line was moving very slowly since most of the people were buying fried fish and they had to wait for the fish to fry. An elderly man I knew came up to me and whispered that there was a fish truck about three blocks away where there was no line. We went there to purchase very fresh fish, and there was no line.

Valladolid is not for everyone. The expat community is VERY small… perhaps, 50 or 60 of all nationalities…. probably fewer than 20 full-time Americans and the rest a mix of Canadians, French, German, Belgian, Italian, Venezuelan, Portuguese, Peruvian, Austrian, Japanese and Chinese…. and probably a few that I do not know.

YL: Did you buy a house right away or rent first? Do you think you made the right decision?

Denis: In Valladolid, I purchased right away. However, I had been living on Isla Mujeres for about 4 years (on and off) in a rental. I had looked there at houses, apartments and raw land. And finally decided I did not like island living.

YL: Are you doing now what you intended to do when you moved here? If not, why not?
 
Denis: When I purchased the house I live in, I had plans to start some kind of business, but I did not know what it would be. As I remodeled the single story building, I decided to build a second floor. And then made the decision to open a bed and breakfast to help pay for the construction. I had never even considered opening a bed and breakfast and had only stayed in ones in rural Pennsylvania and New Hampshire.
  
YL: What are the most interesting things about living here for you?
 
Denis: I have three overlapping lives here, all of which provide interest and stimulation.

My bed and breakfast guests are extraordinarily interesting and diverse. They have visited everyplace I have ever thought about visiting… and have engaging lives and occupations and hobbies and interests. They are split between North Americans and Europeans with smatterings from South American, Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. But we almost always find common interests that lead to great conversations. About a year ago, we opened the “breakfast” part of the bed and breakfast to the public. And have now expanded Xoco Loco Restaurante y Bar to breakfast, almuerzo (lunch) and cena (supper) from 7:00AM to 10:00PM with a full service bar from noon to closing. Our menu is a mix of Yucatec, Mexican, Continental and “eclectic”. For instance, we have an off-menu “Elvis” sandwich of peanut butter, banana and bacon on toast. Before we opened, we hired a professional bartender to come in for five weeks, two hours a day for five days per week to teach or staff about bartending. Before, they could open a beer… period! No idea on how to open a wine or make a cocktail. A similar thing happened when we opened the bed and breakfast… we brought in a young lady who had taught housekeeping services at the Ritz-Carlton in Cancun. She taught our staff how to make a bed (none of the staff owned a bed or slept in a bed) and how to fold a towel (their family probably never had enough towels to fold… they washed them, dried them and then used them).

I am also president of the Valladolid English Library (or VEL… it is somewhat patterned after the Merida English Library). Through the library and its programs, I interact with a wide variety of people and Opening Night at the Valladolid English Libraryorganizations. We host a monthly lecture series under the palapa of Casa Hamaca Guesthouse. This is also the one time a month that I am sure to interact with our local expat community. We have hosted a summer school for local kids for the past four years and our first Easter camp this year. We have English conversation groups and are planning an English teacher training workshop to help students and recent graduates in teaching English to find the means and resources to be better, more successful teachers.

And my third life seems to be part of the very diverse local community. I have lectured, given workshops or participated in panel discussions at three universities. I helped found a group of tourist-related businesses with the objective of helping grow our businesses. And I have participated in a number of food-related events sponsored by the local government. Every year I have university students interning or students doing their practica working alongside us for periods from two weeks to three months. I have started raising Mayan stingless bees and have begun to enter a very closed community of Mayan beekeepers who provide guidance and education to me and my staff. I have a jungle garden of over 80 specimen plants, trees and flowers important to the Maya. There are still a few gaps, but I am filling them as fast as possible. And we have a language academy (Academia AMI) where we teach English (mostly) and Spanish when requested. We also have a small spa and massage business on site in a traditional Mayan thatched-roof nah (house or hut).

YL: What do you absolutely love about living here?

Denis: I never get bored. Life happens everyday. Problems appear and are solved, ignored or changed to opportunities.

YL: What do you miss from your “former life”?

Denis: Not much. My daughter visits me a couple of times a year and I visit her and her family once a year. I do miss good German and Italian sausage and have taken the first steps to make my own. Today we ate spaghetti with both hot and sweet homemade Italian sausage… not bad but spice adjustments are needed.

YL: What don’t you miss from your “former life”?

Denis: Stress. Cold weather. Short growing season. Shoveling snow. Wearing shoes. Sleeping in a bed. Isolation.

YL: What is your favorite local food?

Denis: That’s easy. Lechón al horno… roast suckling pig… even if it is not really made from suckling pig. The place I go most often to eat lechón gives me Lechón Lite… estilo Gringo (gringo style). Sin grasa y sin higado, without fat and without liver.

YL: What is your favorite time of year here and why?

Denis: I like all four seasons here… they are just a little more subtle than in the north. But the trees shed their leaves, fruits come in season and the rainy season provides relief from the May heat. The almost crisp mornings in January when I must wear long pants for two or three days. It’s all good. All of my guest rooms have air conditioning. But I don’t have it in mine. I have slept in a hammock for more than 15 years and my room does not have air conditioning. I kind of like it when I must cover myself with a blanket.

YL: Where do you take guests who visit you here to show them something really special?

Valladolid YucatanDenis: I take them to Casa de los Venados in Valladolid, Teatro de los Indiginas y Campasinos in Xo-Cen, Ek Balam Mayan ruins, the Distillery, Rio Lagartos, the Museum of the War of the Castes, the Valladolid municipal market for breakfast on Sunday, a molina where they grind corn and make tortillas, small Mayan villages to deliver dispensas (two weeks worth of food and household necessities) to the elderly, infirm and out of work, adventures on roads that really require a 4x drive (we go very slowly in a minivan) to pass cenotes, abandoned haciendas and un-explored Mayan ruins to visit Mayan bee-keepers or hunters or shaman. Small villages where the cottage industry is making huipiles and guayaberas. Various cenotes.

YL: The last time you went out to dinner, where did you go and why?

Denis: A street cart to have a sandwich (torta) of lechón. My regular lechón taqueria was closed and i was jonesing for lechón.

YL: How is the city where you live different for residents than it is for tourists?

Denis: Many of the tourists are in Valladolid for less than one hour, either on their way to or the way from Chichen Itza. The buses come from Cancun and Playa del Carmen and for most of the tourists, this is their day of “culture”. They wander around the main square, take some photos and then return to the artificial world of Playa or Cancun. Many of them are too timid to leave the main square. Most will never return to the “real” Mexico.

Denis Larsen Trip Advisor Valladolid YucatanYL: Do you have friends from the local community or do you pretty much hang with the expat crowd?

Denis: Friends from both groups. I can go for days without speaking English… except for the interactions with guests and inquiries via the internet.
 
YL: If you are working or own a business, what is it like owning and running a business here or working here? How is it different from doing the same thing in your country of origin?

Denis: In many ways it is easier to own and operate a business here than it was in New Jersey. But the language and the cultural differences sometimes make things challenging. Now I have a network of local professionals and acquaintances who I can tap when I have a question or problem.
 
YL: Do you find it more or less difficult to make a living here than in your country of origin?

Denis: I have never been very good at making a living. But I have been very successful at making a life here in Valladolid.
 
YL: Are your work habits different here?

Denis: I usually get up at 5:00AM or a little later, so that I can spend time without interruption on the computer making bookings, answering emails and checking FaceBook and world news. If I know one of my guests is checking in from Singapore, for instance, I read the news that might affect him, his country or region. It makes for a good ice-breaker when we first meet.
 
YL: Did you speak Spanish when you moved here? Where did you learn Spanish (if you did)? Is the language barrier a problem for you in your daily life?

Denis: I have been attempting to learn Spanish for 60 years and still do not do well. Most of my staff speak Spanish as a second language (they speak Yucatec Mayan as their first language) so they are not great teachers. Almost everyone in Valladolid speaks or understands at least a little of Yucatec Mayan. Valladolid was founded by the Spanish colonialists about 473 years ago on the Mayan city of Zaci (White Falcon). Many villagers still refer to the city of Valladolid as Zaci… long memories!

YL: What interesting Spanish word or saying have you learned lately? What does it mean and how did you learn it?

Denis: If a visitor is here for a few days and has a few words of Spanish, my favorite is to explain the difference between “malo” and “maa’lo.” Malo is “bad” in Spanish and maa’lo is “good” in Maya. Life can become interesting.
 
YL: Are you a Mexican citizen? Do you plan to become one?

Denis: I am a permanent resident and would like to become a Mexican citizen.
 
YL: Have you traveled much within Mexico? If so, where and what has been your favorite location to visit? What did you see there that you liked so much?

Denis: I have done a lot of volunteer work in border towns in Coahuila, visited Nogales for the afternoon, seen Cuidad de Juarez from El Paso and spent a small amount of time in Aguascalientes and Léon. I think I like the Mundo Maya more than I like the rest of México.

YL: How are you treated by Mexicans? Do you feel resented or welcome?

Denis: I feel very welcomed by the Mayas and the Yucatecas. I don’t know a lot of Mexicans. Many people of the Mayan world first identify as Maya or Yucatecas and, incidentally, as Mexicans. I have a tee shirt that I used to wear that had the Republic of Yucatan flag on it (for two short periods there existed the Republic of Yucatan consisting of the five Mayan states: Quintana Roo, Yucatan, Campeche, Tobasco and Chiapas). When I wore the shirt in Merida, I would always get a lot of thumbs up! Now I only wear guayaberas.
 
YL: How do you feel about the economic prospects of Mexico? Of the Yucatan?

Denis: I try not to think in”economic prospect” frameworks. They almost always imply “growth”. And growth is not the direction we need to think of… we need to think of sustainability NOT growth.

YL: What are some changes you are hoping for in the city in which you live? Do you see any progress towards these changes?

Denis: The police chief wants the city to be safe because his family lives here. The small business owners have been successful on keeping out large franchise businesses (or at least giving them a VERY small footprint). The beekeepers have been successful in keeping out GMO’s. All in all, I am happy with the direction of the city and the state.
 
YL: What are your plans for the future here?
 
Denis: I am at the point of not buying green bananas. However, there are interesting opportunities here:

Education: If I were younger I would start a K-12 school focusing on a vegetable garden. All things worth knowing can grow from planning, planting, tending, harvesting, preparing and eating the bounty of the garden. Math makes sense when you must plan a garden, geography makes sense when a particular plant comes from somewhere else and must be nurtured differently, botany and biology make sense when insects attack your plants and you must find a defense, culinary arts make sense when you must find a way to eat all that you have grown. Getting kids out of classrooms and into the natural environment benefits both the kids and the environment.

Fiber and fabric: Before the Spanish came, the Mayan tended high-bush cotton and wove it using back-strap looms. When the Industrial Revolution came to Mexico in the way of the first cotton factory in Valladolid, this cottage art quickly died. Cotton, as a commodity, is a fertilizer, water and pesticide user par excellence. High-bush cotton, grown sustainably, is organic and very desirable as a “boutique” export crop. In addition, the inner fibres of the banana trunk yield fibers of increasing fineness as you remove the concentric layers of the trunk. The outer layers are coarse like sisal or henequen. As you reach the inner layers, the fibers become finer and finer, approaching silk in the inner core. One of the very cool things about using banana stalks for fiber is that the banana fruits just once and then the trunk dies off. The other is that the fibers of the stalk can be separated mechanically without the use of water since most of the trunk is water. Most other “cool” fibers like hemp and bamboo need a huge amount of water to help separate the fiber.

From any of the Mayan ruins, raised limestone roads (called Sac Be) radiate to other ruins. There is a extensive network of interconnected roads including Mayan ruins in Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador and Mexico. From the ruins of Cobá in Quintana Roo to Yaxunah, Yucatan, is a 100K Sac Be straight through the jungle. The last time it has been officially walked is in the late 1920’s. There is an opportunity to make the Mayan Trail, analogous to the Inca Trail in Peru or the Appalachian Trail in the USA. For anyone with interest, I have a PowerPoint presentation of the possible benefits (economically sustainable) to the economies of Quintana Roo and Yucatan using Peru as a role model. The costs of development are very low (all that has to be done is clear the existing road of vegetation). The support services needed including outfitters, guides, transportation, food, lodging, etc. would support a new kind of tourism for the Yucatan. And this trail would be very accessible compared to the Inca trail which is at 3.000+ meters, and includes a flight to Lima, Peru and another to Cuzco and then either a train trip or a bus trip to the trailhead followed by 3 to 4 days on the trail. The Mayan Trail, on the other hand, is almost at sea level, an easy 2 hour+ bus trip from Cancun and a level trek, as opposed to one which varies from one of about 2,000 meters to over 3,400 meters. Many more people could have the possibility of the experience at a much lower cost and a much lower level of physical capacity. As a kick-off and promotional event, a once-a-year, 100k Ultra-marathon in January (when there are no major ultra-marathons) could attract runners from around the world. Various fun runs and regular marathons could also be incorporated into the event. Eventually a five (5) country interconnected network of Mayan Sac Be trails could be hiked.

Honey: The 16+ types of stingless Mayan bees produce small amounts of very rich honey. The koli cab is the biggest bee of the group and produces the greatest amount of honey… but still only about 10% of what a honeybee might produce. However, there is a market for organic, exotic honey in both the USA and Europe and, I believe, in Asia. The stingless bees, as their name implies, do not sting and therefore beekeepers do not need elaborate protective clothing or smokers. They are easy to care for. Ancient Maya regarded them as family pets. Most honey from the koli cab is now used for ceremonial or medicinal purposes.

YL: What is the one most important piece of advice you would give someone buying property and/or planning a move to the Yucatan?

Denis: Try it on for size before buying. It’s not for everybody. Rent for a minimum of six months… a year is better. Try to live as you envision yourself living if you made a permanent move.

YL: If you could say something to all the people of Mexico, what would you say?

Denis: ¡Si! ¡Si puede! (Yes! You can) and Te amo (I love you).

****

Denis Larsen is the owner of the wonderful Casa Hamaca Bed & Breakfast in Valladolid, Yucatan.

By Khaki Scott

Prizes for Paying Property Taxes Early

For the second year in a row, the current administration in Merida has held a drawing for 100 prizes won by citizens of the city who pay their property taxes (called ‘predial‘) during the first quarter of the year. Prizes included three new cars and four motorcycles. The prizes at the drawing also included 26 32-inch flat screen TVs, 26 seven-inch electronic tablets, and 41 new Mercury bicycles. The Municipality of Merida is doing well. Property taxes rose sharply over the past three years ($113 million pesos for all of 2012, compared to $142,055,000 pesos in just the first quarter of 2015), as did the number of taxable properties in Merida (187,000 in 2012, compared to 214,000 in the first quarter of 2015). From these taxes, the Municipality not only pays for streets and services, such as the expansion of potable water and electricity, the maintenance of parks, and free internet, but also gives reduced or free property taxes and/or other retirement benefits in the amount of $3.3 million pesos to 14,000 pensioners and retired city workers.

Merida Zoos to Exchange Some Species

With an increasing birth rate and the continued need to house 150 circus animals confiscated by Profepa, Centennial Zoo and Animaya are finding their space inadequate, which leads to a direct threat to the gene pool in ongoing breeding programs. In another case, the baby hippo, born at Centennial Zoo four years old, wants to challenge his father for territory. One of them needs to move. Zoo managers report that keeping so many animals at Centennial Zoo is also damaging the environment, hard-packing the ground and ruining vegetation. As a result, 74 animals from Animaya and 40 animals from Centennial Zoo will exchange places. These decisions are not made lightly. Attending the meeting that resulted in this decision were representatives from local, state and Federal agencies, as well as representatives from UADY’s School of Veterinary Medicine, and representatives from local animal aid and canine training organizations. As someone who has been driving by the zoo for years, I hope this means they are going to reunite the giraffe family.

Fashion Show for Real Women in Yucatan

On Sunday, April 20, at 2:00 PM, there is going to be a fashion show at Rancho Tierra Bonita. The 30 dresses presented will be for real women of all size and heights. The purpose is to show that beauty comes from within, not from looking like a stereotypical runway model. This fashion show is presented by the “Living in Fullness” group, directed by Alejandrina Escaroz, and the “Fashion Without Measure” project, directed by fashion designer Javier Fabian. Dresses will be by UNAM Fashion Design students and a local prestigious department store. Models will be young college women, mothers, and women who are “Living in Fullness.” Since the ladies on the runway are not professional models, they will be trained and supervised by Ruben Parra, a specialists in this field. After walking the catwalk, the ladies will share their testimony of life. This is going to be a wonderful event in a beautiful setting. Both the setting and the concept make it well worth attending.

When Solar and Wind Power are Best Options

There are 32 of the 106 municipalities in Yucatan that do not have full coverage with electricity. This is because there are many small villages in this state where the population is between 50 and 100 individuals. At least 40% of the indigenous population still lives in towns with a total population of less than 15,000. Bringing electricity and water to a village of only 50 people is, obviously, a serious cost-benefit issue when resources are scarce. Yet, the indigenous population of Yucatan is no less entitled to proper services than anyone else in the state of Yucatan. This turns attention back to the power that can be generated by sun and wind. Because of the equipment and work involved, it would take years to bring conventional electrical services to all of rural Yucatan, at tremendous cost to the state. Now, however, with a Federal matching grant, solar and wind power could be quickly brought to all of these rural areas. The good news is that this project is now underway. Two locations will be finished within two to three months and nearly 80 more are in line after that.

Designing a Workshop for Fishing and Aquaculture

How many times, world wide, have badly needed programs failed because they were developed from the top down, rather than from management asking those on the front lines what they need and how they would go about providing for those needs? Such is not the case now in the fishing industry in Yucatan. Fishermen are currently in a workshop where they are brainstorming about future strategies for fishing and aquaculture. Following that, there will be a similar workshop that includes management, academics, and other professional personnel. Information gleaned from those two workshops will be used to develop a workshop for Yucatan’s fishermen that will take place in September. This will give Yucatan’s fishermen a great start to being able to manage their industry well into the future. The Center for Research and Advanced Studies is also working with Yucatan’s beekeepers, so we expect more news about this area soon.

Fatal Motorcycle Accidents in Yucatan

In Yucatan, there is one motorcycle death every 2.87 days, along with thousands of serious injuries every year. These deaths and injuries are caused by not wearing a helmet or wearing a helmet improperly, by ignoring traffic laws, by overloading the motorcycle with passengers, by allowing minors to operate motorcycles, and by not mechanically maintaining the motorcycle. For those of us who are on the highways in vehicles, this should serve as a warning. Please be careful and always assume that a motorcycle could appear in front of you at any given time. No one wants to live with a lifetime memory of having been involved, even through no fault of your own, in a fatal accident with a motorcycle.

Paramedics Weigh in on Semana Santa

Although extra Red Cross ambulances remained on duty following the holidays, paramedics reported that they had no more calls, during the entire length of Semana Santa than they have during any normal month. This is great news for the traveling public. Over a month’s time, Red Cross ambulances handle approximately 50 calls, with most of them due to automobile accidents or pedestrians being hit by vehicles. Over the three day Easter weekend, there were only three automobile accidents between Merida and Progreso that required an ambulance. According to paramedics, this is no more than any normal weekend. Perhaps the 7,000 security professionals on duty throughout the holidays made more difference than anyone could have suspected. Whatever the reason, we are happy to report that Yucatan was safe, as usual, during the holidays. Many thanks to all of the ambulance personnel who man bases throughout Merida and the Yucatan.

Record Holiday Numbers in Progreso

Speaking of Semana Santa in Yucatan, there may be no way to count the numbers of tourists in this past weekend’s crowds in Progreso, but those who came in the 4,000 buses, taxis and combi vans can be counted. Those numbers fell somewhere between 100,000 and 120,000 visitors. At least 50,000 of the visitors remained on the malecon, the rest spread out to their vacation homes in towns and villages along the Yucatan Gulf Coast. With the addition of tens of thousands of driving visitors, many with full cars of visitors, there were traffic jams in small towns that lasted for up to an hour. Regardless of the inconvenience, small town fairs and festivals continued and a good time was had by all in Yucatan during Easter week.

Cruise Crowds Not Spring Breakers

Some service providers were disappointed this Semana Santa when the cruise ships arrived and were full of adults and families with children. Those who had planned for Spring Breakers had weak sales, but it was a week of boom times for those who cater to adults and families. Yucatan itself is a state that loves visitors and does everything it can to meet the needs of families and children, so this may be the future trend for Spring Break in Progreso. What we know for sure is that everyone was safe and well and had a marvelous time! We hope to see them all back again next year!

Happy 45th Birthday to the Yucatan State Folkloric Ballet

This past weekend, the Yucatan State Folkloric Ballet turned 45 years young. To celebrate, they held two shows at Teatro Armando Manzanero. For four decades, this group has presented Yucatan’s history and culture to its own people, and has served as Yucatan’s cultural ambassadors both nationally and internationally. They have worked with such talents as the folkloric ballets of other states in Mexico, as well as with the Chamber Choir of Yucatan. They have been to France, Spain, Italy, China, Belize, Canada and to the United States. They have danced their way through the Hispanic Day Parade in New York City and performed at a number of events in Mexico City. Through the years, they have developed a wide array of vaquerias, each more beautiful than the last. Many thanks to the Yucatan State Folkloric Ballet for their wonderful work. Yucatan Living wishes them a happy 45th birthday and many many more!

Do Children Need to Learn a Love of Culture?

Cultures survive or fail on the foundation of their collective memory. How does one go forward without knowing where one has been? The questions “Who am I” and “Who are we” have the power to ring down through the ages. However, this does not mean that one can capture the interest of children by simply sitting them in a classroom, with a history textbook, and talking at them. The Grand Museum of the Maya World now has Spring Mayan Culture classes for children between the ages of 5 and 12. These are hands-on classes, in which the children can make pottery, as well as sculpt and draw. They visit museums and learn to play Mayan games. Every aspect of their creativity and talent is encouraged, so they will learn to love who they are, as well as knowing where they came from. On this kind of foundation, it is certain that the Maya of Yucatan will continue long into the future.

“El Día Del Niño” Support For Children April 30

Support is needed for the School Children of San Simon, a highly marginalized community made up largely of children. These children are between 5 and 15 years of age and live in families that have between two and ten children each. Needless to say, parents lack the resources to purchase school supplies. We are asking you to help Enrique Valdes, who organizes aid for these children, mostly in the form of school supplies, but clothing and baby accessories will be appreciated as well. This campaign is also being organized in Cancun by Araceli Prado and Yveline Lemay (887-2450). Friends in Merida can send an e-mail to Enrique Valdes, who is the Director of Culture and Sustainable Tourism at Mayaland. They will be in Merida every Tuesday in April and will be happy to stop by your home to receive donations. Thank you in advance for anything that you can do!

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting April 13, 2014

Yucatan Living Notice: Teatro Jose Peon Contreras Closed for Maintenance
Rescheduled Symphony of Yucatan Performances:
April 17 & 19, combined performance on April 19
April 24 & 26, combined performance on April 26
May 15 & 17, combined performance on May 17
In all cases, the venue change is from Teatro Jose Peon Contreras to Teatro Armando Manzanero. People who already have tickets are asked to bring them to the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero to either exchange them or to get a refund.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
We have not found out how long this art exhibit will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Monday (Lunes) April 13, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie Night at Hennessy’s
Come watch a movie, have dinner and drinks and enjoy time with new and old friends.
Location: Hennessy’s Restaurant and Bar, Paseo de Montejo at 41
Time: 7:00 PM, Monday
Admission: No cover

Tuesday (Martes) April 14, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Return to Oz
(USA 1985) Dorothy, saved from a psychiatric experiment by a mysterious girl, is somehow called back to Oz when a vain witch and the Nome King destroy everything that makes the magical land beautiful. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 15, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Inside Job
(2010)Takes a closer look at what brought about the financial meltdown. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Rupestre
(Mexico 2014) he director of this film, Alberto Zúñiga, accepts the invitation of cultural promoter Jorge Pantoja, founder of Tianguis Poplar, to document the history, life and motivations of a group of rockers that transformed the history of urban music of Mexico. Over 40 respondents give their testimony about the origin, importance and validity of the cultural movement that say Zuniga is like between rock’n'roll before 80 and who joined the so-called “rock in your language” “missing link” . In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 16, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Klip
(Serbia 2012) Jasna is a beautiful girl in her mid-teens, leading a crude life of the postwar generation in Serbia. In Serbian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie Classics: The Sound of Music
(UK 1965). Director: Robert Wise. Starring: Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer, and Eleanor Parker. A young woman leaves an Austrian convent to become governess to the children of a widowed Naval officer. Come, watch and sing along!
Location: Videosala of the Olimpo
Time: 5:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Performance: International String Quartet
This performance will include Haydn’s Quartet O 76 #1 and Smetana’s Quartet in E minor “From My Life”.
Location: Hacienda Xcanatun, on the road to Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $200 pesos
Reservations: call 930-2140

Yucatan Living Opening of the Exhibition: Retrospective 1984 – 2014
A look at 30 years of the works of local photographer, Ygnacio Rivero.
Location: Galeria de Arte Municipal de Merida, Calle 65 x 56
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Mumia
(USA 2012) The film captures the life and revolutionary militancy political prisoner on death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal. The new documentary by Stephen Vittoria is an inspiring portrait of a man many consider the most famous US political prisoner. A man whose very existence challenges our beliefs about justice and freedom. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Road Home
(China 2013) Prompted by the death of his father and the grief of his mother, a man recalls the story of how they met in flashback. In Mandarin with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) April 17, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: January
(Mexico 2013) After murdering his wife, Horacio flees with his lover, Lucrecia. Refugees in a cottage in the countryside, they look to continue the love that is no longer possible to sustain. Despair and guilt will lead them to face their own limits. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Up With People
Remember Up, Up With People? (…you meet ‘em wherever you go…). They are coming to Merida. Find out more at their Facebook Page.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 at Calle 61, Merida centro
Time: 5:00 PM and 8:30 PM Friday
Admission: Donation… from $100 to $350 pesos
Reservations: Buy your tickets at www.elektrotickets.mx or call Tel. 99 9312 7835. You can also buy tickets at the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero, Segafredo Galerías cafes, in the Gran Plaza and at Universidad Marista, UADY y Colegio Rogers Hall. More information from Katelen Pérez T’Seyen at kpereztseyen [at] upwithpeople [dot] org or Angel Cancino at acancino [at] upwithpeople [dot] org.

Yucatan Living Independent Music Tour: Los Lasgori y Barzoo.
This performance is under the direction of Jairo Couoh Pech.
Location: Music Hall, Calle 30 x 29, Col. México
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, and is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that she has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and that she must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state discovers Anna’s origin. Her real name is Ida and she is Jewish by birth. On top of that, her family lived a tragic fate. Meetings between Anna and Wanda begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing her faith. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Lolita
(USA 1962) A middle-aged college professor becomes infatuated with a fourteen-year-old nymphet. A famous story by Nabokov. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: Free

 

Saturday (Sabado) April 18, 2015

Yucatan Living Weekly Meetup: Sabados de Gay Coffee – Every Saturday
This is a recurring, gay friendly event, hosted by Cindy Santos R, who is looking forward to creating a network of LGBT and others who are LGBT friendly. The objectives are to be in touch, get together, and make new friends. Visit their website at Merida LGBT Professionals Meetup.
Location: Gloria Jean’s Coffee, Av. Andres Garcia Lavin #303 x Calle 37 y Calle 37-A, Local 7, San Ramon Norte, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 5:30 PM every Saturday
Admission: Free but purchase your own coffee and food

Yucatan LivingMovie: Pulp
(UK 2014) The film centers around December 8, 2012, at the time when Jarvis Cocker & Co. were getting ready to celebrate their anticipated concert return to his native Sheffield Motorpoint Arena facilities, the latest presentation stadium band. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: The Return of the Living Dead
(USA 1985) When two bumbling employees at a medical supply warehouse accidentally release a deadly gas into the air, the vapors cause the dead to rise again as zombies. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Timbuktu
(Mauritania 2013) The Malian city of Timbuktu has fallen into the hands of religious extremists. Kidane lives quietly in the dunes Satima with his wife, his daughter Toya and Issam, a shepherd boy of 12 years. But city dwellers suffer the regime of terror imposed by the jihadists: banned music, laughing, smoking and even play football. Women have become shadows trying to resist with dignity. Each day, some Islamists launch makeshift court judgments as absurd as tragic. In Arabian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), April 19, 2015

Yucatan Living Gypsy Market / Bazaar
Come out and support local artists and artisans – plus sample some great specialty food products.
Location: midway between Chelen & Chuburna at Graciela’s Secret Garden, just look for the cars!
Time: 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free but bring money and buy, buy, Buy!

Yucatan Living Fashion Show for Real Women in Yucatan8058359798
There is going to be a fashion show at Rancho Tierra Bonita. The 30 dresses presented will be for real women of all size and heights. The purpose is to show that beauty comes from within, not from looking like a stereotypical runway model. This fashion show is presented by the “Living in Fullness” group, directed by Alejandrina Escaroz, and the “Fashion Without Measure” project, directed by fashion designer Javier Fabian. Dresses will be by UNAM Fashion Design students and a local prestigious department store. Models will be young college women, mothers, and women who are “Living in Fullness.” Since the ladies on the runway are not professional models, they will be trained and supervised by Ruben Parra, a specialists in this field. After walking the catwalk, the ladies will share their testimony of life. This is going to be a wonderful event in a beautiful setting. Both the setting and the concept make it well worth attending.
Location: Rancho Tierra Bonita
Time: 2:00 PM Sunday
Admission: We don’t know.

Yucatan Living Orquesta Sinfonica de Yucatan: Summer Nights
Starring Carla Dirlikov as teh Mezzo-soprano and Juan Carlos Lomonaco as director. Carla is a Mexican singer who has work with the Orchestra on different occasions. She will interpret Summer Nights by Hector Berlioz and the Symphony Number 3 by Sergei Rachmaninov will be played for the first time in Merida.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Tickets on sale

Yucatan Living Chamber Sundays: For the Love of Baroque
This performance is by the International String Quartet of Yucatan.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: The Double
(UK 2013) A clerk in a government agency finds his unenviable life takes a turn for the horrific with the arrival of a new co-worker who is both his exact physical double and his opposite – confident, charismatic and seductive with women. Stars Jesse Eisenberg, Mia Wasikowska and the enigmatic Wallace Shawn. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) April 20, 2015

No events announced for today… yet!

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Chelem Christmas Toy Drive: Tuesday, April 21
April Bingo/Raffle Extravaganza. Just one of the Prizes is an original Paul Lawrence Oil Painting. The fun and funky Nacional Beach Club and Bungalows in Mahahual has donated a three night stay and Lolo Lorena Bed and Breakfast in Isla Mujeres has donated a one night stay. For a $100 peso donation, they will throw 5 tickets in the drawing for you. You do not have to be present to participate in the drawing. You can let them know where to meet you and they can get your tickets to you, or you can donate through PayPal on their donation page.
Location: LaBarca/Dunas Hotel and Restaurant, Chelem
Time: 6:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: There are several categories of bingo cards, so come on out and bring plenty of pesos.

Yucatan Living Red Cross Benefit: Chip and His Dog – Thursday, April 23 & Friday, April 24
Vocel en Escena will present the children’s opera “Chip and His Dog.” All proceeds will go to support the Red Cross.
Location: Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33 #174 x 112 y 114.
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Adults: $100 pesos, Children: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $80 pesos
Tickets on Sale Now at the following locations: (1) Progreso’s Red Cross, Calle 35 x 72 y 74, (2) Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33, #174 x 112 y 114 in Progreso, and DigiPrint Progreso, Calle 29 # 152-A x 89 y 82.

Yucatan Living Bird Photography Workshop: April 24, 25, and 26
This workshop is limited to 12 participants. Participants must have their own photographic equipment, including zoom lenses.
Location: Offices of Pronatura Peninsula de Yucatan (Calle 32 #260 x 47 y 47-A, Col. Pinzon II, Merida.
Time: Friday, 24th: 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Saturday, 25th: 7:00 AM to 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Sunday, 26th: 7:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Fee: $1,500 pesos . Must register by April 21.
More information and Registration: (999) 988-4436 ext 113

Yucatan Living Exhibition From Tibet: Maitreya, Tour of Loving Kindness – April 24 to May 4
This is an exhibit of ancient Buddist relics from Tibet. They are traveling around the world and giving people the opportunity to attend lectures and workshops, and watch films on this religion, although people of all religions are welcome.
Location: Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: During Museum’s hours
Admission: Museum’s admission

Yucatan Living Opera Yucatan, A.C. – May 02
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies beginning May 2.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Yucatan Living Concert: Jazz en el Mar - Friday, July 31
This is a concert by the Big Band of Merida, with three singer-songwriters: Aleks Syntek, Natalia LaFourcade, and Kalimba. The performance is under the direction of Daniel Zlotnik.
Location: Puerto de Altura, Progreso
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: The sale of tickets is now open to the public through http://www.elektrotickets.mx/, cafeterías Segafredo (Gran Plaza, Plaza las América and Centro) and el Centro de Convenciones Yucatán Siglo XXI. Ticket prices are: $2,180, $1,580, $1,180, $780 and $ 560 pesos

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By WD Barr

Renovated seats at Kukulcan Stadium in Merida Yucatan MexicoEditor’s Note: Kukulcan Alamo Stadium has been renovated and the 2015 baseball season has begun. Those of you who enjoyed baseball in the United States may find that you enjoy it even more here in the Yucatan. There are good teams, players and a lot of fun is had by all who attend and play baseball games in Mexico. To keep you more informed about this time-honored favorite pasttime in the Americas, we will be bringing you periodic updates and articles from a new writer, WD Barr, who writes about baseball in Mexico on his own blog (linked below). We hope that you will enjoy this, and that knowing more about the local teams might even spur you to go see a game or two in person. Enjoy!

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The Liga Mexicana de Beisbol (Mexican Baseball Leagure) presence in the Yucatan is firmly established with three teams that compete in the equivalent of America’s Triple A Baseball. Young players with potential to advance to the major leagues are given a venue to exhibit their talents for the major league scouts. Older players, those who know that they will never advance beyond the minor leagues, still have the chance to play and continue living their dream.

The paycheck is not the main motivation for the players, and the travel schedule can be brutal. But, this game played by men who have a talent for hitting a small round ball, can be rewarding on its own merits. Pitchers face an even harder task. As the saying goes, “If you can’t get them out in Triple A, you’ll never make it to the big leagues, kid”. The potential for a callup to the Grande Liga is a driving force for some, while others love the game so much they will endure the hardships, hoping for one last shot at their dream of reaching the big leagues but playing because it is what they do best.

LEague of Mexican BaseballThe Liga Mexicana de Beisbol (LMB) is made up of 16 teams, located in towns from Cancun to Tijuana. The league is divided into two divisions, Norte and Sur. The Piratas de Campeche (Pirates), Tigres de Quintana Roo(Tigers) and Leones de Yucatan(Lions) are in the Sur, or Southern Division. The five other teams in the division are from Ciudad del Carmen, Puebla, Oaxaca, Tabasco and Veracruz.

The rosters of LMB have players with checkered pasts… some with little prospect of moving to the big league and some with great potential and bright futures. They all share a love of baseball and the hope that they can attract the attention of one of the big league scouts.

The Piratas de Campeche, managed by Dan Firova, last won the LMB Championship in 2004 and made the playoffs in 2014, but were ousted in the first round by the Pericos de Puebla. Estadio Nelson Barrera, the 6,000 seat stadium in downtown Campeche is home to the Piratas. With good pitching and timely hitting, Campeche will contend this year. The outfield in 2015 is young and 18 year old pitcher Francisco Haro, along with some seasoned veterans, should have the Piratas back in the playoffs in 2015.

Estadio Beto Avila, a 9,500 seat facility in Cancun, is home to the Tigres de Quintana Roo. Piloted by former major leaguer Jerry Royster, the Tigres made the playoffs in 2014 only to lose the semi-final round to the eventual league runner up, Pericos de Puebla. The Tigres have won 11 LMB Championships, the latest in 2013. Quintana Roo has a good mix of talent with excellent hitters and very good pitching and can be expected to compete for a playoff spot and contend for the LMB title.

Leones de Yucatan baseballThe Leones de Yucatan play their home games in El Estadio Kukulcan on the southeast side of Merida, just off of the Periferico. Although the Leones did not make the LMB Playoffs in 2014, they did win a championship in 2006 and look to rebound in 2015 with a veteran lineup. Roberto Saucedo, a 40 year old Designated Hitter (DH) leads this year’s team with the potential to go deep into the playoffs. Manager Wilfredo Romero is skillfully employing a mix of youngsters with veterans to produce a winning combination of players.

Although early in the 2015 season, the Leones de Yucatán are 2-1, the Tigres de Quintana Roo are 1-2 and the Piratas de Campeche are winless at 0-3.

The Season So Far

The 2015 season has just started, so here is an update of the last Leones game, played against Guerrero, as well as an update on the other games played last week. Looking ahead, each team in the league has 110 games to play culminating in the playoffs in mid August.

Leones vs. Oaxaca Guerreros lose 6-2

On April 5, the season opened with a game between the Tigres of Quintana Roo and the Leones. Sadly for Yucatecan fans, the Tigres won 4-2 to put a bit of a damper on the excitement of the event. Two days later, the Leones faced the Guerreros de Oaxaca (Warriors), winning 5-1 at the start of the series.

The next day, the Leones faced the Oaxaca Guerreros again. Juan Delgadillo started off badly for the Leones, giving up 2 singles and a walk to Alejandro Gonzalez to load the bases with no outs in the top of the 1st. Mike Jacobs followed with a single that scored Alan Sanchez and Jaime Brena. Tim Torres then ground out to first to score Gonzalez. The Guerreros had staked starter Ruddy Acosta to an early 3-0 lead.

Luis Medina singled to lead off the 2nd for Oaxaca, stole second and scored on a triple by Alejandro Gonzalez as the Guerreros increased their lead to 4-0.

The score would remain the same until the top of the 8th inning. With one out, Yunesky Sanchez doubled and came around to score on a 2 run home run to left by Mario Valenzuela that gave the Guerreros a 6-0 lead.

The Leones got on the scoreboard in the bottom of the 8th. Hector Gimenez singled with two outs. Jesus Valdez singled and Luis Garcia hit a ground ball deep in the hole at short for an infield single that loaded the bases. Willy Aybar came through with a single that scored Gimenez and Valdez to narrow the gap to 6-2 but the Leones would score no more runs and Oaxaca won by the 6-2 score.

Game Statistics

Ruddy Acosta pitched 5 shutout innings to get the win for Oaxaca while Juan Delgadillo gave up 4 runs in his first two innings of work and was charged with the loss for Yucatan. Jaime Brena was 3 for 5 on the night for the Guerreros while Mike Jacobs went 1 for 4 with 2 RBIs. DH Mario Valenzuela had the home run in 4 at bats driving in 2. Ivan Araujo, Jesus Valdez and Luis Garcia were all 2 for 4 in the game for the Leones and Willy Aybar went 1 for 4 with 2 RBIs. 4,802 people attended this game at El Estadio Kukulkan.

Other Games Around the League

Diablos Rojos de Mexico baseball in YucatanThe Diablos Rojos de Mexico(Red Devils) collected 25 hits on their way to a 16-10 mauling of the Broncos de Reynosa. This was not a pitchers night by either team. The Diablos had 7 extra base hits, 6 doubles and a triple by Jesus Fabela while the Broncos had a double and home runs by Frank Diaz and Randy Ruiz.The game took 3 hours and 43 minutes to play and only 1,172 were in attendance.

The Veracruz Aquilas (Eagles) scored 4 runs in the 2nd and 4 more in the 6th to score 11 runs on 16 hits. Ciudad del Carmen’s Delfines (Dolphins) managed 8 hits and 3 runs but committed 4 errors in the game. Enrique Osorios went 3 for 4 with 2 RBIs for the Aguilas and Alejandro Rivera was 2 for 5 with 2 RBIs. Alex Valdez had a 2 run home run for the Delfines. 2,676 fans turned out in Veracruz to watch the home team win.

sultanes-de-monterrey Mexican baseball in YucatanManuel Lopez singled to score Christian Quintero with the go-ahead run for the Tabasco Olmecas in the top of the 9th and Luis Ayala shutdown the Piratas in the bottom of the inning to save the game for Jose Cobos and win for the Olmecas 5-4. Osiris Matos took the loss for Campeche. Daniel Nunez went 2 for 4 with 2 RBIs for the Olmecas and Jasson Atondo was 2 for 4 with an RBI for the Piratas. 1,073 fans showed up at Parque Nelson Barrera in Campeche to view the contest.

Pablo Ortega pitched 7 shutout innings for the Quintana Roo Tigres allowing just 4 hits while striking out 3, and winning the game 5-0. Jesus Castillo and Francisco Rodriguez pitched the final two innings to preserve the win for Ortega. Carlos Valencia went 2 for 3 with an RBI for Quintana Roo and Carlos Gastelum was 2 for 5 with an RBI. Jon Del Campo had a double in 4 at bats for the Pericos. 3,759 saw the Tigres knock the Pericos from the ranks of the unbeaten as Puebla fell to 3-1 on the year.

The Toros de Tijuana(Bulls) remained unbeaten so far, 4-0 on the year, with a 7-2 win over the Sultanes de Monterrey (Sultans). Dennys Reyes got his 2nd win of the year in relief. The Toros scored all 7 runs on 5 home runs. CJ Retherford hit his 3rd home run, leading the LMB, in 4 games. Max Ramirez had a solo home run for the Sultanes on a 2 acereros-de-monclova Mexican baseball in Yucatanfor 3 night. 5,188 were on hand to see the home team win again.

The game between Rieleros de Aguascaliente and the Acereros de Monclova was suspended by rain in the middle of the 7th with the score tied 6-6. And the game between the Saraperos de Saltillo and the Vaqueros de Laguna was rained out completely.

****

If you love baseball, keep following the Liga Mexicana de Beisbol here at yucatanliving.com and follow WD Barr at www.wdbarrsports.blogspot.mx or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/wdbarr.

Click here for the schedule of Leones baseball games.

By Nadine Calder

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Six

Doña Prudencia got up that morning in a bad mood. The previous afternoon a messenger from the hacienda had arrived, carrying on a mule a sack of beans and another of fruit, but also a letter that gave her the bad news that the process of scraping pulp from the henequen fibers had been suspended because the steam engine was having problems.

Hacienda worker in Yucatan

“I’m going to blow my top,” she said. “Sometimes it’s the fire stoker arguing with the cart boss. Other times countless cut leaves are drying out or this or that part of the machine has broken. If it isn’t that work has been interrupted because five or six workers are sick. And all of them asking for a fortune . . . . I don’t know how I’m going to do it. Some day when it’s least expected, I’m going to sell the plantation or abandon the whole place and let it go to ruin.”

The messenger, who had gone to see the machinist, returned saying that Sr. Gómez couldn’t go to the plantation until Monday (it was Wednesday) because he had many commitments for the week.

“He has to go!,” exclaimed doña Prudencia, beside herself. “He’s embarrassed to repair something that he didn’t know how to fix right fifteen days ago. They go on, doing bad work and making the problem worse and then they bill us again charging a fortune. Surely they know how to do this! But eight days later the same problem comes up again and it’s back to the same foolishness.”

Niña,” she said, turning to her daughter who was brushing her hair in a dining room chair. “Get things together so that we can write to your brother.”

And with these words she went into the interior rooms, coming out a little later with a tin container in one hand and, holding against her chest with the other, several brown-paper wrapped packages Family in Yucatanwhich she fit into the can after placing it on a table. She was finishing securing the lid of the container, tying it with string, when Lupita, after finding her writing paraphernalia on a wooden pedestal table, pulled up a chair, seated herself on it, and dipping her pen in the inkwell, spoke, raising her voice so that doña Prudencia, who was now in the hall, would hear her.

“I’m ready, mamá.”
“I’ll be right there.”

While she was waiting, the mischievous girl entertained herself by drawing letters and extravagant sketches on the cover of a Manila folder, adding to the many that already littered various items on the tabletop.

Her mother finally began to dictate various recommendations regarding work on the plantation and other details, ending with: “Your mother who loves you and wants to see you”.

Doña Prudencia immediately placed some scribbles at the end of the letter believing she was writing her name, and she hadn’t even lifted the pen when she said,

“Let’s add a flourish.”

This matter of the flourish was indispensable in doña Prudencia’s letters. At first, she had not included the “your mother who you know loves you and wants to see you” but, taking care to demonstrate affection for her children, it was that ubiquitous flourish that came to be her trademark.

At this, three knocks sounded on the door of the zaguán.

“Who’s there?”, the two asked at the same time.

“Me”, answered the voice from the street, as if that pronoun would be enough for them to recognize.

Lupita went to the shutter at the window.

“It’s the Ortegas”, she said to her mother with alarm.

Quickly she then slipped into the room adjacent to the parlor, as she was somewhat disheveled, in old sandals and bare feet. She immediately half-closed the doors and picked up the red-striped stockings she had tossed aside. After putting them and some pretty calfskin shoes on, she looked in the mirror, dusted powder on her face and finished braiding her beautiful hair.

Meanwhile, two young women, a little older than she, had appeared in the parlor.

“To what do we owe the pleasure of seeing you here at this hour?” said doña Prudencia, squeezing the hands they offered her and turning pleasant the sour expression on her face.

“Oh, nothing, doña Prudencia. We came to see if you would do us a favor. Where’s Lupita?”

“In her room; she’ll be here soon. And what is it that you want?”

“Well, as you know the carnaval is coming up, and Belita (Isabelita) wants to learn the lanceros and some other dances. And tonight our cousin Pancho, our brother Perico and six more friends are coming to the house so we can practice, just among friends, with two groups.”

“Good idea.”

“Yes, but the reason for our visit is to let you know that we’re counting on Lupita and we’re begging you to let her join us.”

“But, girls, Lupita doesn’t dance.”

Woman in Yucatan“She danced at Tonita Pérez’s wedding . . .”

“Nothing more than square dances. And that because the group was incomplete and they coaxed her not to leave the three couples in position unable to dance.”

At that Lupita appeared in the parlor.

The Ortega girls arose, and each one of them, stretching her neck to bring her face near, exchanged loud kisses with the recent arrival, who seated herself on the sofa.

Josefita Ortega, who was the older, said to her:

“We want to know if you’ll join us in a rehearsal at our house tonight.”
“A rehearsal,” Lupita exclaimed with delight. “I don’t know if mamá wants me to” she added, timidly lowering her head and raising her eyes in order to see the effect her observation would have on her mother.

“I’ve told them you don’t know how to dance”, doña Prudencia pointed out in order to say something.

“Well, for that very reason”, Lupita almost wheedled in reply.

“All right. If you want to, I don’t see a problem, as long as it doesn’t end too late.”

“No, doña Prudencia. You’ll have her here by 10:00 tonight”, exclaimed Belita firmly, in order to put to rest this last of the señora’s reservations.

“Who is going?”, asked the now satisfied invitee.

“Well, you, our neighbor Chona Garcia and the two of us. That’s four. And the three Palomos and Rosa Barrera, eight, for two groups.”

“And what time does it start?”

“At seven thirty, but it’s better that you come a little early.”

“Well, we’ll be waiting for you!” said Josefita, getting to her feet. “We still have to let Chonita and the Palomos know.”

And they returned to the handshakes with the señora and the kissing with Lupita, who accompanied them to the door of the zaguán, where they had another interesting chat.

In it the daughter of the house explained that she had known since the day before what was developing with the dance and that the one principally behind it was Pancho Vélez, her visitors’ cousin, although she was unaware if it had been decided who the other boys were.

“You tease!”, retorted Belita mischievously. “You want to make us believe that Luis Robles hasn’t told you that he’s one of them.”

“Oh God!”, replied Lupita bursting with pleasure at the joke. “I never speak with Luis Robles. He comes by here, but…”

“No, and they say that because of that, Fermín Dorantes is upset with him.”

“Let’s see”, interrupted Josefita. “Which one of them would you rather have go?”
“Me? Both of them.”
“But Lupe; that is so like you.”
“Why?”
“So you want both of them, right?
“But, girl, what do you want me to answer? Let both go or neither one go, it’s the same thing.”
“Right. Now you make yourself indifferent.”

And so they continued chatting, until the Ortega girls left for good. Lupita went into the parlor, and with obvious pleasure at the prospect of the rehearsal and of the favors and compliments that it promised her, she sat down at the piano and noisily set about playing a mazurka.

Niña, let’s finish that letter”, said her mother, interrupting her when she entered a little later.

And it was finished and placed in the envelope and dispatched with the wrapped parcels, after which doña Prudencia had a look at the kitchen, gave four scoldings to the maids, locked horns with a boy because he was Butaqueplaying and had not finished sweeping, and going for her sewing basket, seated herself in a butaque* in the hallway to do some mending, helped by a little girl. Meanwhile, Lupita had already hurriedly given her piano lesson a bad run-through. Then she went to her room, put her sandals back on and began the operation of rolling the hair around her face into cone shapes so that the wavy hair that would have to look good that night would have been properly curled. When she was finished, she picked up a novel that she had on her dressing table, flung her body into the hammock and sent her imagination flying through the world of illusions.

Soon she mentally selected the outfit she was going to wear and the accessories she thought would have the best effect, devoting a good amount of time speculating about the probable impressions awaiting her at the dance rehearsal.

She opened the book, looked for the page she had left off on and had four chapters under her belt when she was interrupted by the announcement that lunch was on the table.

****
*small, low sling-chair made of wood and leather

Want to catch up? Read Chapter One and the Intro, Chapter Two, Chapter Three, Chapter Four and Chapter Five here.

By Khaki Scott

At the Beach: Telephone and Internet Service

As science, industry, and import/export business grow at the Port of Progreso, reliable telephone and internet service is more important than ever before. Recently, a tech company called ITD took over Motul Connect. Outages are a thing of the past and superior customer service is being reported by users. Packages run from 2 to 10 MB download and begin at $660 pesos per month. Customers can pay online and can even turn the service off when they are gone for extended periods of time. This is a company that even calls its customers to check on how their service has been! Also, Telcel has upgraded its service to Progreso to a 4G LTE high-speed network that allows surfing the net at up to 20 MB per second. It supports 30 different models of phones, tablets and USB modems. This means a great deal to business operations, as well as to the talented professionals who are being courted to come to this area to work. Expats who live at the beach are also the beneficiaries of these new services and it means a great deal to them to finally be securely connected to each other, to family and friends back home, and to the world.

Additional Progreso Events During Semana Santa

While tens of thousands of Yucatecos were enjoying their beach vacations, two groups took advantage of the days off to hold annual conventions and events. On Thursday, April 2, there was a Zumba marathon in the auditorium of Parque Morelos. This marathon was in support of the Yucatan Association Against Autism and Other Related Disorders of AC Development. On Easter Sunday, at the Casa de la Cultura, the first Geek Progreso 2015 convention was held. This event was for all Cospley and Anime lovers. There were lots of bands and booths selling clothing and other items. Both of these events were designed to raise awareness in the community and to include young people in supporting their community and altruistic causes. Community activity in the coastal towns and villages in Yucatan is at an all-time high and is a measure of welcomed improvements in quality of life all along the coast.

New Tennis Courts in Progreso

Over the holidays, with thousands of children out of school for Easter vacation, two new sports parks were opened in Progreso. They include areas for basketball, volleyball, soccer, chess and tennis. On opening day, 100 chess players were on hand to inaugurate their own new areas of the parks. One of the most often asked questions we get from new expats is concerned with where they can find public tennis courts. Now, there are two new courts in parks at the beach. Parques Morales and Vicente Guerrero, both in Progreso, are open and available for those who want to play tennis. There are also free chess classes available.

Chicxulub Crater Explored by UNAM

During March and April, 100 scientists from a number of countries will drill 1,500 meters into the center of the Chicxulub crater as part of a project by the Geophysics Institute of UNAM. This crater is the world’s best-preserved terrestrial scar. Drilling is designed to examine the area for samples of flora and fauna that will give us more information about the environment as it was 65 million years ago. The water depth at the point where they are drilling is only about 20 meters. The rig itself is safe for the environment and has been used in a number of high profile environmental projects around the world. No marine life will be harmed during this project. Some of the most notable scientists working on this project include Joanna Morgan of Imperial College, UK; Sean Gulick, University of Texas at Austin, USA; David McInroy, ECORD Science Operator, the European Union; and Mario Rebolledo Vieyra, of the Yucatan Center for Scientific Research. Following 50 days of drilling, there will be up to one year of laboratory studies prior to a final report of findings. It is expected that these findings will contribute to a better understanding of climate change.

Malcolm and Jillian Bedell In the News

Malcolm and Jillian Bedell are former expats in Yucatan and the founders of Yolisto. They have moved home to Maine, become the parents of two precious baby girls, and have built a wonderful career around their website From Away. Now, they are opening a sandwich wagon called “Wich Please.” It is set to open May 15 in Rockland, Maine’s Buoy Park. Malcolm and Jillian have a new book out called Eating in Maine. Their first book was called “‘Wich Please: 30 Sandwiches to Help You Win Friends and Influence People.” Go to their website: From Away to see Malcolm’s wonderful food photography. It brings new meaning to “looks good enough to eat.” There is a link there to order each of their books. Congratulations, as always, to Malcolm and Jillian Bedell for charting their own course and sticking to it.

Mexican Students Participate in UK’s KICK

Three hundred nineteen Mexican students from the best secondary and high schools in Mexico are traveling to England to participate in Kaplan International Mexico, a leading provider of language courses specializing in English language courses and other study abroad programs. Mexico’s 319 participants in the KICK competition will pit their English language skills against other international groups of students. This Kaplan International Knowledge Challenge is designed to help young people cultivate friends from around the world, as well as to build their confidence in an international setting. These types of events are key to Mexico’s youth being able to bring the country into a more successful future for all Mexicans. Congratulations and best wishes to all of the Mexican students who head off for this competition in England.

Yucatan’s USDA Certified Beef

The beef industry in Yucatan works tirelessly to improve their herds and the quality of their beef. This has now earned Yucatan’s cattle the designation of USDA Certified Beef and cleared the way for their exportation to the United States. In addition, Yucatan’s Maya pulpo (octopus) fishermen are already in training to meet the standards of the European Union. Yucatan already has 46 pulpo boats and will be able to export their catch to the European Union as soon as the training of the fishermen is complete. Gone are the days when Yucatan’s exports were limited to a few citrus fruits. Agriculture, animal husbandry, and all forms of rural development are big business today in Yucatan and the quality of rural life in this state is taking giant leaps forward. We certainly want to congratulate the cattle producers of Yucatan on their new USDA certification and wish them all the best for the future of their industry.

The Tourist Police Speak Four Languages

The Tourist Police in Yucatan are some of the nicest young people you will ever meet, and they can help visitors now in four languages. Twenty-two of the Tourist Police members are fluent in Spanish, English, French and Maya. They spend most of their time in places where there is the permanent presence of foreigners. This includes Progreso’s Malecon, the highway between Progreso and Merida, Paseo Montejo and the Plaza Grande. When needed, they move out to Chicxulub and Chelem. They can usually be found at archaeological sites, on beaches, and in the colonial cities of Yucatan. We would like to thank the Tourist Police for all they do for foreigners who often find themselves in need of just a little help or direction when they are new to our adopted state. They make visiting and living in Yucatan easier for all of us.

Tourism Agreement with Chinese Province of Anhui

Yucatan recently began exporting pork to the Chinese Province of Anhui. Now, in order to strengthen economic, tourism and cultural ties between the State of Yucatan and the Province of Anhui, an agreement has been signed to promote reciprocal tourism. The Governor of Yucatan said that the State of Yucatan is an open land to the world and to establishing relationships with other cultures. Over the past decade, Yucatan’s ties with China have been mostly academic, creating a generation of young Yucatecos and Chinese who are able to function in business in both nations. We know that Yucatan will be gracious to all of her Chinese tourists, and can hardly wait to hear the experiences of the first Yucatecos to visit Anhui.

Working Dads and Daycare in Yucatan

This is one of those stories that makes us wonder why state and federal workers didn’t demand equal rights to daycare years ago. In most of our cultures, we are quite proud of ourselves when we provide daycare to working mothers. Little thought has ever been given to the daycare needs of working fathers. Now, any working head of household who pays into the Institute for Social Security and Services for State Workers (ISSSTE), or who works for a federal agency, has the right to enroll their children in free daycare. We suspect that it won’t be long before this concept is extended to all workers. This is a good thing to hear in a week when other states in other nations might not be sensitive to the rights of their own people. Yucatan continues to amaze everyone with the depth of respect it has for human rights.

By Working Gringos

This Week… starting April 06, 2014

Yucatan Living School’s Still Out
Yucatan’s children will not return to school until Monday, April 13. Families are still on vacation out of the city, which means that state and city sponsored events will not return until the following week. In the meantime, there are loads of activities going on at neighborhood parks, so do get out and about in your own area. As you can see by our Coming Soon section, events pick back up quickly as soon as the Easter vacation ends.

Yucatan Living Bulletin Merida: Cathedral Tours Suspended Until Further Notice
This suspension of the regular tours of the Cathedral in Merida is due to maintenance. In addition, maintenance will begin on the Olimpo in the second week of June.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
We have not found out how long this art exhibit will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Salsa for Gringos
If you are in the mood to dance, you can be certain that Anny is organizing a class just for you! Two new salsa classes are beginning in Merida. We are listing them once here, then moving them to Yucatan Living’s Ongoing Events and Classes page.

For the next two weeks, starting this week…Tuesdays and Thursdays
Location:Hennessy’s, Paseo de Montejo
Time: 10:30 AM Reoccurs weekly on Tuesday and Thursday
Admission: $400 pesos per month

Mondays and Wednesdays
Location: Liberdanza Dance Studio, Calle 24 #95-A x 13 y 15 in Chuburna de Hidalgo, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 7:00 PM Reoccurs weekly on Monday and Wednesday
Admission: $350 pesos per month
For More Information: call Anny at 923-3736 or (999) 125-0466 or e-mail: animex [at] prodigy [dot] net [dot] mx

Monday (Lunes) April 06, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie Night at Hennessy’s
Come watch a movie, have dinner and drinks and enjoy time with new and old friends. Tonite’s movie: Nine Queens, starring Ricardo Darin from Argentina.
Location: Hennessy’s Restaurant and Bar, Paseo de Montejo at 41
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: No cover

Tuesday (Martes) April 07, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Zelig
(USA 1983) “Documentary” about a man who can look and act like whoever he’s around, and meets various famous people. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 08, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Upstream Color
(USA 2013) A man and woman are drawn together, entangled in the life cycle of an ageless organism. Identity becomes an illusion as they struggle to assemble the loose fragments of wrecked lives. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: January
(Mexico 2013) After murdering his wife, Horacio flees with his lover, Lucrecia. Refugees in a cottage in the countryside, they look to continue the love that is no longer possible to sustain. Despair and guilt will lead them to face their own limits. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 09, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: How to Make a Book with Steidl
(Germany 2010) Amazing documentary, in English: The movie observes the publisher, as he collaborates with the world famous photographers Joel Sternfeld, Robert Frank, Ed Ruscha, Jeff Wall and Robert Adams, at their studios and other places of work, in New York, London and Paris, in the Katar desert, and, last but not least, in Göttingen. Here, in “Steidlville”, their works are printed on Steidl‘s own machines, in three shifts. In goes the idea, out comes the finished book. In English.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan LivingMovie: Pulp
(UK 2014) The film centers around December 8, 2012, at the time when Jarvis Cocker & Co. were getting ready to celebrate their anticipated concert return to his native Sheffield Motorpoint Arena facilities, the latest up to now- presentation stadium band. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Friday (Viernes) April 10, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Despertar el Polvo
(Mexico 2013) This is the story of man who has suffered the transgressed living a life of crime and corruption. The neighborhood is the stage where he roams the streets invisible, ignored, lonely, lost in his misery. In Spanish.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Drama / Theater / Contemporary Circus: Magma
This is a performance by Colectivo Clo (Uruguay), starring Maria Noel Rosas and Bruno Tognola. It is a beautiful scenic performance that has been on tour throughout Mexico.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Friday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Ida
(Poland 2013) Poland 1962. Anna is a novice of 18, which is preparing to become a nun. Before that, the mother superior reveals that he has a living relative, her aunt Wanda and must meet her and the outside world before taking final vows. Wanda, a former judge of the Polish communist state, he discovers Anna origin: his real name is Ida and is Jewish by birth; in addition, his family lived a tragic fate. Meetings begin a journey in search of the roots of Ida, testing his faith and his forces. In Polish with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) April 11, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Last Days Here
(USA 2011) Bobby Liebling was the charismatic singer of 70′s hard-rockers and doom pioneers, Pentagram. Today dying in his father’s basement smoking crack and heroin, a zombie with overwhelming sores and skin mottling, toothless and disjointed infections, he flirts with death daily. The film begins with the encounter between Liebling and Sean “Pellet” Pelletier, friend and manager who will try to revive the career of the late metal myth. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Drama / Theater / Contemporary Circus: Magma
This is a performance by Colectivo Clo (Uruguay), starring Maria Noel Rosas and Bruno Tognola. It is a beautiful scenic performance that has been on tour throughout Mexico.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:00 PM Saturday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Sweeney Todd
(USA 2007) The infamous story of Benjamin Barker, AKA Sweeney Todd, who sets up a barber shop down in London which is the basis for a sinister partnership with his fellow tenant, Mrs. Lovett. Based on the hit Broadway musical. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Mumia
(USA 2012) The film captures the life and revolutionary militancy political prisoner on death row, Mumia Abu-Jamal. The new documentary by Stephen Vittoria is an inspiring portrait of a man many consider the most famous US political prisoner. A man whose very existence challenges our beliefs about justice and freedom. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), April 12, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Tim’s Vermeer
(USA 2013) Inventor Tim Jenison seeks to understand the painting techniques used by Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer. Does it sound kind of dull… if you are interested in art, it is MOST fascinating! In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) April 13, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events planned for Today, yet! !

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living Performance: International String Quartet : Thursday, April 16
This performance will include Haydn’s Quartet O 76 #1 and Smetana’s Quartet in E minor “From My Life”. Note: There is only one performance by the International String Quartet in April.
Location: Hacienda Xcanatun
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: $200 pesos
Reservations: call 930-2140

Yucatan Living Up With People : Friday, April 17
Remember Up, Up With People? (…you meet ‘em wherever you go…). They are coming to Merida. Find out more at their Facebook Page.
Location: Teatro Armando Manzanero, Calle 62 at Calle 61, Merida centro
Time: 5:00 PM and 8:30 PM
Admission: Donation… from $100 to $350 pesos
Reservations: Buy your tickets at www.elektrotickets.mx or call Tel. 99 9312 7835. You can also buy tickets at the box office of Teatro Armando Manzanero, Segafredo Galerías cafes, in the Gran Plaza and at Universidad Marista, UADY y Colegio Rogers Hall.

Más información:

Katelen Pérez T’Seyen
kpereztseyen [at] upwithpeople [dot] org

Angel Cancino
acancino [at] upwithpeople [dot] org

Yucatan Living Gypsy Market / Bazaar : Sunday, April 19
Come out and support local artists and artisans – plus sample some great specialty food products.
Location: midway between Chelen & Chuburna at Graciela’s Secret Garden, just look for the cars!.
Time: 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Admission: Free but bring money and buy, buy, Buy!

Yucatan Living Chelem Christmas Toy Drive: Tuesday, April 21
April Bingo/Raffle Extravaganza
Just one of the Prizes is an original Paul Lawrence Oil Painting. The fun and funky Nacional Beach Club and Bungalows in Mahahual has donated a three night stay and Lolo Lorena Bed and Breakfast in Isla Mujeres has donated a one night stay. For a $100 peso donation, they will throw 5 tickets in the drawing for you. You do not have to be present to participate in the drawing. You can let them know where to meet you and they can get your tickets to you, or you can donate through PayPal on their donation page.
Location: LaBarca/Dunas Hotel and Restaurant
Time: 6:00 PM
Admission: There are several categories of bingo cards, so come on out and bring plenty of pesos.

Yucatan Living Red Cross Benefit: Chip and His Dog: Thursday, April 23 & Friday, April 24
Vocel en Escena will present the children’s opera “Chip and His Dog.” All proceeds will go to support the Red Cross.
Location: Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33 #174 x 112 y 114.
Time: 7:00 PM
Admission: Adults: $100 pesos, Children: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $80 pesos
Tickets on Sale Now at the following locations: (1) Progreso’s Red Cross, Calle 35 x 72 y 74, (2) Emily’s Sala de Fiestas, Calle 33, #174 x 112 y 114 in Progreso, and DigiPrint Progreso, Calle 29 # 152-A x 89 y 82.

Yucatan Living Bird Photography Workshop: April 24, 25, and 26
This workshop is limited to 12 participants. Participants must have their own photographic equipment, including zoom lenses.
Location: Offices of Pronatura Peninsula de Yucatan (Calle 32 #260 x 47 y 47-A, Col. Pinzon II, Merida.
Time: Friday, 24th: 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Saturday, 25th: 7:00 AM to 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM, Sunday, 26th: 7:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Fee: $1,500 pesos Must register by April 21.
More information and Registration: (999) 988-4436 ext 113

Yucatan Living OPERA YUCATÁN, A.C.: May 02
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Last Scheduled Meeting: Saturday, April 11

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

16 April: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Mozart – String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K575 – OR – Tansman – String Quartet No. 3, Smetana – Quartet in E minor ‘From My Life’

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open: Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Working Gringos

Name of Applicant: fernando sabido canche
Email Address: fernando [dot] sabido [at] hotmail [dot] com
Phone Number: 9991068291
Type of Work Desired: teacher or tourist guide
Job Location Desired: Merida and surrounding communities

I am an English teacher in a local community, and I am looking for some opportunities to work in the afternoons. I like to speak English and I know several parts of
Yucatan very well, so I could be a good tourist guide too. I have three years of teaching experience.

Please give me a call or send me an email if you are interested!

By James Dayton Gunn, PhD

Marisol Ceh MooEditor’s Note: Here is another review of a book written in Spanish… this time, the book was ALSO written in the Maya language, and by a contemporary author. For that reason, the book and the author are rather famous. Marisol Ceh Moo is famous for winning a national prize… the first person to write in the Maya language to do so. Our thanks to Dr. James Gunn who gives us a peek into this very important work. Enjoy!

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Teya, Un Corazón de Mujer

by Marisol Ceh Moo (Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes, 2008)

Marisol Ceh Moo is one of the new, young Mexican writers of the 21st century. She is commonly known as Sol Ceh, and was born in the town of Calotmul, Yucatan. In 2014 she won the Premio Nezahualcóyotl, a prestigious award for Mexican authors.

The Story of Sol Ceh

Sol Ceh is a woman living in two cultures, neither of which values women as highly as they do men. In addition she is Maya, in a world that does not highly value contemporary Maya culture. At an early age, as Sol Ceh has made clear in her interviews, she set out to break through the gender and cultural biases and barriers that limited her own, and her people’s, opportunities. In that she has been successful.

Since Sol Ceh published her first bilingual novel in Spanish and Maya, other Maya writers have written similar works. But Teya, Un Corazón de Mujer is the first novel written in Maya by a woman, and it is also, apparently, the first of its kind in all of Latin America. Previously, Maya literature was limited to traditional Maya legends and myths. With this novel, Sol Ceh broke new ground and opened a door for her people that gives them one more tool to show the world their worth and ability.

The Story of Teya

The novel describes the short life and the sudden, but expected, assassination of a young man. This youth is the leader of an idealistic group of left-wing (communist) intellectuals who defend the rights of the poor and oppose the oppressive oligopolistic government regime that keeps itself in power by fraud and threat. Perhaps the novel was inspired by the life and death of the most beloved Yucatecan political figure, Felipe Carrillo Puerto, although Sol Ceh has said that she did not have him in mind when creating her tragic hero.

Teya Un Corazon de Mujer book from YucatanIn the novel, Sol Ceh reveals to the reader the thoughts and motivations of all her principal characters. The characters include the idealistic son, who fights fiercely for the poor but has few scruples in his relationship with women; the mother who knows her son will sooner or later be killed and is resigned to the inevitable; the local political boss willing to use any means to maintain his privileges and status; and the cacique (originally an Arawak word that has come into common use throughout Latin America in reference to a leader, chief, or political boss) who rises from poverty to power through intimidation and murder. In my mind, the more interesting figure in the novel is not the young man whose final day and tragic murder we follow in detail, but the mother, Teya. It is her emotional reaction to the circumstances and to the murder of her son that is the author’s most significant focus.

The story itself is mundane. What happens in the book is something that happens with disturbing regularity in too many parts of this world. The story, however, is rescued from being ordinary by Teya, with whom the reader feels great empathy. The other characters in the book act out their parts in unsurprising ways, according to their own reasons, reasons the reader may not share but can easily understand. But Teya does not act. She is almost entirely passive, knowing what is going to happen. Teya expresses a deep fatalistic sorrow. Her son seems proud of having chosen a path to martyrdom, but it is Teya who is the reluctant, innocent victim here. She has no choice, and no way to avoid her fate. But she is admirable in accepting that fate with resignation and dignity.

The recent disappearance in Guerrero of the 43 students who were presumably murdered on their way to demonstrate against a local political boss is a reminder that opposing those who are in positions of power can be very dangerous, even today. Teya, Un Corazón de Mujer is well written, courageous, and a timely reminder of an unpleasant fact of life, in Mexico and around the world.

By Working Gringos

Editor’s Note: There are so many running events in the Yucatan in the next two months that we figured they needed their own page! If you are a runner, here are a number of events for you!!

Runs for April and May

Yucatan LivingUltra Marathon Fe: Sunday, April 2, 2015
This race is from Chelem to Telchac Puerto. Length of Race: 50 km and 100 km
Location: Departure: Church of Chelem
Time: 6:00 PM
Registration: $600 pesos.
Registration: Salvador Alvarado Stadium, Monday – Saturday, 7:00 AM – 10:00 AM.
Online Registration: http://manivelasst.com/Grupoee/

Yucatan LivingCancun Commando Race: Sunday, April 19, 2015
This race is the first militarized steeplechase in Cancun – 6 km of mud, obstacles, effort and lots of fun. Visit the announcement (banner at the bottom of the page) at www.masaccion.com.mx. Registrations are pending and coming soon, so check back with that site often.

Yucatan LivingThe 3rd Carrera Gran Santa Fe: Sunday, April 19, 2015
Some say this is the most anticipated race this year. The 3rd 2015 Carrera approaches at GranSantaFe in Merida. Unfortunately, we cannot seem to find out more about this… we’ll post it here when we do!
Location: Caucel, Gran Santa Fe, Merida
Time 7:00 AM
Registration: TBA

Yucatan LivingCareer Tribune, Campeche: Sunday, April 26, 2015
This is a 10 km and 5 km hike.
Location: Moch Cohuo Park, Campeche
Registration: $150 pesos

Yucatan LivingIII Annual Trecevision (Channel 13) Race and Walk Sunday April 26, 2015 The run will be 9,750 km and 5 km for the walk. Proceeds will be donated to charitable institutions as needed. In 2013, the cumulative total was donated to the Center for Child Welfare for the Homeless (CAIMEDE). In 2014, a community kitchen was equipped in La Mielera, located on the Periferico and which serves vulnerable people in this area. This year, nearly 1,500 participants will take part in this race. Participation categories include: free, submaster, master, veterans, and veterans plus for both sexes. The wheelchair category will be mixed gender as well.
Location: Parque de las Americas, Merida
Time: 7:00 AM
Admission: $100 peso donation. Registration can be made, beginning April 1 at the Salvador Alvarado Stadium between 5:00 AM and 10:00 AM, or at the Trecevision offices between 9:00 AM and 7:00 PM.

Yucatan LivingCorro Por Una Sonrisa (Run for a Smile): Sunday May 3, 2015
This run is being organized by the New Generations Rotary Club of Merida.
Location: At the head of Paseo de Montejo
Time: 7:00 AM
Registration: TBA

Yucatan LivingThe 5th Triathlon Tres Rios, Riviera Maya: Sunday, May 17, 2015
This triathlon is for children and Sprint. More information soon on http://masaccion.com.mx/
Location: Hacienda Tres Rios, Riviera Maya
Time: 12:00 AM
Registration: TBA

Yucatan LivingYucarrera 5 km: Sunday, May 17, 2015
More information at: https://www.facebook.com/yucarrera5k?notif_t=fbpage_fan_invite
Location: Paseo de Montejo
Time: 7:00 AM
Admission: TBA

Yucatan LivingCarrera Mayan Race Xmatquil: Sunday, May 17, 2015
5 km or 10 km, 15 to 20 obstacles. This race also has a children’s category.
Location: Xmatquil
Time: 7:00 AM
Registration: $250 pesos

Yucatan Living17th Marathon of the Marina: Sunday, May 31, 2015
This is the oldest and longest race in Yucatan, and it absolutely has the best prizes! If you plan on running or walking in this race, please register early so you will have the latest in directions for the Marathon and for the Half Marathon. There will be very few changes, but some must be made because of construction in Progreso, so you want to know about those early on. There will be a total of more than $500,000 pesos in cash handed out as prizes. This race includes the following categories: free, submaster, master, veterans, and veterans plus for both sexes. The wheelchair category will be mixed gender as well. There will also be a new motorcycle and free trip to the Mayan Riviera (including spending money) for the first local to cross the finish line, and cash bonuses for the first five Yucateco men and first five Yucateca ladies to cross the finish line.
Location: Begins at the Monumento a la Patria
Time: 5:00 AM
Registration: April 27 – May 8: $170 pesos. May 9 – May 31: $200 pesos. Tickets available from the box office at Salvador Alvarado Stadium and the Polifunctional Gym.

Find out about more races (yes, there are more!) at the CorreYuk Facebook page.

By Working Gringos

Building View at Suites del Sol Furnished Apartments for Rent in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

Suites del Sol Hotel in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Suites del Sol Vacation Rental Hotel in Merida Yucatan

Reading in comfort at Suites del Sol in Merida Yucatan

Suites del Sol Vacation Rental Hotel in Merida Yucatan

Suites del Sol Vacation Rental Hotel in Merida Yucatan

Suites del Sol Vacation Rental Hotel in Merida Yucatan

Suites del Sol vacation rental hotel in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Suites del Sol Hotel in Merida Yucatan Mexico

 

 

 

Suites del Sol

Spacious Apartments With Hotel Services

If you are looking for an economic vacation rental in Merida, but do not want to be totally on your own without resources, Suites del Sol is just the place you are looking for. We have clients that come back year after year, who love the easy access of our location, the clean and spacious apartments and the caring service that we provide to our guests.

Located just one block off Paseo de Montejo, walking distance to both WalMart and the Santa Ana market, Suites del Sol provides vacation rental apartments of various sizes. You can live in Merida like a resident, while still enjoying the concierge and cleaning services of a hotel. If you don’t feel up to accommodating yourself to someone else’s home, as you do in a vacation rental, try our furnished apartments at Suites del Sol!

The one and two bedroom furnished apartments at Suites del Sol are spacious and squeaky clean. They all have kitchens, televisions, phones… it’s all set up for you to walk right in and start living! And, at Suites del Sol, residents enjoy comprehensive personal services with all the benefits of corporate or longterm housing. Our front desk is manned by English-speaking residents of Merida, who take pride and enjoyment in taking care of their guests. They help guests navigate the ins and outs of shopping, dining, banking, traveling and whatever else you might need to live comfortably while you are enjoying Merida and the Yucatan.

Because Suites del Sol is just one block from Paseo Montejo, Merida’s main boulevard, your home-away-from-home in Merida is within walking distance of most Mexican banks, newsstands, grocery stores, copy, fax and shipping facilities, car rental offices, travel agencies and public transportation, as well as many fine restaurants, theatres and the central plaza. They even have an agreement with the hotel across the street, so their guests can use their large pool, enjoying the garden setting and the poolside drink services.

Their friendly and knowledgeable staff can give you directions and recommendations for where to eat, what to see and how to get there. In fact, according to their repeat customers, the staff is one of the best things about Suites del Sol!

Read our Guests Comments about Suites del Sol here.

 

Suites del Sol Vacation Rental Hotel in Merida Yucatan

Amenities

Amenities include…

  • one or two bedrooms with beds, linens
  • wireless internet
  • cable television
  • telephone
  • kitchen with refrigerator, microwave, coffee pot, stove
  • cleaning supplies
  • regular bottled water delivery ($2.30 US per 5 gallons)
  • air conditioning and ceiling fans throughout

 

Chichen Itza, Yucatan Mexico

Prices

Prices change depending on the season, but they are always competitive and reasonable.

For Low Season (March 1 to October 31):

Monthly Rates 
Deluxe rooms: $510 USD per month
1 bedroom residence suite: $830 USD per month 
2 bedroom residence suite: $980 USD per month

Daily Rates 
Deluxe rooms : $35 USD per night 
1 bedroom residence suite: $70 USD per night 
2 bedroom residence suite: $84 USD per night

 

Contact Us Now!

www.suitesdelsol.com

Suites del Sol looks forward to having you as their guest!

By Nadine Calder

El Último Esfuerzo by Delio Moreno Cantón: Chapter Five

This recent conversation bothered the clerk, and he was constantly going over doña Raimunda’s powerful words, examining them in all possible lights and giving his deliberations food for thought.

Get married! He who had entertained so many illusions of sweet family pleasures, who had resigned himself, defeated by Luck’s setbacks, to passing through the world never having walked arm in arm with a woman he loved. Get married, when he had further resigned himself to dying in complete solitude, without a desolate wife piously closing his eyelids in sorrow and loving children dampening his deathbed with tears. . . ! So, is there anyone who, in spite of his poverty, not only shows him respect, but does so to the point of caring about Hermenegildo López’s happiness? One who might in matrimony help him see his way to the end of his perpetual misfortunes?

But who is about to marry him? Who is about to receive as her husband a man who was rejected as such when he was young? He wasn’t old, no señor, but neither was he a boy. If only he could marry Lupita! She was so beautiful and so gracious! Hadn’t he seen older men marry young girls every day? No. He wouldn’t do this. No matter how much he might like a very young wife, he could win from her heart nothing more than respectful esteem, not the kind of overpowering love that would be for him and him alone. He had, then, to think of someone whose age better matched his own.

Bringing this reflection to a close, another name leaped into don Hermenegildo’s mind: doña Prudencia! After his last disaster, he once thought of declaring love for her, but without doing anything, he fearfully resolved to completely renounce the idea of marriage.

Doña Prudencia must be thirty-seven years old, and a woman of that age would ordinarily not attract the clerk’s attention. Would the widow who was in a comfortable position, if not rich, accept him who lived in misery with his meager salary and modest employment? It’s true that their friendship was bolstered by the esteem he enjoyed, and this, too, is a form of wealth. Although he was poor, his name was respected, which she knew perfectly well, judging by the appreciation and considerations with which she favored don Hermenegildo, and that was encouraging to him.

Without a doubt, doña Raimunda’s suggestions had fallen like rain on dry ground. Not only did her companion not dismiss a single one of those suggestions, despite arguing against them, he received them with quiet satisfaction. So it was that, from that point on, the idea of marriage was firmly fixed in his mind. And in order to concentrate on it and on who would be the object of his affections, he had continued talking with doña Prudencia, heeding the urgency of his desire in order to keep his timid nerves from making him more reticent, those wicked nerves that vibrated as if they would burst when their owner approached a woman with amorous intentions.

Occupied with these thoughts, he was going down the street one night after departing from the usual get-together when he was interrupted by a voice calling out to him.

It was Luis Robles.

The young man was somewhat short in stature, of sturdy build, fair-haired, with smiling face and blue eyes. Always good-natured, he was a famous party-goer, witty and charming. Carefree like few others, he never thought ahead and all his effort had been toward living life as happily as possible.

In school he was always trying to find out at the last moment what the day’s lesson was, the end result being that his name could be found on the detention list, either for bad conduct in class or for not knowing the assigned material.

During exams, he was saved many times by the daring gift of gab with which he responded to the reviewers, saying everything he knew, even though it wasn’t what they had asked him about, spilling out not a few uncertain dates from his abundant supply.

When the time for finals was nearing, he would resign himself to staying in his room in order to master the course materials. But these were many and it was impossible to recover in so short a period all the time lost in a year. His Latin teacher repeated to him and others non valet studere sed studuisse. There is no value in studying without having studied. But he had too much self-confidence to face the truth of this proposal, presenting himself before the good-humored review board like one destined for a triumph and behaving like a brave warrior about to acquit himself well in battle.

After one of these experiences in the subject of World History, one of his classmates said to him:

“Do you know that you’re shameless under fire?”

“Why?”

“You’ve named more dates than a chronology text.”

“It’s always a good idea to name the dates of related events that occur.”

“But they were completely absurd!”

“I went in there absolutely sure of myself. Do you think the reviewers have memorized all those numbers? Not one of them dared to contradict me, and instead they admired how knowledgeable I was.”

“To say that Constantinople fell to Mehmed II in 1506…”

“It wasn’t in 1506? Well, look; I remember something very important that happened in 1506.”

“You must be talking about the discovery of Yucatán.”

“Exactly.”

And he remained just as unperturbed.

He had yet another trait that gave a better idea of his character.

The third-year Latin professor, who was a priest, gave his students daily assignments to train them in composition and translation, exercises which were to be presented in written form. Luis, who thanks to his good memory could regularly respond to a lesson when he studied it at the last minute, never thought to bother his head with this new work. So it was that when the professor collected their notebooks to make corrections, our hero, when it came to his turn, calmly replied:

“I didn’t bring the assignment, father.”

“Well, you know you still have to do it.”

And the following day the invariable declaration from the student and the same reminder from the professor until, exasperated, the latter exclaimed:

“Listen, son. From now on, I’m not going to ask for your composition again, because it’s useless. Every day, after class, you will stay here to write it. Now you know.”

And so on it went. The priest, upon calling on the students one by one to present their notebooks, skipped Luis Robles. But one time, forgetting to do so, or better yet, probably believing that the lazy student had mended his ways, said to him when it came to be his turn:

“Your assignment, Robles.”

“But, father,” answered the one addressed, getting to his feet, “haven’t we agreed that I would stay every day to write it after class?”

Needless to say, general laughter resulted in the boy’s leaving the classroom.

And so he managed to get by until advancing to professional studies and embarking on the study of Jurisprudence. He found no more pleasure in the celebrated institutions of Justinian and the depths of P. Taparelli than in Naquet’s formulas or De Candolle’s observations. He wasn’t lacking, however, in the virtue of perseverance and, still rubbing his eyes, he would load up his books and march off to the class which he tried to entertain by putting forward some point he claimed to find questionable and engaging the instructor in discussion for as long as possible.

Before long came the first year exam, on which he received a grade that barely permitted him to go on to the second year. And it was said that it was thanks to some discreet and opportune gifts to the professor and the school’s director that he didn’t fail. After that, he was very happy to spend his vacation in his hometown, delighting his poor father with news of the encouraging results and managing to get his permission to prolong the break… necessary, he said, to rest his overburdened intellectual faculties so that once refreshed, he could embark anew on his studies with more spirit and to better benefit.

Having these facts, and knowing him better, we can follow along with Luis in company of don Hermenegildo, with whom he walked toward the latter’s home. As soon as the bachelor saw the younger man, he felt come to his lips the string of affectionate questions he kept ready to unload on the first person he happened to run into.

“Hello, Luis. Good to see you. How are you?”

“Pretty good, don Hermenegildo. And you, how’s it going?”

“Bad, my boy. But how is it that you always want to turn the conversation back around to me? And your papá? I hope he’s just as strong and healthy as the last time I had the pleasure of greeting him. Don’t forget to give him very kind regards when you write to him. And the rest of the family, all’s well?”

“Fine, with the exception of an elderly maid we love very much and who for several days, according to what they write me, has had a very high temperature. “

“You don’t say! Such a good woman.”

“Do you know her, don Hermenegildo?”

“No, but I can imagine. Those elderly maids are generally good. Believe me, I know what I’m talking about. So she’s sick! You have to wonder why some things happen!”

“What do you want? People in small towns get sick just as they do in Mérida.”

“I don’t say they don’t; but it’s sad . . . and what are they giving her for it?”

“Listen, don Hermenegildo; I want to ask you a favor.”

“With much pleasure. Let’s hear it.”

“I’m in love.”

“Ah, yes! The young men’s sickness. And what, is this about asking a young lady to be your girlfriend?”

“No, sir. What I want is to have you ask permission for me to visit her at home.”

“That’s no inconvenience at all, as long as her parents are open to the idea…”

“That’s precisely the question. If her parents were open to the idea, I would go there alone. But that’s not the case and for that reason I need you.”

“But if they’re opposed to you, they’ll say no.”

“With that in mind, I want the one who asks for the permission to be none other than you, who are very esteemed and respected in their house and besides that, you like me and claim to be a great friend of my father. You can give me a good recommendation.”

Don Hermenegildo felt his vanity flattered by the young man who sought his respectability and influence in order to win over the girl’s parents, but forewarned as they were against Luis. How could he tell them that their daughter’s suitor was responsible and hard-working, with excellent prospects for the future and other favorable characteristics, if on the contrary he had the reputation he had, giving no thought to the fact that he hadn’t a penny to his name? But how could he decline the young man’s request? Embarrass him by letting him know he didn’t want to recommend him due to his less than spotless reputation? He, incapable of displeasing the most wicked man in the world? Never in his life! Accept the assignment? Considering the prudence and respectability of that “highly distinguished family” that has opened its doors and honored him with their confidence, how could he suggest that they warmly welcome a young man who has little to recommend him as nothing less than their daughter’s future? Wouldn’t he be contributing to the unhappiness that could befall the girl?

He was continuing to walk along in this perplexed state when Luis asked him:

“Will you do it?”

“But, Luis. Keep in mind that you haven’t even told me the girl’s name.”

“Lupita. As if you don’t already know.”

“Lupita?,” exclaimed don Hermenegildo in amazement.

“Lupita Fernández, doña Prudencia’s daughter.”

“But haven’t I heard that she’s going with Fermín Dorantes?”

“Yes. She talks with him sometimes, but everyone knows she doesn’t really like him.”

“Well, then, she’ll talk with you, too.”

“No, she won’t, because I never get the chance. But she laughs, and you’ll see that this is a good sign.”

“But even if you can make her smile, as long as you don’t have an understanding, what good will permission to enter her house do you?”

“That’s it precisely! If we had an understanding and we could have a conversation when I approach her, the rest would not matter much to me. But since she goes inside without listening to what I have to say, I want the visits as a way to take that option away from her. Anyway, that’s my plan and I know women. I have my reasons to believe that Lupita, in spite of everything, likes me.”

Don Hermenegildo heard the determined young man with envy. What he wouldn’t have given to be half as daring! He was afraid to accept the delicate and serious assignment proposed to him and he thought about changing the subject, but Luis was a crazy man and there would be no way to dissuade him.

There was no other recourse, and in the end he had to agree to the venture cast upon him, but with the saving condition that he was doing so because the request had been made and for no other reason.

Luis departed giving him repeated thanks and a strong and painful handshake, demonstrating his hope that a recommendation like don Hermenegildo’s would not fall on deaf ears. And the bachelor went on to his poor home where his widowed sister and the nighttime crying of his little nephews awaited him, rubbing his bruised hand and feeling uneasy about the pressures placed upon him by Luis’s request.

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Want to catch up? Read Chapter One and the Intro, Chapter Two, Chapter Three and Chapter Four here.

By Scott Wallace

Editor’s Note: Those of us in the expatriate community of Merida are enjoying a growing set of attractions and entertainment that is becoming richer all the time. Restaurants, music, B&B’s, small hotels, large hotels, shops… Merida today is not the Merida that the Working Gringos “discovered” in 2001. But we are not basically city people, and Merida is most definitely a city, with all that entails. On a regular basis, we like to get out of the city and breathe a bit. We have been hearing more and more about Bacalar, a beautiful lake and growing community that is just four hours away. In fact, we’ve published other articles about the paddle marathon at Bacalar and about Bacalar history. So here is our final story, an inside look at Bacalar, from resident Scott Wallace, who offers some tips to help our readers enjoy their next visit to Bacalar.
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Laguna Bacalar, Beautiful Freshwater

Laguna Bacalar is one of the most beautiful freshwater bodies on the planet. Bacalar also happens to be a comfortable gateway to the fascinating history of Quintana Roo and southern Campeche. Map to Lake Bacalar in YucatanFortunately for Merida residents planning a visit, the same maturing of the business community to meet broader tourist and resident expectations occurring in Merida is also happening in Bacalar. Still, Bacalar is not a major city nor a capital city. Visitors to Bacalar will find an interesting, small pueblo on a spectacularly colorful lake in an area rich with unspoiled nature and complicated history.

The lake and pueblo offer a history, beauty, and engagement of the senses that is every bit as intense as Merida, but definitely not urban and decidedly Quintanaroensis. Forget about the recent alignment with Eastern Time. Somewhere quite early in the four hour drive from Merida to Bacalar, visitors will find themselves squarely in tiempo mexicano.

Visits to Bacalar usually focus on the lake, the town, the history nearby, and the remarkable nature that surrounds it all. Laguna Bacalar has been a vacation destination for nationals for generations and established hotels and restaurants have been serving locals and vacationers for many years. But you still won’t find a spicy tuna hand roll, an extensive wine list, or a Ritz Carlton-level wait staff. What you will find in and around Bacalar is open and genuine hospitality, a stunningly beautiful lake, incredible history and archaeology, and a wide array of options for staying, eating, and enjoying the town and the area.

Start With The Lake

Laguna Bacalar, the hands-down winner on the beauty, activity, and nature front, is not a budget-buster. In fact, it’s free! Six public access points and several public balnearios (public swimming establishments) make hanging out on the beautiful shore or swimming in the clear-blue, soft water simple and easy. Chose from more than a dozen lakefront restaurants and hotels that serve Lake Bacalar on Yucatan Peninsulaup the spectacular colors of the lake all day long. And there are dozens of other pleasant restaurants and hotels to explore. Around Bacalar, as in many places on the Yucatan Peninsula, being flexible and opportunistic navigating the day can gain one much. But even more so in Bacalar, the pace is slow and easy.

Laguna Bacalar is 55 kilometers long and relatively narrow, running more or less north-south with a dogleg on the way. This deliciously-fresh laguna (lake) is Mexico’s second largest sweet-water lake. The east side of the laguna is mangrove shore and low jungle with no houses or development. The west side has development, but also long stretches that remain jungle shore. The north end of the lake is fed by several jungle streams and runoff from seasonal flats. The south end of the lake is fed by a number of cenotes. The lake drains nearly all of this flow out the Pirate Cut and down to the Rio Hondo. Bacalar Pueblo lies on the west side of the laguna about three-quarters of the way south down the lake, directly across from the Pirate Cut. One of the best ways to appreciate both the layout and the beauty of the lake’s remarkable coloration is to check it out on Google Earth.

Bacalar Pueblo

Bacalar Pueblo covers about ten square kilometers with 13,000 or so inhabitants. The older part of the pueblo with the main square, most hotels, restaurants, and shops is east toward the lake. The newer and mostly residential development is to the west. Merida travelers are likely to enter Bacalar Pueblo coming south on Highway #307. As you approach town, just after the fort-shaped tourism center and just before the Pemex station (both on the left), turn left toward the lake. In 200 meters at the “T”, turn right onto 7th Avenue and continue straight into town for eight blocks. On your right you will see the Iglesia de San Jaoquin. Continue one block more and turn left. At the stop sign (you cannot turn right!), you will see the town square. There is plenty of parking around the square, and ATM kiosks ahead and just to the left. Diagonally across the square is the Fuerte de San Felipe (the old fort) and the Tourism Bureau. Along the square are a small collection of restaurants and shops.
The fort at Lake Bacalar on the Yucatan Peninsula Mexico
The 18th century fort (in 2015 it celebrates 32 years as a museum) is a definite vale la pena (it’s worth it!). From atop Fuerte de San Felipe the view of the lake and the Pirate Cut is very, very photogenic, as is the fort itself. And the museum includes many family-friendly exhibits with considerable information on Bacalar’s and the region’s history. The remaining local attractions — the Iglesia de San Jaoquin, the Casa de Cultura, and the Casa de Escritor — are more low key and may merit a visit while you are in town. Unlike the fort, they would probably not warrant making a stop in Bacalar just for them.

Get Outside in Bacalar

If you have a passion that involves nature, you will find friends in Bacalar to help you enjoy birding, paddling, sailing, swimming, hiking, biking and boarding.

Birding in Bacalar

This past January, a group of birding clubs from around the Yucatan converged for a two-day birding jamboree. January and February are great birding months in Bacalar, as some trees lose their leaves making it easier to see birds. Nesting season makes for lots of activity, and many northern species are down for the winter, nearly doubling the population compared to summer months. The Bacalar area Motmot bird on Yucatan Peninsulais well-known for its avian diversity; over 240 species live in the jungle surrounding the Laguna. This event, hosted by Green Jay Mayan Birding (a non-profit in Cancun), was attended by passionate birders from ten clubs.

Over 65 attendees came from Campeche, Yucatan and Quintana Roo. They specifically came to see a number of endemic species (Yucatan Jay, Yucatan Fly Catcher, Rose Throated Tanager) that were of particular interest. Day One started in the jungle and proceeded along the shore of Laguna Bacalar, a meandering walking tour of companions sharing a common passion. Day Two saw the gathering split into many groups. Some explored quiet roadways and agricultural selva (jungle) nearby. Others, returning north toward home in Cancun, went east to explore salt water species an hour away on the Costa Maya shores near Mahajual or went a bit further down the Xcalak Peninsula toward the Xcalak National Park. Campeche-based birders headed south and west to the Rio Bec area to explore Calakmul, Becan, Kohunlich and other jungle ruins readily accessed by car. Merida-based birders toured Chacchoben ruins and nearby jungle on their way home. A number of birders took Kayaking on Lake Bacalar Mexicoadvantage of fair weather for a full-day, guided kayak tour of the remote backwaters.

Water Sports in Bacalar

While the backwaters definitely require the knowledge of a guide, it is easy to explore the shores of the town-side of the lake if one has fair weather. The waters are typically calm with some chop during normal seasonal afternoon wind. And Laguna Bacalar’s breezes are reliable enough and often brisk enough to make for very happy sailing. In February, the Quintana Roo state Olympic team qualification races were held over two days for prams, lasers, and wind surfers. Competitors, principally from Playa del Carmen and north, traversed a course in fair weather and fine wind. On almost any sunny, breezy day in Bacalar, it is common to see a half-dozen or more sailboats scooting along the water. A variety of places on Laguna Bacalar shores offer smaller day sailboat tours and rentals by the hour or the day.

Visitors will find it easy to get on the lake with kayaks, canoes and SUPs (stand up paddleboards) from several adventure outfits as well as hotels and hostels on Laguna Bacalar shores. Waters on the Sailing on Lake Bacalar in Mexicotown side of the lake are shallow and clear. Within minutes of most rental locations, you will find wonderful flat water paddling or swimming, a pleasant shoreline, a deep-water cenote or two, a mangrove waterfront, and, for those with lucky, fair winds or in very good physical condition, islands with larger nesting water birds. A little farther afield, there is a “hidden” jungle cenote with turquoise-clear waters, and still further on, the stromatolite rapids. Guided kayak and canoe tours (1/2 day to three days) into the lake’s very extensive, shallow backwaters and watershed can be arranged in advance for seekers of the ultimate in solitude or extreme birding.

To look at the shore from the lake, a boat tour is the lazy man’s way and, unless you care to paddle for half a day and the wind cooperates, the only way. A dozen or more motor launches offer lake tours that typically take 90 minutes and cost $200 pesos per person ($3000 pesos for a four hour private tour). The town has a cooperative of tour boats and many of the boats and pilots belong. Most tours leave from one of the three balnearios not far from the town square. Typically, these are ponga-style boats with sun covers and life vests. Pilots sometimes seem a Boatrides on Lake Bacalar in Mexicobit more interested in hastening back to the dock for the next customers than in showing the lake at its best, but it is still a nice way to see the lake. Several hotels offer comfortable, shaded pontoon boats with snacks, beverages, and swimming stops and more flexible routes and trip duration.

Bicycling Bacalar

Bacalar Pueblo has a short bike path leading onto town streets from highway #307 at the North end of 7th Avenue. Generally, the pueblo’s streets are in good condition with slow traffic and most make for good-enough cycling. There are definite exceptions and no streets in town are truly 100% kid-ready. The town square is a comfortable, open area just one block from the lake edge. The Costera, which runs along the lakefront, is a very pleasant walk or bike but there is enough traffic to make biking not safe for kids by themselves. The portion north of the main square and the Fuerte de San Felipe (a must see with a surprisingly good small museum) has been recently paved and has smooth sidewalks.

The Costera south of the square is in poorer condition. This route makes for quite decent daytime walking and biking that offers several really nice views of the lake, public access points, and a variety of options for drinks, snacks, or meals. Cenote Azul, a large, deep cenote, is set only meters away from Laguna Bacalar at the opposite end of the Costera from the Fort and makes a nice destination. Four slightly-rolling kilometers from the town square, the cenote has fine swimming, pleasant shady hangouts, and a moderately-priced, large restaurant with a bar. Cenote Azul is unusually beautiful with clear water, vertical-walled 90 meter depths, and a jungle-lined perimeter.

Bacalar Races

Bacalar hosts an annual five and ten kilometer footrace starting and ending in the town center and running along the Costera with a midpoint of Cenote Azul. Later in the year are a half-triathlon and a full-triathlon centered on the town and the lake, with running and biking segments nearby. Want to get out on the lake for some serious paddling? In the first week of May, Bacalar hosts Swimming race at Laguna Bacalar Mexicothe second Paddle Marathon and Festival. The weekend includes a Saturday and Sunday 47 kilometer race, open to any class of paddle watercraft: canoe, kayak, SUP, outrigger canoe or the like. It also includes two days of Adventure Exposition on the lake, two nights of a kayak film festival, a variety of paddle-related workshops and demonstrations, and cultural/musical events for the whole family.

One of Bacalar’s most popular water events is Aguas Abiertas, the open water swim competition that is held each June. In 2014, there were 1200 racers and more than 500 spectators. In 2015, the tenth year of the event, as many as 2000 swimmers are expected. Scheduled for the 19th, 20th and 21st of June 2015, the event includes 5000, 2500, and 1250 meter heats. The swim course finishes at the balneario and large park just two blocks from the main square, making viewing the event simple. The sight of so many swimmers crossing the lake is impressive. In prior years, entrants have come from across Mexico and abroad and the winning times have been extremely competitive.

And There Are Archaeological Zones Too

Within two hours of Bacalar there are various wonderful and infrequently-visited INAH archaeological wonders. It is quite common to find oneself alone in an entire old Maya city or a section of a site. Just north and east of Bacalar lies Chacchoben, a nicely maintained and easily toured site with a collection of restored monuments and buildings. In the southern arc of Quintana Roo and Campeche lie a string of archeological sites that were once cities of varying size or city-states. Kohunlich, Dzibanche, Kinichna, Becan, Hormiguerro, Chicanna, El Ramonal, Xpujil are all in the Rio Bec region and each is an easy day trip from Bacalar. Add in the sites in southern Campeche and there are more than two dozen options!

Calakmul, the largest and most influential of the city-states in southeastern Mexico, lies three-plus hours away near the southern border with Belize. This area along Belize and Guatemalan is a transition zone between low-jungle vegetation of the Yucatan Peninsula and the rainforest jungle of the Peten. Further south in northern Guatemala lies El Mirador and another set of difficult-to-explore Maya sites.

Kohunlich and Dzibanche are the Rio Bec sites closest to Bacalar (more or less an hour by car) and they are also two of the more interesting ruins. They are quite different in their scale and ambience, but each offers the visitor a ready portal into the Mayan past. Both these sites, and the whole area to the west toward Escarcega, are an easy drive. Head south on #307 then west on #186, which are both good roadways. At about Kilometer 215 on Highway #186, you will see the large, overhead sign pointing left to Kohunlich. You will see it shortly after you pass under a similar sign to Dzibanche and Morocoy, pointing you to the right.

300-mask on Yucatan PeninsulaKohunlich was a Mayan center from approximately 300 BC until about 1200 AD, with its peak 600 AD to 900 AD. To get to Kohunlich (an Anglicized name referring to the cahoon palms that abound in the site), turn left just after the large, overhead Kohunlich sign. Travel nine kilometers down the single-lane road into the parking lot. Restrooms are at the guard/payment desk on the right. Parking farthest away (along the forest near the pathway into the site) will ensure your car stays in the shade for the longest time. As with most INAH sites, there is a sparse map showing the monuments and pathways. You might want to snap a quick photo of the map for use along the way.

Entry to the site is through a short pathway surrounded by high jungle and into a large “acropolis” with residential and ceremonial ruins overlooking it. Birds and occasionally small mammals are seen here. Make sure to check the tree canopies for monkeys! At the far end of the acropolis and up a hill is the Templo de Mascarones (Temple of Masks). Originally eight painted, highly-unusual stucco masks, each perhaps two meters tall, decorated this temple. Color and detail can still be seen on several of the roof-protected remaining masks by climbing up the steep staircase.

One can exit the acropolis by passing around and to the rear of the Templo de Mascarones, where a trail leads to the right. This continues downhill until it joins another trail. Head left to Los 27 Escalones (the 27 Steps), a residential complex providing great visibility and breezes from the top. From there, you can get a great view of the ten-square mile site. Returning from Los 27 Escalones brings you back to the acropolis near the ball court, which is not that far from the parking lot.

The Dzibanche site was named for the Maya word for “carved in wood”, referring to carvings on the original temple lintels, which have since been replaced. This very large site covers nearly thirty square miles, including the sister site Kinichna, and was occupied from 600 BC until the Spanish invasion. Hieroglyphs tell of a powerful city or city-state that was successful at war and trade. Dzibanche population peaked between 400 AD and 700 AD. The site has several main areas (again take a picture of that entry map), most with tall forest and large areas of grass or dirt with jungle surrounding.

To get to Dzibanche, head west on Highway 186 and turn right at the signs for Morocoy and Dzibanche. Continue past the pueblo of Morocoy. Not long after, at a storage shed, you will see the one and only one sign pointing to the right to Dzibanche. Take that turn. In another eight kilometers or so, you will reach the Dzibanche parking area. Before you get there, you will see the park station on the right with parking and remarkably clean restrooms. Pay your fee here and then follow signs to the Dzibanche site. The slow drive there is quite picturesque on the single-lane road (caution!), with flowers and trees on both road sides trimmed neatly by passing vehicles.

The path from the parking area into the site is a bit rocky but settles down soon. An early day visit (before 9:00 or 10:00 AM) will almost surely mean you have great portions of the site to yourself. There are lots of birds and several families of howler monkeys live on the site and nearby. One or more of the troops often can be seen in the canopy or, later in the afternoon, heard from afar. You might inquire of the park guard if he has seen one that morning.

Here you will see spectacular trees, with roots cascading down ruin pediments and branches reaching high into the air. Giant termite nests hover in the branches. Tree roots ooze copal sap and occasionally small, present-day Maya offerings are found on the temple steps. It is easy to spend several hours here and the site offers some of the best (still allowed!) pyramid climbing in the area. 300-chac site on Yucatan PeninsulaFrom the top, one can almost see where the network of sacbes (white roads) crossed the jungle to connect the population centers of the area. And it is not hard to imagine a visual, instant communication network across the southern Yucatan Peninsula.

Chacchoben is one of the smaller INAH archeological sites open to the public, but that does not mean it is dull or boring. Not one hour from Bacalar and right on the route to and from Merida, this is a good morning diversion for the trip back. In variable use from as early as 300 BC until the Spanish invasion, most restored areas are likely from the seventh century AD. The site meanders over nearly 100 acres, many with barely-manicured jungle and tall, lush, nut-bearing cahoon palms. The site lies in the “lakes region” (an area of plentiful groundwater and, in Maya times, canal-transport of building wood and stone building materials) and Chacchoben exhibits both the Rio Bec and Chenes architectural influences.

There is ample parking, though not much in the shade. Pay at the entry desk, where you will find restrooms, snacks, and souvenirs. Chacchoben’s paths are clearly marked and lead to sections of the ruin that have been excavated and are well tended. Very pleasant low forest surrounds the monuments of this smaller Mayan city. Parts of the site are accessible to wheelchair visitors but it is often very limited touring for those with walkers or canes. Fruits and flowers are seen in trees and on the edges of the clearings. Raucous parrots, smaller songbirds, and the (very) occasional toucan fly overhead, and leaf-eater ant trails and nests as well as arboreal termite nests are evident during much of the year. Unless you have the great misfortune to overlap with one or more tour buses, Chacchoben is likely to be an enchanting and private site to explore.

Not far to the north and east of Dzibanche — some fifteen kilometers west of Bacalar — lies the all-but-unexcavated city of Xcabal. It is reported to be larger than any other ruin in Quintana Roo and the Rio Bec area, with the exception of Calakmul. Xcabal boasts a pyramid taller than El Castillo at Chichen Itza and its size suggests a very large population at one time.

While a very exciting find and surely an attraction for future Bacalar visitors, Xcabal is not yet open to the public. This may be the one of the few outright failures of hospitality the patient visitor to Laguna Bacalar and Pueblo Bacalar will encounter. But, chances are, Xcabal will become a major attraction soon enough. And, as Bacalar becomes a more hotly promoted and popular Costa Maya destination, the area’s businesses will continue their inevitable march toward their clients’ expectations. That march, one imagines, will proceed not at breakneck pace, but at that decidedly Mexican tempo that those of us who live in Yucatan know well.

Enjoy!

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RESOURCES

The Bacalar Mosaico website has useful information on hotels, restaurants, tours, and local Bacalar businesses as well as maps of the lake and pueblo.

Google Earth is an excellent way to understand where Laguna Bacalar lies in the Yucatan Pensinsula and to observe one moment of the Laguna Bacalar and associated water system’s remarkable coloration. Google Streetview is a resource for exploring and planning remotely. Chacchoben and Dzibanche ruins have Google Earth streetviews, as does much of the town of Bacalar and the Fuerte de San Felipe.

The INAH website has info (in Spanish) on almost all archaeological sites in Quintana Roo and Campeche, including Chacchoben, Kohunlich, Dzibanche and many more of the Rio Bec string. Information is organized by state. Scroll down to the section on Campeche and further down for Quintana Roo.

Facebook Bacalar page (in Spanish) is not very well organized or comprehensive but it is one of the few web resources for Bacalar events.

What’s a stromalite?

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PHOTO CREDITS
Photo of Aguas Abiertas: Turismo Bacalar Facebook
Photo of Sailing Competition: Turismo Bacalar Facebook
Photo of Blue-Crowned Mot-Mot by Green Jay Mayan Birding
Satellite imagery of area: Google Earth
All other photos by author

By Working Gringos

Spacious & Charming
Colonial Vacation Home
For Rent

Come and enjoy the delights of Merida Yucatan Mexico in this historic colonial home, lovingly restored to make it your perfect vacation rental home away from home.

All our rooms have high beamed ceilings typical of these old colonial houses, with both minisplit air conditioners and ceiling fans. The kitchen and bathrooms have been renovated with modern fixtures and appliances, all centered around a courtyard with a plunge swimming pool and a rooftop deck… a great place for an outdoor breakfast or glass of wine while watching the sunset. And because this is the perfect Merida vacation rental, it even has a garage for your car! Look no further, Casa de Los Mosaicos is the perfect vacation house in Merida Mexico!

Better Than Home…

Because it’s in the Centro Historico of Merida! Casa de los Mosaicos (House of Tiles) is located on a quiet street between two parks in the centre of Merida, Parques Santa Lucia and Santiago. It is literally four blocks to the main square, the Zocalo. Here you can watch the world go by, sit in the traditional confidantes (chairs), enjoy the artisans stalls set up on weekends when the centre is closed to traffic. Walk easily to nearby shops, museums and restaurants. And at night, watch the salsa dancing in the parks and maybe even give it a whirl yourself!

The house is also just blocks away from Paseo Montejo with banks, hotels, gas station, restaurants and more.

All The Amenities of a Hotel

Here’s a list of just some of the amenities of this colonial rental home. For a complete list, please see our website:

  • 2 large bedroomswith flexible sleeping facilities that include a queen bed, two twin beds and a futon in the sitting room.
  • Ensuite bathrooms, one with a shower and one with a luxurious bathtub.
  • Spacious sitting room with plenty of space for entertaining.
  • Dining room with seating for 8.
  • Fully equipped and modern kitchen.
  • Central courtyard with plunge pool, sun loungers, table with umbrella and chairs.
  • Roof terrace for additional sunbathing.
  • Private garage with remote door opener.
  • Ceiling fans and remote AC in every room.
  • Cable TV and wireless Internet.
  • Radio and CD music system.

For more details, please see our website!

Prices

This spacious house sleeps 4 to 6 people and is available for $150 US per night in the Low season and $190 US per night in the High season.

We require a 3-day minimum. If you would like to rent by the month, please inquire.

Contact Us!

For information about renting Casa de Los Mosaicos, please see our website:

www.meridahouserentals.com

Or you can email us directly:

email:


jane [dot] galton [at] gmail [dot] com
(we speak English and Español)

 

Thank you.

We look forward to seeing you in Casa de Los Mosaicos.

 

 

By Khaki Scott

This Week… starting March 30, 2014

Yucatan Living Festival of Trova: Merida Yucatan – March 22 – 31
All the best of Yucatan’s trova groups and individuals will be in Merida this week. These are the groups that will be singing for you during this week-long celebration of Trova, Yucatan’s signature style of music. They are the best of the best, and some of them are legends in Yucatan’s music world.
Tuesday, March 31: Orquesta Tipica Yukalpeten, 8 PM, Teatro Daniel Ayala
Location: All performances are in Teatro Daniel Ayala
Time: All performances are at 8:00 PM except Sunday March 29 includes a 12:00 PM performance.
Admission: All performances are Free!

Yucatan Living Semana Santa at the Cathedral
All activities and masses are officiated by Excmo. Sr. Arzobispo de Yucatán Mons. D. Emilio Carlos Berlié Belaunzarán.
Holy Thursday: Last Dinner and Feet Washing: 5:00 PM
Holy Friday: Liturgy: 12:00 PM; Christ’s Passion: 3:00 PM; March of the silence: 8:00 PM
Holy Saturday: Liturgy: 9:00 AM
Holy Sunday: Resurrection Sunday
Location: Cathedral of Merida, Calle 60 x 61
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Semana Santa in Izamal
There will be all sorts of Semana Santa related activities in Izamal as well.
Holy Thursday: Mass and Feet Washing: 6:00 PM
Holy Friday: Procession through the streets representing the Crucifixion: 8 AM; Sermon: Noon; March of the silence to the Municipal Cemetery: 8:00 PM
Holy Saturday: Procession through the streets: 9:00 AM; Mass at 7 PM and 9 PM
Holy Sunday: Mass at 10 AM, Noon, 6 PM and 8 PM
Location:Izamal, centered around the Convento in the center of town.
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Easter Closing Notice at MEL
The Merida English Library will be Closed on Friday, April 3 (Good Friday), and Saturday, April 4. They will reopen on Monday, April 6. As usual, Merida has taken to the beach for the week. You can expect all sorts of activities along the Malecon in Progreso. Beach soccer teams from all over Mexico will be practicing every day for the big tournament that begins on Thursday, April 2.

Yucatan Living Mark Your Calendars for 2015
These dates are all governed by the cycles of the Sun and/or Moon and most are associated with major holidays and celebrations in Yucatan.
April 4: Total Lunar Eclipse
April 5: Easter Sunday
June 21 at 11:38 AM: Midsummer Equinox
July 2 & 31: Blue Moon
September 23 at 3:20 PM: Fall Equinox
September 27: Super Moon
September 28: Total Lunar Eclipse
December 21 at 10:48 PM: Winter Equinox

Yucatan Living La Expresión del Barro (Expression in Clay)
We have not found out how long this art exhibit will continue, but it certainly looks worth checking out. Pieces of barro worked by maestros from around Latin America, collected by the always discerning Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Location: Museo de Arte Popular in Parque Mejorada (Calle 50 x 57), and the Casa de Montejo on Paseo de Montejo
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Salsa for Gringos
If you are in the mood to dance, you can be certain that Anny is organizing a class just for you! Two new salsa classes are beginning in Merida. We are listing them once here, then moving them to Yucatan Living’s Ongoing Events and Classes page.

For the next two weeks, starting this week…Tuesdays and Thursdays
Location:Hennessy’s, Paseo de Montejo
Time: 10:30 AM Reoccurs weekly on Tuesday and Thursday
Admission: $400 pesos per month

Mondays and Wednesdays
Location: Liberdanza Dance Studio, Calle 24 #95-A x 13 y 15 in Chuburna de Hidalgo, Merida, Yucatan
Time: 7:00 PM Reoccurs weekly on Monday and Wednesday
Admission: $350 pesos per month
For More Information: call Anny at 923-3736 or (999) 125-0466 or e-mail: animex [at] prodigy [dot] net [dot] mx

Monday (Lunes) March 30, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events Planned for Today

Tuesday (Martes) March 31, 2015

Yucatan Living Tuesday of Trova: Los Tres Yucatecos
This trio is a member of the association that protects and passes on traditional trova in Yucatan.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 8:30 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Person
(Mexico 1966) A nurse is put in charge of an actress who can’t talk and finds that the actress’s persona is melding with hers. In Spanish.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Tuesday
Admission: Free

 

Wednesday (Miercoles) April 01, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Life Itself
(USA 2014) Documentary about the life of Roger Ebert, one of the most influential US film critics of all time, died in 2012. Ebert wrote most of his life for the Chicago Sun-Times, published numerous books on cinema and was the first critic who received a Pulitzer Prize for his movie reviews. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan LivingMovie: Last Days Here
(USA 2011) Bobby Liebling was the charismatic singer of 70′s hard-rockers and doom pioneers, Pentagram. Today dying in his father’s basement smoking crack and heroin, a zombie with overwhelming sores and skin mottling, toothless and disjointed infections, he flirts with death daily. The film begins with the encounter between Liebling and Sean “Pellet” Pelletier, friend and manager who will try to revive the career of the late metal myth. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Wednesday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Thursday (Jueves) April 02, 2015

Yucatan Living Second Yucatan Beach Soccer (Futbol) Cup
Soccer Competition on the beach for the rest of the weekend.
Location: Malecon in Progreso
Time: TBA
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Ultra Marathon Fe
This race is from Chelem to Telchac Puerto. Length of Race: 50 km and 100 km
Location: Departure: Church of Chelem
Time: 6:00 PM
Registration: $600 pesos.
Registration: Salvador Alvarado Stadium, Monday – Saturday, 7:00 AM – 10:00 AM.
Online Registration: http://manivelasst.com/Grupoee/

Yucatan Living Movie: Stella Cadente
(Spain 2014) The film narrates the brief reign of Amadeo of Savoy in Spain, who in 1870 tried to tidy up and modernize the country which was ungovernable. The king was misunderstood abroad and quickly took refuge inside his palace. Outside his palace, the country was collapsing, and within it, he plays his court games with love, pleasure, beauty and melancholy. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan LivingMovie: Mommy
(Canada 2014) A widowed single mother, raising her violent son alone, finds new hope when a mysterious neighbor inserts herself into their household. In French with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Movie: Side Effects
(USA 2013) A young woman’s world unravels when a drug prescribed by her psychiatrist has unexpected side effects. Stars Rooney Mara and Channing Tatum. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Thursday
Admission: Free

 

Friday (Viernes) April 03, 2015

Yucatan Living Movie: Lucio
(Spain 2007 ) Lucio was a bankrobber. Now he is 76 years old. This is a documentary about him. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living First Friday International Cocktail Party
Special 2×1 drink prices, free botañas, reduced parking. Get connected. Join old friends and make new ones at Merida´s biggest monthly gathering of ex-pats and Meridanos.
Location: Fiesta Americana, La Hach Patio Bar. Paseo de Montejo at Avenida Colon.
Time: 7:00 PM Friday
Admission:Free

Yucatan Living Movie: January
(Mexico 2013) After murdering his wife, Horacio flees with his lover, Lucrecia. Refugees in a cottage in the countryside, they look to continue the love that is no longer possible to sustain. Despair and guilt will lead them to face their own limits. In Spanish with English subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Friday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

 

Saturday (Sabado) April 04, 2015

Yucatan Living Opera at the Movies: Adriana Lecouvreur
Opera in four acts with an Italian libretto by Arturo Colautti , based on the play ” Adrienne Lecouvreur ” by Eugène Scribe and Ernest Legouvé. Release date: November 6, 1902, Milan. Enrico Caruso attended the premiere.
Location: Sala Mayamax in Gran Museo del Mundo Maya
Time: 12:00 PM Saturday
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Movie: Exit Through The Gift Shop
(USA 2011) A documentary about the social grafitti artist, Banksy. Still being debated whether it is authentic, a commentary on authenticity or a complete hoax. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 6:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Yucatan Living Chelem: Lizard Joe’s Monthly Birthday Bash
This is a birthday party for all of Lizard Joe’s patrons who have a birthday in April. Look for loads of expats here, along with the #1 Yucatan Party Band: Ayudantes de Caska.
Location: Lizard Joe’s in Chelem, Calle 17 #75 x 24 y 26
Time: 8:00 PM to 11:00 PM
Admission: No Cover

Yucatan Living Movie: Inside llewyn Davis
(USA 2013) A week in the life of a young singer as he navigates the Greenwich Village folk scene of 1961. In English.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos

Yucatan Living Movie: Leviathan
(Russia 2012) A documentary shot in the North Atlantic and focused on the commercial fishing industry. In Russian with Spanish subtitles.
Location: LA 68, Calle 68 at Calle 55, centro of Merida
Time: 9:00 PM Saturday
Admission: $35 pesos, $15 pesos students

Sunday (Domingo), April 05, 2015

Yucatan LivingEaster Sunday
Mass at the Cathedral in downtown Merida (and throughout the city) is well attended on this day.

Yucatan Living Music: Chamber Sundays: Dances of Europe
This is a performance by the International String Quartet of Yucatan. They are under the direction of Pawel Marek Blaszkowski. If you have not heard them, the city is quiet now and this is a perfect opportunity to do so.
Location: Auditorium of the Olimpo, Calle 62 x 61
Time: 6:00 PM Sunday
Admission: General: $50 pesos, Students and INAPAM: $25 pesos

Yucatan Living Chelem: Lizard Joe’s Fun in the “Sun” Day
Classic Rock by Nota Negra.
Location: Lizard Joe’s in Chelem, Calle 17 #75 x 24 y 26
Time: 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Admission: No Cover

Yucatan Living Movie: Margin Call
(USA 2011) Follows the key people at an investment bank, over a 24-hour period, during the early stages of the financial crisis. In English with Spanish subtitles.
Location: Cairo Cinema, Calle 20 #98A x 15 y 17, Colonia Itzimná
Time: 9:00 PM Sunday
Admission: Free

 

Monday (Lunes) April 06, 2015

Yucatan Living No Events planned for Today, yet! !

 

Coming Soon

Yucatan Living OPERA YUCATÁN, A.C. – May 02
Opera Yucatan, A.C. is a non-profit civil association, created to promote the art of opera in the Yucatán. Their objectives are purely educational and cultural. In collaboration with the Gran Museo del Mundo Maya they continue their Sixth Season of Opera at the Movies.
Location: Sala Mayamax del Gran Museo del Mundo Maya.
Time: Brief opera talk at 11:30 AM, performance video begins at 12:00 PM
Admission: Free

Yucatan Living Yucadanz: Monthly Contra Dance in Merida
When is a square dance not square? You’re just going to love this new dance in town. Contra dance is a community “barn dance”, where everyone socializes and dances with everyone else. We love their energy and hope that everyone will give contra dance a whirl. Everyone is welcome!
Location: Tumaka’t Dance Studio, Calle 51 #475-A x 52 y 54 (blue building, middle of block), Centro
Time: Beginner Class: 7:15 PM in English and Spanish, Contra dance: 8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Admission: Bring your own refreshments and water, no alcohol at the dance. $50-$100 pesos donation requested. Proceeds benefit Tumaka’t, a nonprofit arts group, and to establish a fund for live music. Read this great page on the Yucadanz website!
Last Scheduled Meeting: Saturday, April 11

Yucatan LivingThe International String Quartet
This much-loved group features excellent musicians from all over the world. Don’t miss at least one of these performances!

16 April: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Mozart – String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K575 – OR – Tansman – String Quartet No. 3, Smetana – Quartet in E minor ‘From My Life’

21 May: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140.
8 PM performance. Program to be announced

18 June: Hacienda Xcanatun – $200 pesos. Call for reservation 930-2140. 8 PM performance.
Gliere – Quartet in A Major Op 2 and Shostakovitch – Quartet No. 2

“The String Quartet in the Romantic Period”
20 June : Palacio Canton y Museo de Antropologia de Yucatan – 2 PM performance
20 June : Centro Cultural de Merida Olimpo – 6 PM performance

Yucatan Living Tournament: Yucatan Polo Open – Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3
This tournament will be the last of the 2014/15 season. The host, of course, will be the Yucatan Polo Club. Players from throughout Mexico and from abroad will be participating and this will be the highest level of competition in the history of the club. In addition to polo, there will be several excellent restaurants on hand, a mixed drinks bar, wine tasting and beer. For entertainment, they will have a DJ, a fashion show and, on Sunday, a ladies hat competition. As always, entry is free.
Location: at the Yucatan Polo Club. However, they have a new road that reduces travel time from the Periferico by eight or nine minutes so, if you would like to attend, do be sure and look at the map on the Yucatan Polo Club website.
Time: 4:00 PM on Saturday and on Sunday
Admission: Free
For More Information: Call Ralf at (999) 127-2394 or e-mail ralf [at] leszinski [dot] com

Have an event you want to promote? Email us at info [at] yucatanliving [dot] com and we’ll be happy to list it in our Events listing and our Month-at-a-Glance Calendar

By Khaki Scott

Children and Dogs Costume Contest Held in Progreso

One of the most popular events anyone can host is a costume contest that includes children and their dogs. No location for such an event is better than Progreso because of the energy that port city brings to such a day. The entrance fee was affordable (only $25 pesos), and the only requirement was for the child and their pet to wear costumes with coordinating themes. Of course, there could be no injury to the dog, such as hair dye or glue. The day was a great opportunity for families to interact with children and pets, which leads directly to a strengthening of cultural ties. We cannot resist a plea to A.F.A.D., the host of this wonderful event in Progreso, to organize the same thing for those of us who live in the city!

New Yucatan Sports Hall of Fame Now Open

This past week, Yucatan finally opened their long awaited Sports Hall of Fame with a wonderful event at Salvador Alvarado Stadium. The first 20 inductions to the Hall of Fame were announced and, then, there was a calesa parade for the ones who are still living. Among their number were boxers, weightlifters, and ball players from baseball to soccer and basketball. Those inductees who have passed away were represented by family members, for whom this ceremony meant so much. There were several exhibitions throughout the day, including weightlifting and boxing. Sergio Esquivel Cortes, one of Yucatan’s treasures in his own right, sang Gloria, one of his own compositions, during the closing ceremony.

Inauguration of Chuburna Puerto’s Fishing Pier

Yet another place in Yucatan leaves the ranks of “way out in” (name). At one time or another, we have seen places like Uman spoken of as way-out-in-Uman. Until quite recently, it was way-out-in-Chelem. We even remember Progreso and Chicxulub when they didn’t meet in the middle. Now, its Chuburna. Their long-awaited fishing pier, complete with an energy saving lighting system, a 200 meter platform and 43 meters available for birthing boats. Of course, the shipping and cruise companies are thrilled to have the new distributer road to their Progreso docks, and we are as well, but that fishing pier in Chuburna has been a long time coming and we are more than pleased and excited for those who live in the area. We also ask that our readers take a few minutes to see what the Chuburna Student Support Program has been up to lately. They have two sites that tell their whole story. The separate blog has great photos.

Water Monitoring on the Coast

It’s Semana Santa and the crowds along the beaches of Yucatan are bigger than they have ever been. Some of the people are tourists. Many have come on cruise ships that are larger and arrive more frequently than before. Others are new and returning renters and homeowners. Quite a few of the homes have just been completed. This crush of people makes it absolutely necessary that the waters along the coast of Yucatan are safe for any interaction they might have with people. That means that people in the water must be safe, as well as people who are eating the seafood captured in Yucatan’s waters. Toward that goal, state laboratories are monitoring the entire coast for any hint that a red tide may be developing, and they are monitoring the catches of the fishermen for any toxins that might be present. Thus far, no problems have been found and visitors to the beaches of Yucatan can dine and swim with no fear of getting sick.

Water in the City

There’s a new buzz term in the news this week: “culture of sanitation.” This means that the pressure of population growth, in Merida, has reached the point where citizens are going to have to become better stewards of the water they are allowing to return to the ground. Using private wells to obtain water for one home and adding many more septic tanks are not a suitable replacement for full fledged sewage and water treatment plants. Reference was made to the fact that the city has the equipment necessary to put in proper drainage, and has done so in some of the newer neighborhoods. Reference was also made to the extremely low cost to the consumer of water at this time. It looks as if these are the first discussions on raising water prices, as well as developing a drainage plan for the city. Perhaps it is time for a reality check, on the topic of water, for everyone, whether they live in Yucatan or not.

Creating Harmony and Security with Paint

This is the revival of a program that was widespread several years ago. In that first version, the buildings in the historic, central districts of colonial cities were given enough paint to cover the front of their buildings. The city with the biggest change, in our estimation, was Campeche. Now, Yucatan has some outlying fraccionamientos that are a beginning to be a bit run down. The State is providing homeowners with a gallon of vinyl sealer and a 20 liter bucket of acrylic paint. They say this is “critical care for harmony and security.” In fact, the name of the program is “Painting Your Wellness.” This rather reminds us of our mothers admonishing us to “Get up. Get dressed. If you look better, you’ll feel better.” In reality, it’s true! It will be interesting to see if this clean up, fix up, paint up campaign makes a difference for this first neighborhood of 2,500 homes.

Merida Takes Aim at Colon Cancer

Analyzing medical numbers often turns up problems that might be affecting large groups of people. Such was the case, recently, when it was discovered that a number of cases of colon cancer had been misdiagnosed as colitis. Further inquiry showed that there are only eight Colo-proctologists currently practicing in Merida. There has never been a medical area of practice in this city that was not addressed by its Board Certified physicians and this will certainly not be the first. Initial efforts are going into training all medical personnel in those skills and techniques necessary to make a proper diagnosis or referral. It is up to the patient to make certain to have any and all recommended tests for the possibility of colon cancer and see a specialist as quickly as possible if they have a problem. Look for Merida’s shortage of Colo-proctologists to soon be a thing of the past. Please be aware that this is not a cause for alarm, or that Yucatan has had an increase in its colon cancer rate. It is simply pointing out a shortage area and informing the public as to what is being done to change the situation. Many thanks to the pro-active specialists in Merida who saw this need and moved immediately to rectify the problem.

Solar Irrigation: New Maya History in the Making

It’s official. The Governor of Yucatan attended the beginning of solar irrigation in the Family Farm Program in a pumpkin field in the rural Municipality (County) of Cacalchen. Gone is the need for government subsidies to provide gasoline for the generators necessary to bring up and deliver water to these fields. Gone is the need for government supplied food pantries when irrigation equipment failed or gasoline was slow in arriving. Gone is the worst of the backbreaking labor farmers faced when trying to harvest crops that were drying out too fast. It’s a new day for farmers in rural Yucatan. They already have secure markets for every crop they produce, so the only way to go now is up into the sunshine of the future. When we get questions about whether the children of these farmers will stay on and farm, the answer is easy. Some do now, but others already obtain degrees in marketing, engineering, and international relations. With these degrees, they will be the international negotiators of the future and their families’ success will be assured. Congratulations to all of Yucatan for embracing solar energy in this very practical way.

Exhibition and Sale: Crafts Made in Cancun Prison

On Saturday, March 28, 2015, the best work of 150 artisans who currently reside in the Center for Social Readjustment (prison) in Cancun was for sale at the “Magic Hands” flea market, located in Cancun’s Hotel Zone. The handicrafts available for purchase included both woven and embroidered hammocks, natural beauty products, accessory creations, jewelry, and carved and painted figurines. It seems that this is the first time the prison in Cancun has allowed prisoners to put their work for sale outside of the prison walls. This led us to remember visiting the prison in Merida, where some crafts and art objects were for sale. It was a pretty dingy shop at the time, and hard to find. But we do know that the hammocks made by Merida prisoners are famous for their quality.

By Working Gringos
Maya DBN Architects and Builders in Merida Yucatan Mexico

Educated in the USA, Experienced in the Yucatan

Maya DBN Architects, led by Carlos de la Barrera, offers integrated architectural, interior design, construction, remodeling and restoration services in the entire Yucatan Peninsula. We have over fifteen years experience in a variety of projects.
Architect, Contractor and Builder in Merida Yucatan Mexico
Carlos de la Barrera grew up in Merida, Yucatan. After attending the School of Architecture at UADY in Merida, he went on to obtain his B.A. degree in Architecture with specialties in Interior Design and Planning from the University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. After spending time working in architecture and interior design in Ohio and Florida, Carlos returned to his hometown of Merida and began working with English-speaking clients to design, build or renovate homes in Merida and throughout the Yucatan Peninsula. Carlos and his team at Maya Architects and Builders have worked with many happy clients from the USA, Canada and other countries on Kitchen built by Maya Architects and Builders in Merida Yucatantheir first and subsequent homes here in Mexico.

Carlos says his mission is to “offer an integration solution to your project through a comprehensive and close collaboration between the client and the architect. We offer our talent and experience in design and construction, ensuring the correct use of the diverse regional materials in both traditional and avant-garde ways. Our final goal is to enhance the quality of life through the creation of architectural spaces that have their own unique identity, while existing in harmony with the natural and social environment.”

Client Testimonials

Carlos and his team have designed and/or built many homes in Merida and along the Yucatan Gulf Coast. Here is an example of a happy customer…

“We purchased and then renovated a home in Merida. We completed the project in June of 2010. We worked with Carlos de la Barrera on our project in Merida. The completed house is beautiful and more than we could have hoped for. We found working with Carlos to be easy and easy to manage through email, pictures, etc, as we were in the States for almost all of the project. We trusted Carlos completely and he came through. He went the extra mile and took us all around Merida to show us homes and what could be done. He even helped us get appliances… and a mattress! We would recommend Carlos to anyone looking to build or renovate in Merida.”